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Simpson, Tiwanna Michelle'She has her country marks very conspicuous in the face' : African culture and community in early Georgia /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

African Americans;Slaves;Slaves

Weissman-Galler, NancyScarlett's Sisters: The Privileged Negotiations of Plantation Women
BA, Oberlin College, 1995, History

This study examines the diaries, letters, and memoirs of twenty-six white plantation women in the American South during the antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction periods. I have utilized these materials to reconstruct the lifecycle of plantation women and to establish their perspectives on their lives. In particular, I have focused on their participation in the culturally encouraged progression from bellehood, a period of relative power and independence, to mistresshood. For these women the transition entailed a loss of freedom and the addition of numerous domestic and social duties. Despite these added responsibilities, these women embraced the role of plantation mistress. I have endeavored to explain why.

Within the historiography of nineteenth century southern women two opposing models exist for the lives of white plantation women. The first views these women as "the slave of slaves" l as Catherine Clinton believes, the second as "privileged members of a ruling class" as Elizabeth Fox-Genovese asserts. Clinton maintains that plantation women lived arduous lives, filled with demanding responsibilities of housework and slave management. Fox-Genovese describes these plantation women as resenting the burden of slave management and their husbands' affairs with slaves, but not as willing to relinquish the other privileges of their position.

Committee:

Gary Kornblith (Advisor)

Subjects:

African American Studies; American History; History

Keywords:

slaves;plantation;mistress;women;America;South;

Purtee, Edward O'ConnorThe Underground Railroad from southwestern Ohio to Lake Erie
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1932, History

Committee:

Wilbur Siebert (Advisor)

Keywords:

fugitive; slaves; anti-slavery; Abolitionists; Slavery; negroes; UNDERGROUND

Smith, Carolyn F.The Origin of African American Christianity in the English North American Colonies to the Rise of the Black Independent Church
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Education : Educational Studies

Christianity has played a major role in African American lives from Africa to the North American Colonies. African Americans have had an important presence in both the Old and New Testaments of the bible. From a black woman named Keturah who was Abraham's second wife, which had six children by him, to the Queen of Sheba that had a son by Solomon and others blacks in the bible. These were the beginnings of the rise of the Black Independent Church.

The independent black church became a refuge in times of trouble for the black race and a place of comfort for the despair. The church is a noble place that strove to meet the spiritual, educational and social needs of its people in times of trouble.

Committee:

Leo Krzywkowski, PhD (Committee Chair); Annette Hemmings, PhD (Committee Member); Vanessa Allen-Brown, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Religion; Religious Education; Religious History

Keywords:

slaves; Church; Methodist; Negro; African; Negro History; Journal Negro History

Paris, MelanieRepatriated Africans from Cuba and Brazil in nineteenth century Lagos
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1998, African-American and African Studies

During the late nineteenth century, primarily between the 1840s and 1860s, a significant repatriation movement to Africa took place among ex-slaves from the Latin American countries of Cuba and Brazil. Since most of these repatriates were of Yoruba descent, they chose to resettle in Yoruba-populated areas along the West African coast. Some of these Cuban and Brazilian repatriates resettled in Ouidah and Porto Novo in the present-day country of Republic of Benin. However, many of the returnees established themselves in West Africa’s largest port city of Lagos in what is now known as Nigeria.

It was also during the nineteenth century that British colonialists began to aggressively launch their quest for total domination and annexation of Yorubaland and the hinterland areas of “Nigeria”. In order to facilitate this agenda, the British used the Cuban and Brazilian repatriates as mediators between themselves and the local Yoruba population. Consequently, in order to secure the repatriates’ cooperation, the British elevated the Cuban and Brazilian returnees to an elite status in colonial Lagos.

This thesis examines the economic and social status of repatriated Africans from Cuba and Brazil in Lagos, and the social and economic conditions that served as an impetus for their drastic transition from slavery. More specifically, this study focuses on the relationship between the repatriates and British colonialists during the nineteenth century, and the elite position that the returnees assumed in the Lagos community as a result of this association.

