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Masterson, Colette M.A Qualitative Study of College Student Participation in Volunteer Fundraising through Dance Marathon
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Higher Education (Education)
The purpose of this study was to describe the motivation, experience and outcomes of undergraduate students participating in a dance marathon. This research specifically focused on participants of BuckeyeThon at The Ohio State University, a 12 hour student created dance marathon benefitting Nationwide Children’s Hospital, a CMN hospital. I explored how participants were motivated to participate in the event, how they participated in the event, and in turn, how their experience may have influenced their behavior and experiences after the event. A basic interpretive qualitative methods approach was used to study the experience of dance marathon participants. Data was collected from five dance marathon participants of BuckeyeThon 2015. These participants completed a pre-event interview, three during event interviews during the dance marathon, and a post-event reflection. Themes of connection to the cause, event community, and philanthropy and fundraising were identified as the most prevalent for research participants. The findings derived from this research may help to influence best practices in cocurricular philanthropy programs. Additionally, nonprofits, including higher education institutions, may learn how to harness past experience in volunteer fundraising into future philanthropic behavior.

Committee:

Peter Mather (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

higher education; student affairs; philanthropy; co-curricular philanthropy; dance marathon

Witte, Deborah A.Women's Leadership in Philanthropy: An Analysis of Six Giving Circles
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
Women have played an essential role in the development of philanthropy in the United States. While their giving behavior and financial contributions have been studied extensively, other aspects of their philanthropy-namely leadership-have not been documented as completely. The giving circle-a new trend within philanthropy where groups of individuals pool their money, and through educating themselves about issues in their community, decide together where to award their funds-provides an ideal case for this study, as the majority of giving circle members are women. In order to gain a better understanding of women's leadership, focus groups were conducted with more than 35 members of six giving circles. This study asks the questions: What meaning, understanding, or insights about women's philanthropic leadership can be derived from the experiences and perceptions articulated by members of giving circles? What definitions, models, or new articulations of leadership can be discerned? and What are the implication of the stories of leadership that members tell for the formation, growth, and sustainability of giving circles? A multimethod analysis of the focus groups reveals that these women identify leadership in three primary ways: leading through relationships; leading with a focus on impact and change; and leading to create civic capacity. It is the third frame-leading to create civic capacity-that holds the most promise for an expanded understanding and a clearer articulation of women's leadership in philanthropy. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Philomena Essed, PhD (Committee Chair); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Suzanne W. Morse, PhD (Committee Member); Angela M. Eikenberry, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Organizational Behavior; Social Psychology; Social Research; Womens Studies

Keywords:

philanthropy; women; leadership; giving circles; qualitative methodology; focus groups; Skype; grassroots; networks; impact; community capacity building; charitable behavior; grantmaking; community; human females

Kuhr, Brittanie ElizabethDonor Perceptions of Cultivation and Stewardship at Lourdes University
Master of Education, University of Toledo, 2015, Higher Education
Donor cultivation and retention is vital to the continued success of higher education institutions, especially at a time when tuition is on the rise and state funding continues to decrease. Mid-range donors are the future of major gifts, thus it is vital for institutions to have an adequate understanding of their giving influences and patterns. This research solicited mid-range donors for their perceptions on cultivation and stewardship practices at Lourdes University. An electronic survey was distributed to 275 individuals who were identified by Lourdes University as mid-range donors. Fifty-three surveys were electronically submitted for a response rate of 19%. Respondents placed significant value on Lourdes University’s positive influence on the community. Responses also revealed that there is a lack of awareness in regards to campus events and giving societies. The researcher suggested that Lourdes capitalize on the University’s involvement and influence on the community when cultivating new donors. Recommendations also included increasing donor scope through engagement of community members rather than focusing solely on alumni.

