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Bender, Patricia LynnImplementation of a Parent-Generated Electronic Family Health History Tool in an Urban Pediatric Primary Care Setting
Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree Program in Population Health Leadership DNP, Xavier University, 2018, Nursing
As the United States (U.S.) health care system moves towards a health promotion model, identifying those at risk for common health conditions is crucial. Comprehensive family health history (FHH) data collection and analysis has been proposed as a low cost, highly efficient and effective way to screen for common health conditions. However, patients' electronic health records (EHRs) currently do not contain enough FHH information to adequately assess for health risks. The purpose of this DNP Scholarly project was to implement a parent completed electronic family health history (eFHH) tool in a socially disadvantage, pediatric population receiving care in an urban primary care clinic. A descriptive observation study design was used to evaluate parents' use of My Family Health Portrait (MFHP), an eFHH tool. Forty parent participants were observed for ease of MFHP use to determine the feasibility of using a parent completed FHH tool. The majority of parents (85%) were able to complete the MFHP tool prior to completing provider evaluations, with 70% of parents completing a four generation family history assessment using MFHP. Facilitators for completion included: desire to enter their own information, perceived positive benefit, ease of use, internet access and enjoyed entering information. Barriers to completing the MFHP tool were: program was not intuitive, issues with unknown information, clinic interruptions, complexity of health categories, and the tool is not pediatric focused. Results support the possibility of using a parent-generated electronic family health history tool in a pediatric care setting.

Committee:

Elizabeth Bragg, PhD (Committee Chair); Kelly Bohnhoff, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Genetics; Health Care; Information Technology

Keywords:

Family Health History, Risk Assessment, Computer-generated tool, Primary Care Providers, My Family Health Portrait, Family History, pedigree, electronic family health history

Fuller, Melissa SuzannePrimary Care Providers Believe Patient-Generated Family History Will Increase Ability to Assess Patient Risk
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Allied Health Sciences : Genetic Counseling
Family history is the best predictor of an individuals risk for common disease, yet it is inaccurately used in routine care. We hypothesized that patient-generated family history can improve a primary care provider's ability to asses risk without decreasing the number of patients seen. We mailed surveys to 301 providers and had a response rate of 24% (n=68). Seventy-three percent felt a computer-generated pedigree would improve their ability to assess risk as compared to their current methods. Seventy percent felt a computer-generated pedigree would either have no effect on or increase the number of patients seen in a day. Results suggest that providers feel optimistic about the potential benefits of patient-generated family history and are open to the implementation of patient-generated family history into routine care.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, PhD, MS, CGC (Committee Chair); Cynthia Prows, MSN, CNS (Advisor); Thomas Webb, MD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Genetics

Keywords:

Family history; primary care providers; common disease; genetic disease; family history tool

Anzeljc, Samantha AnnA Primary Care Intervention for Management of Childhood Obesity
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Nutrition Program, The Ohio State University
Introduction: To support weight control and acquisition of healthy behavior in the families with overweight children, the essential first step is to create and sustain behavior change among the primary care providers (PCP) who are doing the counseling toward a standard of care. Despite regular access to families with young children, PCPs lack a comprehensive model for approaching office visits on pediatric excess weight. In 2007, an Expert Committee comprised of 15 national organizations established guidelines for a standard of care for managing pediatric excess weight centered on the PCP. Reluctance of PCPs to assume responsibility for weight management has been the result of numerous professional, practice, and patient related barriers. We hypothesized that improved PCP self-efficacy to counsel, documentation within the medical record around weight management, and knowledge of counseling recommendations, would improve the clinical effectiveness of PCPs and establish a standard of care around obesity management. Methods: We developed “A Pound of Cure” (POC), a series of modularized office visits for use by PCPs, founded on the 2007 Expert Committee Recommendations. This program was piloted and efficacy established at an urban clinic with a diverse, low-income population by clinicians experienced in the tertiary care of obese children. The POC intervention tools provided PCPs with a counseling model, office systems, and educational tools to direct behavior modification in families with overweight children. Using a novel approach to behavior change first piloted in business, we adapted quality improvement methodology to host a 6-month Learning Collaborative comprised of Ohio PCPs. Here, we introduced the POC intervention tools and evaluated effectiveness of POC in modifying PCP behavior. The quality improvement methods focused on integration of the POC model and ECRs incrementally into the primary care practices. Physician outcomes were monitored through monthly chart reviews and surveys regarding their knowledge of the ECRs and sense of self-efficacy to counsel the overweight patient. Practice narratives, site visits, and closing interviews highlighted practice specific implementation of POC. Secondarily, patient outcomes were monitored through patient registries. Results: “A Pound of Cure” physicians achieved a standard of care around obesity management. The Learning Collaborative fostered flexible, practice specific adaptations of the POC model, supported by changes in office systems to support weight management counseling. Provider self-efficacy increased by 10.85 points (p=0.000) during the collaborative while knowledge remained constant. Monthly chart reviews reflected improved PCP documentation around all weight management counseling encounter measures; 100% documentation was achieved for all measures except for documentation of laboratory assessment. Patient and family engagement remained a constant obstacle to counseling. Still, those children who persisted and whose care was captured in the patient registry experienced a modest decrease in BMI percentile, 0.313% (p=0.067). Conclusion: In summary, the POC Learning Collaborative was a novel mechanism to incrementally improve PCP self-efficacy and documentation around weight management visits and created a supportive primary care environment. By offering serial POC Learning Collaboratives, Ohio PCPs will establish a standard of care on pediatric weight management within the practice setting, the optimal site for early identification and intervention in childhood obesity.

Committee:

Robert Murray, MD (Advisor); Carla Miller, PhD, RD (Committee Member); Carolyn Gunther, PhD (Committee Member); Richard McClead, MD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care; Nutrition

Keywords:

primary care providers; childhood obesity; quality improvement; behavior change