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Kajuna, Laxford W.Implementation of Technology Integration in Higher Education: A Case Study of the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2009, Curriculum and Instruction Instructional Technology (Education)

The use of technology in education is one of the major trends in educational reforms all over the world. Integrating technology into the learning and teaching processes is widely perceived as a great assert in those reforms. However, the implementation process of technology integration has been surrounded by skepticism concerning its effectiveness. Challenges to and gaps in technology integration have been identified and discussed by scholars based on different contexts. In the context of higher education in developing countries, despite notable progress, many challenges loom concerning the use of technology.

The purpose of the study was to investigate and evaluate the nature of technology implementation at the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania. The study examined the classroom practices and what surrounded the learning and teaching processes using technology from the perspective of teachers and students. It also evaluated the use of technology at the University based on four of Ely‚s eight conditions for adoption of innovations and ACOT‚s stages of development of technology integration. Two research strategies were used: Interviews and document analysis. Twenty-four students, ten faculty members, one head of a department, and one faculty dean were interviewed. They were selected from the Faculty of Science and Faculty of Education.

The findings revealed that although there were significant efforts and positive attitudes toward the use of computers in learning and teaching, the process of technology integration at the university faced impediments that affected its effectiveness. The impediments included lack of enough computers, absence of sound computer knowledge and skills of teachers and students so as to effectively integrate technology into learning and teaching, absence of adequate and effective teachers‚ professional development programs on technology, and lack of effective technology planning and technology plans.

The result of this study indicated that the four Ely‚s conditions of diffusion of innovations were not effectively met at the university and that the university‚s technology integration process was leveled at entry and adoption stages of ACOT‚s Stages of Development. The following recommendations were made: 1) more priority and emphasis on teacher training on computer knowledge and skills, 2) creation of technology plans at different levels and divisions, the process that should involve teaching staff, 3) creation of technology a committee to oversee all aspects of the use of technology, and 4) an establishment of partnership with local people and organizations to diversify sources of funds for acquisition of technology equipment and services.

Committee:

Teresa, J. Franklin, PhD (Committee Chair); Sundra Turner, PhD. (Committee Member); Scott Jarvis, PhD. (Committee Member); Adah, W. Randolph, PhD. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Higher Education Technology; Teaching with Technology; Technology Implementation; Technology in Education - Tanzania; Technology Integration; University of Dar-es-Salaam Technology

Braat, Christopher J.Perceptions of Two Educational Technology Standards: A Case Study of an Ohio Urban K-12 School District
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2009, College of Education and Human Services
This study investigated relationships of 42 faculty and administrators’perceptions in the evaluation of educational technology in an Ohio K-12 urban school district using demographics and two national evaluation standards. The standards used were the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and Joint Committee Standards for Educational Evaluation (JCSEE). This study presented analysis of quantitative survey data to establish standards awareness and determine significant relationships between perceptions, demographic characteristics and standards in evaluating educational technology. The findings suggest higher levels of awareness and significant relationships for NCES standards over JCSEE standards. Statistically significant, relatively low relationships exist between perceptions of educational technology and demographics analyzed along NCES and JCSEE standards. Interesting statistically significant results were seen between individual responses on survey items for NCES and JCSEE standards towards implementation or evaluation of educational technology. Analysis of research questions are followed by links to existing research and implications for practice including use of more accurate definitions and better measurement of standards, and strengthening practitioners’ perceptions of educational technology policy and evaluation using multiple demographics.

Committee:

Ralph Mawdsley, Ph.D./J.D. (Committee Chair); Kathleen Little, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ann Galletta, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Lih-Ching Chen Wang, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sylvester Murray (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Software; Educational Theory; Public Administration; School Administration; Teacher Education; Teaching; Technology; Urban Planning

Keywords:

Educational Technology; Technology Implementation; Technology Evaluation; Urban Educational Technology; Educational Technology Policy; Educational Technology Standards; Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation

DEAN, CAROL MAEPREPARING PRESERVICE TEACHERS TO MEET THE ISTE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS: A CASE STUDY OF AN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY CLASS
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2001, Education : Curriculum and Instruction
This was a case study that focused on the teacher of one instructional technology class; the class itself, the students and their perceptions of preparedness to meet the ISTE Standards for teachers and technology. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. This research study provided insights into the curriculum design and instructional techniques needed to help preservice teachers gain the skills and knowledge to use computers as instructional tools. The theoretical foundation of this research study was based on literature related to standards; teacher education and instructional technology, and the theory of constructivist learning. The results of this study indicated that: 1) The instructional technology class played a critical role in preparing these preservice teachers to meet the ISTE Standards. All of the standards were covered, but not in the same depth; 2) The students' perceptions of their preparedness to implement the standards did increase; 3) The students rated themselves higher in their preparedness to meet those standards the professor emphasized in class (Standards, I, II, III); 4) The use of selectivity in standards, teachable moments; threaded discussions, asking critical thinking questions about computer technology and classroom use; modeling techniques, and hands-on opportunities for students to work with the technology, helped them become better prepared to meet the ISTE Standards; and 5) The professor's pedagogy of direct instruction and focus on constructivist learning activities combined with a variety of instructional techniques assisted students in developing skills and knowledge to use instructional technology effectively in the classrooms.