Committee:

Debra Harmening, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Snejana Slantcheva-Durst, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David Meabon, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Finance; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Fundraising; Philanthropy; Cultivation; Engagement; Solicitation; Stewardship; Higher Education; Education; Donors; Retention; Mid-Range; Mid-Range Donors; Alumni; Influences; Colleges; Universities; Giving;

Oyakawa, MichelleBuilding A Movement In The Non-Profit Industrial Complex
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Sociology
Today, democracy in the United States is facing a major challenge: Wealthy elites have immense power to influence election outcomes and policy decisions, while the political participation of low-income people and racial minorities remains relatively low. In this context, non-profit social movement organizations are one of the key vehicles through which ordinary people can exercise influence in our political system and pressure elite decision-makers to take action on matters of concern to ordinary citizens. A crucial fact about social movement organizations is that they often receive significant financial support from elites through philanthropic foundations. However, there is no research that details exactly how non-profit social movement organizations gain resources from elites or that analyzes how relationships with elite donors impact grassroots organizations’ efforts to mobilize people to fight for racial and economic justice. My dissertation aims to fill that gap. It is an ethnographic case study of a multiracial statewide organization called the Ohio Organizing Collaborative (OOC) that coordinates progressive social movement organizations in Ohio. Member organizations work on a variety of issues, including ending mass incarceration, environmental justice, improving access to early childhood education, and raising the minimum wage. In 2016, the OOC registered over 155,000 people to vote in Ohio. I conducted 55 semi-structured interviews with staff members of OOC and allied organizations, including funders. I also observed 330 hours of OOC meetings and events and collected over 1300 documents pertaining to OOC’s history and fundraising. Using funds from foundations, the OOC has made progress toward their goal of building social movement infrastructure in Ohio. However, the OOC faces tension between the demands of its elite funding sources on one hand and its mission to organize communities on the other. This work illuminates the mechanisms through which elites impact efforts to organize poor people and people of color. Non-profit organizational fields, often referred to by social movement leaders as the non-profit industrial complex (NPIC), are governed by a technocratic political logic wherein elite experts determine strategy and decide what issues to prioritize. The Ohio Organizing Collaborative, on the other hand, is governed by a populist political logic, which holds that political leaders should prioritize the demands of ordinary people. I find that the NPIC limits nonprofit organization leaders’ ability to build trust and authentically engage ordinary citizens in the political process. The structure of the NPIC distorts accountability, making organizers beholden to elite funders instead of grassroots leaders. Issue-based funding and short-term grants make it difficult for organizers to focus on their primary mission, which involves recruiting and mentoring community members and building relationships across race, class and geography to strengthen social movement infrastructure.

Committee:

Korie Edwards (Advisor); Andrew Martin (Committee Member); Lopez Steve (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

social movements; politics; elites; organizing; race; mobilization; non-profit organizations; philanthropy; elections

Cunningham, Lisa J.Correcting Arthur Munby: Philanthropy and Disfigurement in Victorian England
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2009, English (Arts and Sciences)

“Correcting Arthur Munby: Philanthropy and Disfigurement in Victorian England” focuses on the life and works of Arthur Munby, a poet and amateur social scientist whose literary representations of working-class women and efforts on behalf of disfigured women have been overlooked in Victorian scholarship. This project examines Munby's journals and poetry for evidence of the extent to which he fought institutional and symbolic oppression on behalf of working-class and disfigured people on three critical fronts: literary representation, the right to employment, and access to healthcare. I demonstrate the extent to which Munby combated oppression at the individual level of personal action, the symbolic level of representation, and the institutional levels of access and inclusion.

In Chapter One I examine Munby's fifty-year writing career that. I argue that his literary accounts of working women are important in their attempt to change the symbolic level of working-class oppression in Victorian England. Instead of presenting pastoral images of country folk that sanitize the working-class, I argue that through his poetry, Munby sought to accurately represent the dialect, labor, and pride of working-class women.

In Chapter Two I argue that Munby's commitment to working-class women extended into the realm of employment and medical treatment through his relationship with a severely disfigured woman, Harriet Langdon. I argue that for Victorians, disfigurement was collapsed within the frame of disability, the two conditions conflated to such an extent that there was little appreciable difference. I argue that Munby's philanthropy was based on benevolence rather than exclusively on abjection.

