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Braga, BrunoOn the Borel complexity of some classes of Banach spaces
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Mathematical Science
In this dissertation I mainly study several classes of Banach spaces and I try to compute, of at least to obtain a lower/upper bound, to its Borel complexity. Also, using those results, we show some non-universality results for some of those classes of Banach spaces.

Committee:

Joe Diestel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Mathematics

Keywords:

Effros-Borel structure, Banach spaces, Banach-Saks property, Radon-Nikodym property, complete continuous property, weak compact operators, unconditional converging operators, local structure

SANOGO, RAMATATHE EFFECTS OF INSECURE PROPERTY RIGHTS ON INVESTMENT AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICAN COUNTRIES
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2003, Arts and Sciences : Economics
Sub-Saharan Africa has been perceived as a very high-risk place for investment for diverse reasons, including incredible rules, systemic corruption, political instability and social unrest, lack of formal mechanism of contract enforcement and insecure property rights. Because of this perception, investors are reluctant to commit capital. Our case- studies in Mali and Burkina Faso, suggest that these beliefs are well - founded; the lack of contract discipline is real. Firms and businessmen prefer to rely on mechanisms of commercial enforcement based on personal recommendations, repeated interactions as they lack confidence in the legal system and the effectiveness of the judiciary. In the empirical cross- country analysis section, we attempt to build some link between this lack of formal mechanism of contract enforcement (or secure property rights) and investment and economic growth. The empirical section investigates the general proposition that insecure property rights lower growth by limiting capital accumulation. Variables that capture political violence and secure property right are introduced in the framework popularized by Barro and Sala-I-Martin for cross-country growth analysis to shed light on these relationships. Evidence from 48 Sub-Saharan African countries does not bring any support to our first claim that insecure property rights deter investment. However, the cross-country growth analysis shows a significant negative relationship between Gastil index and growth. In this study, Gastil index measures political freedom and civil liberties in a given country. The higher this index, the lower political freedom and civil liberties for the country. This negative relationship between Gastil index and growth confirms our hypothesis that insecure property rights reduce growth.

Committee:

Dr. Mayer Wolfgang (Advisor)

Subjects:

Economics, General

Keywords:

property rights; investment and growth; Sub-Saharan African countries; economics; insecure property rights; economic growth

Epstein, Katherine CranstonInventing the Military-Industrial Complex: Torpedo Development, Property Rights, and Naval Warfare in the United States and Great Britain before World War I
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, History

The warfare state is much older than the welfare state. For centuries, the relationship between militaries and the private manufacturing sector has been the most important point of interaction between the state and society. The naval-manufacturing relationship has even deeper historical roots: since warfare at sea has traditionally required much more sophisticated technology than warfare on land, nations have had to invest more money in navies in peacetime.

In the late nineteenth century, two developments transformed the naval-manufacturing relationship. First, the intense naval competition preceding World War I increased the pace of technological change and the need for peacetime investment in naval technology. Second, the Second Industrial Revolution transformed the manufacturing sector into the industrial sector, and it accordingly altered the nature of military and naval technology. Torpedoes were in the vanguard of both developments.

They played a significant role in the arms race before World War I because they threatened to revolutionize naval tactics and strategy. Navies realized that the tactical system built around capital ships primarily armed with big guns might give way to one built around smaller vessels primarily armed with torpedoes. At the strategic level, the ability of smaller vessels carrying torpedoes to sink larger ones made battle and blockade very risky. Given the potential of torpedoes to alter the metrics and application of naval power, navies worked feverishly to develop them before World War I.

The sophistication of torpedo technology, however, complicated the task of turning potential into reality. Powered by fossil fuels and made with hundreds of small, steel, inter-changeable parts, torpedoes symbolized the Second Industrial Revolution at sea. Sending a torpedo prototype into mass production without adequately testing it beforehand would produce nightmares of assembly and operation. A robust research and development infrastructure was therefore vital.

Torpedo development in the United States and Great Britain showed the two sides of the research-and-development coin. Despite the common depiction of a declining Britain and a rising United States in this period, Britain actually had a decided edge over the United States in naval-industrial research and development resources. This edge enabled it to perfect existing torpedo technology and test new technology, while the United States had to take technological gambles. It was research and development resources, not Yankee can-do spirit or John Bull conservatism, that accounted for the nature of technological change.

Although the two nations met with differing degrees of success, the effort to create an adequate research-and-development infrastructure profoundly changed the relationship between state and society in both the United States and Britain. Lacking the resources to develop adequate technology alone, the public and private sectors were forced to work together—but their collaboration raised fundamental and complex questions about the nature of property in relation to invention, and it imperiled the liberal political philosophy on which both nations were putatively founded.

Between their interaction with industrialization and the new relationship between the government and the private sector, torpedoes may be said to have helped put the “industrial” and the “complex” in the military-industrial complex. Their story therefore belongs in larger narratives about the nature of technological change, industrialization, modern warfare, and national development.

Committee:

Geoffrey Parker, PhD (Advisor); John Guilmartin, PhD (Committee Member); Jennifer Siegel, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

torpedo; property rights; invention; naval; history; patents; intellectual property; military-industrial complex

Mihaescu, Oana-PusaBrownfield Sites and Their Negative Impact on Residential Property Values: A Spatial Hedonic Regression Approach
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Regional Development Planning
The main objective of this research is to estimate the impact of brownfields on the surrounding property values by using a Maximum Likelihood-based hedonic price model that takes into account the phenomenon of spatial dependence among real estate property values and thus yields coefficient estimates that are unbiased and consistent. The study aims to also contribute additional relevant information to the urban and regional planning literature by determining the magnitude of the total impact traditional hedonic variables, and in particular brownfield sites, have on the value of single-family residential properties. The total impact represents the cumulated effect determined by each explanatory variable and by the spatial dependence phenomenon. The results of the Maximum Likelihood estimation procedure indicate that the negative externalities on property values determined by the presence of brownfield sites in their neighborhood are limited to the first 1,000 feet around brownfields. Based on these findings, the loss in property value for each of the properties included in the analyzed sample and the corresponding tax revenue loss for the city are calculated. Although the magnitude of the loss in property values alone may not justify the need for public support for brownfield redevelopment, it opens a new array of directions for future research, such as, to name just a couple, the need to compare the potential monetary gains from brownfield redevelopment with the actual costs of redevelopment or the need to look beyond single-family residential properties in calculating the total impact of brownfields on the surrounding property values.