Committee:

Dr. Janet Bohren (Advisor)

Keywords:

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY; INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND PRESERVICE TEACHER TRAINING; TEACHER TRAINING AND TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS; CRITICAL THINKING QUESTIONS AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY; PRESERVICE TEACHER TRAINING AND TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS

Owens-Hartman, Amy RA Case Study of Technology Choices by High School Students
Doctor of Education, University of Akron, 2015, Secondary Education
The purpose of this case study was to examine student technology choices when given the freedom to choose technology devices to complete a project-based learning activity in a content area of study. The study also analyzed factors affecting technology choice as well as how technology proficiency scores aligned to technology choices. Patterns and themes were identified during data analysis. Three research questions guided this study are: 1) When given a choice, what technologies do students use to accomplish a Project-based Learning mission? 2) Why does a student choose certain technologies to accomplish a Project-based Learning mission? 3) How do students’ technology choices during a Project-based Learning mission align with their Atomic Learning’s © Technology Skills Student Assessment scores? Data analysis of the first question indicated that for hardware choice, students overwhelmingly chose laptops to complete a project-based mission with smart phones coming in second to complete or enhance the mission. In my results section for software choice, all students chose some sort of cloud-based technology: Google Slides, Prezi, a blog, Twitter, and Google Sites. Data analysis of the second question concluded that both internal and external factors affected student technology choices. Students chose the software choice first to accomplish their project and then chose the hardware tool to work best with the software. Hardware was seen as the needed device to make the cloud based software work as best as possible. Data analysis of my final and third question indicated that self-efficacy and previous experiences are crucial components for secondary level students when choosing and using technology. Technology proficiency scores aligned to student technology choices.

Committee:

Lynne Pachnowski, Ph.D. (Advisor); Gary Holliday, Ph.D. (Advisor); Harold Foster, Ph.D. (Committee Member); John Savery, Ph.D. (Committee Member); I-Chun Tsai, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Secondary Education; Teaching

Keywords:

21st century learning; Atomic Learning; BYOD; educational technology; Generation M;International Society for Technology in Education; one to one technology; project-based learning; self-efficacy; technology ability; technology perception

Nicholas, John B.Investigating Engineering Educators' Views on the Use of Educational Technology: A Q Methodology Study
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2011, Secondary Education
The purpose of this study is to investigate the views of engineering/engineering technology (E-ET) educators on the use of educational technology in E-ET courses. In this study, views of the use of educational technology were investigated using Q Methodology. William Stephenson developed Q Methodology as a means of measuring subjectivity (Brown 1980, 1993; McKeown & Thomas, 1988). Students' views on the use of educational technology in science and engineering technology courses have been investigated using Q Methodology (Kraft 2008; Nicholas, 2009, 2010a, 2010b) but very little research has been done on the views of E-ET educators' views on the subject. The participants of this study were from a mid-sized Midwestern university that houses both engineering and/or engineering technology programs. This study aimed to elicit the views of E-ET educators on the use of educational technology in E-ET courses. A pilot study was conducted during the spring 2010 semester on the use of classroom technology in E-ET coursed by the researcher. This study replicated and improved upon the pilot study based on the results of and the post-sort interviews conducted at the conclusion of the pilot study to determine if these three factors or views will replicate and/or new factors or views emerge. The study resulted in three factors or views on the use of classroom technology in E-ET courses that were based in the pedagogy of the participants. These findings should assist those interested in discovering and implementing the best use of educational technology in E-ET education.

Committee:

Susan Ramlo, Dr. (Committee Co-Chair); Lynne Pachnowski, Dr. (Committee Co-Chair); Cheryl Ward, Dr. (Committee Member); I-Chun Tsai, Dr. (Committee Member); D.Dane Quinn, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Educational Theory; Engineering; Epistemology; Pedagogy

Keywords:

Q Methodology; Engineering Education; Engineering Technology Education; Classroom Technology; Educational Technology; Instructional Technology

Perry, Nicholas DTeacher attitudes and Beliefs about Successfully Integrating Technology in their Classroom During a 1:1 Technology Initiative and the Factors that Lead to Adaptations in their Instructional Practice and Possible Influence on Standardized Test Achievement
Doctor of Education (Educational Leadership), Youngstown State University, 2018, Department of Counseling, School Psychology and Educational Leadership
The purpose of this study is to measure factors that may lead to adaptations by teachers in their instructional practices as they relate to technology integration in a 1:1 laptop environment in a Western Pennsylvania school district. Much has been done around the concept of technology integration in schools and the impact or lack of impact on student achievement. Most of the literature on technology use in schools centers around availability and access to technology in the classroom setting. This study looks at the actual integration of technology through instructional delivery in the classroom. Teacher perceptions with regard to their own instructional practices were gathered using the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Framework and measured next to classroom observational practices as gathered by building administrators throughout the school year. If teacher perceptions using TPACK correlate with instructional technology delivery as measured by classroom observation using SAMR and the Charlotte Danielson Framework, then districts may be able to ensure their investment in technology by focusing on factors that increase likelihood of actual use in the classroom. Participants in this study reported above average comfort with regard to technology as related to technology knowledge and technology pedagogy knowledge which may be attributed to the time and investment in teaching staff by the district through ongoing professional development activities. In addition, teachers were observed implementing technology in their classrooms, in some cases at a higher level of implementation on the SAMR scale, as observed through walkthrough observations. Finally, the district in this study saw tremendous gains by first time test takers on state the mandated standardized test since the inception of the 1:1 initiative which might be attributed to the above mentioned professional development activities focused on technology, technology content creation, and instructional technology delivery.

Committee:

Karen Larwin, PhD (Advisor); Lauren Cummins, PhD (Committee Member); Matthew Erickson, PhD (Committee Member); Salvatore Sanders, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Inservice Training; Pedagogy; Technology

Keywords:

One to One Technology;Classroom Technology Integration;Teacher Attitudes Toward Technology Integration;Technology Impact on Student Standardized Test Achievement

Yidana, IssifuFaculty Perceptions of Technology Integration in the Teacher Education Curriculum: A Survey of Two Ghanaian Universities
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2007, Computer Education and Technology (Education)

This study was designed to investigate the relationship of teacher education faculty members’ attitudes and their perceptions of technology professional development needs with faculty technology use for teaching and learning in two Ghanaian tertiary teacher education institutions. The study was based on Rogers’ (1995) Diffusion of Innovations (DoI) theory, the Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM) of Hall and Hord (1987), and Ely’s (1999) conditions for educational technology innovations as theoretical frameworks.

The study used survey methodology supplemented by interviews. The quantitative data were analyzed using multiple regression. Participants in the study were 132 faculty members of the University of Education, Winneba and the Faculty of Education of the University of Cape Coast, both Ghanaian teacher education institutions. The faculty technology survey consisted of 65 items factored into five factors.