In Chapter Three I explore the lack of access to hospital care for the disfigured and Munby's successful fight to help provide that access. I critique the Royal Hospital for Incurables where Langdon became a pensioner as fundamentally embedded in classist and ableist practices. I argue that while Munby provided immense aid to Langdon, he was deeply complicit in the negative rendering of the disfigured as unhappy, pathetic, and depressive individuals who can never marry or integrate fully into the social fabric of Victorian life. I use the journals as literary texts and argue that Munby is an unreliable narrator, unwittingly revealing his own prejudgments of disfigured life more than the reality of what it meant to live within a disfigured identity. I read against Munby's version of Langdon to reveal her subjectivity, normalcy, and capacity for joy.

Committee:

Joseph P. McLaughlin, PhD (Committee Chair); Carey Snyder, PhD (Committee Member); Nicole Reynolds, PhD (Committee Member); Susan Sarnoff, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

English literature

Keywords:

Munby; Disfigurement; Philanthropy

Strode, James PatrickDonor motives to giving to intercollegiate athletics
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, Physical Activity and Educational Services
Academic institutions have experienced an unprecedented decline in funding from state and local governments, and intercollegiate athletic departments are not immune to this trend. Philanthropic giving has increasingly become a necessity for the financial vitality of athletic departments. A thorough understanding of what motivates individuals to donate money is critical for development staffs to design marketing campaigns that maximize gift giving. With few studies in sport management literature related to donor motives, the purpose of this study was to develop a psychometrically sound instrument based on theory to explain motivations to give. Using McClelland’s theory of needs and helping behavior, items were generated for a survey related to four motives to explain giving—achievement, affiliation, philanthropy and power. This survey was tested for reliability and validity through the use of a panel of experts, a field test and a pilot test. Item-to-total correlations and Cronbach’s alphas were used to prove validity. A final instrument, including an existing measure on fan identification, was sent to a random sampling of athletic donors at a large public Midwestern institution. One thousand three hundred and thirty four surveys were mailed, with 683 returned for a response rate of 46%. The survey was designed to test a series of hypothesis related to the following variables: motives to give, fan identification, gender and level of donation. The results of the study showed that the strongest motive to give was achievement (M = 5.7, SD = 1.1), with affiliation as the second highest motive (M = 5.5, SD = 1.1). Using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), no statistical significance was found between gender and the four motives. A t-test indicated no difference between gender and identification. A positive correlation was found between identification and the achievement motive, and a t-test was conducted to show that this relationship was significant. A hierarchical multiple regression indicated identification was not predictive of giving. The four motives developed for this study explained only 1% of the variance in giving. A donor profile for the institution was developed. Implications of these results were discussed and suggested for future research presented.

Committee:

Janet Fink (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration, Marketing

Keywords:

Donor; Motives; Fund raising; Philanthropy; Giving; Sport; University; Identification; Achievement; Affiliation; Power

Marshall, Charminn BleuzetteExploring the Functions of Alumni Associations at Selected Urban Universities
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Education : Educational Studies
A mixed-methods approach was used to assess the organizational structure and programming of 30 alumni associations at selected urban universities. A content analysis synthesized data regarding mission statements, marketing techniques, membership cultivation, innovation, and aspiration. An exploratory factor analysis converted 31 programming, activity, and service variables into a 12-component solution. A conceptual model of an alumni continuum was created that consisted of four stages of engagement: prospect, apprentice, alum, and benefactor. A confirmatory factor analysis of the four hypothesized structures yielded one as the best fit. The results of a MANOVA indicated there was no significant difference in programming based on size and type of institution. The findings can be shared with participants to enhance programmatic endeavors, foster institutional pride, decrease student attrition, and cultivate a spirit of volunteerism and philanthropy among their alumni.

