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Scardino, Anthony JServant Leadership in Higher Education: The Influence of Servant-Led Faculty on Student Engagement
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
Franciscan education has a long tradition of educating the whole student—educating to make better citizens. The focus of this research was to examine the success of that tradition, namely, whether a positive correlation exists between servant leadership of faculty members and higher levels of engagement with their students. Full-time professors at three Franciscan institutions of higher education completed the Servant Leadership Questionnaire (SLQ), which measures participants’ level of servant leadership, and the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE), which measures the engagement of the students with faculty. The results of the SLQ and FSSE were organized to answer two research questions: (1) To what extent do faculty in these institutions exhibit the qualities of servant leadership? (2) Among full-time professors teaching at Franciscan institutions of higher education, what is the relationship between servant leadership and deep approaches to learning? This study captured the effects of self-identified faculty “servant ” leaders and their potential to encourage deeper approaches to learning for students, with the hope of creating an environment more squarely within the Franciscan tradition of this learning community. The study’s results indicated a link between servant leadership and deep approaches to learning with a strong correlation to emotional healing. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Dan Wheeler, PhD (Committee Member); Al Guskin, PhD (Committee Member); Patricia Hutchinson (Other)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Religious Education

Keywords:

higher education; college faculty; servant leadership; Franciscan colleges and universities; Servant Leadership Questionnaire; Faculty Survey of Student Engagement; FSSE; SLQ; emotional healing; engagement

Graham, Daria-Yvonne J.Intersectional Leadership: A Critical Narrative Analysis of Servant Leadership by Black Women in Student Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2018, Educational Leadership
Little research exists that centers the experiences of African American women student affairs administrators in higher education. The challenges and barriers that exist for African American women student affairs administrators are complex and directly connected to the history of slavery, race and racism in the United States. Concepts such as mentorship, success, and leadership are situated in normative practices informed by White narratives and privileged vantage points. The aim of this qualitative study is to illuminate how the experiences of African American women student affairs administrators at predominantly White institutions support or contradict leadership models often used as frameworks for development and strategy. The research questions are as follows: What are the experiences of African American women student affairs administrators at predominantly White institutions in higher education as they relate to race and gender? How do participants describe reflecting on, considering, or implementing leadership models in their work as student affairs administrators? And how do the experiences of African American women within student affairs at predominantly White institutions reflect or problematize the Servant Leadership model? The research questions were answered using critical narrative to provide voice to a marginalized population. My dissertation challenges colleges and Universities to consider the impact of using White narratives to standardize behaviors and strategies across all social identities. The findings also urges universities to address environments that continue the oppression and exploitation of Black women student affairs administrators in higher education.

Committee:

Molly Schaller (Committee Chair); Leslie Picca (Committee Member); Mary Ziskin (Committee Member); Michele Welkener (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; African History; African Studies; American History; Black History; Black Studies; Education; Education History; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Epistemology; Ethnic Studies; Gender; Gender Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

critical race theory; Black Feminist Thought; student affairs; Black women; administrators; leadership; Servant Leadership Theory; servant leadership; decenter; standpoint; standpoint theory; leadership development; intersectionality; race; social justice

McClellan, Patrice AkilahWEARING THE MANTLE: SPIRITED BLACK MALE SERVANT LEADERS REFLECT ON THEIR LEADERSHIP JOURNEY
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this dissertation was to explore, understand, and profile the leadership experiences of Black male leaders residing in Northwest Ohio. The guiding question was “In what way do the racialized and spiritual experiences of Black men influence their leadership?” This study was an exploration of how these men navigated through personal and professional obstacles by relying heavily on spiritual relationships with others and/or a higher power as they lead through service. Portraiture was the biographical method utilized in this study. Portraiture is a qualitative method that blends art, science, and social critique with intent of storying as well as learning from the lives of the Black men in this study. Leadership is the influential relationship among leaders and followers directed through the communication process toward the attainment of goals by influencing through vision, values, and relationships. In this study, these men illustrate their leadership by employing spirituality, servant hood, and their identity as Black men. I presented in depth portraits that expand and illustrate elements of the conceptual framework. This study contributes to the understanding of leadership experiences from a Black male perspective. The overarching themes in this study were: (a) spirituality, (b) servant leadership, and (c) Black identity. The data illustrate these themes in addition to a reconfiguration and combination of the themes that produce what I have coined critical servant leadership. As critical servant leaders, these men merge spirituality, servant leadership, and Black identity into a visionary, empowering, prophetic soul force in an effort to lead and benefit those in their communities whose voice is muted. Lastly, this dissertation provides a framework and serves as a catalyst for future studies on leadership.