The results showed that: (i) faculty perceptions of the effects of technology use on pedagogy and students’ learning, (ii) faculty perceptions of barriers and challenges to the adoption and use of technology for teaching and learning, and (iii) faculty motivation for adoption of instructional technology made unique significant contributions to explaining faculty use of technology for teaching and learning.

According to the interviews and responses to an open-ended question on the survey, this study also found that the contextual conditions that facilitate educational technology innovations were not met in the two participating universities. The majority (55.7%) of participants were at the non-adopter stages of technology adoption, based on the CBAM stages of adoption survey.

The study offered faculty members an opportunity to voice their concerns and views concerning their institutions’ technology integration programs. The findings could inform university management about technology decisions to promote the use of instructional technology among faculty members.

A major limitation of this study was the use of non-randomized sample which limits the generalization of the findings to these particular Ghanaian institutions at a particular point in time.

Committee:

Sandra Turner (Advisor)

Keywords:

instructional technology; technology professional development needs; faculty attitudes; teacher education curriculum; technology integration; technology innovation; Ghana

Al Zebidi, Ali A.Predictive Factors to Adopt Integrating Technology into the Teaching Process by Faculty at Al-Qunfudah University College
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Instructional Technology (Education)
This study aimed to investigate predictive factors that influence faculty members at Al-Qunfudah University College to adopt integrating technology into the teaching process by applying the initial four UTAUT factors: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions to predict the behavioral intention of the faculty to integrate technology in teaching. Barriers that faculty encounter and potential incentives that faculty would receive were highlighted since the college did not have a clear vision toward adopting technology tools yet. A hard-copy survey was distributed among all staff members. Only 142 surveys were collected out of the 185 representing the total size of the faculty. In addition to the survey, ten faculty members were interviewed by the researcher inside the college campus. Multiple regression was used to highlight the influence of these factors on the outcome variable. Pearson correlation coefficient was applied to detect whether or not the initial UTAUT variables are correlated with each other. An independent-samples t-test was used to compare the mean scores of faculty’s behavioral intentions regarding their gender. One-way ANOVA was directed to identify the differences among three divided groups of faculty’s ages on the behavioral intention. As well, it was employed to identify the differences among the three divided groups regarding years of teaching experience on their behavioral intention. The results of the regression analysis revealed that all independent variables predicted the behavioral intention to adopt technology for education; however, performance expectancy and social influence showed as insignificant predictors after controlling for other variables. Results of the interview supported the significant results of all four predictors which represented the triangulation of the study. Also, there were no differences among faculty’s behavioral intentions to adopt technology integration in the teaching process based on their gender, as revealed by the independent-samples t-test. One-way ANOVA showed no differences in the outcome based on faculty’s ages and years of teaching experience. Lack of technology infrastructure, lack of technological knowledge by faculty, the absence of training programs, and lack of leadership support were the common barriers. Providing ICT facilities and incentives for the faculty are recommended.

Committee:

Greg Kessler (Committee Chair); Gordon Brooks (Committee Member); Min Lun Wu (Committee Member); Danielle Dani (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Factors to Integrate Technology; Technology Adoption; Faculty Use of Technology

Kenny, Catherine J.Meta-Analysis of Entrance Standards for Undergraduate Nursing and Selected Allied Health Programs
PHD, Kent State University, 2010, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of admission standards that have been used for undergraduate allied health and nursing programs. Five professions met the initial criteria including the awarding of a 2- or 4-year degree, a national board examination administered upon program completion, and published research covering entrance standards. The professions are: dental hygiene, medical technology, registered nursing, radiologic technology, and respiratory therapy.

Random-format meta-analysis was used to evaluate 28 years of research gathered from both published and unpublished documents. Length of time used for data collection was defined by published research using outcome parameters, including national board examinations. Forty-eight studies resulted in 230 comparable effect size variables.

Twenty-one predictors were identified in the research and were measured against 4 criterion variables. ACT English, entrance grade point average, and biology were statistically significant predictors for all 5 professions. While no predictors had a shared variance across all professions, 8 predictors resulted in shared variance when moderators were considered. These included: ACT English, math, science, and social science; chemistry; entrance grade point average; SAT verbal; and a specialized test, the AHPAT. Each of these measures used board scores as the criterion measure. Moderators included the length of time used to gather data, year of study or publication, whether the study was published, and the profession. Profession had the largest effect on the statistical significance of the predictors.

Two- and 4-year programs were identified as subgroups. Considering the moderator, profession, only 2 predictors were affected by the subgroups: entrance grade point average in Medical Technology and ACT science in Registered Nursing.

Committee:

Mark Kretovics, PhD (Committee Chair); Susan Iverson, EdD (Committee Member); Frederick Law, PhD (Committee Member); Alicia Crowe, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

meta-analysis;admission standards;allied health;dental hygiene;entrance standards;medical laboratory technology; medical technology;nursing;radiologic technology;respiratory therapy;undergraduate admission standards;undergraduate entrance standards

Hovland, Jana A.Elementary Teachers' Practices and Self-Efficacy Related to Technology Integration for Teaching Nutrition
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Instructional Technology (Education)
Stakeholders are interested in using technology to integrate nutrition education into the regular school curriculum as one strategy, among many, to combat the childhood obesity epidemic. The primary purposes of this study were to: (a) gain a better understanding of elementary teachers’ perceptions concerning technology integration in nutrition education, and (b) identify factors influencing elementary teachers’ self-efficacy for integrating technology into nutrition education. An online survey was used to collect demographic information, teacher perceptions of barriers to using technology to teach nutrition, teacher perceptions of barriers to teaching nutrition in general, teacher perceptions of supports for using technology to teach nutrition, and technology integration self efficacy for teaching nutrition. Frequencies, means, and standard deviations were calculated to gain a better understanding of teacher perceptions related to technology integration and nutrition education. Multiple regression analysis examined whether the variables (nutrition training and technology training) could predict elementary teachers’ self-efficacy for utilizing technology to teach nutrition. One hundred sixteen elementary educators from a six county region in West Virginia completed the survey. All educators taught at schools participating in Marshall University’s Nutrition Education Program. Results indicate that “Unavailability of personal technology for students’ home use to learn nutrition (iPad, laptop, fitness tracker)” was the greatest challenge for teachers in using technology to teach nutrition. The two greatest challenges for teaching nutrition in general were “lack of appropriate resources” and “lack of instructional time.” Results of the multiple regression revealed an overall significant regression (p = .011) with a small effect size. Multiple regression analysis with four forms of training revealed that the variables professional development, undergraduate course, graduate course, and technology certification explained 17.1% of the variance in technology integration self-efficacy for teaching nutrition. Technology certification was the only training variable found to be a significant unique contributor to the prediction model, explaining 7.4% of the variance in technology integration self-efficacy for teaching nutrition. Future training programs aiming to increase teachers’ technology integration self-efficacy for teaching nutrition may benefit from using similar techniques as the Technology Integration Specialist Certification training. Training which emphasizes ways to integrate technology into nutrition education may be more salient than training focused simply on nutrition content or new technology applications.