Committee:

Rainer vom Hofe, PhD (Committee Chair); Christopher Auffrey, PhD (Committee Member); Xinhao Wang, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Urban Planning

Keywords:

brownfield sites;residential property values;spatial hedonic regression;maximum likelihood;property tax revenues;negative externalities

Williams, Christian BrantWOMEN’S MARITAL PROPERTY IN SHAKESPEARE’S ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL AND MEASURE FOR MEASURE
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2017, English
Many scholars have investigated the bed trick and its significance within the context of gender and sexuality in two of Shakespeare’s plays, All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure. Yet, I contend that an analysis and discussion of the physical bed is as important as the trick itself. Just as the trick has brought about important discussions relating to men’s and women’s sexual experiences in the early modern era, an examination of the physical bed and Helena’s and Mariana’s return thereto, illuminates the different yet equally important issues surrounding early modern women’s marital property. In this thesis, I will demonstrate that despite restrictive and limiting coverture laws of the time, both plays indicate that early modern married women were experiencing more autonomy over their own persons and possessed more rights to property than is often associated with or discussed in relation to the early modern era.

Committee:

Cynthia Klestinec, Dr. (Committee Chair); Gillespie Katharine, Dr. (Committee Member); Bromley James, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

British and Irish Literature; History; Law; Literature; Religion

Keywords:

Shakespeare; Bed Trick; Early Modern; Marriage; Married Women; Religion; Marital Property; Women and Property; Marriage Law

Yi, Kyŏng-nyongThe cost of capital and rate regulation of property-liability insurance companies /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1977, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Economics

Keywords:

Property insurance premiums;Property insurance;Liability insurance premiums;Liability insurance

Miller, Norman G.The influence of market transaction phenomena on residential property values /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1977, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration

Keywords:

Real property;Property tax

Vardar, CerenOn the Correlation of Maximum Loss and Maximum Gain of Stock Price Processes
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Mathematics/Probability and Statistics
One of the primary issues in mathematical finance is the ability to construct portfolios that are optimal with respect to the risk. The stock price is subject to stochastic variability so the risk an investor encounters is due to the stock prices. A commonly used measure of risk is the expected maximum loss of a stock, in other words, how much one can lose. It can be defined informally as the largest drop from a stock peak to a stock nadir. Over a certain fixed length of time, a reasonably low expected maximum loss is as crucial to the success of any fund asa high maximum gain or maximum profit. The correlation coefficient of the maximum loss and the maximum gain indicates the relation between the gain and the risk using measures which are functions of the Sharpe ratio. The price of one share of the risky asset, the stock, is modeled by geometric Brownian motion. By taking the log of geometric Brownian motion, Brownian motion can be used as basis of the calculations related to the geometric Brownian motion. In this dissertation work, we present analytical results related to the joint distribution of the maximum loss and maximum gain of a Brownian motion and the correlation of them, and detailed explanation of this theoretical result which requires a review of standard but difficult literature. We have given an analytical expression for the correlation of the supremum and the infimum of standard Brownian motion up to an independent exponential time, we have shown convexity of the maximum gain and the maximum loss, and we have calculated some bounds for the expected values of maximum gain and maximum loss. We also search for a relation between the Sharpe ratio and the correlation coefficient for Brownian motion with drift and geometric Brownian motion with drift. Using the scaling property, we have shown that the correlation coefficient does not depend on the diffusion coefficient for Brownian motion. And finally, using real-life data, we have presented the correlation of maximum gain and maximum loss and the correlation of the supremum and the infimum of stock prices.

Committee:

Gabor Szekely (Advisor); Craig Zirbel (Advisor); Bullerjahn George (Committee Member); Rizzo Maria (Committee Member); Chen John (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mathematics

Keywords:

Brownian Motion; Geometric Brownian Motion; Sharpe Ratio; Strong Markov Property; Scaling Property; Bessel Process; Doob's h-transform; Path Decomposition

Skowronski, Keith CollinsManaging Manufacturing Outsourcing Relationships
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Business Administration
In the last fifteen years there has been a drastic increase in the outsourcing of manufacturing activities to offshore suppliers, otherwise known as offshore outsourcing. These offshore outsourcing endeavors have often encountered a variety of unanticipated or hidden costs. While these hidden costs can manifest in a variety of forms, two of the main variations are intellectual property risk (i.e., supplier poaching) and quality risk (i.e., supplier shirking). The research in this dissertation utilizes dyadic data from 109 manufacturer-supplier relationships to investigate how the institutional environment of a supplier's location influences the effectiveness of different safeguards and relationship management practices, which can result in increased poaching and shirking. Understanding how to control these hidden costs of outsourcing is what differentiates successful outsourcing relationships and is of critical importance to manufacturers. Manufacturers are often putting their innovations at risk by outsourcing to suppliers in geographical locations that do not protect intellectual property. For that reason, poaching, or supplier's unauthorized use of a buyer's proprietary information, has been considered one of the main hidden costs of outsourcing. The strength of property rights has also been suggested to influence the effectiveness that safeguards have on poaching. Building on these arguments, this dissertation investigates how property rights impact the effectiveness of two safeguards, supplier transaction specific assets and communication, on poaching. Property rights are found to not only have a direct effect on supplier poaching, but they also change the effectiveness of both safeguards. In weak property rights locations, communication is found to be more effective in reducing poaching. Interestingly, in weak property rights locations not only are supplier transaction specific assets less effective in reducing poaching, but increases in these investments are actually associated with an increase in poaching. Shirking, or the deliberate underperformance of a supplier's agreed upon duties, is another manifestation of the hidden costs of outsourcing. Manufacturers implement different relationships management practices to control or influence suppliers, and relationship management practices vary in their effectiveness across suppliers in different cultures. The second study in this dissertation investigates how influence attempts, or the bases of interfirm power, are affected by a supplier's national culture, which can result in increases in supplier shirking. The findings in this study highlight how two different dimensions of culture, uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation, have different influences on coercive and expert power. While the safeguarding effect of expert power on shirking is greater in high uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation societies, the effects of coercive power manifest in different ways. In long-term orientation societies coercive power has a positive direct effect on shirking, whereas in high uncertainty avoidance cultures coercive power attenuates the effectiveness of expert power. Intriguingly, in low uncertainty avoidance cultures, a complementary relationship is found between coercive and expert power. Overall, the research in this dissertation highlights how the supplier's institutional environment should influence a manufacturer's relationship management strategy. Without adapting their relationship management approach across different institutional environments, manufacturers are increasingly likely to encounter the hidden cost of outsourcing.