Committee:

Lanthan Camblin, PhD (Committee Chair); Vanessa Allen-Brown, PhD (Committee Member); Roger Collins, PhD (Committee Member); Nancy Evers, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

alumni; alumni association; retention; volunteerism; philanthropy

Latta, Marcia SloanCHARACTERISTICS AND MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS OF MAJOR DONORS TO BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Leadership Studies

With declining state support, increased financial need on the part of the fastest growing demographic sections of the population, and public policy that discourages major increases in tuition for public higher education, the only logical source of additional finances for public colleges and universities is increased private funding through philanthropic contributions. The purpose of the present study was to examine what motivated individuals to make major gifts of $25,000 or more to the Bowling Green State University (BGSU) Building Dreams Centennial Campaign, and to identify the characteristics of these donors. Data were collected from the Building Dreams Campaign Survey, which was sent to all 310 individuals who gave $25,000 or more. A total of 58% of those contacted responded to the survey. The survey solicited feedback on the size of the campaign gift, motivations for making the gift, and demographic data such as household income, geographic location of home, whether or not the individual was an alumnus, length of time he or she had been a donor to BGSU, gender, and age. To determine whether each participant had served on a volunteer board at BGSU, and if so, which one(s), information was obtained through the Office of Alumni and Development database, which is the database of record for university board service.

The first research question asked: Does the amount of the major gift differ by age, geographic region, and gender? The results showed that there is a significant difference by age, with donors in the 70-79 years of age category giving the most, and also by gender, with men giving more than women. There was not a statistical significance in giving by geographic region. The second research question asked: Does the amount of major gift differ by the presence of motivational factors? Respondents were given 20 different possible motivational factors and were allowed to choose as many of them as they wished. Only one of these factors was significantly related to the amount of the gift. The factor of Being Asked was negatively related to the amount of the gift. Research question three asked: Does serving on a voluntary board at the university impact the amount of gift? The results showed that there was a positive relationship between serving on a board and the size of gift, and that those who served on the Board of Trustees or Foundation Board gave significantly more than those who served on other boards at the institution. The fourth research question asked which motivational factors and demographic variables best predict the amount of gift. The variables entered into the equation were Income, Leaving a Legacy, Age, Identification with a Project, and Board Participation. Income accounted for the greatest amount of variance in the amount of giving.

Findings from the study can assist university administrators, development professionals and researchers interested in philanthropic giving obtain a better understanding of the characteristics and motivations of potential major donors. Ultimately, this knowledge can better utilize both human and financial resources in development offices in higher education, by helping development officers to identify and develop relationships with potential donors, determine which individuals to consider for board service, and ultimately, asking them for donations.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor); Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Committee Member); Carolyn Palmer (Committee Member); Ernest Savage (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education History; Higher Education

Keywords:

major giving motivations; non-profit board governance; fundraising; higher education; development; advancement; philanthropy; philanthropic campaign; university; college

Crawford, Jessie AArt for One or Art for All? Exploring the Role and Impact of Private Collection Museums in the United States
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2016, Arts Policy and Administration
The trend towards establishing one’s own private collection museum has been on the rise both in the United States and globally. Through research of publicly available data, this study analyzes two case museums: The Pizzuti Collection in Columbus, Ohio, and The Rubell Family Collection and the corresponding Contemporary Arts Foundation in Miami, Florida. Qualitative data was collected from the theme areas of the profiles of their founders, their management and governance strategies, the programs that they provide to their communities, their financial health and amount of public support, and their levels of community was used to situate each institution within Moore’s strategic triangle used in nonprofit management analysis to determine the benefit of the existence of these new museums. Research indicated that the case study private museums do generate public value and private museum functionality makes the public museums’ lives easier by providing artwork loans and allowing them to focus on their collections rather than making sure that a donor is satisfied with the display of their painstakingly assembled personal collection. The addition of the private collection museum is a positive evolution within the current museum ecosystem.