Committee:

Greg Kessler, PhD (Advisor); Darlene Berryman, PhD (Committee Member); Christopher Guder, PhD (Committee Member); Min Lun (Alan) Wu, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Elementary Education; Health Education; Nutrition; Teaching

Keywords:

Elementary; nutrition education; technology integration; teacher perceptions; teacher self-efficacy; technology integration self-efficacy; technology integration self-efficacy for teaching nutrition; elementary education; teacher training; nutrition

Lin, Shiang-YuThe Use of Technology in K-12 Schools: Demystifying the Relationship between Technology Leadership and Technology Use
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, EDU Policy and Leadership
Abstract There is a common belief that technology can help improve learning opportunities for all students (DeBell & Chapman, 2006; U.S. Department of Education, 2010). Although the U.S. government encourages the use of educational technology in K-12 schools through funding technological infrastructure and the development of educational technology applications, the state of technology use in K-12 schools remains vague. Technology leadership, an emerging concept in educational scholarship, has been described as a school characteristic associated with planning, purchasing, and a host of distributed management and leadership practices that lead to meaningful and effective utilization of technology in schools (S. Dexter, 2008; Hew & Brush, 2007). Although there is research establishing a positive relationship between school leadership and student outcomes (Hallinger & Heck, 1996; Robinson, Lloyd, & Rowe, 2008; Waters, Marzano, & Mcnulty, 2003), few studies have examine links between technology leadership and technology use by teachers and students. This study was conducted to examine the current state of technology use and technology leadership in K-12 schools. It also examined the relationship between technology leadership and teachers’ technology use for mathematics instruction. Following Anderson and Dexter's (2005) claim that technology leadership functions as a necessary role in the effective use of K-12 school technology use, I hypothesized a positive relationship between technology leadership and technology use for teaching and learning. This dissertation begins with a review of relevant research and policy literature on ways in which school-level technology leadership and technology policies influence technology integration. Next, it describes how data from the 2009 fast-response survey titled "Teachers' Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools" (FRSS95, 2009) has been analyzed. Descriptive statistics and factor analyses were conducted to characterize K-12 technology use and technology leadership. Next, MANCOVA and a follow-up regression analysis were utilized to examine whether a relationship between technology leadership and technology use existed, and to determine which attributes of technology leadership were significantly associated with technology use. The target population for this study was U.S. public elementary and secondary teachers who were identified to participate in the 2009 fast-response survey titled "Teachers' Use of Educational Technology in U.S. Public Schools" (FRSS95, 2009b). The FRSS nationwide teacher survey sampled 3,159 public school teachers from 1563 public schools (NCES, 2010). The sample consisted of 1784 public elementary teachers, 1286 public secondary teachers, and 89 teachers in public combined schools. Due to a large difference existing in the distribution of main teaching assignment between the participants in elementary schools and those in secondary schools, the elementary sample and the secondary sample were extracted from the total sample to explore the research questions regarding teachers’ and students’ educational technology use, teachers' perceptions of technology leadership, and the relationship between technology leadership and educational technology use in K-12 schools. In the FRSS95 dataset, technology use was characterized by teachers' general technology use for classroom preparation, instruction, and administrative tasks (general use), teachers’ administrative technology use for communicating with parents or students (Admin_comm), teachers’ administrative technology use for viewing or managing student data (Admin_data), and students' technology use during instructional time (student use). Teachers' perceptions of technology leadership were characterized by full-time technology personnel within districts (tech personnel), the quality of professional development for educational technology (PD quality) and equitable access to digital tools and resources (range of access). With these four indicators of technology use and three indicators of technology leadership, analyses examined the relationship between technology use and technology leadership in elementary schools and secondary schools. As expected, PD quality and range of access had statistically significant positive relationships with all four technology use indicators in both samples. Furthermore, technology personnel was a statistically significant predictor across all types of technology use in the elementary sample, but not a significant one across Admin_comm, Admin_data, or student use in the secondary sample. The study findings also showed that the inclusion of technology leadership in the models resulted in a significant increase in the amount of variance explained above and beyond that accounted for by school enrollment size, community type, poverty, minority student population, main teaching assignment and years of teaching experience. In short, regardless of the type of technology use or teachers’ instructional grade level, technology leadership matters. The amount of variance explained for general technology use was the greatest among the four technology use variables in elementary schools, as well as in secondary schools. The amount of variance explained for Admin_comm use was the least among the four technology use variables in elementary schools, as well as in secondary schools. With the exception of student use, the technology leadership indicators in elementary schools explained a greater amount of variance of technology use than that in secondary schools. Even with the limited number of indicators used in this analysis to measure technology leadership and technology use, the study findings confirmed and demonstrated the influence of teacher's perceptions of technology leadership on several meaningful technology-related uses by teachers and students. Although the indicators of technology leadership in this study differed from those conceptual dimensions of technology leadership in Anderson and Dexter's study, both of these studies showed a strong positive relationship between technology leadership and technology use. This implies that technology leadership still serves a necessary role in the effective utilization of educational technology even if technology leadership is not depicted as principals’ behaviors. Moreover, the findings imply the importance of the quality of technology-related professional activities and the equitable access to educational technology. The study suggest future researchers and policy makers should regard technology leadership as a powerful organizational function that positively impacts teachers’ and students’ technology use.

