Search Results (1 - 25 of 49 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Lindsay, Kristen ReneeSenior Student Affairs Officers' Perceptions Of Critical Professional Competencies
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Higher Education Administration
Literature describing the role of the senior student affairs officer (SSAO) is plentiful, but research studies describing the specific skills needed to successfully fulfill the role are fewer in quantity. Therefore, in order to better understand the skills needed to be a senior-level student affairs administrator, and how to acquire them, this study examined SSAOs' perceptions of the ACPA and NASPA joint competencies. The sample, comprised of SSAOs who hold ACPA membership, shared their perceptions, which were examined according to several variables including gender, ethnicity, professional experience, and institution characteristics. Findings indicated that a doctoral degree was particularly significant for developing the skills necessary to be a successful SSAO. Additionally, there were differences according to several of the variables, indicating the importance of different competencies at different types of institutions, although no clear-cut picture of specific competency importance emerged. The additional competencies suggested by the SSAOs who participated in the survey, although nearly all of them overlapped with the ACPA and NASPA joint competencies, provide reinforcement of skills important to SSAOs in today's higher education landscape. The findings provide a snapshot of the skills necessary for successful SSAOs, as well as implications for graduate preparation programs and future revisions of the ACPA and NASPA join competencies.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Dr. (Advisor); Steven Cady, Dr. (Committee Member); Michael Coomes, Dr. (Committee Member); Robert DeBard, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

ACPA and NASPA competencies; senior student affairs officers; student affairs competencies; SSAO; student affairs professionals; higher education competencies; senior-level student affairs administrator; student affairs skills; professional competencies

Collins, Kathleen M.Those Who Just Said “NO!”: Career-Life Decisions of Middle Management Women in Student Affairs Administration
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Higher Education Administration

This study examined the experiences of six female middle managers in student affairs who, while otherwise qualified with experience and an earned doctorate, turned down the opportunity to serve as vice president of student affairs. In-depth purposeful interviews were conducted with each participant, using naturalistic qualitative research methods grounded in the constructivist paradigm (Guba & Lincoln, 1989; Lincoln & Guba, 1985). From a backdrop of related research (Aleman & Renn, 2002; Blackhurst, Brandt & Kalinowski, 1998; McKenna, 1997; Nobbe & Manning, 1997), interview probes guided the examination of personal and professional experiences that led these women to their current status and their perceptions of any consequences they may have faced as a result of their career decisions. Data revealed emergent themes, which were used to craft individual case reports and to assemble an aggregate construction in response to the primary research questions.

Findings indicated that, while participants once aspired to the vice presidency as their ultimate goal, a number of personal and professional reasons led each to make a conscious decision to forgo the next step on the student affairs career ladder and remain in their current, middle management position. Personal reasons included the need to attend to relationships with significant others (e.g., spouse, partner, children); professional reasons included levels of anticipated stress and undue expectations and time commitments that placed their family-work balance in jeopardy. A combination of motives related to their rejection of advancement as well as their desire to maintain their current level in the organization led to their revision of occupational aspirations and a reclaiming of a more holistic life pattern.

Themes generated in these data resulted in a number of recommendations for student affairs administrative policy and practice, as well as suggestions for future research. From a perspective of policy and practice student affairs could benefit from reconsidering current work expectations, with an eye toward alternative models to accommodate a broader range of career patterns. Further research is needed to consider in greater depth the role significant others play in career decisions, especially as it intersects with influences of race, culture, and gender.

Committee:

Carney Strange, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Dafina Stewart, Ph,D, (Committee Member); Maureen Wilson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Steven Langendorfer, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

women in student affairs; work-life balance in student affairs; student affairs administration; alternative career paths through student affairs administration

Ashley, Evelyn LaVetteThe Gendered Nature of Student Affairs: Issues of Gender Equity in Student Affairs Professional Associations
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Higher Education Administration
This study examined the gendered nature of the student affairs profession by investigating how three student affairs professional associations, the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), ACPA: College Student Educators International, and the Association of College and University Housing Officers International (ACUHO-I) handled issues of gender equity. The founding of each association was reviewed using archival information from the National Student Affairs Archives. After a review of the archival data, a profile was created for each of the three associations. Interviews were conducted with 13 participants who were members of one or more of the associations and had served in an elected or appointed leadership position. The participants provided insight into the current issues of gender equity faced in the associations. The study employed a constructivist epistemology featuring the co-construction of knowledge. Thus, the archival data for each of the associations and the participants’ interview data were considered in the process of data analysis and interpretation. The following categories emerged from the analysis of the interview data: gender equity, the messages received about gender, delegation of roles and responsibilities, policies and procedures used within the organizations, and perceptions of the symbols, images and artifacts used within each association. Implications for practice related to the development of organizational culture, maintaining the history of student affairs associations, and role modeling for undergraduate students are presented

Committee:

Dafina Lazarus Stewart, PhD (Committee Chair); Ruben Viramontez Anguiano, PhD (Committee Member); Michael D. Coomes, EdD (Committee Member); Robert DeBard, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Gender; Higher Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Gender; Equity; Gender Equity; Student Affairs; Higher Education; Women; Professional Associations; History of Student Affairs

Kegolis, Jeffrey L.New Professionals' Perspectives of Supervision in Student Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Higher Education Administration

The importance of effective supervision to increase productivity in the administration of student affairs motivated this dissertation. This study was designed to assess the perceptions of new professionals regarding the supervision practices encountered in their initial experience following graduation from their master's program. The sample featured alumni from 17 different institutions with professional preparation programs in college student personnel, higher education administration, or student affairs administration. From these institutions, 447 alumni participated and completed the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI-Observer).