Committee:

W.C. Benton, Jr. (Advisor); Peter Ward (Committee Member); James Hill (Committee Member); Sean Handley (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration

Keywords:

outsourcing; opportunism; poaching; shirking; intellectual property theft; supply chain relationships; safeguards; interfirm power; national culture; property rights; hidden costs of outsourcing;

Meneghetti, Paulo CesarSYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF RUBBER-CLAY NANOCOMPOSITES
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Chemical Engineering
Styrene-butadiene (SBR)/clay nanocomposites were synthesized via mechanical mixing using a Brabender mixer and 2-roll mill. The montmorillonite (MMT) used was functionalized with four different surfactants: commercially available octadecyl-amine (C18amine) and laboratory synthesized octadecyldimethyl-betaine (C18DMB), vinylbenzyl-dodecyldimethylammonium chloride (VDAC), and vinylbenzyl-octadecyldimethylammonium chloride (VODAC). The surfactant chain length and functional groups affected the dispersion of clay nanolayers in the matrix and the properties of the nanocomposites. Partially-exfoliated SBR nanocomposite obtained with VODAC-MMT presented the greatest mechanical reinforcement and oxygen barrier: elastic modulus at 25°C was 14 times higher than SBR, and oxygen permeability was reduced by 60% with 15 wt.% silicate. Nielsen model was used to fit the permeability data and to calculate the filler aspect ratio, which was also determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The best performance of nanocomposites containing VODAC-MMT is attributed to the presence of the vinyl-benzyl group in the surfactant, which provides higher compatibility with SBR and greater dispersion of the organoclay, increasing the tortuous path for gas diffusion through the rubber. Furthermore, the addition of carbon black to SBR and to SBR/clay nanocomposites was investigated. While carbon black alone (40 phr) offered great improvement in the mechanical properties of the rubber, the synergism of organoclay and carbon black brought similar property enhancements with only half the total filler loading (10 phr each filler). The oxygen permeability of the two-filler system was also lower than for SBR containing only carbon black. Two other types of rubber/clay nanocomposites were synthesized: natural rubber (NR) and bromo-butyl rubber (Br-IIR). Oxygen barrier for both nanocomposites was higher than pure rubber or conventional composite. The types of surfactant used to modify MMT led to different clay morphology in the matrix, affecting the tortuosity for gas diffusion. Significant enhancements in mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties were demonstrated for rubber/clay nanocomposites. In addition, a nanocomposite gel electrolyte consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay, ethylene carbonate/propylene carbonate as plasticizer, and lithium perchlorate was synthesized for electrochemical studies. Ionic conductivity varied slightly, exhibiting a maximum of 8x10-4 S/cm with 1.5 wt.% clay at 25°C, and stable lithium interfacial resistance was observed over a three-week storage period.

Committee:

Syed Qutubuddin (Advisor)

Keywords:

Nanocomposites,; rubber,; clay,; barrier property,; mechanical property,; gel electrolyte

Pelanda, Brian Lee“For The General Diffusion Of Knowledge”: Foundations of American Copyright Ideology, 1783-1790
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2008, History

This study attempts to fill a gap in the historiography on the formation of American copyright law by exploring the specific historical nature of print culture in the late eighteenth-century which directly influenced copyright’s development. Those who campaigned for copyright protection espoused its broad nationalistic implications in the wake of a socially and politically disruptive revolution, and its eventual legislative design recognized a distinct tension between private interests and the public sphere as it embodied the pervasive republican values of the early national period. This examination seeks to clarify how the conceptual architecture of copyright was initially framed in the United States in order to more insightfully and constructively address the question of the continued utility of its function established by historical precedent.

The first chapter of this study argues that the earliest calls for copyright legislation in the United States immediately after the Revolution were inextricably intertwined with the efforts to construct a distinctly American national identity. As the dictates of print-capitalism were quickly becoming institutionalized, prominent copyright advocates argued that copyright was necessary both to protect the indigenous American authorial class and their labors from the widespread practice of literary piracy and to encourage others to participate in the craft of authorship. They argued provocatively – and successfully – that copyright laws would indeed serve as declarations of cultural independence from Britain, and would help establish America’s cultural parity with the greatest powers in the world. Whereas colonial printmen played the most critical role in shaping American identity throughout the 1760s and 1770s by producing a deluge of literature in opposition to parliamentary imperial policies, I argue that the calls for copyright laws in the post-revolutionary period were an attempt by American intellectual writers to establish their own measure of cultural control over what was a largely unregulated printing industry.

The second chapter of this study demonstrates how eighteenth-century Enlightenment ideals and republican ideology significantly influenced how contemporaries expected the explicit limitedness of copyright terms to function. Through an examination of the concurrent development of learned societies and proposals for publicly funded education systems, I argue that a significant aspect of American political culture was a passion for the “diffusion of knowledge.” As contemporaries understood printed literature to be integral in the production and consumption of knowledge, such understandings strongly influenced the expectations and design of copyright. Additionally, the prevailing ideology of republicanism established a delicate balance between personal and public interests, which ultimately expected the republican citizen to act first and foremost for the benefit of society as a whole. Hence, copyright’s explicit limitedness exhibited the tension inherent in republican ideology: it granted authors only temporary monopolistic control over the publication of their creations so that they could sustain themselves in their labors, so that when the copyright term on a work expired it entered the public domain, from which anyone could freely access, manipulate, or republish it. Explicitly limited terms were not some arbitrary legislative decision, but rather a byproduct of the contemporary fixation on diffusing knowledge through print as extensively as possible among the American populace.