Committee:

Abiola Irele (Advisor)

Keywords:

Agudas; Lagos; Yoruba; slaves; returnees; CUBA; CUBA AND BRAZIL

Payne, Clandis VImmersive Cultural Plunge: How Mental Health Trainees Can Exercise Cultural Competence With African American Descendants Of Chattel Slaves A Qualitative Study
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
Abstract This qualitative study utilized ethnographic techniques to explore the potential for change in mental health trainees resulting from the participation in an in vivo Immersive Cultural Plunge (ICP) within the African American Descendant of Chattel Slave community. The ICP combined Multicultural Immersions Experiences (MIE) of Cultural Immersion (CI) and Cultural Plunge (CP) to contribute to the developing body of research utilizing MIEs that incorporate contextual, experiential, and historical knowledge to teach the skill of cultural sensitivity. During the 12- hour ICP the participants experienced an orientation, a lecture, a tour/community interaction, a multimedia presentation within an African American community. In this study, the data collection included participants utilizing email on their personal computers to forward consent forms, five observational protocol forms, and a demographic questionnaire to the researcher. Data from the focus group session were transcribed and combined with emailed Observational Protocols for the thematic analysis. The findings for the study are from two themed areas. The first theme is the under utilization of psychotherapy services for African Americans. The second theme is the effectiveness of the Immersive Cultural Plunge as an MIE. The responses of the mental health trainees to the ICP demonstrated that the cultural competency of the students was altered. Recommendations include using ICP experience for curriculum development for mental health trainees in cultural competency specifically for African Americans and treatment development for the African American Descendant of Chattel Slave client. The electronic version of this dissertation is available free at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Ronald Pilato, PsyD (Committee Chair); Munoz-Flores Albert , PsyD (Committee Member); Jenkens Damien, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Black History; Clinical Psychology; Therapy

Keywords:

Qualitative; Therapy; African American Descendants of Chattel Slaves; African American Studies; Clinical psychology; Ethnography; Counseling Psychology; Curriculum development; Mental health; Multicultural Immersion; Minority and ethnic groups

Robinson, Jacquelyn Patricia PriceSociocultural Risk Factors of Non-Insulin Diabetes Mellitus Among Middle Class African Americans in Central Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Anthropology
Slavery, as an innovation in human cultural development, not only caused disequilibria in culture, ecology and biology, but also produced by-products that affect health and mortality and stimulated selection for metabolic adjustment to health and environmental imbalances. That the adjustment may have programmed slaves’ descendants to the present type II diabetes epidemic, forms the basis for this dissertation. Its purpose is to develop an etiology of diabetes that uses a global structural analysis of folklore, biohistory, and socio-political hegemony for interpreting anthropometry and sociocultural variables that may contribute to type II diabetes. Statistical analyses suggested: obesity and anthropometry predict plasma glucose; the influence of sociocultural risk factors on the dependent variable is minimal; and the relationship between total dietary cholesterol and post-load glucose is highly significant. The cholesterol/post-load glucose relationship has important implications. Global structural analysis provides confirmatory evidenct that “masters” manipulation of slaves’ diets by adding fats to increase energy for maximum labor output, has impacted the dietary habits and soul food cuisine of slaves’ descendants today as social inheritance. Analysis of data from the Central Ohio Study of Diabetes and Aging (COSDA) and global structure resulted in development of a diabetes profile, the Anabolic-Catabolic- Homeostasis Etiology of Diabetes Mellitus (ACHED). It focuses on energy metabolism and selection of “high-performance genotypes,” those adjusted to prolonged catabolism, under-cum-deficient nutrition, excesses in energy dissipation, morbidity, life stresses, and fat consumption. Analysis of environmental disequilibria experienced by slaves and their descendants show two periods of intergenerational food scarcity, one was prolonged and followed by another shorter and more severe. These periods occurred with excessive morbidity, life stresses, energy output and fat consumption as precursors to type II diabetes when obesity prone “high-performance genotypes” become physically inactive and overweight but can’t maintain metabolic homeostasis following food scarcity periods.

