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Kurz, Joshua JThe Figure of the Refugee
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Comparative Studies
This dissertation demonstrates how the processes and institutions of contemporary globalization have fundamentally altered the relation of people and place to politics. Thus, The Figure of the Refugee contributes to debates about mobility and freedom in an era of globalization. It intervenes in key debates regarding the meaning of citizenship, the mutations of territorial sovereignty, and struggles for self-determination and non-state social organization. The principal contributions of the dissertation are its critique of inclusion as the goal of social movements, its exploration of the figure of the refugee as the novel form of political subjectivity produced within globalization, and the articulation of a politics that begins with mobility as a constitutive element of the contemporary world.

Committee:

Philip Armstrong (Advisor); Leo Coleman (Committee Member); Mathew Coleman (Committee Member); Sandro Mezzadra (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Geography; International Law; International Relations; Philosophy; Political Science

Keywords:

refugees; political theory; autonomy of migration; Agamben; global apartheid; border studies; refugee status determination; control; governance; global governance; globalization; Deleuze; Hardt; Negri; differential inclusion; exclusion

Higgins, DarcyMarked Space: Public Art and the Public Sphere
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2011, Political Science
Connecting democratic theory and geography, this thesis argues that public art can play a unique role in facilitating democratic inclusion and communication. It analyzes the ways that formal and informal art in the context of public space can be used as a means for improving access to the public sphere; for communicating across differences; and for consolidating or disrupting control, power relations, and exclusions. It concludes with a case study of public art found around the Station North neighborhood of Baltimore and its socio-political implications.

Committee:

Julie White, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Geography; Political Science

Keywords:

public sphere; political theory; street art; graffiti; public art; human geography; urban space; diversity; gentrification; Baltimore; representation

Hartford, CharlieHannah Arendt and the Meaning of Political Action
BA, Oberlin College, 2012, Politics
In the first section, I begin with an account of action within the context of the vita activa as laid out by Arendt in The Human Condition. I then proceed to identify some of the more perplexing features of her account, and suggest that they are confounding enough to throw the coherency of what Arendt is saying into question. Taking my cue from Hanna Pitkin, I then argue that we can understand action as activity informed by thinking, by drawing upon Arendt's posthumously published work The Life of the Mind. This account, however, though illuminating with regard to some aspects of political action, will be shown to possess serious deficiencies in others. Thus, I will proceed in section two to explicate Heidegger's conception of "worldhood," and will demonstrate that Arendt's conception of "the world of appearances" in The Life of the Mind is essentially derivative of this account. I will then go on in section three to show that Arendt's conception of the "world" in The Human Condition is fundamentally a critique of Heidegger's account, and that far from being derivative, Arendt actually exposes major deficiencies in Heidegger's notion of worldhood. I will then conclude by giving an account of action as taking responsibility for the world, with the world understood as a space for action and freedom.

Committee:

Harlan Wilson, PhD (Advisor); Sonia Kruks, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

Political Theory; Arendt; Heidegger; Action; Political Action; Phenomenology; YMCMB; The Human Condition; Being and Time

Chandler, Eric B.GIVING GROUND: EXPLORING NON-COERCIVE POLITICS
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2003, Political Science
This essay has a dual objective. First, it aims to provide a formal definition of non-coercive politics (NCP), and discuss some implications of the concept. Second, it evaluates three political alternatives in terms of each theory’s capacity for meeting the definition of NCP. Chapter 1 provides a formal definition: In NCP, members (1) exercise ‘volition’ in learning the social norms associated with their community (i.e. socialization is internally realized); and (2) exercise ‘volition’ in adhering to those same social norms (i.e. compliance is internally realized). Chapters 2 – 4 assess, in turn, whether liberalism, antifoundationalism, or esotericism meets the definition of NCP. Each evaluation proceeds by analysing the metaphysical components of the prescriptive theory, and comparing the results with the requirements set out in the formal definition of NCP. The heuristic guiding the evaluation comprises three questions: 1. Does the prescriptive theory preclude coercion relative to socialization (the acquisition of social norms)? 2. Does the prescriptive theory preclude coercion relative to compliance (the enforcement of social norms)? 3. Does the prescriptive theory preclude coercion relative to political obligation (i.e. does obligation derive from a Universal)? Chapter 5 concludes that while each theory has some of the necessary components of NCP, both liberalism and antifoundationalism prove to be incompatible in certain respects. In short, neither theory offers a practical means for attaining a non-coercive politics. Esotericism proves to be fully compatible with NCP, but faces another problem: it is least compatible with the prevailing culture of modern industrial societies. While the premise of NCP is consistent with both explicit and implicit ideals of contemporary politics, it amounts to a foreign concept. Additionally, NCP at times conflicts with other explicit and accepted requirements of contemporary politics. The result is something of a Catch-22: Only by altering certain requirements of modern politics is NCP likely to become a practical alternative; yet, because such an approach necessarily alters the nature of modern politics itself, there is little incentive within industrial society to make the relevant changes.