Committee:

Elizabeth Mancke, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

American History; American Literature; American Studies; Education History; History; Law

Keywords:

copyright law; noah webster; joel barlow; john trumbull; copyright; intellectual property; intellectual property law; imagined communities; early american culture; american copyright law; diffusion of knowledge; republicanism; free culture

Ijla, AkramThe Impact of Local Historical Designation on Residential Property Value: An Analysis of Three Slow-Growth and Three Fast-Growth Central Cities in the United States
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2008, Levin College of Urban Affairs

THE IMPACT OF LOCAL HISTORIC DESIGNATION ON RESIDENTIALPROPERTY VALUES: AN ANALYSIS OF THREE SLOW-GROWTH AND THREE FAST-GROWTH CENTRAL CITIES IN THE UNITED STATES

AKRAM M. IJLA

ABSTRACT

Historic designation is thought to have a role in neighborhood economic and community development. Local designation of historic districts is increasingly used as a tool to revitalize deteriorated neighborhoods and to protect endangered historical districts. A number of limitations in several previous studies have made policy development as well as a complete assessment of the impact of designation difficult. Some past studies focused only on historic neighborhoods in one city or one state; other studies have tested the impact of historic designation in general without distinguishing between local, state, or federal designation. Lastly, several earlier studies have also relied on comparing changes in property values in historic areas with those non-historic areas but with too few control variables to isolate the effects of historic area designation. This dissertation expands upon previous work by examining the effects of local historic designation on residential property values across six central cities in five states in the United States while controlling for numerous other variables that could impact the property values. The study employs hedonic regression models and difference on difference (case-control) descriptive statistical models to estimate the impact of local government designation of an area as a historical district on the prices of residential property. This is accomplished by the pairing of each historic district with a similar community that was not designated as historic. The research was performed in three fast-growth and three slow-growth central cities. The results indicate that local historic designation is associated with higher property values in the six central cities. In addition, the positive appreciation effects of local historic designation in slow-growth central cities were higher than in fast-growth central cities by 7.7 percent suggesting that historic designation has a role to play in urban revitalization for areas striving to improve property values despite slow population growth.

Committee:

Dr. Mark Rosentraub (Advisor)

Subjects:

Urban Planning

Keywords:

Historic Preservation; Property Values; Local Historic Designation; Sales Price; Hedonic Regression Model; Positive Axternalities

Ramachandran, RamnathQuantification of Structural Topology in Branched Polymers
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Engineering and Applied Science: Materials Science

Complex molecular structures occur in various natural and synthetic materials. From common plastics like polyethylene to proteins like hemoglobin, the significant effect of the molecular structure of these materials on their properties cannot be understated. Hence, it is fundamental to comprehensively characterize these complex structures. In the case of polyethylene, branching plays a significant role in determining its structure-property relationships.

Various characterization techniques are available to measure the branch content in polyethylene. Qualitative techniques based on gel permeation chromatography and rheology; and absolute measurements from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are commonly used to estimate branch content. Drawbacks posed by these common techniques have been well documented in literature. Further, these techniques are unable to provide a comprehensive picture of the structural topology of polyethylene which is crucial to understanding the structure-property relationships of these systems.

In this dissertation, a novel scaling approach is described to quantify branching in polyethylene. The approach is useful in quantifying both short-chain and long-chain branch contents in polyethylene. Additionally, unique measurements such as average long-chain branch length and hyperbranch (branch-on-branch) content are available through this approach. Such enhanced topological information can help us better understand the effect of catalyst systems on the structure of polyethylene as well as the effect of branching on the polymer’s physical properties.

The scaling approach was successful in quantifying the structure of variety of model and commercial branched polyethylene systems. Specific examples of high-density and linear low-density polyethylene as well as hydrogenated polybutadienes are discussed here. The dissertation is intended to standardize and corroborate the scaling approach in quantifying the structure of branched polymers. The scaling model described in this dissertation is universal. For instance, it can be adapted to quantify the structure of other complex structures such as ceramic aggregates, cyclic polymers and to quantify the degree of folding in protein molecules.

Committee:

Gregory Beaucage, PhD (Committee Chair); Vassilios Galiatsatos, PhD (Committee Member); Francis M. Mirabella, PhD (Committee Member); Stephen Clarson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Materials Science

Keywords:

Polyethylene Polymers Polyolefins;Branching Long chain Short chain characterization;Small Angle Neutron Scattering SANS;Structure Property Relationships;Catalysts Metallocene Ziegler Natta;Hyperbranching;

Kim, SangjoonThe Development and Characterization of Double Layer Hydrogel for Agricultural and Horticultural Applications
Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering, University of Toledo, 2010, Chemical Engineering
This research aimed to develop hydrogels for agricultural and horticultural application. The most remarkable characteristic of hydrogels is their ability to absorb large amounts of aqueous solutions, such as pure water and nutrient solution. They could make plants grow at optimal environments as the release of water and nutrients is controlled into soils. The advantages not only keeps continuous optimal environment but also reduces the use of freshwater and associates labor cost, being compared to directly sprinkling water to plants. Currently, commercial hydrogels are being produced from these hydrogel advantages. However, there are a few drawbacks. Firstly, while these hydrogels can rapidly absorb large amounts of water, they also dehydrate very rapidly in a matter of hours. Secondly, they are fragile and break apart easily losing their water retention properties. In this study, we tried to overcome the weakness of commercial hydrogels. We researched the dehydration and mechanical characteristics of various types of hydrogels, such as pure hydrogels and ionic hydrogels. Based on these studies, we designed a double layer PAAm-based hydrogel to overcome the inherent weakness of pure and ionic hydrogels which are kinds of commercial hydrogels. The inner layer gel consists of soft, low crosslinked PAAm which retains the high water absorbing property, ensuring its ability is to supply sufficient water, while the outer layer is made up of either highly crosslinked PAAm or polyurethane (PU), providing low aqueous permeability and high mechanical strength. The dehydration rates of PU-PAAm double layer hydrogels could be controlled by the pore sizes of PU coating layer determined by the molecular weight of polyethylene glycol and by the thickness of coating layer. In addition, the cross-linking density of inner gel and the temperature of coating solution affected the dehydration rate of PU-PAAm double layer hydrogels. Such a double layer design resulted in mechanical stability for deployment in soils as well as continuous dehydration time over a week at a room atmosphere and nutrients release until one week in DI water.