Committee:

Judy Alston (Advisor)

Keywords:

Servant Leadership; Spirituality; Black Identity; Critical Servant Leadership; Race; Critical Race Theory; Portraiture; Leadership

Bunch, ClarenceServant Leadership and African American Pastors
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
Robert Greenleaf (1977) took a follower’s, rather than a leader-centric, point of view of leadership by describing a leader as one who leads by serving. He identified a leader as one who sets other people’s needs above his or her own. He argued that motivation of leaders must begin with the conscious choice to serve others. Greenleaf’s concept provides the basis for a theoretical model of servant leadership. This dissertation examines the extent to which African American pastors exhibit servant leadership characteristics, using the Servant Leadership Questionnaire (Barbuto & Wheeler, 2006). A sample of 358 African American pastors from 11 denominations across the United States was included in this study. This study uses a non-experimental quantitative approach to examine the behaviors and attitudes of African American pastors through Barbuto and Wheeler’s (2006) Servant Leadership Questionnaire, which has five factors (altruistic calling, emotional healing, organizational stewardship, persuasive mapping, and wisdom). The results of this study showed that African American pastors sometimes see themselves as servant leaders: that is, they fall into the middle range of the scale. Among various demographic variables, including age, gender, denomination, and years in service, a statistically significant difference in SLQ score was found only in size of church. Contrary to the study’s initial expectations, African American pastors reported highest subscale scores on persuasive mapping and not altruistic calling. This finding invites further qualitative research. The electronic version of this dissertation is available through the OhioLink ETD Center at http://ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laura Morgan Roberts, PhD (Committee Member); Richard Couto, PhD (Committee Member); Drew Smith, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Clergy; Organizational Behavior; Religion; Religious Education; Theology

Keywords:

servant leadership; African Americans; pastors; Servant Leadership Questionnaire; SLQ; quantitative; pastoral leadership; religion; Christianity; Black ministers; servant leader

Tufts, Winfield F.High People-High Mission: The Power of Caring Leadership as Experienced in the Air Force
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
On the surface, caring and the military appear to be opposites. The stereotypical image of the military giving and obeying orders does not conjure up images of leaders caring for their subordinates. In reality, caring for subordinates and caring for the mission could help leaders form stronger relationships with subordinates, because subordinates may have confidence that their leaders will not recklessly send them into harm’s way. Subordinates may develop confidence in their leaders based on their leaders’ care during non-combat environments. Yet, empirical studies of caring in the military are sparse. This study investigates how Air Force retirees characterize “great bosses” care for them and care for the mission. A mixed method study of 12 qualitative interviews with Air Force retirees, followed by a quantitative survey study of 226 Air Force retirees revealed that caring actions cluster into four themes: Caring for Subordinates Personally, Caring for Subordinates Professionally, Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Mission Execution, and Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Empowering the Unit. This study also examined how these subordinates responded to those bosses that cared for them through Stronger Job Performance and Stronger Relationship with the Boss. The dissertation findings operationalize caring, demonstrate correlations between caring actions and self-reported increases in performance and boss-subordinate relationship quality, and detail actions that an authentic, caring leader can take to pursue the flourishing of subordinates and mission success simultaneously. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Laura Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Davis, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Military Studies

Keywords:

Air Force; bosses; mixed methods; leadership; care; caring; caring leadership; military culture; military leadership; servant leadership; virtuous leadership

Smith, Carnel LorenzoLASTING LEGACIES: THE EFFECTS OF NATURAL MENTORS IN THE LIVES OF AT-RISK AFRICAN-AMERICAN MALE ADOLESCENTS
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand how natural mentoring helps at-risk African-American male adolescents avoid high-risk behaviors. Natural mentors are people with whom mentees have natural relationships outside of their immediate family, such as community members, teachers, ministers, extended family members and coaches. The participants were two current and two former at-risk African-American male adolescents who were either currently living in, or formerly lived in, high-risk environments. Participants had experience with a natural mentor-mentee relationship and were interested in talking about their experience. The present study’s mentoring relationships consisted of three male-to-male relationships and one male-to-female relationship. Several characteristics of natural mentoring impacted the mentees in this study. Mentees related examples of mentors’ caring behavior, understanding, comfortable conversations, unconditional support, and commitment to the relationship. When natural mentors display these characteristics in relationships with at-risk African-American male adolescents, the mentees voluntarily assist in changing their attitudes and behaviors and enhance their chances of living more meaningful and productive lives. Concept of a Natural Mentor and Effects of Natural Mentoring relationships were the two themes that emerged from the interviews of participants. The Concept of a Natural Mentor revealed that natural mentors are people who naturally assist in others’ times of need. The concept of being a natural mentor is wrapped up in commitment and selflessness. Natural mentors’ commitment focuses on their relationships with at-risk African-American male adolescents, their willingness to allow mentees to make mistakes without judging them, and the flexibility given to mentees to make their own decisions. The second theme to emerge was the Effects of Natural Mentoring relationships. Natural mentoring relationships allow mentees to adapt concepts and ideals that allow them to successfully mature into productive adults. Natural mentoring builds resiliency in mentees and helps them avoid at-risk behavior and overcome the fear of failure. Mentees who are successful have natural mentors in their lives that help them with emotional support and encourage them to learn adult behaviors and responsibilities while developing social skills. Among the leadership lessons taught and learned were servant-leadership, character building, meaning making, and the transferability of natural mentoring to formal mentoring relationships. More research is encouraged on the nature of caring relationships and the ethic of care among men, the continuity of natural mentoring relationships across generations, and resiliency and the fear of failure among at-risk adolescents.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor)

Keywords:

Natural mentoring; Mentoring; Caring; Ethic of care; Men and caring; At risk; African American; Adolescence; Servant leadership; Character building; Meaning making; Phenomenology; Resiliency; Fear of failure; Leadership

McCarthy, Austin ThomasServant Leadership from a Christian Context
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Ohio University, 2014, Business Administration
An examination of Servant Leadership theory through the lens of St. Paul of Tarsus and the Pastoral Epistles. This paper explores those books and seeks to catalog the characteristics of leadership identified therein based on the assumption that the leadership style which Paul describes aligns with servant leadership. Additionally, the paper offers an explanation for what might motivate a leader to be a servant.

Committee:

Lenie Holbrook (Advisor)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Business Administration; Ethics; Management

Keywords:

Servant; Leadership; Service; Christianity; Christian; Saint Paul;

Didlick-Davis, Celeste Renee'The LEGACY Project: A Case Study of Civic Capacity Building and Transformative Educational Leadership in a Community-based Academic Enrichment Program
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2016, Educational Leadership
This study examines how a grassroots educational enrichment program in a small urban economically depressed area builds and uses civic capacity. Using qualitative data collected through a case study of the Legacy Academic Enrichment program in Middletown, Ohio, I identify factors that make Legacy sustainable and successful in a community that has experienced significant educational challenges and decline in recent years. The findings of this research include six (6) major components: culturally responsive teaching; community mobilization; building trust and agency; gauging community need; leveraging community resources; and participatory planning. I also explore these six (6) program components that inspire and sustain leaders of the program given the state of education in the community. The research question that guides this analysis is: How does Legacy, a community-based academic enrichment program, build and use civic capacity?