Committee:

Douglas Crews (Advisor)

Keywords:

metabolic homeostasis; food scarcity; malnutrition; thrifty-genotypes; type II diabetes; non-insulin dependent diabetes; slavery; African Americans; African slaves; Etiology of diabetes mellitus; soul food; slave food; obesity; global structure; environme

Turton, CecilThe underground railroad in Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1935, History

Committee:

Wilbur Siebert (Advisor)

Keywords:

slaves; negroes; IOWA; UNDERGROUND; Salem

Zernich, Nicole MPhysicians, Women, and Slaves: The Professionalization of Medicine in the Long Nineteenth Century
Master of Arts in History, Youngstown State University, 2014, Department of History
In nineteenth-century America, the professionalization of medicine elevated the status of doctors within American society, resulting in increased authority and public respect for the profession. This transition manifested through the publication of professional and popular medical literature published between 1840 and 1910. Although there have been examinations of the effects of professionalization on women and the enslaved, there is little research into the way that it manifested itself through the literature. Public perception of women and the enslaved was directly affected by biomedical research, as well as social and intellectual thought. Although these theories were debated and not entirely embraced by laypeople, the authority claimed by doctors as the only providers of true medical knowledge gave them legitimacy. These ideas became ideals within society and defined what it meant to be male or female, black or white. This thesis contends that the perception of women and the enslaved was negatively affected by the professionalization of medicine and was reflected through various publications, which were consumed by the public and professionals alike. One of the effects was to affirm cultural stereotypes of white women as weak and inferior to white men. The other was that male and female enslaved Africans were categorized scientifically as racially inferior to white men and white women. This increased the lifespan of proslavery arguments and created a legacy of prejudicial thought that carried over well into the twentieth century. While professionalization was beneficial to doctors, their newfound authority allowed them to legitimize the subordination of women and the enslaved.

Committee:

Diane Barnes, PhD (Advisor); Daniel Ayana, PhD (Committee Member); Martha Pallante, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Gender; History; Medicine

Keywords:

Nineteenth century; America; Medicine; Physicians; Slaves; Women

Page, Brian DanielLocal Matters: Race, Place, and Community Politics After the Civil War
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, History

This study examines how a seemingly disparate population of rural migrants was able to incorporate itself into the political process and elevate community concerns to the center of political discourse after the Civil War. Too often scholars pay little attention to the local concerns and historical processes that determined not only how former slaves conducted themselves in the political arena, but also how their goals and aspirations changed over time. Surrounded by majority slaveholding counties in the Mid-South, Memphis provides an opportunity to study the grassroots political mobilization of former slaves. Beginning with an examination of the wartime migrations of enslaved men and women in the Mississippi River Valley to Memphis, Tennessee, this study identifies the cooperative strategies black migrants utilized to express their freedom, forge new bonds of fellowship, and establish a sense of community in their new surroundings. In order to understand how the concerns of former slaves became a matter of public interest, I trace the movements and daily interactions of members of social networks within black neighborhoods to demonstrate how socialization and civic life influenced the contours of popular politics. While black political leaders focused on civil rights and the transformation of the social order, former slaves used politics to experience freedom and express their desire for self-determination in ways that demonstrated their level of attachment to their community.

By focusing upon these social and spatially based networks, this study seeks to broaden our historical understanding of the connection between civic life and political participation in an urban setting. An examination of former slaves’ cooperative associations reveals a variety of personal connections that transcended material conditions and long-term or migrant status. African American residential activities, leisure interests, and personal familiarity established a feeling of connectedness in their neighborhoods that became the basis for the development of political strategies. These social attributes, therefore, become a way to reconsider the shifting political alliances that characterized post-Civil War southern politics. African Americans were willing to forge alliances with ethnic minorities and ex-Confederates that reflected their sense of belonging in their respective communities and elevated local concerns to the center of public debate. In the end, my study challenges historians to consider looking beyond questions of race, class, and gender to explain black southerners’ participation in the public sphere. African Americans responded to multiple issues that allowed them to carve out a middle ground. In Memphis, African Americans relied upon neighborhood associations to foster a consultative model of local self-governance designed to not only elect their own representatives to local office, but also to articulate their desire for self-determination by ensuring their right to secure their material well-being, protect friends and families from violence, and educate children in their own neighborhoods. An examination of neighborhood life, the central role of black sodalities in popular politics, and electoral behavior, therefore, demonstrates former slaves’ willingness to eschew long-term political objectives for short-term goals to protect the social integrity of their new communities.

Committee:

Stephanie J. Shaw, PhD (Advisor); Kenneth W. Goings, PhD (Advisor); Stephen G. Hall, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; American History; Black History; History; Minority and Ethnic Groups

Keywords:

African Americans; Emancipation; Memphis; Slaves; Freed People; Migrations; Place; Neighborhood; Community; Politics; Race; Class; Gender; Civil War; Reconstruction;Self-help;