Committee:

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller (Advisor); Wayne Lawson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Cultural Resources Management; Fine Arts; Museum Studies; Museums; Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Private Museums; Museums; Museum Studies; philanthropy; public value

Bartolini, William F.Prospective Donors’ Cognitive and Emotive Processing of Charitable Gift Requests
PHD, Kent State University, 2005, College of Communication and Information / School of Communication Studies
Utilizing Ajzen’s (1985) theory of planned behavior as the theoretical basis, prospective donors’ cognitive and emotive processing of requests for charitable gifts was examined. The study extended the model by including emotional involvement operationalized as self-reported strength of discrete emotions. Within a counterbalanced design, subjects (N = 144) watched 3 nonprofit organizations’ fundraising videos and were offered a $15 honorarium, which could be contributed to the organizations as a measure of behavior. Among attitudes toward (a) making a gift, (b) philanthropy, and (c) the organization, only attitude toward the gift (ATT_G) was found to explain a significant portion of behavioral intention (BI). Social and moral norms were found to be components of subjective norms and contributed to behavior intention, whereas descriptive norms did not. Perceived behavioral control also contributed to BI. BI was not related to actual behavior, nor were attitudes or perceived behavioral control. Among the emotions, sadness and puzzlement negatively impacted ATT_G and compassion positively impacted ATT_G. Anger, sadness, and contentment negatively impacted BI and compassion positively affected BI. Higher levels of fear, contentment, happiness, and compassion were related to more positive ATT_G, whereas higher levels of anger and puzzlement were related to less positive ATT_G. Implications for both theory development and professional practice are presented. First, although the TPB effectively predicts intentions to make a charitable gift, the study questions the assumption that positive attitudes or intentions are related to behavior. This study suggests that there are other factors which may impact behavior. Second, this study confirms that people have multiple emotional reactions to altruistic requests, suggesting that research examining the impact of single emotions on persuasive situations may be inadequate. Third, the study suggests that there are cognitions and emotions simultaneously being considered in the decision-making process. For the fundraising professional, these results suggest that development officers should closely monitor prospective donors’ emotional reactions, assess an individual’s attitude toward making a gift, provide information reinforcing that others are making gifts as well as the obligation to assist others, and reinforce the affordability of the gift.

Committee:

Rebecca Rubin (Advisor)

Keywords:

theory of planned behavior; altruism; philanthropy; charitable requests; appraisal theory; persuasion; influence; interpersonal communication

Lee, Hyung-JinFactors Related to Grantee Perception of Service Quality in the Community Chest of Korea
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2006, Social Welfare
Foundations achieve their impact largely by working in partnership with their grantees. The foundation-grantee relationship provides a unique and critical lens for observation and evaluation of foundation performance and organizational effectiveness. That is, grantees function in an intermediary sphere between a foundation’s resource base and its social impact. The ultimate beneficiaries of more productive foundation-grantee relationships are not just grantees and foundations, but also the groups they seek to help, including the public at large. The main purpose of this study is to explore and identify key dimensions of foundation service quality, using Community Chest of Korea’s (CCK) as a test case. Another purpose is to examine the effects of these key dimensions on grantee overall satisfaction and grantee perception of CCK’s impact on the recipient organization, the field, and the community. In order to measure quality of service, grantee perceptions of service quality will be empirically investigated using an adapted instrument based on: (1) SERVPERF and SERVQUAL; (2) LIBQUAL+; (3) the Grantee Perception Survey instrument; and (4) consultation with CCK staff and grantees. CCK is the largest grantmaking organization in Korea with features of public, fundraising, and quasi-government-linked foundations. Under these circumstances, the foundation-grantee relationship is more critical and complex in that it is driven by (1) competition for acquisition of scarce and valued resources; (2) donors’ desires to know how their contributions make a difference; and (3) the satisfaction of the public at large. The target population for this study was: (1) awarded grantees; and (2) declined applicants. Data collection was conducted by mail survey questionnaire. Final sample size for analysis was 651. Hypotheses were tested using exploratory factor analysis, hierarchical regression analysis, and Pearson correlation. As a result, exploratory factor analysis identified four dimensions with 31 items. The four dimensions comprised Competence, Expertise, Affect, and Evaluation. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that higher level of service quality is associated with higher level of overall satisfaction and perception of impact. Pearson correlation found that higher level of overall satisfaction is strongly positively correlated to higher level of perception of impact.