One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the significant differences among the demographic information of new professionals and their supervisors. The results showed that male supervisors were rated as effective as female supervisors and African American supervisors were rated as effective as White supervisors at frequency of exemplary practice.

On a national level, when compared to the research collected online by Posner from 2005 to 2007 of various sectors, it appears from this study that increased attention on supervision within student affairs is necessary. Conclusions and recommendations focused on the importance of gender differences, racial and ethnic backgrounds, and the need for further exploration of this topic in future research.

Committee:

Robert DeBard (Advisor); J. Oliver Boyd-Barrett (Committee Member); William Knight (Committee Member); Patricia Kubow (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

leadership; management; supervision; new professionals; student affairs; college student personnel; student affairs administration;

O'Neill, Keith BrendanChanging Places: Narratives of Spiritual Conversion during the First College Year
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Higher Education Administration
A student's first year of college study is marked by the transition of leaving a familiar routine of academic, social, and family commitments. Upon arrival at college, a student can learn how to negotiate personal responsibility for intellectual and community development during the first year. New college students are primed for such immense intellectual, intrapersonal, and interpersonal development, and it may include consideration of religious practice and spiritual values, their meaning and relevance, and determination of religious habits and spiritual identity. This study explored the experiences of spiritual conversion among first-year college students, and how the college environment may contribute to such experiences. Religious and spiritual conversion experiences may reflect a creation, diminishment, strengthening, or transformation of a student's spiritual identity, and this exploratory study sought to include any of these forms of conversion and the factors that challenge and encourage them. By studying the nature of these experiences in the postsecondary environment, educators may learn more about how the experience of college can affect students before, during, and beyond conversion experiences. Students were invited to share their stories to illustrate how their spiritual lives were created, diminished, strengthened, or transformed during their first college year. They shared insights into the related challenges and opportunities encountered through feelings of loneliness, community inclusion and exclusion, academic achievements in the midst of personal turmoil, and environmental influences that may have shaped their journeys. The findings of this inquiry suggested the need for additional opportunities for training for personnel in higher education and student affairs to be more attentive to and better able to support students who are searching spiritually and who may experience a spiritual conversion during the first year of college. These findings demonstrated educators' need to focus on ways in which the college environment can best support safe and healthy student journeys to, through, and beyond the campus. Educators must shape the college environment academically, socially, and spiritually to be a place of change that welcomes and challenges students for success.

Committee:

Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Advisor); Kenneth W. Borland, Jr., D.Ed. (Committee Member); Dara R. Musher-Eizenman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Maureen E. Wilson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Spirituality

Keywords:

spiritual conversion; religious conversion; college students; student development; spiritual development; higher education; college student development; first-year college students; conversion narrative; student affairs; student affairs administration

Campbell, JoBehaviors, Attitudes, Skills, and Knowledge for Senior Student Affairs Officers: Perceptions of Leadership Success
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Higher Education Administration
Success of senior student affairs officers (SSAOs) on a college campus involves a number of critical factors set in the context of three themes: effective leadership, constant change, and a connection to the university mission and culture. These critical success factors were couched as behaviors, attitudes, skills, and knowledge (BASK) of current SSAOs. As a profession built by scholar-practitioners, it is important to understand success from the SSAOs doing the job. NASPA members and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) SSAOs known to the researcher were asked to share their point of view about which BASK factors were most important. The purpose of the current study is to assess current SSAOs’ perceptions of the importance of these BASK factors to success in their positions. The research questions asked how current SSAOs rate the importance of the BASK factors relative to one another, to what extent there are group differences in how SSAOs rate the BASK factors, and to what extent there are group differences in how SSAOs rate the order of BASK factors relative to one another. Integrity in decision making was rated as most important, and presenting sessions at professional conferences and/or submitting articles or book chapters for publication, while still important, was rated as the lowest of the BASK factors. Overall, women and people of color had higher BASK scores. A total of 50 lesbian/gay/bisexual SSAOs participated, representing over 11% of respondents; there were no differences for sexual orientation found in the rating of BASK factors. The relative ranking of BASK factors was similar regardless of SSAOs’ gender identity, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. This study marks the first time sexual orientation was included as a demographic question in published research about SSAOs. The findings provide a path for aspiring and new SSAOs and offer implications for practice, policy, and future research pertaining to the training of student affairs professionals.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Ph.D. (Advisor); William Balzer, Ph.D. (Other); Kenneth Borland, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Nicholas Bowman, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

senior student affairs officer; student affairs leadership; higher education leadership

Crowe, Peggy A.Development and fundraising practices in divisions of student affairs at 4-year, public universities
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Higher Education Administration

This study surveyed 261 NASPA (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators) voting delegate SSAOs (senior student affairs officers) at 4-year, public institutions with enrollment greater than 5,000 students, in regard to the current status of their division-sponsored development and fundraising practices. A total of 111 respondents (42.5%)completed a questionnaire soliciting information about each student affairs division's: a.)institutional profile; b.) preparation for development and fundraising; c.) divisional priorities, capital campaign involvement, and fundraising success; d.) development and fundraising practices applied; e.) relationship to institutional advancement staff; and f.) major challenges and needs for those involved in such efforts. Complemented by themes evident in open-ended comments, the data were presented and analyzed through application of descriptive and nonparametric statistics.