Committee:

Anika B. Anthony (Advisor); Ann O’Connell (Committee Member); Scott Sweetland (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Educational Technology

Keywords:

The Use of Technology, K-12 Schools, Relationship between Technology Leadership and Technology Use

Kurlinkus, William CNostalgia and New Media: Designing Difference into Rhetoric, Composition, and Technology
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, English
In this project I construct a democratic model of new media composing education and production that uses nostalgia (a community, tradition, and emotion-focused lens) to uncover design lessons within a diverse set of techno-composing milieus: the hipster craft movement, the new capitalist workplace, debates in the field of composition studies, and several client-designer interactions. In doing so, I argue that because communities value diverse technological pasts, so, too, do they inevitably imagine diverse ideal futures. Sadly, citizens and students who value technological futures beyond efficient high-tech profusion are historically labeled technophobic and/or illiterate. Through such a dismissal, scholars of technology--from ER doctors to new media composition instructors--miss out on a wide array of design assets and possible futures that could make the world a better place. To counter this anemic thinking, I develop a cross-cultural rhetoric of technology, which uses nostalgia to identify, mediate, and design from techno-logical "contact zones" (see Pratt; Pfaffenberger; Selfe and Selfe; Canagarajah), spaces where different communities with different understandings, values, goals, and literacies surrounding writing technologies interact and clash in systems of uneven power. In doing so, I call for the expansion of definitions of technological literacy in new media composition; I argue for teaching composing students to mediate technological conflicts; and I illustrate how composers can learn from the contextualized memories of their audiences in order to create more inclusive, creative, and profitable texts.

Committee:

Cynthia Selfe (Advisor); H. Lewis Ulman (Committee Member); Beverly Moss (Committee Member); Nancy Johnson (Committee Member); Susan Delagrange (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Communication; Composition; Design; Education; Education Philosophy; Literacy; Philosophy; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Technology

Keywords:

nostalgia; new media; rhetoric; composition; literacy; technology; design; wicked design; new media composition; multimodality; multimodal composing; multiliteracy; philosophy of technology; technology; democratic design; metis

Darbanhosseiniamirkhiz, MirmahdiHERD BEHAVIOR AND INDIVIDUALS’ INFORMATION SYSTEM BEHAVIORS: USAGE, ABANDONMENT, AND EXPLORATION INTENTIONS
PHD, Kent State University, 2018, College of Business Administration / Department of Management and Information Systems
The ubiquity of information, in part a consequence of the fast growth of Internet technologies, provides individuals with previously unknown opportunities to acquire and share information about new technology products. One may witness numerous situations where potential adopters observe the decisions (but not the reasoning) of others, and imitate their system usage behaviors. This implies that herd behavior can lead to en mass adoption and subsequent abandonment patterns. Adopting a herding lens, this dissertation investigates individuals’ technology adoption and post-adoption behaviors. Drawing on the rich extant literature on technology adoption, post-adoption usage, and technology exploration, and integrating it with other relevant research streams, I aim to shed light on understudied determinants of individual decision-making regarding technological artifacts in highly uncertain environments. Each of the three essays concentrates on investigating different technology-related phenomena, i.e., adoption, usage, and exploration of technology by individuals through the lens of herd theory. My research follows the three-manuscript model. In the first essay, which focuses on the adoption phase, I look at user and technology characteristics and their interaction with the antecedents of herd behavior, observed popularity of prior adoption and perceived uncertainty. In the second essay, I extend my focus to the post-adoptive context and study the impact of the herd effect on how a user’s task-technology-fit perceptions evolve over time. I also investigate factors influencing en mass abandonment in herd-like adoption conditions. In the third essay, which focuses on a specific explorative technology usage behavior, I investigate how team-level factors influence herd-like adoption and consequently explorative learning behaviors in the post-adoption stage.

Committee:

Greta Polites (Committee Chair); Mary Hogue (Committee Member); Dong-Heon Kwak (Committee Member); Christopher Groening (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Information Systems

Keywords:

Technology adoption; Herd behavior; IS behaviors; Task-Technology Fit; Perceived niche; Niche technology; Explorative learning; IT training; Team cohesion

Incerti, FedericaAn Exploration of Emotional Intelligence and Technology Skills Among Students at a Midwestern University
Master of Education (MEd), Ohio University, 2013, Computer Education and Technology (Education)
The author of this study sought to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and technology proficiency among undergraduate pre-service teachers enrolled in a teacher preparation technology course. The study seeks to contribute to the understanding of the relationship between two important educational elements (emotional intelligence and technology skills) that need to be applied to a twenty-first century education. The study analyzed 113 surveys administered to undergraduate pre-service teachers enrolled in teacher preparation technology courses. The results of this study indicated that participants own a high level of emotional intelligence and very low technology skills. The results also indicate that there is no significant relationship between emotional intelligence and technology skills among undergraduate pre-service teachers in a College of Education teacher preparation technology course at a Midwestern University.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, Dr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Software; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Information Science; Information Technology; Multimedia Communications; Neurosciences; Psychology; Teacher Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Emotional Intelligence; Technology Skills; learning; Education Technology; Higher-Education Technology; Teacher's Preparation; Neuroscience of Learning; Social-emotional Learning; Digital Natives; Web 2.0; Web Applications; 21st century skills; teachers

Angelis, John N.Decision Models for Growing Firms: Obstacles and Opportunities
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2009, Operations

This dissertation is comprised of three essays. The first, “Optimal Marketing Strategies for Competing New Ventures in a Nascent Industry” has been originally accepted for publication in the International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management. It considers new ventures that are pioneering a nascent industry. Just as their established counterparts do, these ventures strive to increase profit by acquiring sales of rival new ventures. However, new ventures can also grow by attracting unrealized sales. The essay investigates the resulting tradeoff in marketing expenditures via a differential game between two competing new ventures. Extensive numerical analysis suggests that an increase in a new venture’s unit profit margin, effectiveness in gaining new sales, or initial sales level, but a decrease in sales decay, may cause a positive spillover for its rival.