Committee:

Lisa Weems (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Cultural Anthropology; Cultural Resources Management; Curriculum Development; Educational Leadership; Ethnic Studies; Families and Family Life; Literacy; Multicultural Education; Social Structure; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

community education, complementary education, academic enrichment, civic capacity building, organic programming, transformational leadership, servant leadership, critical spirituality, culturally responsible teaching,

Light, MarkFinding George Bailey: Wonderful leaders, wonderful lives
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2007, Leadership and Change
He is underpaid and overworked, his organization lives from payroll to payroll with an overtaxed and underpowered staff and a contentious board of directors. He sacrifices for the mission, but is frustrated about forgone personal dreams. He is George Bailey, the central character in Frank Capra's film It's a Wonderful Life and he practices Leadership for Good by being a mission centered, visionary, results driven, and adaptive difference maker. Through a construct-building non-generalizable mixed methods study with two concurrent, but independent phases—instrumental case study and Delphi—this study searched for real-life Baileys, to test whether or not Leadership for Good extends beyond the silver screen, to see whether or not life imitates art. The results supported all five propositions, although certain elements within the propositions were refuted and new elements substantiated. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding of the Leadership for Good construct, enriching the literature about nonprofit leadership, and reinforcing the usefulness of mixed methods research including Delphi technique, the study suggested that there were two primary types of leaders—those with a bias for growth and those with a bias for execution—who delivered equally superior financial results to the bottom line. As part of this finding, it appeared that these leaders practiced situational leadership in the here-and-now, but used contingency leadership over the long run to gravitate to preferred contexts—growth or execution—that corresponded roughly to periods of evolution and revolution. Other implications of the study were the reinforcement of the centrality of mission at the personal and organization levels, a more comprehensive understanding about what causes stress for those who practice Leadership for Good, and the ways in which leaders think about change. The electronic version of the dissertation is accessible at the OhioLINK ETD center http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/.

Committee:

Jon Wergin (Advisor)

Keywords:

leadership; change; purposeful; servant leadership; self-sacrifice; trustworthy; vision; visionary; results driven; decisive; determined; dependable; adaptive; alert; aligned; allied; empowerment; nonprofit

Moon, Joan LucilleEffect of a Computer-based Multimedia Educational Module on Knowledge of the Menstrual Cycle
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Leadership Studies
The menstrual cycle is an intricate web of hormonal interactions within the female anatomy impacting a woman’s fertility, health, and sense of wellbeing and is considered the “fifth vital sign” (Halpin, 2006). Although an understanding of the menstrual cycle is fundamental to a woman’s awareness of her reproductive health, many seek healthcare without this basic knowledge. A woman needs to understand her cycle, be aware if it is not following the normal course and seek an opportunity to discuss her menstrual experience with her care provider. However, time constraints exist in the provision of patient education in our current healthcare delivery system. A review of the literature revealed that computer-based education has been shown to have advantages in the delivery of information. However, no studies were found regarding the use of computer-based education for teaching the menstrual cycle. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a computer-based, multimedia, educational module on the level of knowledge of the menstrual cycle when compared to a written information module and a PowerPoint module. It was intended to test a patient education tool on the menstrual cycle that would engage women in healthcare decision-making. The study was framed within Starratt’s 1991 model of the ethics of critique, justice, and care. Seventy-two college-aged, undergraduate students at a Midwestern university participated in the study which involved a pretest, an intervention, and a posttest experience. The students were randomly assigned to a computer-based multimedia educational module (C-bmem), a written information module (IM), or a PowerPoint (PP) module intervention groups. The interventions were similar in content and varied only in the manner of presentation with the C-bmem including animation and narration. The hypotheses were: (1) There will be significant group differences in change in knowledge about the menstrual cycle in women who participate in the C-bmem relative to the IM and PP; and (2) There will be a significant difference in the knowledge gained on the menstrual cycle between pretest and posttest for women in each treatment group. The pretest results showed that knowledge of the menstrual cycle among the sample of women was minimal with the mean being less than 50%. Results showed there were no significant differences for hypothesis 1. However, there was statistical significance for hypothesis 2 in knowledge gained by all women in the treatment groups. Sixty-six of 70 respondents stated they would “most definitely” or “probably” use the information learned in the future. The value women placed on the experience and the fact that there was significant improvement in knowledge, coupled with the documented need for informed patients, supports the importance of providing women with education on the menstrual cycle. By teaching women about the menstrual cycle at their point of contact, i.e. the care provider’s office, women would be able to build on their existing knowledge thus facilitating informed decision-making.