In comparison to previous studies, the data revealed a significant presence in student affairs of an employed staff member responsible for development and fundraising, a range of best practices and preparation expectations, and an overall concern for the status of student affairs in the institution's fundraising strategy. Further analysis yielded several significant differences attributed to institutional size and mission, with student affairs divisions within larger and more research-oriented institutions more developed in their advancement efforts. Several implications from the data were noted, including the need for: a.) clearer intra-institutional communication as to the purposes and functions of student affairs divisions; b.) inclusion of other personnel in development and fundraising efforts; c.) continuing support for training in development and fundraising; d.) greater coordination of fundraising strategies; and e.) greater attention to the particular circumstances of small institutions.

Likewise, implications for future research included the need to: a.) further explore the effects of different institutional types; b.) utilize alternative research methodologies; c.) extend the focus of the research questions longitudinally; d.) examine the culture of philanthropy on campus; e.) evaluate the relative effectiveness of various development models; and f.) follow-up with participants regarding additional training needs.

The results of this study are of particular interest to SSAOs, student affairs department heads, graduate preparation faculty, institutional advancement professionals, and professional organization leadership.

Committee:

C. Carney Strange (Advisor); Louisa S. Ha (Committee Member); William E. Knight (Committee Member); Maureen E. Wilson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

fundraising; student affairs; 4-year, public universities; development; institutional advancement; senior student affairs officers; NASPA voting delegates

Stafford, Linnea CarlsonCollege Student Personnel Professional Preparation Program Faculty Perspectives about Full-Time, Tenure-Track Faculty: A Q Methodology Study
PHD, Kent State University, 2012, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration

College student personnel (CSP) professional preparation program faculty are a unique group in higher education because their work spans both student affairs and academic affairs functions. The purpose of this Q methodology study was to explore the perspectives that full-time, tenure-track CSP faculty hold about full-time, tenure-track, non-CSP faculty. Specifically, this study examined what factors emerged when CSP faculty at Carnegie Classification Research Universities/High Research Activity institutions were asked to model their viewpoints about faculty via a Q sort. This process involved CSP faculty placing 36 statements about faculty and faculty life into a forced distribution grid representing the array of statements with which they most agreed to the statements with which they most disagreed.

A total of 28 CSP faculty participated, with 18 completing the sorts in person and 10 completing the sorts online. Post-sort interviews with participants and demographic data were also collected. Q factor analysis of the sorts revealed two viewpoints about faculty. One viewpoint focuses on the professional contributions of faculty. The second factor focuses on the difficulties of academic life and the mixed successes faculty have in meeting the demands of their job. This study serves as a foundation for further research into perceptions about faculty among student affairs faculty and practitioners.

Committee:

Mark Kretovics, PhD (Committee Chair); Susan Iverson, PhD (Committee Member); Steven Brown, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

professional preparation faculty; student affairs faculty; faculty perspectives; Q methodology; student affairs; college student personnel

Schott, Nancy L.Mentoring and its association with leadership self-efficacy for women senior student affairs officers
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Educational Policy and Leadership
The purposes of this study were to: (1) report scores on a leadership subscale of a self-efficacy instrument for women Senior Student Affairs Officers (SSAOs), (2) investigate the association between the level of leadership self-efficacy and whether the SSAO had a primary mentor, (3) examine the association between the level of leadership self-efficacy of women SSAOs and when the SSAO was mentored, and (4) investigate whether women SSAOs who have high leadership self-efficacy identify the same benefits of mentoring as women SSAOs with low leadership self-efficacy. A quantitative methodology utilizing a five part questionnaire was chosen. Study data suggested that women SSAOs, as a group, scored high on the leadership self-efficacy instrument. Additionally, women SSAOs who had a primary mentor had higher leadership self-efficacy than women SSAOs who did not have a primary mentor. In contrast, when a woman SSAO had a mentor was not found to be associated with the SSAO’s level of leadership self-efficacy. Only two mentoring benefits, aided in upward career mobility and, to a lesser degree, gave job leads and references, demonstrated significance on predicting whether or not an SSAO who ranked this benefit higher (aided in career mobility) or lower (gave job leads and references) fell in a high leadership self-efficacy category. Lastly, women SSAOs who had successfully climbed the administrative ladder seemed to acknowledge the importance of being mentored. The study’s data revealed overwhelming evidence for the sample belief that having mentors promoted leadership self-efficacy.