The second essay, “Integrating Customer Preferences with Technology Adoption and Product Redesign in a Duopoly” focuses on a firm’s decision to add a technology that changes how customers interact with the firm’s product. We formulate a two-stage game-theoretic framework to investigate the conditions under which two competing firms should add a technology, and how a firm that adopts technology should redesign its product to incorporate technology. We investigate how prospective and existing customers’ preferences for the technology and the product-technology fit should affect the firm’s adoption and product redesign decisions. We articulate conditions for the existence of a Nash equilibrium where both firms add technology, and demonstrate that customer preferences for technology standardization may actually impede standardization.

The third essay, “New Product Positioning for a Segmented Market” focuses on how competing firms should set price and quality for a new technologically-advanced product. The targeted market is comprised of two customer segments that differ in innovativeness. We analyze a closed-loop Stackelberg game with perfect information and find that a late entrant’s ability to challenge an incumbent is most affected by production cost. If a firm has a large enough production cost advantage relative to its rival, it can attract customers from both segments; however, such a firm should not necessarily be the first mover.

Committee:

Moren Levesque (Advisor); Lisa Maillart (Committee Member); Bo Carlsson (Committee Member); Danny Solow (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Management; Operations Research; Technology

Keywords:

Technology Management; Entrepreneurship; Innovation; Technology Adoption; Game Theory; Growing Firms; Technology Selection; Differential Games; New Ventures

Park, KyungsukThe value of technology education to elementary school students’ learning of technology concepts and processes: A qualitative investigation of a constructivist perspective
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Teaching and Learning
This study investigated the value of technology education to elementary school students’ learning of technology concepts and processes as a result of technology education experiences. The research questions were (1) How do elementary school students learn technology concepts as a result of technology education experiences?, (2) How do elementary school students learn technology processes as a result of technology education experiences?, and (3) What are elementary school students’ beliefs and attitudes toward technology and technology activities? This study employed a qualitative research methodology. Evidence has been collected from several major sources for five months: participant observation; semi-structured interviews with students and teacher; and documents including students’ journals, notebooks, written works, and the teacher’s handouts. I presented the evidence through using inductive analysis and interpreted the evidence through the lens of the constructivist perspective. The findings revealed that technology education provided elementary school students with a constructivist learning context. Elementary school students were introduced to meaningful hands-on activities of technology education and encouraged to involve themselves in creative problem solving processes and social interactions. In addition, they conceptualized technology as making, invention, new things, and computers and perceived technology and technology activities as fun and exciting. This study has two major implications for educational practice and further study. First, classroom teachers’ efforts are needed to bridge the gap between elementary school classrooms and cognitive science throughout technology education activities. Second, continued examination of students’ learning of technology concepts and processes is needed in order to investigate the value of ESTE.

Committee:

Karen Zuga (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Technology

Keywords:

Elementary school technology education (ESTE); Technology concepts; Technology processes; constructivist

Bridgewater, MatthewWriting in the Age of Mobile: Smartphone and Tablet Multiliteracies and Their Implications for Writing as Process
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
This dissertation compares the writing practices of students on desktops and laptops with their writing practices on mobile computing devices, namely tablets and smartphones. While there is much scholarship on computer-mediated writing (e.g., Eldred, 1991; Dave and Russell, 2010; Haas, 1989; Hochman and Palmquist, 2009; Palmquist et al., 1998), there has been less attention paid to how mobile computer devices mediate writing practices and promote (digital) literacies. This study used mixed methods, specifically quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews. Using a process-oriented first-year research writing class as a research site and the research paper as the genre of analysis, the study found that there are significant differences between the writing, research, and reading practices done on these computing devices. The student survey found that students indeed use mobiles for academic writing purposes, are less likely to revise on mobile devices than on desktops and laptops, and generally make local edits to global revisions when they do revise. It also found that students are more likely to access sources that are not typically considered scholarly, preferring to use unscholarly and advertisement-supported sources. The literacy narrative took a closer look at the research practices of a student in the first year writing program. Several emerging themes arose that are relevant to writing studies, including that the period between high school and the first year of college is a critical time in acquiring and losing different literacies, socioeconomic sponsors and barriers greatly influence writing practices, and some students' expectations and values make them unsure of the place of mobile technology in education.

Committee:

Kristine Blair, Dr. (Committee Chair); Lee Nickoson, Dr. (Committee Member); Donna Nelson-Beene, Dr. (Committee Member); Radhika Gajjala, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition

Keywords:

mobile technology; research methods; digital literacy; technology literacy; classroom technology; computer-mediated writing; research practices; revision practices; computers and writing;

Elbayadi, Moudy ERelational Leadership, DevOps, and The Post-PC Era: Toward a Practical Theory for 21st Century Technology Leaders
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
This theoretically oriented scholarly personal narrative (SPN) explored how the constructionist view of relational leadership might be applied in a post-PC technological era marked by fast-paced innovation and an always on technology organization and infrastructure. Through reflecting on my personal and professional experience, I hope to offer the reflective scholar-practitioner new ways of thinking, present relational practices and suggest ways of being a leader participating in the fast-paced technology driven world. This new way of being combined both relational leadership and new DevOps practices that reduce organizational friction, break down departmental silos, and increase employee engagement in technology operations. Through this inquiry, I uncovered several practices and ways of being that are grounded in philosophical, theoretical, and social domains. In challenging the taken-for-granted reality of managing technology, I am attempting to produce practices for higher performance, humane, sustainable, and inspiring corporate information technology (IT) departments. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/etds/ and OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Mitchell E. Kusy, Ph.D (Committee Member); Ann L. Cunliffe, Ph.D (Committee Member); Brian Kolo, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Management; Technology

Keywords:

DevOps; technology management; relational leadership; leadership practices; social construction; scholarly personal narrative; SPN; technology operations; IT; Information technology;

