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Poonamallee, LathaFROM THE DIALECTIC TO THE DIALOGIC: GENERATIVE ORGANIZING FOR SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION – A COMPARATIVE CASE STUDY IN INDIA
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2006, Organizational Behavior
The dissertation examines generative capacities and generative organizing for social transformation from a global-critical-organizationalperspective. It is a comparative case study of three social experiments in India, all of which are focused on creating sustainable alternatives for local livelihood. The first case features a successful social transformation through reclamation of traditional environment management methods and creation of parallel governing structures for the ‘commons’. The second case is an attempt by an elected village leader to create a sustainable and locally networked economic model that he hopes can become a viable model for rural India. The third case, a corporate consortium in India has formed a livelihood advancement school for urban, underprivileged youth and places them in jobs thus opening doors to the new economy. However, they vary in terms of structural characteristics occupying unique spaces in a shared post colonial context. This study makes a number of contributions to our field:1) substantive - it brings marginal perspectives to mainstream conversation and moves toward mitigating the ethnocentric imbalance of our field; 2) paradigmatic – based on Hindu philosophy it offers a framework for holistic ontology that transcends the dualistic ontological conceptions of subjectivity-objectivity; 3) epistemological-theoretical, it presents a dialogic framework for studying change, bringing together the much polarized discourses of change-continuity, structure-agency, cooperation-conflict, internal-external sources of change, long term-short term, and output-process and proposes that generative capacities of organizations rest on the interplay between these polarized entities that are conceived of as foundational elements of change phenomena; 4) theoretical-practical - it presents an exposition of Generative Organizing as the interplay between intentional and emergent organizing for change; 5) methodological – it locates itself in an innovative social ontology called Site Ontology (Schatzki, 2002), uses the practice- arrangements bundle as the level of analysis and offers a conceptual framework for conducting multi-level research to examine complex social phenomena; and 6) pedagogic – this dissertation challenges conventional, polarized and simplistic theorizing of organizational life and argues that if education should simultaneously fulfill the functions of preparing individuals for meaningful employment as well as progressive and cosmopolitan citizenship, it is important to bring critical thinking back into our curricula.

Committee:

Fry Ronald (Advisor)

Keywords:

social change; organizing; critical management studies; generative organizing; qualitative research method; post colonialism

Srivastva, AlkaIn Search of Noble Organizing: A Study in Social Entrepreneurship
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2004, Organizational Behavior
This dissertation is an invitation for dialogue and change. It introduces a generative, grounded theory of noble organizing; a dynamic process linking noble intentions and the translation of those intentions into social action through processes that defy traditional norms. This inquiry explores four social entrepreneurship organizations in their commitment to the common good and high purpose of developing human communities. Two for profit companies employ a multi pronged holistic approach to economic community development by 1) using the business of finance and credit to stimulate growth in disinvested areas and 2) providing quality service and care for a constituency that includes its low-income minority workforce, clients and ultimately the industry through public policy advocacy and reform. Two nonprofit entities cultivate and maintain communities of the highest quality by 1) providing social justice organizations with alternative funding sources to promote community-based advocacy work and 2) serving recovering drug and alcohol abusers by promoting personal development and collective learning. Interviews with strategic persons, published materials and subsequent consensual validation from each of the organizations were used to develop narratives that provide the framework for this study. A discourse analysis of the narratives revealed six universalistic principles characterizing the ethos of social entrepreneurship. Exploration into the Principles of Intentionality, Serendipity, Values-Led Governance, Unconventional Wisdom, Reinvention and Reverberation offer ways of approaching ideas for developing new directions for organizing in the interest of human beings with the intent to engage persons who desire change for the future and wish to participate in that future by contributing and influencing its own transformation. The term noble is used as a verb qualifier to understand and describe organizing processes that focus on conduct in the service of others and expressed through actions. Through the study of social entrepreneurship, the development of propositions offer insights into noble organizing that provide implications for further inquiry. By promoting the generativity of noble organizing and its concomitant values that support and sustain social entrepreneurship organizations, contributions to the field of positive organizational scholarship, management theory and/or practice could generate a multiplicity of transformations toward a higher moral direction for members in society.

Committee:

David Cooperrider (Advisor)

Keywords:

Social Entrepreneurship; Noble Organizing; Organizing Processes; Narrative Development; Positive Organizational Scholarship

Davis, Casey J.Using Self-Organizing Maps to Cluster Products for Storage Assignment in a Distribution Center
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2017, Industrial and Systems Engineering (Engineering and Technology)
This thesis provides a methodology on how to use self-organizing maps (SOMs) to cluster stock keeping units (SKUs) based on historical order data, in order to effectively slot a forward area in a distribution center. This methodology relies on creating zones that contain SKUs that are commonly ordered together. There are several techniques that improve on the benchmark method tested including a percent reduction of up to 11% in the total time to complete all orders given a zone configuration. Results are discussed as well as possible future work that could improve upon the methodology.