Committee:

Steven DeLue (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science, General

Keywords:

Non-Coercive Politics; Political Theory; Antifoundationalism; Esotericism; Liberalism; Metaphysics

Kock, Stacia L.TOWARDS INCLUSION: EXPANDING AND CHALLENGING CITIZENSHIP THROUGH INTERSECTIONAL ANTIPOVERTY ACTIVISM
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, Womens Studies

Within low-income populations, there is a history of community work aimed at highlighting the plight of those living in poverty and establishing economic justice. In the contexts of the United States, an increasing number of these antipoverty activists are mobilizing within their communities to make demands on the state in an effort to contest state exclusions, challenge notions of inequitable citizenship, and reclaim power as impoverished citizens. This project investigates the relationship between the state, economic status, and citizenship by focusing on the role antipoverty activism plays in generating critiques of the state and defining citizenship for low-income individuals. While feminist political theorists posit that citizenship can exclude certain populations based on gender, race, and class, this study investigates how those individuals living at the margins understand citizenship in their own right.

By comparing and contrasting the work of two women-led antipoverty groups located in the Midwest, this study uncovers that despite the lower-class standing of their members, these organizations collectively express important critiques regarding the relationships between citizenship and neoliberal individualism within the United States. Specifically, as this study reveals, through an articulation of an oppositional community, in which individuals challenge class, gender, and race oppression through activism, these antipoverty organizations are renegotiating citizenship rights from the economic margins.

Committee:

Christine Keating, PhD (Committee Chair); Wendy Smooth, PhD (Committee Member); Franco Barchiesi, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Womens Studies

Keywords:

citizenship; antipoverty activism; feminist political theory

Heron, Jason AndrewThe Analogia Communitatis: Leo XIII and the Modern Quest for Fraternity
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
This dissertation examines the social magisterium of Pope Leo XIII as it is developed in the aftermath of the French Revolution and during the nationalizing process of the liberal Italian state. The thesis of the dissertation is that Leo XIII provides Catholic social teaching with a proper vision of human relationship as a mode of analogical participation in the Lord’s goodness. In his own historical context, Leo’s analogical vision of social relations is developed in tension with the nation-state’s proposal of political citizenship as the social relation that relativizes every other relation – most especially one’s ecclesial relation. In our own context, Leo’s analogical vision of social relations stands in tension with the late-modern proposal of consumerism as the social reality that relativizes every other relation – including one’s matrimonial, familial, social, and ecclesial relations.

Committee:

Kelly Johnson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Russell Hittinger, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jana Bennett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael Carter, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Philosophy; Religious History; Social Structure; Theology

Keywords:

Catholic Social Teaching; social theory; political theory; citizenship; nationalism; consumerism; 19th century Catholicism; social Catholicism; Leo XIII; modern papal teaching; Catholic social magisterium; theological anthropology; social anthropology

Dombrowski, Andrew GFrames within Themselves: Treating Visual Imagery as a Variable in IR
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Political Science
What implications, if any, has the growing ubiquity of visual images had for state security practices and behaviors? To answer this question, this paper considers how social scientists should treat visual imagery as a causal variable in its own right. Of the two literatures that have seriously considered the implications that the visual has for IR, one treats it as an intervening variable and leaves it both under-conceptualized and deeply entangled with the discourse variable (the “CNN-effect”), while the other argues that visual images have no effects apart from the discursive practices that render them intelligible (the “discursive approach”). To date, no study has treated visual imagery as the independent variable. It is argued below that the independent effect that visual imagery enjoys finds its source in the sense experience that it produces in the human subject. Certain sense experiences will elicit universally shared responses from human beings. How an event or object appears is argued to constrain what it can mean.