Cook, Casey JEXPLORING THE USE OF INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCE IN MIDDLE SCHOOLS OF NORTHWEST OHIO
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Career and Technology Education/Technology
Public education in the United States is in a notable state of transition regarding its use of computer technology as a tool to help educate K-12 students, but usage in the classrooms of American public schools is inconsistent and far from reaching its full potential, according to a report issued in 2003 by the National Research Council. Advocates who endorse interactive multimedia as part of computer based instruction believe that it can enhance teaching and learning because it can combine the benefits of visual and audio media with sophisticated programming to offer useful feedback during instruction. If interactive multimedia truly has the potential to enhance teaching and learning, then it should be studied. This descriptive study explored the use of interactive multimedia as an instructional resource in middle schools located throughout northwest Ohio. The research method for this study was a survey sent to middle school teachers. The sample was a stratified convenience sample of schools selected from urban, suburban, and rural communities throughout northwest Ohio. Teachers were asked if they used interactive multimedia in their classrooms, and were also asked what subject matter they taught, how many years they had been teaching, and what their gender was. A slightly larger majority of the teachers that responded to the survey indicated that they do use interactive multimedia as part of their classroom instruction, but responses were different between the strata, and it became apparent that most teachers still used interactive rarely during the school year. It was also discovered that a majority of teachers who indicated that they do not use interactive multimedia listed reasons that seemed more circumstantial in nature, rather than due to choice or personal preference not to use it. Lack of computers and lack of training emerged as the two most common deterrents as to why those teachers were not using interactive multimedia as part of their instruction. The results of this regional study seemed to validate the National Research Council’s claims that computer technology (which includes interactive multimedia), is still not being utilized to its full potential.

Committee:

Gene Poor (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Technology

Keywords:

interactive multimedia; education technology; educational software; information technology; survey; technology integration

Kowalczyk, Nina K.The Impact Of Voluntariness, Gender, And Age On Subjective Norm And Intention To Use Digital Imaging Technology In A Healthcare Environment:Testing A Theoretical Model
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, ED Physical Activities and Educational Services

The primary purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the data collected on ARRT certified radiographers utilizing digital imaging equipment support the modified TAM2 theoretical model in a radiology department where the equipment use is mandated. This study measured model fit using SEM as well as examining a series of dependence relationships between observed exogenous and endogenous variables.

The study population consisted of 120 radiographers certified by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) utilizing direct capture digital radiographic units in The Ohio State University Medical Center Healthcare System. A survey method was used to investigate the applicability of the modified TAM2 utilizing a written questionnaire adapted from previous Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Technology Acceptance Model 2 (TAM2) studies. The response rate was 92.5%.

The results of this study indicate the data does support the implied theoretical model; however age and gender were shown to have little impact on the original model. Standardized regression coefficients (β) were used to examine a series of dependence relationships between observed exogenous and endogenous variables. Two relationships were identified in this study in reference to the intention to use digital imaging equipment in a mandated healthcare environment. A relationship was recognized involving voluntariness and subjective norm and concerning subjective norm and the intention to use the digital imaging equipment. These findings support previous research indicating that the social context in which the technology is employed plays an important role in an individual's decision to ultimately use the technologic innovation.

Committee:

David Stein, PhD (Advisor); Joseph Gliem, PhD (Committee Member); Melanie Brodnik, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care; Information Systems

Keywords:

technology acceptance; technology adoption; technology in healthcare; health informatics

Agyeman, Cynthia A.Artists' Perception of the Use of Digital Media in Painting
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, Curriculum and Instruction (Education)
Painting is believed to predate recorded history and has been in existence for over 35,000 (Ayres, 1985; Bolton, 2013) years. Over the years, painting has evolved; new styles have been developed and digital media have been explored. Each period of change goes through a period of rejection before it is accepted. In the 1960s, digital media was introduced to the art form. Like all the painting mediums, it was rejected. It has been over 50 years since it was introduced and yet, it has not been fully accepted as an art form (King, 2002; Miller, 2007; Noll, 1994). This exploratory study seeks to understand the artist’s perception on the use of digital media as an art tool and its benefit to the artists and art education. Grounded theory was used as a methodological guide for the study. Eleven participants participated in this study. Participants for the study were drawn from art instructors who teach at 4-year higher education art colleges located in Ohio and Illinois. The research explored the perception of artists on the use of digital media, otherwise known as digital media in painting. The study relied on interviewing as a method of data collection, which was triangulated with reviewed literature relating to the research. The emergent theory describes how an artist's perception of digital media and digital paintings can be interpreted. It takes into account three main variables: how the artist defines painting, how their definition influences their tool of choice, and their view on the importance of the role and function of painting in the lives of individuals, in society and culture and in art education.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art Criticism; Art Education; Art History; Educational Technology; Fine Arts; Higher Education; Technology

Keywords:

Digital painting; Traditional painting; Grounded theory; Artist perception; Instructional technology; Art education; Technology integration; Art; Technology; Aesthetic value; Art criticism; Creativity; Criticism of digital art

Hastings, Tricia A.Factors that Predict Quality Classroom Technology Use
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Leadership Studies

Despite technological advancements intended to enhance teaching and learning in the 21st century, numerous teacher and school factors continue to impede quality classroom technology use. Determining the effectiveness of educational technology is challenging and requires a detailed understanding of multifaceted, complex, contextual relationships. The purpose of this correlational study was to identify factors that predict quality classroom technology use and inform educators about effective technology integration.

The researcher analyzed both Technology-Related (Risk-taking Behaviors and Comfort with Technology, Perceived Benefits of Using Technology in the Classroom, Beliefs and Behaviors about Classroom Technology Use, Teacher Support for Technology Use, Teacher Technology Proficiency, and Technology-Related Professional Development) and Non-Technology-Related (Teacher Self-Efficacy, Teaching Philosophy, Teaching Professionalism: Hours Beyond Contract, and Teaching Professionalism: Years Teaching Experience) variables in regard to Teacher, Student, and Overall Technology Use. Five research questions were developed to investigate factors of quality classroom technology use.