Committee:

Dale Masel, Ph.D (Advisor); Gary Weckman, Ph.D (Committee Member); Dianna Schwerha, Ph.D (Committee Member); William Young, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Industrial Engineering

Keywords:

Warehousing Design; Clustering Techniques; Self-Organizing Maps; SOMs; Unsupervised Learning; Product Picking

Woo, Victoria Choi YueTHRIVING IN TRANSITION: COGNITIVE, SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL RESOURCES FOR TIMES OF CHANGE
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2015, Management
There is a widely accepted sentiment that a large and growing segment of the developed world experiences life and work in a more dynamic and less predictable way than ever before. Many people, across a wide spectrum of age cohorts, will engage in frequent transitions throughout their lifetimes. Some will relocate multiple times and will traverse numerous peaks and valleys of change during those career and life transitions. Streams of research have been dedicated to the negative consequence of dealing with these disruptions as compared to a stable and settled existence. Large bodies of research and commentary have been produced on how to manage the difficult process and negative consequence of accelerating change. In contrast, my research offers empirical evidence that such transitions can result in positive consequences for one’s well-being. It is a study of how thriving can become a “normal” outcome of experiencing change and how we might revise the lexicon and expectations of engaging in transitions. I conducted three studies on the ontological experience of thriving in transition. Using an exploratory, sequential and embedded mixed-methods approach, I identified social, cognitive, psychological and behavioral factors that contribute to thriving in transition. As a result of the current study, I elucidate an abstract system that contains four representative ontologies of change forming a skeletal framework for a descriptive model on thriving and surviving in uncertain times. The 4-quadrant model is divided by the degree of change together with an individual’s ontological organizing principle relating to the phenomenon of change; stability is the norm or change is the norm. This abstract model has predictive value in identification of cognitive, social and behavioral resources at a time of change. At any given point in one’s life, a transition can be interpreted in terms of the magnitude of change (how big or how little the change) and the individual’s ontological experience of change (whether it disrupts an equilibrium or continues to be part and parcel of an evolving, cyclical and emergent way of life). Contingent upon these two dimensions, one can use this framework to ignite self-discovery and mobilize resources to design a response and hypothesize a desired outcome. The four quadrants represent different ways to live. Individuals may find themselves at various junctions of these quadrants over a lifespan. These four quadrants provide “requisite variety” to navigate individual ontology as they move into and out of fluid spaces we often call instability during a time of transition. Thriving in transition is an iterative, non-linear, and a generative process that produce knowledge, agility and other beneficial resources. It is fueled by positivity, as one negotiates and develops dynamic self-knowledge in the context of new stimuli. Two new constructs were developed to empirically operationalize findings from my initial qualitative study: Transformation Quotient (TQ) and Thriving Transition (TT). TQ measures an individual’s receptivity to change as demonstrated by the willingness and ability to embrace transition as an ongoing activity as well as fully engaging in the metamorphic potential inherent in transitions. TT measures an individual’s psychosocial “prosperity” that includes several universal human psychological needs such as competence, autonomy, relatedness and self-acceptance, as well as positive social relationships, the desire to learn, and vitality for life. The pop-culture notion of carpe diem, YOLO (you only live once), or FOMO (fear of missing out) captures the spirit of TT combined with TQ. The first study utilized a grounded theory approach. It was a qualitative data collection and analysis on international mobile professionals that informed the conceptualization of the “Thriving in Transition” model. Subsequent quantitative analysis in Study II, and embedded mixed-methods analysis in Study III empirically tested social, cognitive and behavioral factors influencing well-being at a time of change as part of the “Thriving in Transition” model. Three key integrated findings from this body of work are: 1) the importance of the construct Improvisation Behavior as both a cognitive and a behavioral resource; 2) the validation of the new construct TQ across two studies and the positive significant relationships found to TT in Study III; 3) the interaction between Improvisation, Self-knowledge and TQ that creates the foundation for expanding the current 4-quadrant abstract model as a useful paradigm to describe and predict thriving in transition. Other findings include social, cognitive and emotional factors at a time change. Perceived social support and positive cognitive appraisals are positively related to Flourishing in Study II; emotional response to uncertainty is negatively related to TT in Study III for subjects whose ontology of change is one where stability is the norm. Across studies, Improvisation behavior turned out to be an extremely powerful concept in thriving in transition. In Study II, a quantitative study, the independent variable, Improvisation behavior across magnitude of change, has a positive and significant relationship with TQ. Improvisation also has a direct, positive and significant relationship to Flourishing (a reflective construct measuring an individual’s psychosocial prosperity) for various magnitudes of change. In Study III, Improvisation is only relevant to individuals who report a high degree of change, and ontologically view change as the norm. For individuals in this quadrant, Improvisation has a strong, significant and positive relationship with TT. These findings are backed by research on how environmental turbulence tends to have a positive influence on catalyzing the improvisation process. “Practicing improvisation” contributes to thriving in transition due to positive knowledge production, flexibility improvement and positive affective outcomes. Transformation Quotient (TQ) partially mediates the relationship between Improvisation and Flourishing for participants without global relocations in Study II. In Study III, TQ is relevant to all groups except one—positive, strong and significant effect for individuals who experience various magnitude of change and who have the view that change is the norm. However, a negative, strong and significant effect is observed between TQ and TT for those who experience high degree of change and view stability as the norm. TQ as a mediator in Study II and an independent variable in Study III provide empirical evidence that TQ is a relevant construct in the conceptual framework of thriving in transition. TQ is defined in this research as an aptitude for change, potentially developed to be a navigational competence in the quest for eudaimonic well-being in uncertain times. Also, in Study III, self-knowledge is hypothesized to be a cognitive resource and an important factor contributing to thriving in transition. However, no significant relationship was observed between Self-knowledge and TT for individuals who experience high degree of change and ontologically organize change as the norm. Indicated by qualitative data from Study III, these individuals deploy a combination of intuition, creativity and bricolage to convert self-knowledge into action, they benefit from deploying Improvisation behavior both as a behavioral and a cognitive resource. Improvisation is a behavioral resource; it is when individuals take action as the situation unfolds while drawing upon available material, cognitive, affective and social resources in problem solving. It is also a cognitive resource; the act of Improvisation offers individual an opportunity to re-interpret new stimuli. Sense-making, dialectical cycling and narrative identity are the three key mechanisms that drive the difference between thriving transitions versus merely surviving transitions. The experience of transition rests with the individual’s ontological experience of change and the intervention sequence deployed in response to various degrees of change. My dissertation contributes to positive organizational scholarship, antecedents and consequences of transitional experiences through a 4-quadrant system of understanding thriving in transition. This framework provides the initial structure to help individuals navigate toward eudaimonic well-being and fulfillment during uncertain times.