Committee:

Leonard Baird (Advisor)

Keywords:

mentoring; leadership self-efficacy; women Senior Student Affairs Officers

Schaller, Joni Y.Performance Funding in Ohio: Differences in Awareness of Success Challenge Between Student Affairs Administrators and Academic Affairs Administrators at Ohio’s Public Universities
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2004, Higher Education (Education)

The purpose of this study was to establish the current differences in awareness of Success Challenge between administrators at the thirteen public four-year institutions of higher education in the state of Ohio. Specifically, the study examines differences in Success Challenge awareness between student affairs administrators and academic affairs administrators at selective and open admissions institutions.

Completed in the fall of 2003, the study used a stratified random sample of 406 administrators. Two hundred and twenty-four surveys were returned for a response rate of 55.2%. The survey instrument used in this study was developed based on a previous questionnaire instrument by Joseph Burke (2002), and consisted of five-point Likert scale items that were developed for the eight major constructs of Success Challenge awareness as well as seven open-ended questions.

Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Pearson Chi Square to determine if any significant differences existed in the responses between student affairs and academic affairs administrators at selective and open admission institutions. Significant differences were found to exist between student affairs and academic affairs administrators in the following awareness constructs: familiarity with performance funding, knowledge of Success Challenge criteria, Success Challenge funding, Success Challenge effect on decision making, positive impact of Success Challenge, and Success Challenge communication and information dissemination. Significant differences between administrator awareness at selective and open admission institutions were found to exist in the familiarity with performance funding construct.

This study found that overall administrators, both academic affairs and student affairs student affairs at open and selective institutions, reported a lack of awareness of Success Challenge. In addition, this study also indicated that where significant differences were found, student affairs administrators tended to be more aware of the Success Challenge performance funding program than academic affairs administrators. It was determined that further study, both qualitative and quantitative, should be performed on the relationship between awareness and success, as measured by the amount of state subsidy allocation received through performance on Success Challenge indicators.

Committee:

Gary Moden (Advisor)

Keywords:

Performance Funding; Success Challenge; Ohio; Higher Education Policy; Higher Education Funding; Student Affairs and Academic Affairs Administrators

Gerda, Janice JoyceA History of the Conferences of Deans of Women, 1903-1922
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2004, Higher Education Administration
As women entered higher education, positions were created to address their specific needs. In the 1890s, the position of dean of women proliferated, and in 1903 groups began to meet regularly in professional associations they called conferences of deans of women. This study examines how and why early deans of women formed these professional groups, how those groups can be characterized, and who comprised the conferences. It also explores the degree of continuity between the conferences and a later organization, the National Association of Deans of Women (NADW). Using evidence from archival sources, the known meetings are listed and described chronologically. Seven different conferences are identified: those intended for deans of women (a) Of the Middle West, (b) In State Universities, (c) With the Religious Education Association, (d) In Private Institutions, (e) With the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, (f) With the Southern Association of College Women, and (g) With the National Education Association (also known as the NADW). Each of the conferences is analyzed using seven organizational variables: membership, organizational structure, public relations, fiscal policies, services and publications, ethical standards, and affiliations. Individual profiles of each of 130 attendees are provided, and as a group they can be described as professional women who were both administrators and scholars, highly-educated in a variety of disciplines, predominantly unmarried, and active in social and political causes of the era. The primary conclusions are: There was little continuity between the conferences and the NADW; the nature of the professional groups and the profiles of the deans of women suggest that the profession underwent a change around 1920; and the careers and lives of the early deans of women were filled with important accomplishments, and are worthy of study. A deeper understanding of the early deans of women and their professional activities can inform research on the history of student affairs and the roles of women in higher education. Finally, the stories of these remarkable women can provide inspiration and illumination for those who continue the work with students in higher education.

Committee:

Michael Coomes (Advisor)

Keywords:

dean of women; student affairs; history of higher education; women in higher education; administration of higher education; student personnel

Davidson, Denise L.National Job Satisfaction of Enty- and Mid-level Student Affairs Professionals
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Higher Education Administration

Most workers aspire to jobs where they are highly satisfied. This satisfaction may come from remuneration, opportunities for advancement, the work itself, or other factors. Although an awareness of job satisfaction has the potential to reduce absenteeism and employee turnover, we know little about the satisfaction levels of student affairs professionals. This study examined a population of entry- and mid-level student affairs practitioners in order to develop a profile of their levels of satisfaction with the overall job and five facets of satisfaction. In addition, differences were examined among demographic characteristics and predictors of job satisfaction for entry- and mid-level staff were explored.

Findings indicated significant differences between entry- and mid-level student affairs professionals’ levels of job satisfaction when compared to the neutral level of job satisfaction established by the general population of workers. In addition, significant differences were identified in relation to age, gender, position level, and student affairs functional area. Predictive models were identified for entry-level professionals’ satisfaction with opportunities for promotion and mid-level professionals’ satisfaction with pay.

Suggestions for future research are provided. Implications for practice are noted including the recommendation that student affairs leaders should make much of the fact that student affairs is a satisfying line of work. In addition, results suggested that leaders within student affairs should attend to the differences in satisfaction levels between older and younger professionals at the entry and mid-levels. Further, results implied a generational influence on job satisfaction levels that has bearing on effective supervisory and leadership behaviors. Finally, practitioners may find it useful to attend to the differing satisfaction levels between various functional areas and what these variations imply for leadership practice.