Committee:

Alexander Wendt (Committee Chair); Jennifer Mitzen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Political Science

Keywords:

International Relations, Political Theory, Aesthetics, Visual Imagery, Foreign Policy, Risk Analysis

Poland, Kristofer P.A NATION OF GAMERS
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2007, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis probes the world of video games, focusing on their relationship to America’s contemporary sociopolitical scheme. Particular attention is paid to gaming’s place in popular culture, the role of leisure in the average American’s life, and the content and uses of video games. Video game culture, gaming communities, and individual gamers are examined as potential sources for a more pluralistic, participatory democracy.

Committee:

Julie White (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science, General

Keywords:

video game; videogame; video games; videogames; gaming; gamer; gamers; political science; political theory; popular culture; democracy; participatory democracy; pluralism; leisure

Paul, Peter M.Life, Liberty and Security: Using the Science and Politics of Thomas Hobbes in Public Administration
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2006, Urban Studies and Public Affairs
Can the political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes be applied to public administration theory development? Insecurity and unease follow the events of 9/11, and scholars in the field respond by searching for an acceptable relationship between security and liberty. Locked into a historical horizon that barely dips into the landscape of thought before the Founders, before the Declaration, before the Constitution, scholars rarely make their way back to the one political philosopher who has produced the most complete system of civil society born of war. Could responses benefit from such a coherent system? Renascent issues are of security and liberty, of civil society born out of abhorrence of war, and of the rights of individuals who chose to abandon the war of all against all. The comforts of commodious living gain new salience when contrasted against increased integration of the individual into the artificial muscles and sinews of what Hobbes called the Artificial Man, the monster, the Leviathan that civil society has become. What are the rights of survival of a political system who prime purpose is the keeping of the peace in a world where wars, like thunderstorms, are always impending as soon as the last has gone? What are the rights and powers of a sovereign whose sword would keep them all in awe? The present study surveys a recent spate of response by a special issue of the field’s leading journal. Using the history of ideas approach, the study asks whether reference to Hobbes’s understanding of civil science in civil society would not produce additional insights into the nature of post-9/11 security and the freedom of ourselves, both from premature and violent death, and the awesome power of the Leviathan.

Committee:

Ralph Hummel (Advisor)

Keywords:

Hobbes; Leviathan; security; liberty; political philosophy; science; politics; civil society; public administration; political theory

Culp, Andrew CEscape
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Comparative Studies
This work reimagines autonomy in the age of spatial enclosure. Rather than proposing a new version of the escapist running to the hills, "Escape" aligns the desire for disappearance, invisibility, and evasion with the contemporary politics of refusal, which poses no demands, resists representation, and refuses participation in already-existing politics. Such escape promises to break life out of a stifling perpetual present. The argument brings together culture, crisis, and conflict to outline the political potential of escape. It begins by reintroducing culture to theories of state power by highlighting complementary mixtures of authoritarian and liberal rule. The result is a typology of states that embody various aspects of conquest and contract: the Archaic State, the Priestly State, the Modern State, and the Social State. The argument then looks to the present, a time when the state exists in a permanent crisis provoked by global capitalist forces. Politics today is controlled by the incorporeal power of Empire and its lived reality, the Metropolis, which emerged as embodiments of this crisis and continue to further deepen exploitation and alienation through the dual power of Biopower and the Spectacle. Completing the argument, two examples are presented as crucial sites of political conflict. Negative affects and the urban guerrilla dramatize the conflicts over life and strategy that characterize daily existence in the Metropolis. Following a transdisciplinary concern for intensity, the work draws from a variety of historical, literary, cinematic, and philosophical examples that emphasize the cultural dimension of politics. The wide breadth of sources, which range from historical documents on the origins of the police, feminist literature on the politics of emotion, experimental punk film, and Deleuze and Guattari's nomadology, thus emulates the importance of force over appearance found in contemporary radical politics. Departing from many of the accounts of political change given by political theory or sociology, "Escape" shows how the recent politics of autonomy is essential to understanding the struggle against Empire.