Committee:

Richard Boland, Jr (Committee Chair); Kalle Lyytinen (Committee Member); Cooperrider David (Committee Member); Ronald Fry (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Transformation Quotient, improvisation, thriving, self-knowledge, self-identity, narrative identity, expat, agentic behavior, dialectical cycling, transitions, post traumatic growth, ontological organizing principles, cognitive appraisal, growth stories

Lewis, EmilyExploring Models of Community Organizing for Environmental Justice: The Cases of Fernald and the ELDA Landfill in Cincinnati, Ohio
MCP, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Community Planning

Grassroots organizing has occurred around a wide range of issues in nearly every major city in the United States. This study examines the Cincinnati/Hamilton County metropolitan region and details the cases of citizen-led community organizing to address concerns about environmental contamination at the Fernald uranium processing plant and the ELDA landfill. Specifically, the study details the sequence of events in each case and analyzes community organizing according to a three-part framework of conscientization, organization, and mobilization that was derived from the theories of Saul Alinsky and Paolo Freire. It then examines the role of conflict and consensus-based organizing, social and political capital formation, and actor interactions on the two cases’ ultimate outcomes.

The study concludes that traditional views of environmental justice that are riveted on race, income, and power differentials between actors in a community may not be the best framework for a comparative analysis of these two cases, although they often are cited as two of the most prominent environmental justice cases in the region. From this finding, a looser interpretation of environmental justice is proposed to supplement what typically is found in the literature. In this interpretation, environmental justice concerns are seen as the product of community organizing and social capital formation around immediate environmental concerns, not necessarily as a call to action to address notions of inequity in environmental quality.

Committee:

Carla Chifos, PhD (Committee Chair); Terry Grundy, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Urban Planning

Keywords:

Environmental Justice;Community Organizing;Social Capital;Fernald;ELDA Landfill

Sawant, AnkushTime-based Approach to Intrusion Detection using Multiple Self-Organizing Maps
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2005, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science (Engineering and Technology)
Anomaly-based intrusion detection systems identify intrusions by monitoring network traffic for abnormal behavior. Integrated Network-Based Ohio University Network Detective Service (INBOUNDS) is an anomaly-based intrusion detection system being developed at Ohio University. The Multiple Self-organizing map based Intrusion Detection System (MSIDS) module for INBOUNDS analyzes the time-based behavior of normal network connections for anomalies, using the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) algorithm. The MSIDS module builds profiles of normal network behavior by characterizing the network traffic with four parameters. A SOM, developed for each time interval, captures the characteristic network behavior for that time interval using the four parameters. This approach achieves better characterization of normal network behavior, leading to better intrusion detection capability. During real-time operation, the four-dimensional vectors, representing the attack connection for the time intervals, are fed into respective trained SOMs. For each input vector in the four-dimensional space, a “winner” neuron is determined. If the distance between the input vector and the winner neuron for any SOM is greater than a certain threshold value, the MSIDS module classifies the network connection as an intrusion. Moreover, detecting the attack in early stages of the connection leads to near real-time response to intrusions.