Committee:

Dennis Young (Advisor)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

Foundation; Nonprofit; Philanthropy; Grantmaking; Effectiveness; Performance; Foundation-Grantee Relationship; Social Impact; Community Chest of Korea; Satisfaction; Service Quality; SERVQUAL; SERVPERF; Exploratory Factor Analysis

Bodwell, Gregory B.Grassroots, Inc.: A Sociopolitical History of the Cleveland School Voucher Battle, 1992-2002
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2006, History
The question of the socioeconomic character of the movement for school vouchers in Ohio has implications for historians and policymakers. Understanding the constituencies that drive reform can alert legislators to shape policies that balance the legitimate interests of all. Historians of U.S. education have long been interested in the class origins of school reform, which they have often portrayed as ironically top-down, even into the twentieth century. Scholars of school choice have accurately observed an unusual, bipartisan alliance of elite and grassroots elements supporting the movement. Symbolic locally of these two socioeconomic extremes in the push for reform were millionaire Akron industrialist David L. Brennan and black Cleveland councilwoman Fannie M. Lewis. Despite polemical celebration of school choice as grassroots, voucher reform in Ohio overall was more top-down than bottom-up. Original quantitative analyses of patterns of ideological and financial backing as well as a review of news, legal, and other sources on the legislative, judicial, academic, and public opinion battles over the Cleveland voucher program suggest that representatives of the intellectual, socioeconomic, and political elite primarily drove reform, during a period in which Reaganesque neoliberal philosophies of privatization were gaining adherents even among major Center-Left institutions. Motivations among the corporate and foundation elite to support school choice encompassed a blend of idealism and economic interest.

Committee:

David Hammack (Advisor)

Keywords:

school choice; education policy; lobbying; nonprofit organizations; philanthropy; foundations

Guion, David StantonA STUDY OF SPIRITUALITY IN CONTEMPORARY VISUAL ART AND FOUNDATIONS FUNDING
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, Art Education
This study traces the emergence and defines the role of spirituality in the contemporary visual arts and examines and proposes possibilities for nurturing that role through philanthropic foundations within the context of postmodern American culture. The study describes the issues and changing attitudes regarding spirituality in art within the artworld and the philanthropic community. Extensively analyzing the work of contemporary artist Bill Viola (b. 1951), the study examines the references to the sublime and spirituality in his work and their connections with postmodern theory. The contemporary discourse of the sublime, championed by French philosopher Jean-François Lyotard (1924-1998), serves as a structural grounding for spirituality in a postmodern context. Recommendations and subsequent implications are made for combining contemporary research, writings, and artistic creations that are spiritually centered in order to understand the potential impact of the growing phenomenon of spirituality in art. The study identifies issues and problems and poses new possibilities for substantively supporting, encouraging dialogue, and disseminating information about spirituality in art that enables it to thrive in postmodern American culture.

Committee:

Wayne P. Lawson, PhD (Advisor); Sydney Walker, PhD (Committee Member); Patricia Stuhr, PhD (Committee Member); Jennifer Cheavens, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Art History; Fine Arts; Philosophy

Keywords:

spirituality; Bill Viola; postmodern theory; sublime; philanthropic foundations; philanthropy; contemporary art

Pinion, Tyson LFactors That Influence Alumni Giving at Three Private Universities
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2016, Higher Education
State and federal funding for higher education is becoming more restrictive at the same time competition for donations to non-profit and educational institutions grows. As such, university development departments are challenged with identifying potential donors and with adopting more efficient practices so as to ensure successful fund-raising campaigns. This study used de-identified alumni donation information from three, private, Ohio-based universities over a 10-year period, 1995-2005. Using Astin’s Theory of Student of Involvement (1984) as its framework, the researcher sought to determine what influence, if any, alumni demographic information, undergraduate fields of study, and undergraduate experiences in on-campus academic, social, and athletic pursuits have on alumni donations. A significant finding from this study is the fact that having alumni involved in more than one on-campus academic, social, or athletic pursuit was the most significant predictor of alumnus total donations, the study’s criterion variable. This study is believed to be the first to have applied Astin’s student involvement theory to alumni donation patterns. Future researchers may identify even more opportunities to target philanthropic opportunities among alumni so as to ensure more efficient, effective higher education donor campaigns.