Committee:

Judith May (Advisor)

Keywords:

menstrual cycle; computer-based education; multimedia education; women's health; ethic of critique; ethic of care; ethic of justice; servant-leadership; fifth vital sign; healthcare decision-making; leadership; patient education; reproductive healthcare

Womack, Sandy DSanctions: Exploring the perceptions of urban school principals on No Child Left Behind (NCLB) after successfully turning around low-performing schools
Doctor of Education, Ashland University, 2017, College of Education
This qualitative case study explored the experiences of two principals at two urban school districts in Ohio during the No Child Left Behind era. Each principal was affected by NCLB sanctions yet successfully turned around a low-performing school. Critical Race Theory and Social Learning Theory were used as the conceptual frameworks. The case study involved six semi-structured interviews, as well as the use of survey questionnaires along with the collection of archival data. The intent of this study was to (1) investigate the impact of school sanctions on communities from the perspective of practitioners in urban settings who successfully transformed schools in the era of school accountability and (2) investigate the financial implications of NCLB sanctions on public schools

Committee:

Judy Alston, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Rosaire Ifedi, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Tanzeah Sharpe, Ed.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Finance; Educational Leadership; School Administration

Keywords:

No Child Left Behind sanctions; servant leadership; successful school turnaround; segregated schools; principal leadership; espoused values; enacted values; sanctions financial impact on urban schools; school community partnerships; testing

Jang, JichulA Multi-Level Examination of Factors Predicting Employee Engagement and its Impact on Customer Outcomes in the Restaurant Industry
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Human Ecology: Hospitality Management
With increasingly fierce competition in the hospitality industry, employee engagement is becoming a topic of considerable interest among researchers and practitioners. The primary reason for this growing interest in employee engagement is that engaged employees are now considered one of the key factors that contribute to building a competitive advantage for organizations. However, the challenge of engaging employees is mounting. For instance, Crabtree (2005) showed that nearly 15% of U.S. employees were disengaged in their work, costing employers $300 billion a year in lost productivity. Therefore, understanding the drivers that may foster increased levels of employee engagement is crucial to service organizations if they are to sustain a competitive advantage and reduce costs related to employee disengagement. To date, however, empirical research examining the role of employee engagement as an effective strategy in the hospitality industry has been limited. In order to fill this research gap, this study developed and tested a conceptual model examining the antecedents and consequences of employee engagement in the restaurant setting. More specifically, the study identified the employee perception of servant leadership, personal-organization (P-O) value congruence and employee self-efficacy as the antecedents of employee engagement. In particular, this study used employee self-efficacy as a potential mediator in the relationship between the employee perception of servant leadership and employee engagement. This study also examined the impact of employee engagement on service-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) as the consequence of employee engagement. Furthermore, this study explored the relationship between store-level service-oriented OCBs and store-level customer outcomes such as customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. In order to test the hypothesized model, data were drawn from 245 non-managerial employees and 1,374 customers in nine restaurants in the United States. The results indicated that both the employee perception of servant leadership and P-O value congruence were positively related to employee engagement. This study further found that employee self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between the employee perception of servant leadership and employee engagement. The results also demonstrated that employee engagement was positively related to service-oriented OCBs at the individual level. Store-level service oriented OCBs were positively associated with store-level customer outcomes such as customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.