Committee:

Carl Bruggeman (Advisor)

Keywords:

Network Security; Intrusion Detection; Self-Organizing Maps; Anomaly Detection

Oyakawa, MichelleBuilding A Movement In The Non-Profit Industrial Complex
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Sociology
Today, democracy in the United States is facing a major challenge: Wealthy elites have immense power to influence election outcomes and policy decisions, while the political participation of low-income people and racial minorities remains relatively low. In this context, non-profit social movement organizations are one of the key vehicles through which ordinary people can exercise influence in our political system and pressure elite decision-makers to take action on matters of concern to ordinary citizens. A crucial fact about social movement organizations is that they often receive significant financial support from elites through philanthropic foundations. However, there is no research that details exactly how non-profit social movement organizations gain resources from elites or that analyzes how relationships with elite donors impact grassroots organizations’ efforts to mobilize people to fight for racial and economic justice. My dissertation aims to fill that gap. It is an ethnographic case study of a multiracial statewide organization called the Ohio Organizing Collaborative (OOC) that coordinates progressive social movement organizations in Ohio. Member organizations work on a variety of issues, including ending mass incarceration, environmental justice, improving access to early childhood education, and raising the minimum wage. In 2016, the OOC registered over 155,000 people to vote in Ohio. I conducted 55 semi-structured interviews with staff members of OOC and allied organizations, including funders. I also observed 330 hours of OOC meetings and events and collected over 1300 documents pertaining to OOC’s history and fundraising. Using funds from foundations, the OOC has made progress toward their goal of building social movement infrastructure in Ohio. However, the OOC faces tension between the demands of its elite funding sources on one hand and its mission to organize communities on the other. This work illuminates the mechanisms through which elites impact efforts to organize poor people and people of color. Non-profit organizational fields, often referred to by social movement leaders as the non-profit industrial complex (NPIC), are governed by a technocratic political logic wherein elite experts determine strategy and decide what issues to prioritize. The Ohio Organizing Collaborative, on the other hand, is governed by a populist political logic, which holds that political leaders should prioritize the demands of ordinary people. I find that the NPIC limits nonprofit organization leaders’ ability to build trust and authentically engage ordinary citizens in the political process. The structure of the NPIC distorts accountability, making organizers beholden to elite funders instead of grassroots leaders. Issue-based funding and short-term grants make it difficult for organizers to focus on their primary mission, which involves recruiting and mentoring community members and building relationships across race, class and geography to strengthen social movement infrastructure.

Committee:

Korie Edwards (Advisor); Andrew Martin (Committee Member); Lopez Steve (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

social movements; politics; elites; organizing; race; mobilization; non-profit organizations; philanthropy; elections

Dennison, Amanda JoWomen's Advocates: Grassroots Organizing in St. Paul, Minnesota
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, History
This dissertation overviews the creation of Women’s Advocates in St. Paul, Minnesota, one of the first shelters for battered women in the United States. Following the tradition of grassroots organizing and coalition building of the women’s movement in the 1970s, organizers of the Women’s Advocates collective overcame numerous obstacles to find allies for the creation and maintenance of the shelter. Identifying wife abuse—the term used in the 1970s—in their community, Women’s Advocates helped initiate community and state policy changes to help abused women and their children. As a part of the larger social movement that raised awareness of and helped those affected by abuse, Women’s Advocates’ work was groundbreaking and contributed to the nationwide discussion of wife abuse. Women’s Advocates’ successful grassroots organizing contributes to the historiography of U.S. Women’s History as well as social movement theory and potential activism.

Committee:

Rebecca Mancuso, Dr (Advisor); Ellen Berry, Dr (Committee Member); Jorge Chavez, Dr (Other); Michael Brooks, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Womens Advocates; St Paul, Minnesota; Wife Abuse; Battered Women; Domestic Violence; Grassroots Organizing; Womens Activism

Albalooshi, Fatema A.Self-organizing Approach to Learn a Level-set Function for Object Segmentation in Complex Background Environments
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2015, Electrical Engineering
Boundary extraction for object region segmentation is one of the most challenging tasks in image processing and computer vision areas. The complexity of large variations in the appearance of the object and the background in a typical image causes the performance degradation of existing segmentation algorithms. One of the goals of computer vision studies is to produce algorithms to segment object regions to produce accurate object boundaries that can be utilized in feature extraction and classification. This dissertation research considers the incorporation of prior knowledge of intensity/color of objects of interest within segmentation framework to enhance the performance of object region and boundary extraction of targets in unconstrained environments. The information about intensity/color of object of interest is taken from small patches as seeds that are fed to learn a neural network. The main challenge is accounting for the projection transformation between the limited amount of prior information and the appearance of the real object of interest in the testing data. We address this problem by the use of a Self-organizing Map (SOM) which is an unsupervised learning neural network. The segmentation process is achieved by the construction of a local fitted image level-set cost function, in which, the dynamic variable is a Best Matching Unit (BMU) coming from the SOM map. The proposed method is demonstrated on the PASCAL 2011 challenging dataset, in which, images contain objects with variations of illuminations, shadows, occlusions and clutter. In addition, our method is tested on different types of imagery including thermal, hyperspectral, and medical imagery. Metrics illustrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm in improving the efficiency of boundary extraction and object region detection. In order to reduce computational time, a lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) convergence criteria is used along with the proposed self-organized active contour model for producing faster and effective segmentation. The lattice Boltzmann method is utilized to evolve the level-set function rapidly and terminate the evolution of the curve at the most optimum region. Experiments performed on our test datasets show promising results in terms of time and quality of the segmentation when compared to other state-of-the-art learning-based active contour model approaches. Our method is more than 53% faster than other state-of-the-art methods. Research is in progress to employ Time Adaptive Self- Organizing Map (TASOM) for improved segmentation and utilize the parallelization property of the LBM to achieve real-time segmentation.