Committee:

Ronald Opp, PhD (Committee Chair); Debra Harmening, PhD (Committee Member); Michael Coomes, PhD (Committee Member); Jim Troha, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Alumni; donations; fundraising; philanthropy; student affairs; predictive modeling; alumni affairs; athletics; development; advancement; astin; donor; campaign; target marketing; participation rates; academic affairs; strategic planning; board; private

Hagerty, RonnieRole of Foundations in the Changing World of Philanthropy: A Houston Perspective
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
From the earliest days of the American nation, philanthropy has had a defining role in leading change. Philanthropy has provided vision and voice for nascent social movements ranging from civil rights and the women’s movement to AIDS research and environmentalism. As the 21st century has moved into its second decade, philanthropy finds itself facing significant pressures that threaten to compromise its ability to innovate and advocate for issues and individuals whose voices cannot be heard over the public rhetoric of the day. Once perceived as the purview of the rich and well connected, modern philanthropy cuts across social, economic, and ethnic classifications. Historically, private foundations have played a defining role in philanthropic investment. These tax-exempt charitable organizations, typically funded by a single source (individual, family, or corporation), were created to serve the common good, primarily through grantmaking. As philanthropy continues to evolve through new models and methodologies that enrich, extend, and question traditional giving parameters, foundations are exploring new paradigms for redefining and reinforcing their leadership capabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of economic and social forces defining the environment in which private foundations operate in the 21st century, and to learn how Houston foundations are adapting to this new reality. Further, the research captured their individual and collective vision for the future of foundation philanthropy. The dissertation provides a brief overview history of philanthropy to position it in a 21st century context. Within this construct, the study has assessed the nature and impact of current philanthropic challenges, and sought an understanding of future learning and leadership strategies as defined of by members of the Houston foundation community. This qualitative, multicase research study is comprised of in-depth interviews with Houston foundation leaders. Rather than setting out to illustrate a particular theory, the study has been designed to capture the perceptions of foundation leaders as they assess and adapt to a rapidly changing philanthropic environment. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, PhD (Committee Chair); Lize Booysen, PhD (Committee Member); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Sandie Taylor, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Organizational Behavior; Social Psychology

Keywords:

Philanthropy; Foundations; Nonprofit Sector; Charities; Charitable Organizations; Fundraising; Grantmaking; Philanthropic Foundations; Private Foundations; Houston; Change; Giving Motivation; Community; Leadership

Emory, Jorie LynnePublic Pedagogy and Relational Philanthropy: An Insider Action Research Study of Columbus SOUP
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
This qualitative research study critically examines the public pedagogy that surrounds community-based—or relational—philanthropy. Situated within the broader context of social capital and community democracy, the study considers what is being taught or learned (and how) when individuals engage in community philanthropy. This study is grounded in critical and feminist theories and employs insider action research methodology to explore the organizational and programmatic activities of Columbus SOUP, a recurring grantmaking project in Columbus, Ohio. I am positioned as an insider in this research: both as a board member of Columbus SOUP, and as a community-based and socially engaged arts practitioner. I pose the question: How does Columbus SOUP operate as a site for public pedagogy toward new understandings of grassroots and/or relational philanthropy? to facilitate the emergence of participant stories about their experiences with relational philanthropy. Participants include twenty individuals from Columbus, Ohio who actively engaged in Columbus SOUP, including Columbus SOUP board members, grant applicants, event attendees, volunteers, and myself as researcher and co-participant. Several significant themes emerged from interviews, observations, and researcher reflections, including those revolving around issues of transformative learning, building social capital, community strategies for engagement, and tensions and challenges embedded in “grassroots” projects, such as the urge to institutionalize/corporatize community-based initiatives. This study is not meant to provide a prescriptive approach for the fields of philanthropy or nonprofit management, but rather to illuminate the transformative, informal teaching and learning that takes place in public events and programs.