Committee:

Eugene W. Holland (Advisor); Philip Armstrong (Committee Member); Mathew Coleman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature; Philosophy; Political Science

Keywords:

escape; autonomy; freedom; the state; empire; metropolis; biopower; the spectacle; affect; digital culture; continental philosophy; political theory; cultural studies; film; literature; media; deleuze and guattari; foucault; tiqqun;

Tucker, Brian L.Punk and the Political: The Role of Practices in Subcultural Lives
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2008, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
Studies of punk subculture have heretofore focused almost solely on the communicative properties of cultural artifacts, neglecting the role practices play in creating and affirming subcultural identities and at the same time tacitly putting forward a conception of the political subject that is detached from day to day experience. In this paper, I attempt to reassert the importance of subcultural practices, especially those of cultural production and political contestation. Utilizing Foucaultian ethics, theories of the role and importance of spaces of resistance, and agonistic democratic theory, I locate the political content of Do-It-Yourself punk in the day-to-day practices that facilitate the punk scene in an attempt to construct a materialist cultural studies.

Committee:

Julie A. White, PhD (Committee Chair); Judith Grant, PhD (Committee Member); Vincent Jungkunz, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

punk; D.I.Y.; cultural studies; political theory

Jones, Kyle T.Marcuse's Subject
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2015, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis is an exegesis of the Subject in Herbert Marcuse’s published work. In this regard, I use Marcuse’s Subject as a representation of the concepts he gleans from his diverse theoretical engagements in the history of political thought. I focus on three of these engagements and explain his conception of the Subject in each respectively. The first chapter explains the Subject that arises out of his critiques of the German Idealists (in particular, Kant and Hegel). The second chapter focuses on the Subject that arises out of his ambitious Freudian-Marxism that he develops in Eros and Civilization (1955). The third chapter explains the Subject in his magnum opus, One-Dimensional Man (1964), which represents a culmination, if not, theoretical synthesis of the previous theoretical pursuits described in the first and second chapters. By explaining Marcuse’s Subject, this thesis hopes to provide the reader with the conceptual apparatus to pursue further studies in determining what, if any, contributions Marcuse could offer political theorists today.

Committee:

Judith Grant (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

Herbert Marcuse; subject; political theory; German Idealism; One-Dimensional Man

Gardner, KaiInto the Fray : Norman Jacobson, the Free Speech Movement and the Clash of Commitments
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, History
Norman Jacobson, a renowned political theorist at the University of California, Berkeley, experienced firsthand the radical campus politics of the 1960s. Through an analysis of Jacobson's letters, speeches and lectures, this thesis seeks to reconstruct the way Jacobson understood and experienced the 1964 Free Speech Movement. Jacobson attempted to authentically face an overwhelming political crisis at the university. Ultimately, Jacobson knew he must take a stand in response to the student protests. By simply focusing on the concrete political action Jacobson did take, however, one risks overlooking the complexity of his political thought.

Committee:

Clayton Koppes (Advisor); Renee Romano (Committee Chair); Shelley Lee (Committee Member); David Kelley (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Education Philosophy; History; Philosophy; Political Science

Keywords:

The Free Speech Movement;Norman Jacobson;existentialism;Albert Camus;The Myth of Sisyphus;authenticity;commitment;responsibility;1960s;radical politics;Mario Savio;political theory;University of California, Berkeley;Clark Kerr;multiversity

Slodov, Dustin A.Nostalgia and World of Warcraft: Myth and Individual Resistance
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2008, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
Using post-structuralist psychonanalytic theory and ludology theory, this analysis looks at the game World of Warcraft (Warcraft). It asserts that Warcrafts relationship to its players resembles society's connection to the individual: they both give a framework of myths, of unreality, from which the individual defines him/herself. Defining oneself from a constructed reality results understanding of self and others in terms of a constructed identity. This arouses a desire for a unified sense of self, a way to connect back to the real. However, this desire can turn into pathology, where players try to ascribe meaning onto others in a possessive and degrading manner. In their attempts to reconcile their disconnectedness, anxiety and melancholy, they can choose to avoid this pathology. Games can inscribe myths on players, but players can resist this through creative use of meaning, creating identity from the self rather than as myths dictate, and avoiding power relationships created from constructed identity.

Committee:

Judith Grant (Advisor); Michelle Frasher-Rae (Committee Member); Mia Consalvo (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

world of warcraft; warcraft; myth; political theory; post structuralism; politics of resistance; resistance; psychoanalysis; ludology; game theory