Committee:

Vijayan Asari (Advisor); Raúl Ordóñez (Committee Member); Eric Balster (Committee Member); Muhammad Usman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering; Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

active contour models; level set function; self organizing map; lattice Boltzmann method; object segmentation

Brown, Emily BatesHer Money, My Sweat: Women Organizing to Transform Globalization
Bachelor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2007, School Of Interdisciplinary Studies - Interdisciplinary Studies
Women who live in Third World nations are disproportionately negatively affected by globalization. Moreover, theorizations of Third World women's economic hardships are often characterized in terms of their victimization and helplessness even within Western feminist literature. Such characterizations have been intensely criticized in the last two decades by Third World and postcolonial feminist theorists who have effectively exposed the dangers of representing Third World women as a homogenized group. Western feminist discourse on gender, globalization, and Third World cultures has since made inroads toward addressing the specificity of identity issues such as race, class, and nationality, and in bridging the gap between the objectives of Western and non-Western women's groups. Within discussions of the inequities of globalization and in efforts to organize women around globalization issues, negotiating similar identity issues and goals is a constant challenge. With an emphasis on the intersection of theory and practice, this thesis argues that for transnational feminist networks to organize constructively on globalization issues in the Third World, the agency and experience of local actors must be regarded as a primary source of legitimate knowledge. Only in this way will transnational feminist networks, which operate across both geographical and intangible borders, be successful in empowering local actors and in producing more viable, counter-hegemonic economic opportunities than currently exist under processes of globalization. Through the empowerment of local actors, more sustainable, long-term projects that resist globalization can develop without, or with less, dependence on First World actors and the transnational networks themselves. The Women's International Sewing Cooperative of Nueva Vida, Nicaragua provides a practical example of successful transnational organizing that legitimates and accounts for local experience and knowledge. The result is a more viable economic opportunity than those presently offered by globalization, and is one that empowers Third World women and grants them the agency to define and determine their economic futures, thus demonstrating the real power implicit in crafting strategies from both theory and practice.

Committee:

William Newell (Advisor)

Keywords:

women and globalization; women and economics; international women's organizing; Latin American cooperatives; worker-owned free trade zone; Women's International Sewing Cooperative

Bosse, Douglas A.The organization and performance implications of vertical interfirm exchanges at small and entrepreneurial firms
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, Business Administration
This dissertation aims to further advance our theoretical and empirical understandings of interfirm governance decisions among entrepreneurial or small firms and their large firm exchange partners. Entrepreneurial firms often establish relationships with large firm partners to gain access to critical resources. While these relationships can support the growth and even survival of the entrepreneurial firm, they can also present great risk if the large firm partner behaves in an opportunistic manner. Entrepreneurial firm managers must decide how to govern these relationships so the potential benefits can be realized and the risks minimized. Consisting of three related essays, this dissertation applies resource-based theory (RBT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) to empirically investigate the antecedents to and performance implications of exchange governance choice among entrepreneurial and small firms in exchanges with large firm partners. The first essay develops and tests a model to provide simultaneous consideration of the benefits and costs associated with how entrepreneurial firms govern alliances with large partners. The empirical setting is alliances between entrepreneurial biotechnology firms and their large downstream partners. Primary and secondary data for this study was collected on 59 entrepreneurial firm-large firm dyads in a three-phase process. The second essay presents a similar model and tests it using a sample of 365 relationships between small firms and their primary financial services supplier. Data for this study is taken from the Federal Reserve Board’s 1998 Survey of Small Business Finances (SSBF). Whereas the first two essays analyze the antecedents to and performance consequences of one governance device in each interfirm relationship, the third essay examines the tradeoffs among multiple governance devices that firms bundle together. A total of 796 small firm-financial institution relationships from the SSBF are used in this study. The study examines the relationships and tradeoffs among five different governance devices to determine how they tend to be bundled into effective and efficient governance mechanisms. The performance implications and possible prioritization schemes of different governance device combinations are compared and discussed.

Committee:

Jay Barney (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration, Management

Keywords:

Transaction cost economics; Resource based theory; Organizing interfirm exchanges; Entrepreneurial firms; Small firms

Kurmapu, DhruvaA Methodology to Measure and Improve U.S. States Highway Sustainability Using Data Envelopment Analysis and Self Organizing Maps
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2012, Industrial and Systems Engineering (Engineering and Technology)
To determine the efficiencies of U.S. States in terms of highway performance and sustainability, a data envelopment analysis based mathematical model is developed. To determine the improvement paths for the inefficient U.S. States self organizing maps based cluster analysis is used. Sustainability goals chosen with respect to the three dimensions of sustainability i.e. social, economic and environmental are: expand highway infrastructure, improve safety, and conserve natural resources. Utilizing the developed variable returns to scale DEA model, the 51 U.S. States are divided into seven tiers based on their efficiencies. Utilizing the self organizing maps clustering the 51 U.S. States are divided into four clusters based on their input similarities. Improvement paths for the inefficient states are determined using the clusters and the tiers formed. The aim of the study is to show that Data Envelopment Analysis and Machine Learning based sustainability assessment and improvement model could be used to identify the shortcomings of inefficient U.S. States based on highway performance and sustainability, thereafter make improvements towards increased efficiency.