Committee:

James H. Sanders, III, PhD (Advisor); Karen Hutzel, PhD (Committee Member); Joni Acuff, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Arts Management; Pedagogy

Keywords:

public pedagogy; philanthropy; insider action research; giving circles; crowdfunding; relational practice; nonprofits; social capital; community democracy

Eicher, Michael D.The Influence of Leadership Style on Philanthropy and Fundraising in Three Independent Appalachian Schools
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2017, Educational Administration (Education)
This multiple-methods study explored the influence that leadership style has on philanthropy and fundraising, and investigated how behaviors and characteristics associated with leadership style promote successful fundraising in three P-12 independent schools. Research was conducted via a multiple-methods design in which qualitative and quantitative approaches were used. Initially, qualitative interviews were conducted with the head of school, the director of development, and a major donor to the respective school. Subsequently, quantitative data were collected using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire for a more complete understanding of each head of schools’ unique leadership style. Findings revealed that heads of school utilize both transformational and transactional leadership behaviors and characteristics. Additionally, results indicated that the ability of independent heads of schools to delegate leadership tasks, thereby utilizing a distributive leadership approach in addition to transactional and transformational leadership achieved maximum success in their fundraising efforts.

Committee:

Charles Lowery (Committee Chair); Krisanna Machtmes (Committee Member); Leonard Allen (Committee Member); Renee Middleton (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

Annual fund; Capital campaign; Charter School; Director of development; Distributive leadership; Fundraising; Transactional Leadership; Transformational Leadership; Philanthropy; Successful Campaign Funding; Independent School

Cugliari, Christine WetherholtA post-positivist qualitative study of philanthropic donors to Appalachian Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Agricultural Education
The 29 county region of eastern and southern Ohio designated as Appalachia held only 2% of the endowed foundation assets in the state while housing 12% of the population and 16% of the poverty. Consequently, there were insufficient assets to carry out the work of the nonprofit sector in the region. The purpose of this study was to identify, examine, and understand the motives and criteria of donors for making philanthropic gifts to Appalachian Ohio. My intent was for the knowledge garnered from this study to be of value to those working in Appalachian Ohio to expand philanthropic giving and, eventually, endowed assets in the region. A post-positivist qualitative study was conducted. Working through 7 of the region’s community foundations that held assets in excess of $1 million, 10 philanthropic donors were identified and interviewed. For the purposes of triangulation and crystallization, other methods utilized included member checks, peer debriefing, and reflexive journaling. Finally, a grounded survey was completed by 14 community foundation professionals from within the region. The information generated provided a means of checking for converging and diverging information. As a result of the research, several themes emerged regarding donors and their giving: influences, connectedness, and gifts. In concert with other studies, the results indicate that family and religion are key influences of people’s giving. Philanthropic donors are connected to something larger than themselves. In addition to family and religion, community is a strong point of connection. Involvement in organizations and activities is also a means of connecting. Finally, donors proposed telling the story as a means of connecting others in the community with the power of philanthropy. The gift process includes 3 key components: the ask, the decision making, and the thank you. The ask for a gift should be personal and made by the right person at the right time. The decision making process is careful, thoughtful, and analytical. Through their gifts, philanthropic donors seek to meet their interests and accomplish tasks that they are unwilling or unable to do themselves. To complete the gift, a thank you is imperative, as it not only ends one gift cycle but also serves as the beginning for the next ask. Also emerging from the data was a sense of hope; a vision of a brighter future for the Appalachian Ohio region. The data collected from community foundation professionals via the grounded survey converged with the thoughts of the donors with 3 notable exceptions. First, professionals failed to truly comprehend the important of the ask, at least from the perspective of the donors. Second, the task of completing personal mission through giving was not seen by the professionals. Last, the decision to make a gift was not seen by community foundation professionals to be an investing decision. Drawing on the data collected, the literature, and the analysis conducted, major conclusions reached included: philanthropic donors are ordinary people; stories of giving need to be told; professional advisors are a secondary, rather than primary, route to donors; and community foundations must be more welcoming.

Committee:

Garee Earnest (Advisor)

Keywords:

philanthropy; donors; Appalachia; Appalachian Ohio; giving; community foundations