Committee:

Nadarajah Arun (Committee Chair); Dong-Shik Kim (Committee Member); Jonathan Frantz (Committee Member); Maria Coleman (Committee Member); Sasidhar Varanasi (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agricultural Chemicals; Agricultural Engineering; Chemical Engineering

Keywords:

Polyacrylamide hydrogel; Dehydration; Swelling; Mechanical property; Ionic hydrogel; Double layer hydroel; Polyurethane; Coating; Coated hydrogel; Dehydration simulation; Diffusion

McDaniel, Jamie LynnTrespassing Women: Representations of Property and Identity in British Women’s Writing 1925 – 2005
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2010, English
This dissertation examines novels for spatial and temporal practices, what I call “tactics of trespassing,” used by twentieth- and twenty-first-century women writers Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, Penelope Fitzgerald, Margaret Drabble, Hilary Mantel, and Jeanette Winterson to re-imagine established constructions of national and gender identity and its relation to property. I focus on property’s ability to enable or to prevent particular identity formations and chart the responses of modern British women writers to the ways that legal, political, and economic treatises have historically rendered property ownership in terms of the masculine. As a result, these discourses have defined feminine propriety through property’s inaccessibility for women. In novels by these writers, I discern a preoccupation with “looking back,” a process through which authors revisit narratives of national and gender identity – narratives that did not account for or represent particular sections of the British public – for the goal of redefining what, as a result of this absence, was defined as properly “British” for a woman. The specific sites through which these works look back are incarnations of property. By enacting new narratives of identity that challenge the propriety of traditional accounts, contemporary women writers aim to stake a claim for a place within the current British body politic. Through their tactics of trespassing upon grounds of property and propriety defined by masculine society, in other words, these writers show how traditional constructions of national and gender identity are essential but insufficient for marginalized groups to understand their relationship to and position within Britain. By showing how these writers establish a degree of plurality and creativity in their intellectual heritage, this dissertation disputes the claims of British property discourses that assert to represent the whole of British society. My approach investigates contemporary novels that current studies of British identity often neglect and combines the idea of looking back with examinations of property in order to draw together two strands in British Studies previously considered in isolation.

Committee:

Kurt Koenigsberger (Committee Chair); Mary Grimm (Committee Member); Gary Stonum (Committee Member); Joseph Fagan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

English literature; Gender; Law; Literature; Womens Studies

Keywords:

property; propriety; identity; looking back; Britishness; law and literature; feminism; gender studies; contemporary British women writers; Virginia Woolf; Jean Rhys; Penelope Fitzgerald; Hilary Mantel; Margaret Drabble; Jeanette Winterson

Milliman, HenryREINFORCEMENT OF MELT-BLEND COMPOSITES; POLYMER-FILLER INTERACTIONS, PHASE BEHAVIOR, AND STRUCTURE-PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2012, Macromolecular Science and Engineering
In recent years POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes) has been incorporated into a number of polymers as a copolymer, graft or as a melt-blend. The advantages gained from using POSS come from its hybrid organic-inorganic nature whose inorganic core provides molecular reinforcement while its variety of functionalization schemes allow for reaction or other interactions with the host polymer. Previous work has shown the ability of POSS to reinforce polymers when incorporated through grafting or copolymerization, but there is a lack of understanding of how to obtain successful reinforcement when using POSS as a melt-blend additive. One hypothesis is that a high degree of POSS-polymer interactions are necessary which promote a pseudo-grafted structure yielding results similar to that of copolymer system. The first part of this thesis (Chapters 2 and 3) will address the role of POSS-polymer interaction in reinforcement. Specifically, Chapter 3 will discuss a new approach to predicting these interactions through the determination of Hansen solubility parameters. This approach however does not take into account the role of processing. Chapter 4 will address this by evaluating the structure-property relationships in melt-spun fiber composites. Finally, Chapter 5 will discuss a different field of polymer composites, polymer clay aerogels. In this work the use of these low-density composites as an oil absorbing media will be discussed.

Committee:

David Schiraldi, PhD (Committee Chair); Hatsuo Ishida, PhD (Committee Member); Joao Maia, PhD (Committee Member); Xiong Yu, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Chemistry; Materials Science; Polymers

Keywords:

POSS; composites; blends; structure-property relationships; phase behavior; Hansen solubility parameters

Aronow, EmilyEnvironmental clean-up and property price change
BA, Oberlin College, 1999, Economics

In my experiment, I am trying to find the value, to Lorain County property owners, of cleaning up the Black River which runs through Lorain County. This study involves a number of property variables, a number of neighborhood variables, and the environmental variables. The hedonic price function takes this general form:

Property Price = c + β1Property Characteristics + β2Neighborhood Characteristics + β3Environmentai Characteristics + u.

This equation says that the price of a piece of property is a function of several things: the characteristics of the property, the characteristics of the neighborhood it's in, and the characteristics of the environment. The slope coefficients β1, β2, and β3 are the hedonic prices of the property, neighborhood, and environmental characteristics, respectively. u represents the combined effect of all the housing characteristics about which I have no information.