Committee:

Jay Kandampully, Dr (Advisor); Margaret Binkley, Dr (Committee Member); Robert Scharff, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Employee Engagement; Servant Leadership; Service-Oriented OCBs; Customer Satisfaction; Restaurant Industry

Litten, Joyce A. PuracchioA Quantitative and Qualitative Inquiry into the Call to Serve Among Non-Traditional Undergraduate Social Work Students
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Leadership Studies

The purposes of this study were to explore the narratives of nontraditional social work students who were identified as servant leaders, and to investigate the students' perception of his or her call to service and the meaning of leadership within their developmental and prior lived experiences. This exploration study examined the phenomena of baccalaureate social work education as a choice for nontraditional students. Three research questions guided this investigation: (a) What is the relevance of self-resiliency and self-efficacy to these individuals and to their self-identification as social work leaders? (b) What can these stories tell us about how we can better structure social work education and curricula for students who are nontraditional? (c) What instructional methods and advising strategies should social work education consider in order to better support and nurture leadership in this group?

Quantitative and qualitative methodologies supported the study of these questions. A survey was administered to 33 nontraditional social work students who were enrolled in an introductory social work class. Six key informants were identified through the survey and interviews were conducted with these informants that identified themes that emerged from the survey and through the conceptual framework of the research proposal. A semi-structured interview with standardized questions was completed with each key informant, and of the key informants also participated in a cognitive mapping exercise in order to elicit more detailed data.

The findings suggested that: (a) key informants validated the concepts of the research framework, (b) key informants identified the concept of resiliency as most significant and relevant in their call to serve through social work, and,(c) key informants provided additional concepts with meaningful connections to their decision to seek professional social work education. The research raised questions to be further explored with nontraditional students can provide additional guidance to baccalaureate social work program directors, support recruitment and retention strategies in social work higher education, and inform standards and policies of the accrediting body of professional social work education.

Committee:

Judith A. Zimmerman (Committee Co-Chair); Judy Jackson May (Committee Co-Chair); Mark A. Earley (Committee Member); Gerald Strom (Committee Member); Sr. Ann Francis Klimkowski, OFS (Committee Member); Ruben Viramontez Anguiano (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Higher Education; Social Work

Keywords:

social work; non-traditional students; servant leadership; mixed-methods

Caudill, Leann EDoes Type of Leader Matter in Moral and Risky Decision Making? An Investigation of Transformational and Servant Leadership
Master of Arts (M.A.), Xavier University, 2012, Psychology
Several types of leadership have been identified in the leadership literature. Two types considered to be effective in organizations are transformational leadership and servant leadership. The main purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of type of leadership (transformational vs. servant) on perceptions of followers' decision making in moral and risky situations. Results showed that followers were perceived to make moral decisions, regardless of type of leader. Results also showed that, overall, type of leader affected perceptions of followers' risky decision making, such that followers of transformational leaders made more risky decisions than followers of servant leaders. This study expanded the leadership literature by focusing on contextual testing within leadership and showing that not all popular leadership types may be effective in all situations. Findings of this study also further clarified the similarities and differences between transformational and servant leadership. Overall, findings suggested that both types of leaders seem to be effective in moral situations, but that transformational leaders seem to be more effective in risky situations.

Committee:

Dalia L. Diab, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Morell E. Mullins, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mark S. Nagy, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Psychology

Keywords:

transformational leadership; servant leadership; decision making - moral and ethical aspects; risk-taking

Ogletree, Ann LavedaServant Leadership: The Urban Principal’s Role in Facilitating Inclusion
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Education : Urban Educational Leadership

This study intends to examine the specific relationships between general education and special education teachers and the role of the principal in facilitating their shared success relative to inclusion of students with special needs in the general education classroom and curriculum. The information gathered may help inform the practice of principals leading teams in the process of creating inclusive settings. Providing support to collaborating teachers improves the services delivered to students. Discovering patterns and behaviors that sustain successful teams may aid in the overall achievement of schools.