Committee:

William Knight, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael Coomes, PhD (Committee Member); Audrey Ellenwood, PhD (Committee Member); Maureen Wilson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

job satisfaction; student affairs; entry-level professionals; mid-level professionals; job descriptive index; job in general scale

Kirchner, Lisa MaureenManaging Student Death at Small College Campuses: Experiences of Senior Student Affairs Administrators
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
With an increase in focus on critical incident management in higher education in recent years, a better understanding of the experiences of senior student affairs administrators who have the duty to respond to incidents and care for students and families is important. In particular, the response of these administrators to student death can have powerful positive or negative ramifications, depending upon the effectiveness and professionalism of their actions. By considering a phenomenon that senior administrators experience at small college campuses and learning how others deal with these events, professionals can consider different insights that will help them to be successful and effective, if and when they are faced with these responsibilities. Through a naturalistic inquiry involving interviews with five senior student affairs administrators, this study illuminates how they planned for, responded to, and managed student death at their small college campuses. The study also explored how they navigated the emotions involved, and what they found to be meaningful from what they learned as a result of their experiences. Guiding with compassion is a key factor in the effective management of critical incidents involving college student death. Administrators should approach death incidents by being inclusive of the community and allowing for the different and unique aspects that comprise each situation. Student death can take an emotional toll on a small campus community and the responders, but the priority for responders is to ensure that necessary tasks are completed. Proactive and ongoing training and preparation of staff, faculty, and students may help to foster a more seamless institutional response and better overall management of the incident.

Committee:

Maureen E. Wilson, Ph.D (Advisor); Madeline Duntley, Ph.D (Other); Ellen M. Broido, D.Ed (Committee Member); Michael D. Coomes, Ed.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; American Studies; Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

college; student; death; managing; critical; incidents; student; affairs; administrators; compassion; fatigue;

Howell, Leah MAcademic Identity Status and Alcohol Use Among College Students: A Mixed Methods Study
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Educational Studies
As a student affairs professional in higher education, my primary role is to support the development of a student outside the classroom, in an effort to enhance and compliment the classroom experience. In doing so, I have the opportunity to engage with students on a day-to-day basis that exhibit excellence in academics, leadership and service to their community. Despite their success in many other areas, when I talk to students they express little to no concern about their high risk activity and, in fact, give no indication that they even see these behaviors as risky. The study was anchored in Social Cognitive and Identity Development Theory, and augmented by the phenomenon of the high functioning alcoholic, or persistent problem drinker. A sequential, explanatory mixed methods design was used in this study to explain variations in alcohol use among students with highly developed academic identity status, with the aim of informing prevention and intervention strategies on college campuses. Specifically, garnering an understanding of the relationship between identity development and decision making related to high risk behaviors can enhance the ability of higher education professionals to better support the developmental needs of students on their campus. During the first phase, a quantitative instrument was distributed to examine the relationships between academic identity status and alcohol use (n = 97). The instrument was a compilation of sub-sections, including general demographics, Academic Identity Measure (AIM), the Risky College Drinking Practices measure, and select questions adapted from the American College Health Assessment: National College Health Assessment. Results do not indicate a significant relationship between Academic Identity Status and decision-making related to alcohol use. Results do indicate significant gender differences in drinks consumed the last time they “partied”/socialized. In addition, a positive correlation was found between the Risky College Drinking Practices Measure (RDCM) and the number of drinks consumed the last time they “partied”/socialized. During the second, qualitative phase, a semi-structured interview protocol was utilized to determine how students who were identified as individuals experiencing Academic Identity Achievement status, made decisions surrounding alcohol use, the experiences that influenced these decisions, and how they conceptualize high risk use. Decisions were generally made in consideration of academic priorities when the participants had an appreciation for the connection between various facets of their identity. Personal and observed negative experiences with alcohol impacted the decision to use, frequency, and type of alcohol consumption in this same group. All of the participants shared similar conceptions of high -risk alcohol use; however, not all participants identified high risk use as problematic. Three major themes emerged in this phase, including identity development through active exploration, impact of experiences with alcohol, and navigating environmental expectations. The substantive findings give way to future research examining variations in high risk alcohol use by gender and developmental stage.

Committee:

Marcus Johnson, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Rhonda Douglas Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Vicki Plano Clark, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rebecca Vidourek, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Psychology

Keywords:

Academic Identity Development;high functioning alcoholic;persistent problem drinker;student affairs;harm reduction