I hypothesize that the environmental health of the Black River is a commodity (or source of pleasure) in the housing bundle. At first, one might suspect that the health of a nearby stream is not considered when purchasing a house. However, recall that water moves in a hydrologic cycle. The Ohio EPA says, "the populations of fish in a river reflect the overall state of environmental health of the watershed as a whole. This is because fish live in water which has previously fallen on the cities, fields, strip mines, grasslands, and forests of the watershed." The water and other solutes in the river are products of the land around a river. A river near an urban center that sends off sulfur and carbon monoxide will have elevated acidity because the rain washes the airborne pollutants into the river. The fish and insects will reflect this increased acidity. Therefore, the river is a good approximation of the health of the surrounding area.

In order to test this hypothesis, I determine the implicit price of the health of the Black River. In regression

Property Price = c + β1Property Characteristics + β2Neighborhood Characteristics + β3IBI+ u.

β3 is the implicit price of health of the Black River. If β3 is statistically significantly different from zero, the health of the Black River has an effect of β3 on local property prices. I also evaluate the welfare consequences of changes in environmental quality.

Committee:

(Advisor)

Keywords:

Lorain County;Black River;clean-up;environmental;property;values;Ohio;

Fan, HaijianPerformance Based Design of Deep Foundations in Spatially Varying Soils
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2013, Civil Engineering
With the implementation of load and resistance factor design (LRFD) by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration, the design of deep foundations is migrating from Level I (e.g., allowable stress design) codes to Level II codes (e.g., LRFD). Nevertheless, there are still unsolved issues regarding the implementation of load and resistance factor design. For example, there is no generally accepted guidance on the statistical characterization of soil properties. Moreover, the serviceability limit check in LRFD is still deterministic. No uncertainties arising in soil properties, loads and design criteria are taken into account in the implementation of LRFD. In current practice, the load factors and resistances are taken as unity, and deterministic models are applied to evaluate the displacements of geotechnical structures. In order to address the aforementioned issues of LRFD, there is a need for a computational method for conducting reliability analysis and computational tools for statistically characterizing the variability of soil properties. The objectives of this research are: 1) to develop a mathematically sound computational tool for conducting reliability analysis for deep foundations; and 2) to develop the associated computational method that can be used to determine the variability model of a soil property. To achieve consistency between the strength limit check and the serviceability limit check of the LRFD framework, performance-based design methodology is developed for deep foundation design. In the proposed methodology, the design criteria are defined in terms of the displacements of the structure that are induced by external loads. If the displacements are within the specified design criteria, the design is considered satisfactory. Otherwise, failure is said to occur. In order to calculate the probability of failure, Monte Carlo simulation is employed. In Monte Carlo simulation, the variability of the random variables that are involved in the reliability analysis is captured by simulating a large number of samples according to their respective probability distributions. Next, the simulations of the random variables are used as the input to the commonly used p-y method and load transfer method to evaluate the load-displacement behavior. Once the displacements are calculated, it can be determined whether or not failure will occur. Accordingly, the failure probability is calculated as the number of failure events to the total number of simulations. A series of computer programs have been developed and validated based on the proposed performance-based design methodology. These computer programs can be used to conduct reliability analysis for designing a drilled shaft. To determine the variability model of soil properties that will be used as input to the computer programs, a computational method has been developed in which the blow counts in a standard penetration test are required as inputs. It is found that the consideration of the dependence structure of soil properties is important for reliability analysis.

Committee:

Robert Liang, Dr. (Advisor); Lan Zhang, Dr. (Committee Member); Qindan Huang, Dr. (Committee Member); Xiaosheng Gao, Dr. (Committee Member); Chien-Chung Chan, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Civil Engineering; Statistics

Keywords:

reliability based design; deep foundation; load transfer; Monte Carlo; failure probability; risk assessment; soil reaction; computer program; soil property; static analysis; performance based design; Bayesian; MCMC; spatial variability