Committee:

Namkyu Park (Advisor); Diana Schwerha (Committee Member); Gary Weckman (Committee Member); Khurrum Bhutta (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Industrial Engineering; Operations Research; Sustainability

Keywords:

highway sustainability; data envelopment analysis; machine learning; linear programming; self organizing maps; sustainable development

Oyakawa, Michelle Mariko"Turning Private Pain Into Public Action": Constructing Activist-Leader Identities in Faith-Based Community Organizing
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Sociology
The importance of local leaders and experienced activists to the success of social movements has been established in the sociological literature. These activist-leaders do not spontaneously emerge out of nowhere, however, the process through which these activist-leaders emerge has not been explored. This study contends that these individuals have constructed an activist-leader identity through a process of politicizing the personal and personalizing the political. The role of identity in social movements has recently been emphasized as an area of interest, specifically collective identity. Scholars have been grappling with the question: what is the nature of the relationship between individual identity and collective identity in social movements? This case study of a faith-based community organizing group (FBCO), ELIJAH, draws upon 32 interviews, participant observation, and archival data to address these two issues through understanding the process by which an activist-leader identity comes about. The findings indicate that activist-leaders go through a process of politicizing their personal experiences and personalizing their political beliefs and actions. This results in a politicized personal narrative that motivates sustained activism and makes the collective identity with the social movement an integral part of the activist-leader’s identity. This study provides an important contribution to the growing literature on identity in social movements and helps to address the question of how activist-leaders come about as well as the question of how individual and collective identities are related to one another.

Committee:

Korie Edwards, PhD (Advisor); Townsand Price-Spratlen, PhD (Committee Member); Andrew Martin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

identity; collective identity; social movements; narrative; organizing; activism

Moore, Gaylen LeslieFrom Chaos to Qualia: An Analysis of Phenomenal Character in Light of Process Philosophy and Self-Organizing Systems
MA, Kent State University, 2010, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Philosophy
Recent advances in our understanding of complex dynamical systems may be of interest to philosophers seeking the best metaphysical grounds for understanding the qualitative character of subjective experience (qualia). In this thesis I will propose that qualia are not specifically brain processes, but are instead best thought of as world processes that can be characterized as distributed self-organizing networks of Whiteheadian actual entities. On this Whiteheadian model, different aspects of a quale that a subject experiences as a specific shade of blue, might be contributed by entities that are, contemporaneously, also contributing other aspects of other qualia to other subjects widely distributed throughout time and space. Cellular automata and network models will be used to help clarify this proposal.

Committee:

David Odell-Scott, PhD (Advisor); Kwang-Sae Lee, PhD (Committee Member); Frank Ryan, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Bracher, PhD (Committee Member); Michael Byron, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Philosophy

Keywords:

qualia; Whitehead; self-organizing system; chaos; chaotic systems; dynamical systems; subjective experience; actual entity; actual occasion; eternal objects; god; phenomenal stance; process philosophy; hard problem; consciousness; cellular automata

Trocchia-Balkits, LisaA Hipstory of Food, Love, and Chaosmos at the Rainbow Gathering of the Tribes
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Individual Interdisciplinary Program
Engaging with sensory ethnography at the Rainbow Gathering of the Tribes, I bring forward ways of knowing about food and social relationships that are complex and interdisciplinary, abstract, and at the same time, intensely felt and personal. Conducting research in the Green Mountains of Vermont in 2016, during the 44th annual gathering, I explore the social spaces of the counterculture gathering where food is produced, distributed, prepared, consumed, and disposed of, as being deeply performative. These sites enable expressions of difference, and stand as incarnations of the personal as political—embodied and dynamic. Food spaces are potent affective environments, where Love, variously expressed and interpreted, directs intention. Through active participation, select interviews, historical research, and reflection, I encounter and consider how food and affect interanimate to define identities, influence relationships between ecologies, modulate environments, and shape economies. Chaosmos, the constant interplay between order (the cosmos) and disorder (chaos) provides the stage for considering the experience of self-organized food systems in affective, cooperative, and horizontal environments. This interdisciplinary study privileges embodied experiences and intuitive ways of knowing as they concern multisensorial scholarship. Hybrid creative/academic elements introduce chaosmos into the dissertation-as-artifact. In the end, through the transmission of affect, the performance of food, and the praxis of self-organizing and complex reciprocity, a social ecology of food emerges at the Rainbow Gathering of the Tribes as order from disorder. The implications of this research speak to the complex nature of food environments as social structures of empowerment and resistance.