Gunzburger, Jessica S"Get it together, damn it!": Racism in student affairs supervision
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2017, Educational Leadership
Supervision occurs throughout student affairs, yet receives little attention from current literature, graduate preparation programs, and student affairs practitioners. The limited literature and practical work around supervision that does exist does not address the way that racism influences supervision relationships between White supervisors and supervisees of color. This study addresses the role of racism in student affairs supervision when White professionals supervise professionals of color. I conducted a narrative inquiry study grounded in a constructivist paradigm with critical influences from Critical Race Theory and Black Feminist Theory. I interviewed eleven student affairs professionals of color from various racial backgrounds and working in different functional areas across the country. I completed three interviews with each participant, delving into their experiences with White supervisors. Participants shared examples of some White supervisors who were effective and supportive, and many whose consistently racist behavior negatively affected participants. Participants’ experiences revealed the pervasiveness of racism in supervision from White supervisors. Despite good intentions to the contrary, many White supervisors consistently centered Whiteness in their supervisory practice and perpetuated racism through both interpersonal interactions (e.g., racial microaggressions) and departmental directives (e.g., appointing a person of color as head of a diversity committee because of that individual’s race). These many instances of racism from White supervisors resulted in significant negative effects for participants, including decreased engagement at work, self-doubt, detrimental effects to their wellbeing, and departure from their positions or institutions. Most White supervisors seemed oblivious to their racist actions. To cope with continued racism from White supervisors, supervisees sought support from trusted mentors and colleagues and developed survival mechanisms. Overall, analyses of participant experiences illuminate the many ways that supervisory practice in student affairs is rooted in White norms and perpetuates racism. These analyses have important implications for student affairs practice, particularly for White supervisors. I explore key areas in which White supervisors need to shift their thinking around both their Whiteness and supervision. I name changes in practice White supervisors can make to engage in more socially just supervision practices, such as understanding the extra burden of racism for supervisees of color, being aware of current events, and believing supervisees of color when they surface racism to their supervisors. I also note implications for supervisees of color for working with White supervisors and student affairs as a field to adequately prepare new supervisors and address racism in supervisory practice.

Committee:

Elisa Abes (Committee Chair); Mahauganee Shaw (Committee Member); Stephen Quaye (Committee Member); Gwendolyn Etter-Lewis (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership

Keywords:

student affairs; supervision; racism; white supremacy; whiteness; cross-racial; higher education

Lombardi, Kara M.Understanding Anticipatory Socialization for New Student Affairs Professionals
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Higher Education (Education)
The purpose of this study was to examine the anticipatory socialization experiences of new student affairs professionals. The focus was to gain a deeper understanding of how new professionals experience their anticipatory socialization, specifically the job search and pre-entry communication with their new organizations. The theory that emerged provides insight to hiring organizations on their hiring practices, graduate school preparation programs on the strategies used to prepare students for the job market, and graduate students and new professionals as they transition from graduate student to new professional. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to develop theory regarding the anticipatory socialization of new professionals. Data were collected over the course of 8 months with 14 participants. Participants engaged in 3 rounds of journal writing exercises and interviews at different stages of their anticipatory socialization. It was found that these participants experienced and managed a public job search, as well as a private job search. Aspects of the public job search included the public nature of cohort membership, participating in placement conferences, networking and interviewing, and accepting a job offer. It was also found that participants were managing private aspects of their job search, which included redefining relationships, finding fit, trying to make sense of experiences, varying levels of confidence, managing expectations, and seeking connections with others. These findings contribute to the profession’s understanding of the experience graduate students face as they move from student to professional.

Committee:

Peter Mather (Committee Chair); Laura Harrison (Committee Member); John Hitchcock (Committee Member); Brittany Peterson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

anticipatory socialization; student affairs; new professionals; job search; cohort membership

Snyder, Kacee FerrellA Study of Motherhood and Perceived Career Satisfaction of Women in Student Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Higher Education Administration

There is limited research available on the relationship between motherhood and career satisfaction. This dissertation examined women who worked as student affairs professionals to develop a greater understanding of the relationship between motherhood and career satisfaction.

The following research questions were addressed: Is there a difference between the levels of career satisfaction for women who work full-time in student affairs based on the independent variables? To what degree are the independent variables predictive of career satisfaction for women working in student affairs? What combination of the independent variables will produce the best predictive model of career satisfaction for women working in student affairs? Is there a statistically significant difference in levels of career satisfaction between mothers and non-mothers who work in student affairs? Is there a statistically significant difference in levels of career satisfaction of mothers who work in student affairs based on the independent variables?

Feminist standpoint theoretical framework was utilized and women who were members of ACPA – College Student Educators International were surveyed. Chi-square tests of independence was used to determine differences between groups and ordinal regression was utilized to model the relationship between levels of career satisfaction and independent variables. Findings showed that women were very satisfied or satisfied with four of the career satisfaction areas: career success, meeting overall career goals, professional development goals, and the development of new professional skills, but not for progress toward meeting goals for income. There were statistically significant relationships between the five areas of career satisfaction and degree attainment and motherhood status. Suggestions for future research and implications for practice are discussed.