ZHANG, GUOJUNCRYSTALLINE POLYMERS IN MULTILAYERED FILMS AND BLEND SYSTEMS
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Macromolecular Science and Engineering
Abstract CHAPTER 1: In this study, multilayer films of sPS-PPS (syndiotactic Polystyrene and Polyphenylene sulfide blend) against P4MP1 [Poly (4-Methylpentene-1)] with various compositions and layer thicknesses were prepared by a layer multiplying co-extrusion process. Incorporating the PPS into sPS layers before co-extrusion produced pores in the sPS layers upon a post-extrusion, uniaxial orientation. Confined crystallization of P4MP1 by sPS-PPS was examined before and after the uniaxial orientation. A melt and recrystallization method was employed to achieve the preferred in-plane orientation of P4MP1 crystals. This was characterized by the atomic force microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. We found that with P4MP1 layer thickness smaller than 400 nm, a confinement effect will induce in-plane P4MP1 crystal orientation where the crystal c-axis is perpendicular to the film. This arrangement of crystals reduced oxygen’s tortuosity through the multilayer films. This conclusion was verified by increased oxygen permeability of the stretched-recrystallized multilayer films. CHAPTER 2: High-density polyethylene (HDPE) was co-extruded against high glassy transition temperature (Tg) polycarbonate (PC) to fabricate multilayer films. Melt and recrystallization experiments were conducted on these extruded films to study the effects of isothermal recrystallization temperature and layer thickness on HDPE lamellae orientation. WAXS and AFM were used to demonstrate lamellar morphology of HDPE layers. We report that HDPE lamellae show twisted morphology in 30 nm thin layers after confined crystallization at a high temperature (128 oC). It may be the first time that anyone has created such twisted lamellar morphology with HDPE in such a thin layer. Similar twisted morphology of HDPE was also observed when HDPE was co-extruded with another high Tg glassy polymer, polysulfone (PSF). Interestingly, the twisted HDPE lamellar morphology associated with an increased crystallinity improves both the oxygen and water vapor barrier properties of the multilayer films. CHAPTER 3: Confined crystallization of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in multiplayer films is studied in this paper. A new cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), HP030, is co-extruded with HDPE by a layer multiplying technique. The number of layers and layer compositions are changed to study the effect of layer thickness on the crystalline morphology of the HDPE layers under confinement. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to investigate the crystalline morphology of the HDPE layers. MOCON ((Minneapolis, MN, commercial instrument) units are employed to measure both oxygen permeability and water vapor transport rate (WVTR) of these co-extruded HDPE/HP030 multilayer films. We report that when the HDPE layer nominal thickness is about 290 nm in the HDPE/HP030 multilayer films, the HDPE layer effective gas barrier property is improved approximately 2 times for oxygen and 5 times for water vapor. This is the result of confined spherulite morphology of HDPE, which increases the tortuosity for gas to diffuse through the films. Similar phenomenon is found for polypropylene (PP), when PP is co-extruded against polycarbonate (PC). The same experiments as for HDPE are conducted to confirm that PP spherulites have been confined by PC in PP/PC multilayer films. We discover that the confined spherulites of PP improve its gas barrier properties as well. CHAPTER 4: Blends of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) with different weight fractions are extruded to fabricate thin films. The extruded blend film morphology is investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The extruded blend films have shown extended morphology along the extrusion direction (ED) and dispersed morphology along the transverse direction (TD). We report that due to this morphology, a two-dimensional (2-D) confined crystallization occurs. The EVOH has successfully confined the LLDPE from both film normal direction (ND) and transverse direction (TD) in this study. The confinement from ND results in an on-edge orientation of LLDPE, while the confinement from TD forces the on-edge oriented LLDPE crystals to further elongate along the extrusion direction (ED). This specific crystal orientation is different from one-dimensional (1-D) confined crystallization observed in multilayered films. Both wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) are utilized to investigate the crystal orientations of LLDPE in the extruded blend films. Moreover, due to the morphology, the extruded blend films have shown high oxygen barrier properties, which make this material valuable in packaging applications. CHAPTER 5: The blend of linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) and ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) with weight fraction of 50-50 is extruded by a multiplication extrusion system to fabricate thin films. Different numbers of multipliers are utilized to tailor the morphology of the extruded blend films. We found that as the number of multipliers increases, the blend film morphology transforms from an elongated and layer-like structure to the co-continuous structure and eventually becomes homogeneous. This is because during the multiplication process, the multipliers behave similar to static mixers that physically break the elongated and co-continuous like structure of LLDPE and EVOH into tiny domains. As the morphology evolves, the physical properties of the extruded blend films change dramatically. After the co-continuous and elongated morphology becomes homogenous, both the gas permeability and the transmission rate of these films increase. The tensile mechanical behaviors become isotropic at different deformation directions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) are utilized to investigate the morphology and crystalline structure of the blend films. Oxygen gas permeability and water vapor transport rate (WVTR) of these blend films are measured by MOCON units. The transmission rate and mechanical properties are studied by the UV-vis and a mechanical tensile stretcher (MTS) respectively.

Committee:

Eric Baer (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Polymers

Keywords:

Crystalline polymers, multilayer film, structure, property, morphology

Dahlquist, Kyla NStrategic Protection of Vital U.S. Assets Abroad: Intellectual Property Protection in the Trans-Pacific Partnership
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Arts and Sciences: Political Science
In 2012, the United States Trade Representative (USTR) submitted a high-standards intellectual property (IP) provision to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiation forum. Indications that this provision is incredibly aggressive were seemingly confirmed by a series of draft leaks on the Internet, leading to overwhelmingly negative assessments of the USTR and the U.S. trade agenda in the Asia-Pacific. However, these scholars and analysts have not adequately addressed the strategic element of the U.S. trade agenda regarding intellectual property. Arguments have been made regarding the strategic importance of the TPP negotiations, as a whole, to the U.S.: economically, politically, and even militarily. I will argue that the U.S. trade agenda regarding intellectual property in the Asia-Pacific region, specifically, is not counter to these strategic interests. Examining the reasoning behind this policy is the primary objective of this comparative analysis of the perceived intellectual property protections of TPP states. One of the primary, overarching purposes of this examination is to contribute to the discussion of intellectual property as an all-encompassing security issue. I propose that promoting the effective enforcement and implementation of intellectual property protections within other countries provides the United States with a mechanism for countering the unilaterally insurmountable security issues of the twenty-first century, including cyber-espionage and forced technology transfer. I will argue that it is the long-term external effects that provide the most persuasive explanation for U.S. behavior in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations. The United States is still proceeding in a strategic manner, establishing long-term mechanisms for the protection of U.S. interests abroad through bilateral and small-scale trans-regional agreements with limited membership rather than global international institutions in an effort to hedge against the rising power in Asia: China. I have conducted a descriptive, exploratory analysis of the U.S. perception of the intellectual property protections provided in trade partner states. I have defined these protections according to the legal infrastructure and the enforcement capacity of that trade partner. In addition to China, four TPP negotiation members have been selected as case studies for this analysis based upon their Special 301 designations from 2001 to 2014: Canada, Chile, Peru, and Vietnam.

Committee:

Thomas Moore, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Richard Harknett, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

International Relations

Keywords:

Intellectual Property Rights;International Political Economy;Trans Pacific Partnership;Cybersecurity;Asia Pacific Regionalization;US Trade Interests