This study relied primarily upon two frameworks to identify factors that predict and a method of measuring quality classroom technology use. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) is a conceptually-based theoretical framework for understanding the complex relationships between Technology, Pedagogy, and Content that pertain to classroom technology use. In addition, the study also utilized a framework, the Tiers of Technology Integration into the Classroom Indicators (TTICI), which was developed by the Washington State Technology Integration into the Curriculum Working Group (2005). The researcher applied the TTICI framework in order to generate technology integration scores, based upon levels (low, moderate, high) of quality classroom technology use.

Two online surveys were administered to 280 K-12 public school teachers in Northwest Ohio. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all five research questions and inferential statistics, including correlation and multiple regression, t-test of independent samples, and an ANOVA were calculated for research questions 3-5. The study revealed that Technology-Related factors generated better models in predicting technology use than Non-Technology-Related factors. The factors that best predict weighted technology use were: 1) Beliefs and Behaviors about Classroom Technology Use; 2) Technology Proficiency in Productivity Software, and 3) Perceived Benefits of Using Technology in the Classroom. A few, culminating themes have emerged from the literature review and data analysis of the results. The study concludes that: 1) teachers, in general, are still not using technology effectively; 2) technology-related professional development is essential to promoting quality technology use; 3) measuring classroom technology use is a complex, multifaceted process; and 4) educators must become reflective practitioners in an effort to promote quality classroom technology use.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Judith Zimmerman (Committee Member); Beth Christoff (Committee Member); Savilla Banister (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; School Administration; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

technology; quality; teacher technology use; technology integration; predict; proficiency; professional development; self efficacy; professionalism; education

Arikan, ArzuAn interpretivist approach to understanding technology policy in education: sociocultural differences between official tales of technology and local practices of early childhood educators
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Educational Theory and Practice
This ethnographic case study examines the technology policy practices in the context of a federal technology initiative, the Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to use Technology Program, and describes this policy process at three levels of social construction, interpretation and reconstruction. The study traces the policy expectations of technology integration in multiple layers of sociocultural practice, including the federal government layer, the teacher education layer, and the early childhood education layer. The purpose of the study was to understand the ways educators responded to the technology policy and the ways they translated technology goals of the PT3 Initiative into local practices in multiple contexts. The social construction of technology policy across three layers of policy practices did not simply entail policy engagement in predetermined or preplanned ways; rather, it revealed complex and evolving technology policy practices, interwoven in communicative exchanges, mediations, tensions, interactions, negotiations, and learning through participation. Those practices connected through three overlapping dynamics of social construction: social agency, social capital, and sense making. The complexity also included disconnected visions, promoted by political advocates in positions of power and privilege, and many versions of those visions, reconstructed by professional advocates. The study suggests that policymakers should view technology as a social construct and possess culturally relevant and realistic visions that resonate with the cultural realities of the educational community they serve. Federal policies should be cognizant of early childhood educators’ needs to access to technology and information, and supportive leadership structures that stimulate teachers’ motivation to learn and use technology.

Committee:

David Fernie (Advisor)

Keywords:

Technology Policy; Technology in early childhood education Technology learning; Social Construction

Lehrman, Eliana RoseIntroductory Guide to Assistive Technology for Educators
BS, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
Assistive technology devices are being utilized more frequently in classrooms for accommodations and modifications, especially for students with disabilities. These devices can be high technology devices containing batteries, or low technology devices which may be inexpensive and do not require batteries to be used. Throughout the thesis, the use of high technology devices and low technology devices is specified to introduce the idea of integrating devices into general education and special education classrooms. Furthermore, resources are provided regarding learning more about specific devices, how to further implement technology in the classroom, and catalogs to buy devices.

Committee:

Robert Cimera, Dr. (Advisor); Sloane Burgess, Dr. (Committee Member); Annette Kratcoski, Dr. (Committee Member); Natasha Levinson, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Special Education

Keywords:

Special Education; Assistive Technology; Teaching; High Technology; Low Technology; Special Education Law; General Education; Individualized Education Plan; IEP; Autism Spectrum Disorder; Language Disorder; Intellectual Disability; Motor Disability;

Long, Leroy L.An Investigation into the Relationship between Technology and Academic Achievement among First-Year Engineering Students
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, EDU Teaching and Learning
In order to increase the number of American STEM degree recipients, it is important for academics to develop ways to improve students’ interest, retention, and success in fields like engineering. The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between first-year engineering students’ (FYES) perceived (a) knowledge, (b) usefulness, as well as (c) frequency and nature of use of technology and their academic achievement (i.e., grades). This investigation focused on the specific types and uses of educational technology by FYES, while also analyzing differences by race/ethnicity and gender. Previously, scholars have employed a broad definition of technology to describe hardware such as cell phones and computers or software for word processing and web-based applications. Such definitions have been used to understand how collegians, instructors, and professionals interact with technology. In the present study, educational technology signified specific computer and information technology such as computer hardware (e.g., desktops, laptops), computer software (e.g., Microsoft Word/Excel, MATLAB, SolidWorks), electronic devices (e.g., cellphones, tablets, E-readers), and the Internet (e.g., websites, course management systems). Rogers’ (1995) technology adoption theory was chosen for the current study as it related well to the present research questions. A multi-step approach (i.e., descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests, hierarchical linear regression) was used to analyze survey data from nearly 500 students. Results from the present study determined there were significant racial/ethnic differences in FYES’ perceived usefulness as well as frequency and nature of use of technology. There were also significant gender differences in FYES’ perceived knowledge and usefulness of technology. Furthermore, FYES’ background characteristics significantly predicted their final course grades in the second of two Fundamentals of Engineering courses. Findings have important implications for practice, research, and theory surrounding FYES and educational technology.

Committee:

Paul Post, PhD (Advisor); Terrell Strayhorn, PhD (Advisor); Lin Ding, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Gustafson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Engineering; Technology

Keywords:

Technology; Educational Technology; Technology Adoption; Academic Achievement; First-Year Students; First-Year Engineering Students; Underrepresented Students; Engineering Education;

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