Committee:

Dafina Stewart, PhD (Committee Chair); Vikki Krane, PhD (Committee Member); Maureen Wilson, PhD (Committee Member); Robert DeBard, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Student Affairs; Career Satisfaction; Motherhood; Women; Higher Education; Career; Mother; Work

Tullier, Sophie M“It Was More About the Functional Area”: Pursuing and Persisting in Student Affairs Community Engagement Positions
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Policy and Leadership
The purpose of this constructivist narrative study was to explore the prior experiences that have influenced new student affairs professionals to pursue positions focused on promoting community engagement as well as factors that contribute to their desire to leave or persist in this functional area. The research questions guiding this study were: 1) What are the prior life experiences of new student affairs professionals that have influenced their decision to hold a position focused on engaging students with the local community through co-curricular volunteerism, community service, or service-learning? 2) What factors influence individuals’ desire to leave or persist in these positions? Data collection occurred through three separate interviews with four participants, each focusing on a separate timeframe of the new professionals life experiences. Additional data was collected through document analysis, including participants’ position descriptions, resumes, and cover letters. Data was analyzed using the content-categorical method of narrative analysis to identify commons themes and experiences. Findings from this study indicate the influence of service involvement and related leadership experiences during students’ undergraduate education, when decisions were made regarding specialization within the field, as well as socialization to the functional area.

Committee:

Susan R. Jones (Advisor); Tatiana Suspitsyna (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

student affairs; career decision-making; community engagement; service-learning; community service; higher education

Corder, ShazlinaNontraditional Adult Women Experiences with the Institutional Services and Support Systems at the University of Toledo
Master of Education, University of Toledo, 2011, Higher Education

The U.S higher education demographic has changed, and adult women constitute the fastest-growing segment in the higher learning environment. Increasingly, many institutions of higher education have come to recognize the important role of student services and support systems in the lives of adult women learners. Although much effort exists in creating supportive learning environments for adult women students, educators and higher education practitioners still know very little of these students’ experiences with institutional support and student services, what services are beneficial to them and why. The purpose of this study is to enhance our knowledge of nontraditional undergraduate adult women students’ experiences with the student services and support systems. An additional purpose of this study is to explore the types of institutional student services and support systems that are found useful and beneficial by these undergraduate women learners themselves and why they are found useful, as well as to explore the challenges, needs, and expectations of adult women learners regarding institutional support systems that they deem unavailable but necessary.

A qualitative research method was employed in this study. The participants in this study were nontraditional undergraduate adult women students enrolled at The University of Toledo (UT). The research design used was a semi-structured open-ended interview questionnaire. The in-depth interviews were conducted face-to-face, and the data generated from the interviews were analyzed. The data analysis provided insight into adult women’s experiences with the institutional support services in higher education, and captured adult women students’ thoughts on the ways they used and benefited from the available academic support, student activities, and campus facilities. The data analysis also provided insight into the adult women students’ challenges, needs, and expectations pertaining to their academic journey for success. The results from this study enhance our knowledge of nontraditional undergraduate adult women students’ experiences with the institutional support services that effectively support their achievement and academic goal.

Committee:

Snejana Slantcheva-Durst, PhD (Committee Chair); Lynne Hamer, PhD (Committee Member); Debra Gentry, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

nontraditional adult women; adult student; instutional support system; student services; academic affairs; student affairs; campus facilities

Hoffman, Matthew D.Change in CHANGE: Tracking first-year students' conceptualizations of leadership in a themed living, learning community
Bachelor of Arts, Miami University, 2010, College of Arts and Sciences - International Studies

A central tenet of Miami University's mission and the goals of President David Hodge, student leadership development has become an increasingly important part of the Office Student Affairs and higher education. Nowhere is this focus more obvious than in the intentional leadership programming within the residence halls of the University. One of these residential communities, the CHANGE Living, Learning Community (LLC). works with first-year students to provide them with curricular and co-curricular experiences and to aid in their development and understandings of leadership. Despite observations and evaluations of other similar programs, additional research on these initiatives becomes a necessity in order to make changes and improvements to benefit leadership programs and student development at Miami.

Chronicling the experiences of 10 students in the CHANGE LLC over a six-month period, this study examines the effects of the different components of living, learning communities. Particularly targeting students who participate in the course EDL 306: Nature of Group Leadership, this study works to construct narratives to explore the practice of leadership at Miami and how these students interact with this conceptual structure. After discussing the theoretical basis of this study, common themes and ideas expressed by participants are identified and analyzed. Finally, this paper will make recommendations to the Office of Student Affairs and other University partners in order to help improve the experiences of students in the CHANGE community and across campus. Many of these suggestions target methods for clarification, intentional programming, and ideas to help build student buy-in. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the current programs and ways in which leadership development at Miami might be enhanced.

Committee:

Richard Nault, PhD (Advisor); Jennifer Buckley (Committee Member); Andrew Beckett, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

Leadership; Social Justice; Social Change; Residence Hall; Living, Learning Community; Student Development; Student Affairs; College; University; Miami University

Custer, Bradley DeanStudents with Felony Convictions in Higher Education: An Examination of the Effects of Special Admissions Policies on Applicants and on Campus Communities
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2012, Educational Leadership
There is limited research documenting the outcomes of college admission policies that screen applicants with prior felony convictions. Without this data, there is no evidence to support that these policies make college campuses safer. Additionally, there is no information available on the effects of special admissions policies on the applicants or on academic performance of students with prior felony convictions. This mixed-method study examined the applications of 54 undergraduate applicants with prior felony convictions at a mid-sized, public institution in the Midwest to reveal demographic trends among the population, to reveal themes from written narratives, and to examine the academic performances of admitted students. The study revealed that none of the 37 enrolled students with felony convictions violated any student policies during their enrollment, indicating that individuals should not necessarily be perceived to pose a heightened level of risk just from having felony convictions. Analysis of written statements revealed that some applicants were distressed and some were ultimately deterred from the institution, indicating that the process may be stressful, marginalizing, stigmatizing, or discriminatory. Finally, descriptive statistics showed the enrolled students' average grade point averages and retention rates were low, indicating that students with prior felony convictions may need special academic and support services. The researcher recommended that the research institution discontinue general admissions policies that screen applicants with felony convictions and that all institutions assess their own special admissions policies.