Ruark, Christopher DanielThe Guinea Pig Model For Organophosphate Toxicology and Therapeutic Development
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Wright State University, 2015, Biomedical Sciences PhD
Organophosphates (OPs) are highly toxic insecticides and nerve agents that have been designed to inhibit the hydrolysis of acetylcholine by binding to the serine active site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). They are one of the most common causes of human poisoning worldwide and are frequently intentionally used in suicides in agricultural areas. For this reason, there is a need for therapeutics to rescue those from intoxication. Obvious ethical concerns prevent humans from being subjected to OP exposure for therapeutic efficacy and safety testing. Therefore, animal surrogates for humans must be appropriately selected. A new paradigm, described herein, incorporating both in silico and in vitro techniques may be able to reduce the use of animals in biomedical research. Historically, the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) has been believed to be the best non-primate model for OP toxicology and therapeutic development because, similarly to humans, guinea pigs have low amounts of OP metabolizing carboxylesterase (CaE) in blood and tissues. To explore the hypothesis that guinea pigs are the most appropriate human substitute for studying OP toxicology and therapeutic development, I cloned, purified and enzymatically compared a recombinant guinea pig acetylcholinesterase (gpAChE) with the human and mouse enzyme variants. The guinea pig, mouse and human apparent inhibition constants for diisopropyl fluorophosphate were found to be 8.4+/-0.6 uM, 4.9+/-0.6 uM and 0.42+/-0.01 uM, respectively, indicating that species differences exist for OP inhibition. Furthermore, I developed a mechanistic quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) to predict OP and therapeutic tissue: plasma partition coefficient (Kt:pl) parameters for each species. Differences in tissue lipid, water and protein content contributed to species specific Kt:pl. For example, guinea pig and human lung Kt:pl predictions for paraoxon were found to be 0.3 and 0.17, respectively. Biological and chemical specific parameters were then incorporated into a SimBiology guinea pig and human physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) OP-therapeutic interaction model. A 7 regional compartment model was needed to adequately simulate the pharmacodynamics of VX in the brain. The OP PBPK/PD model was validated against the small amount of available data published in the literature and was used to predict and compare guinea pig and human species differences in response to exposure and therapeutic efficacy. It was found that the human is 3.45 times more sensitive than guinea pigs to VX as shown by the area under the curve in the brain, 1.14 times more sensitive than guinea pigs as shown by the area under the curve in the diaphragm and 1.11 times more sensitive as shown by the time to minimum concentration in the diaphragm. The OP PBPK/PD model structure, along with chemical parameters, can be altered to make predictions for other OP chemicals of concern. It was also shown that a constant intravenous infusion of a novel allosteric modulator that increases AChE's velocity may be an effective means of treating dermal exposure in both guinea pigs and humans. In conclusion, this dissertation carefully evaluated physiological and enzymatic differences between these two species and greatly assisted in evaluating the suitability of the guinea pig as a model for human OP toxicity testing and therapeutic development. It is recommended that the guinea pig continue to be used as an animal model for OP toxicity testing and therapeutic development as long as the in silico and in vitro techniques, developed herein, are properly utilized to extrapolate to human populations.

Committee:

Jeffery Gearhart, Ph.D. (Advisor); Adrian Corbett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); James Lucot, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mateen Rizki, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Gerald Alter, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biochemistry; Molecular Biology; Pharmacology; Toxicology

Keywords:

organophosphate; acetylcholinesterase; guinea pig; toxicology; therapeutic; recombinant; physiologically based pharmacokinetic model; quantitative structure-property relationship; PBPK; QSPR; allostery; tissue plasma partition coefficient; YASARA

Guillen, Gabrielle S.Daughters of the Alcaldes: Women of Privilege in Medieval Burgos
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2014, History (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis contributes to the historiography by locating active women of medieval Spain in sources that reveal the reality of women's actions as opposed to their ideal behavior. Evidence for women's activities comes from charters—legal documents that recorded property transfers—from various religious institutions in thirteenth-century Burgos, the historic capital of the Christian kingdom of Castile. Women participated in 60% of transactions. Empowering factors included connections to urban oligarchs, dense social networks, collective enterprise, and generous inheritances. Women were not inherently disenfranchised as property owners by virtue of sex, though their absence in the roles of witness and guarantor indicates efforts to exclude women from public space. Nonetheless, the valorization of private law and the commitment to patrimonial rights worked in women's favor to counteract (in part) the legal disabilities they faced on account of perceived feminine weaknesses. Socioeconomic status more greatly affected one's economic opportunities than did gender.

Committee:

Miriam Shadis (Advisor); Michele Clouse (Committee Member); Katherine Jellison (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Medieval History; Womens Studies

Keywords:

medieval; history; women; Spain; charters; archives; XIII; Burgos; Castile; Las Huelgas; Hospital del Rey; San Juan de Burgos; urban; oligarch; elite; widow; property; landholding; agency; inheritance; patrimony; heredad; witness; fama; community; law

Duning, Solomon George3D Textile PMC Damage Evolution: Effects of Fiber Volume Fraction and Morphology Variation
Master of Science (M.S.), University of Dayton, 2016, Mechanical Engineering
3D textile polymer matrix composites (PMC) exhibit geometric and material state variances due to differences in manufacturing processes and a variety of other factors. Developing a more thorough understanding of these strength and damage variations is a vital aspect of generating an accurate predictive model for the material response of a 3D textile PMC. This work entails both experimental and modeling efforts in order to gain a more thorough understanding of how tow level geometric variations relate to damage evolution in a 3D textile PMC. A 3D orthogonal weave textile is imaged utilizing an X-Ray micro-CT to examine the fiber volume fraction and fiber path distributions within the composite. Additionally, damage evolution is observed at different load steps and CT images are utilized for Digital Volume Correlation analysis. Modeling efforts are primarily focused on tow morphology simulations within the software package- Virtual Textile Morphology Suite (VTMS). Damage evolution analysis on the VTMS models are performed using an advanced Regularized eXtended Finite Element Method (RX-FEM) within the Air Force Research Laboratory developed B-Spline Analysis Method (BSAM) program. Local fiber volume fraction variation in the specimens is examined through serially sectioned images obtained using Robo-Met 3D. Fiber volume fraction distributions are compared to VTMS predictions and VTMS predictions are modified to reflect experimental values. The effect of these local fiber volume fraction distributions on damage evolution in the composite are examined through experimentation and modeling efforts.

Committee:

Margaret Pinnell, Ph.D. (Advisor); David Mollenhauer, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Tom Whitney, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Engineering; Materials Science; Mechanical Engineering; Mechanics

Keywords:

3D Textile Polymer Matrix Composite; Fiber Volume Fraction Variation; Discrete Damage Modeling; Textile Morphology Variation; Inter-tow Property Variation; Tow Fiber Path Distribution

Goldsten, JosephA normative model of net operating income and the effect of inflation on the market value and equity interest of multi-family dwelling units /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1974, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration

Keywords:

Inflation;Real property

Walby, Karen Elizabeth Printy, 1947-The impact of jurisdictional differentials in public education provision on residential location /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1977, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Geography

Keywords:

Municipal services;Real property

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