The application of servant leadership principles assists principals in facilitating inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. These ten themes discovered across sites indicate that commonalities exist: shared philosophy; concerns about teacher/pupil ratio; time; planning; communication; professional development; flexibility; principal’s visibility; team stability; and high expectations for student achievement. All participants shared the daily focus of meeting the needs of students.

Principals who support inclusion: are visible during the school day; provide stability in team membership; are flexible in organizing schedules; provide professional development that teachers find applicable to their daily work; and join teachers with similar philosophical beliefs when organizing inclusion teams. The most important finding is that all principals examined held high expectations for student achievement and expected teachers to provide students with instruction reflecting those elevated expectations.

Implications for practice are that principals who wish to support teachers working collaboratively in inclusive settings should nurture a school culture that supports teachers meeting the needs of all students. Implications for principal and teacher preparation programs and staff development planners are addressed. Implications for research indicate that the ten themes identified should be more deeply examined, prioritized, and used to increase the body of educational leadership knowledge. Other implications for research involve investigating the relationship between school culture and the success of inclusion in schools.

Committee:

Nancy A. Evers, PhD (Committee Chair); Ted A. Zigler, EdD (Advisor); James W. Koschoreck, PhD (Committee Member); Roger L. Collins, PhD (Committee Member); Glenda Myree-Brown, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Education; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; Organizational Behavior; School Administration; Special Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

educational leadership; inclusion; collaboration; principal; special education; servant leadership; student achievement; school culture

Annor, GraceExploration of the Organizational Culture of Selected Ghanaian High Schools
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
The purpose of this study was to explore the organizational culture of two high schools in Ghana, examine the unique influence of cultural components on the schools’ outcomes, identify the exceptional contributions of the schools’ subcultures, investigate the emergent leadership styles of the schools’ leaders, and determine how these approaches promoted their work. This qualitative dissertation examined the various ways that the schools defined culture; how the schools’ subcultures participated in school governance; and how school leaders approached school governance. The description of the cultural components focused on the physical structures, symbols, behavior patterns, and verbal expressions, beliefs and values; and expectations. These descriptions were based on Edgar Schein’s diagnosis of the levels of culture. Efforts to improve school outcomes have not considered school culture, as a strategy in Ghana, neither has any educational research focused on the organizational culture of schools. This study was based on the premise that the inclusion of the cultural approach to school reform produces more sustainable results than the technical or political approaches, used in isolation. The sample size for this study was 26 and comprised two school leaders, six teachers, two PTA chairpersons, two alumni, and 14 students. The study employed the case study tradition and garnered data through one-on- one interviews, focus group interviews; observation at morning devotions/assembly, Sunday church services, classrooms, dining halls, orientation, sports festival, staff and academic board meetings, and the physical environment; and review of relevant documents. Results indicated that although the Ghana Education Service managed both schools, and the schools were similar in some ways, they each demonstrated some unique characteristics. The major factors that influenced the achievement of school outcomes included the tangible and intangible cultural components; the involvement of subcultures in school governance; and three emergent leadership styles (participative, servant, and supportive) of school leadership. The schools targeted realization of outcomes through West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) results, national quizzes, religious and moral growth, and extracurricular activities such as sports and clubs. This data fills the gap in literature about organizational culture in Ghanaian schools. It also provides reference for educational practitioners, policy makers, school administrators, and teachers for their respective roles. The data guides parents concerning their roles in their children’s schools and also provides guidance for alumni about how they could give back to their alma maters.

Committee:

David Moore (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Organization Theory; School Administration; Secondary Education; Sub Saharan Africa Studies

Keywords:

School organizational culture; tangible culture; intangible culture; visual culture; behavior culture; verbal culture; stakeholders; subcultures; parents; alumni; emergent leadership; participative leadership; supportive leadership; servant leadership