Committee:

Stephen Scanlan, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Devika Chawla, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Smoki Musaraj, PhD (Committee Member); Larry Burmeister, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Communication; Cultural Anthropology; Economic Theory; Experiments; Peace Studies; Personal Relationships; Social Research; Social Structure; Sociology; Spirituality; Sustainability

Keywords:

Food systems; Self-organizing; Affect; Sensory Ethnography; Counterculture; Rainbow Family; Mutual Aid; Performance of food; Interdisciplinary; Social Ecology of Food; Diverse Economies; Complex Reciprocity; Resistance; Collective Action

Smith, Erik TThe Characteristics of Cold Air Outbreaks in the eastern United States and the influence of Atmospheric Circulation Patterns
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Geography
Periods of extreme cold impact the mid-latitudes every winter. Depending on the magnitude and duration of the occurrence, extremely cold periods may be deemed cold air outbreaks (CAOs). Atmospheric teleconnections impact the displacement of polar air, but the relationship between the primary teleconnections and the manifestation of CAOs is not fully understood. A systematic CAO index was developed from 20 surface weather stations based on a set of criteria concerning magnitude, duration, and spatial extent. Statistical analyses of the data were used to determine the overall trends in CAOs. Clusters of sea level pressure (SLP), 100mb, and 10mb geopotential height anomalies were mapped utilizing self-organizing maps (SOMs) to understand the surface, tropospheric Polar Vortex (PV), and stratospheric PV patterns preceding CAOs. The Arctic Oscillation (AO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnections were used as variables to explain the magnitude and location of mid-latitude Arctic air displacement. Persistently negative SLP anomalies across the Arctic and North Atlantic were evident 1 – 2 weeks prior to the CAOs throughout the winter. The tropospheric and stratospheric PV were found to be persistently weak/weakening prior to mid-winter CAOs and predominantly strong and off-centered prior to early and late season CAOs. Negative phases of the AO and NAO were favored prior to CAOs, while the PNA was found to be less applicable. This method of CAO and synoptic pattern characterization benefits from a continuous pattern representation and provides insight as to how specific teleconnections impact the atmospheric flow in a way that leads to CAOs in the eastern U.S.

Committee:

Scott Sheridan, Dr. (Advisor); Thomas Schmidlin, Dr. (Committee Member); Cameron Lee, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Climate Change; Environmental Science; Geography; Meteorology

Keywords:

Climate; Synoptic Climatology; Cold Air Outbreaks; Atmospheric Circulation Patterns; United States; Self-Organizing Maps; Polar Vortex; Extreme Weather; Teleconnections

Kang, DongjingOrganizing for Languages Preservation, Community Enhancement, and Social Transformation in Kham Tibet: A Dialogical Ethnography
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, Communication Studies (Communication)
UNESCO (2013) has reported that many Kham Tibetan languages are facing extinction and will disappear by the end of this century if nothing is done. Languages embody the worldviews that enable us to understand, interpret, and share realities with one another. Preserving ethnic minority languages is crucial to the sustainability of plural human social practices. This dissertation research used a dialogical perspective to examine Tibetan teachers’ and community members’ organizing practices for mother tongue preservation, community building, and achieving meaningful social change. Tibetan communities have been historically silent, absent, and (mis)represented by romanticized and reductionist ideological/political discourse. My dissertation recognized Tibetan teachers and community members as active social change agents, organizers, and advocates who are capable of creating partnerships across differences (e.g. class, gender, ethnicity, and educational levels, etc.) to address local issues in communication and to organize for meaningful social transformation in Kham Tibet. To achieve this project, I conducted a dialogical ethnography for the past three summers including archival and textual collection, numerous in-depth interviews, and participant observation in Kham Tibet. Four narratives emerged that exemplified the features of meta-theory of dialogue. They are 1) Boundless Bound, 2) Purposeless Purpose, 3) Embodiment, and 4) Being while Becoming. The findings of this study extend the theory of dialogue and advance knowledge in communication scholarship, as well as provide insights for educators, policymakers, governments, and international NPO/NGOs involved with indigenous/ethnic language and cultural preservation program implementation in Tibet. Finally, this study may provide transferable values to other indigenous/ethnic groups working towards similar goals.

Committee:

William Rawlins (Advisor); Raymie McKerrow (Committee Member); Yea-Wen Chen (Committee Member); Jaylynne Hutchinson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

organizing; dialogue; dialogical ethnography; Tibet; Kham; relating; language

Michaels, LaurieTransnational Labor in the Age of Globalization: Labor Organizing at the Farm Labor Organizing Committee
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2014, Sociology
This thesis explores the organizing strategies of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC), and documents the precarious, hazardous and exploitative conditions faced by farm workers in Ohio and North Carolina, based on 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork. Farm workers experience dangerous conditions and poor pay, and are often subjected to human trafficking, sexual or physical abuse, and unsanitary housing conditions. Farm workers are often undocumented workers, facing hostile political and cultural discourses which position them as "illegal aliens," with the ever-present threat of deportation. FLOC's strategy of "supply-side organizing" in its campaign against Reynolds America Inc. and other strategies of transnational organizing are analyzed; it is suggested that such strategies are an effective response to economic liberalism, globalization, and effects of free trade policies such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). FLOC's use of community unionism, and its broader engagement with the Latino/a community, are also analyzed in the thesis.