Committee:

Jill Lindsey, PhD (Committee Chair); Yoko Miura, EdD (Committee Member); Enamul Choudhury, PhD (Committee Member); Charles Ryan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Criminology; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Law; Legal Studies

Keywords:

higher education; college students; felony convictions; admissions; student affairs; educational policy

Ouwerkerk, Lauren ElizabethEXPERIENCES OF THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION WITH POLITICS & POWER IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2016, Leadership Studies
The millennial generation is continuing to replace previous work generations within higher education. The way that the millennial generation navigates issues of politics and power is not easily understood by institutions. This qualitative study of millennial professionals investigates how they handle issues of power and politics, their experiences with top-down structure, how they work around issues of power and politics and how their identity plays a role. Individual interviews and a demographic questionnaire were used to obtain data in this study. Participants invited to participate were millennial professionals who had worked at the institution from 1-5 years. Eight participants were interviewed, with five identifying as women, two identifying as men and one identifying as genderqueer. All participants were currently employed at a mid- size four-year, public university in the Midwest in a student affairs position or similar field. Themes that emerged from the interviews included politics and power, experience related to French and Raven’s five bases of social power, labels and hierarchy, being intentional within the work, and identity. Limitations of the study, implications for higher education, suggestions for future research and recommendations for professionals working in higher education are also addressed.

Committee:

Joanne Risacher , Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Dan Abrahamowiz, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Glenn Graham, Ed.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Politics, Power, Millennial Generation, Student Affairs

Moore, LaDonna R.The Relationship Between Experiences with Microaggression and the Leadership Practices of Mid-Level Student Affairs Professionals
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
Microaggressions reflect the active manifestation of oppressive worldviews that create, maintain, and perpetuate marginalization (Sue, 2010a). Individuals from marginalized backgrounds “describe their work climate as hostile, invalidating, and insulting because of microaggressions that assail their race, gender, or sexual-orientation identities” (Sue, 2010a, p. 213). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between microaggression and the work experience of mid-level student affairs professionals within higher education, specifically those from marginalized populations that pertain to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, or disability. Participants completed a web-based survey that measured their interactions with microaggression and its relationship with their leadership practices. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses were performed to analyze the data for this study. The results of this study confirm what the extant literature, focused on the experience of higher education professionals, has demonstrated. Prior studies have found that administrators within higher education encounter microaggression (Alabi, 2014; Garvey & Drezner, 2013). Within this study, 78.3% of participants reported that they have experienced microaggression within the workplace. These individuals also revealed that the forms of microaggression they experience most frequently included microinvalidations, followed by microinsults. Although the populations were different in studies prior, the extant literature does reflect higher occurrences of microinvalidations and microinsults (Clark et al., 2014; Garvey & Drezner, 2013; Grier-Reed, 2010; Guzman et al., 2010; Harwood et al., 2012; Minikel-Lacocque, 2012; Poolokasingham et al., 2014; Yosso et al., 2009). The findings of this study offer compelling suggestions for the improvement of the student affairs profession.

Committee:

Dafina-Lazarus Stewart (Advisor); Judith Jackson May (Committee Member); Nicholas Bowman (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Microaggression; microinvalidations; microinsults; microassaults; Mid-level student affairs professionals; higher education administration; leadership practices; leadership; Kouzes and Posner; subtle discrimination; higher education

Studer, James D.Career patterns, job satisfaction, and perceptons of needed preparation of chief student personnel administrators /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1980, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Student affairs administrators;Job satisfaction

Cooper, ShaRonda M.From There to Here: The Experiences of Historically Black College and University Graduates in Pursuit of an Advanced Degree from a Predominately White Research University
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
As defined by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (2010) HBCUs are “colleges or universities that existed before 1964 that have a historic and contemporary mission of educating African-Americans” (p.8). These institutions have served a critical role in research, diversification of the professoriate (Allen & Jewell, 2002), educational opportunity, and more importantly the pipeline used by some African Americans to graduate school (Louis, Phillips, Louis, & Smith, 2015). Over the past three decades educational research centering on Black students and/or HBCUs have often centered on the undergraduate level with focus on issues such as retention and academics and less on the impact of student experiences and higher achieving academic pursuits. This study explores the experiences of Black HBCU graduates in pursuit of an advanced degree from a Predominately White Research University and examines how this sample of population makes meaning of those experiences.

Committee:

Peter Mather (Advisor)

Subjects:

African Americans; Higher Education

Keywords:

Higher Education; HBCUs; Student Affairs

Next Page