Committee:

Mark Sherry (Committee Chair); Dwight Haase (Committee Member); Willie McKether (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

farm labor, transnational labor organizing

Meade, Wilbert E.On Road Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions; Identifying Hotspots and Ranking Roads in the State of Ohio
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2011, Environmental Sciences
This is a study that attempts to develop a methodology to quantify the amount of air pollution that can be attributed to On Road Mobile Sources in the State of Ohio Highway Network. Traffic count data was used as an input for ARCMAP 9.3 to create maps of State, County and US routes. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) MOVES 2010a air pollution model was used to predict five different pollutants that can be attributed to mobile sources. Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) were used in the process of clustering and ranking the roads. Federal Tier 2 regulation standards were used in comparison with the MOVES2010a outputs in the evaluation process of this study. This paper also reports on limitations of the study, as well as future research options.

Committee:

Hays Cummins, PhD (Advisor); Mark Boardman, PhD (Committee Member); Sandi Woy-Hazleton, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Environmental Engineering

Keywords:

on-road mobile source air pollutants; MOVES2010a; Self-Organizing Maps (SOM)

Novak, David R.“Flipping the Scripts” of Poverty and Panhandling: Crafting Work, Doing Democracy, and Creating Connections Through StreetWise
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2006, Organizational Communication (Communication)

Homelessness is a complex social issue about which there has been no shortage of scholarly discussion. I enter this discussion through a case study of StreetWise, an organization in Chicago, Illinois. StreetWise produces a newspaper that is sold by people without homes or those at risk for homelessness. In bearing witness to the lived experiences of individuals traditionally excluded from public discourses, I provide an interpretation of how human action occurs in recurrent institutional patters of symbolizing that are developed and reinforced by the conditions of living. I work to understand how those discourses are shaped by extra-symbolic forces. Using the theoretical frameworks of American Pragmatism(s) and feminism(s), I utilized four methodologies to collect discourse related to StreetWise, poverty, and homelessness: participatory photography, in-depth interviews, participant observation, and document analysis.

The results are encompassed in nine themes which include discussion of issues related to what constitutes “real” work, the importance and drawbacks of historical narratives, and corporeal and material impacts on communication. Also discussed are issues of the construction and disruption of public and private space, the connection and separation of diverse peoples, and organizational hierarchies as they occur within StreetWise and in public space. Finally, issues of journalistic agendas, definitions of success and failure, and the importance of daily acts of participatory democracy are presented.

The results of the data collection and interpretation are presented in light of four research questions. I argue that the organizational-environment interface for vendors’ participation in public life is revealed through attempts by the organization to “flip the scripts” that guide commercial and social relationships between vendors and the broader public. It is within the complex interplay of organizational and environmental forces that StreetWise crafts viable employment and vendors do democracy. I also suggest that small acts of daily participation (e.g., simple recognition, striking up a conversation, taking and reading a street newspaper) are significant ways by which ordinary citizens can co-construct a more inclusive ethnos. Ultimately, I argue that StreetWise fosters democracy by enabling vendors to participate in public space. Practical implications for StreetWise, limitations, and directions for future research are also discussed.

Committee:

Lynn Harter (Advisor)

Keywords:

Organizational Communication; Democracy and Organizing; Homelessness; Pragmatism; Feminism; Civic Journalism; Qualitative Research

Zhao, YiqiangThermodynamic and Dynamic Behaviors of Self-Organizing Polymeric Systems
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Macromolecular Science

Two topics of self-organizing polymeric systems are explored in this work: thermodynamic and dynamic properties of liquid crystal polymers in solutions and rheological behaviors of self-organizing gels.

For dilute nematic solutions of end-on side-chain liquid crystal polysiloxanes (SCLCP) dissolved in 5CB, the chain anisotropies R/R, obtained from electrorheological(ER) analysis based on the Brochard model, are consistent with independent measurements of Rg‖/Rg⊥ via small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), which unambiguously demonstrating a slightly prolate SCLCP chain conformation. Dissolution of this prolate SCLCP in flow-aligning 5CB produces a tumbling flow, clearly indicating a discrepancy with the Brochard hydrodynamic theory which predicts such a transition only for oblate conformation. A numerical comparison using a modified version of the Brochard model leads to improved self-consistent agreement between SANS, ER and shear transient experiments. The molecular weight dependence of the chain conformational relaxation time τr indicates an extended SCLCP chain conformation in 5CB. SANS analysis suggests that the SCLCP conformation is sensitive to the solvent interaction, i.e. a more extended conformation is observed in isotropic acetone-d6 than in nematic 5CB.

A SANS conformational study of SCLCPs with methoxyphenylbenzoate mesogenic side group in CDCl3 demonstrates that the form factor of a single comb-like SCLCP chain is well described by a wormlike chain model with finite cross-sectional thickness over the entire q range, taking into account the molecular weight polydispersity. Consistent with measurement of a large Rg from low q analysis, the resulting persistence length lp is in the range 28~32 Å, substantially larger than that of unsubstituted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chain (lp =5.8 Å), which suggests a relatively rigid SCLCP chain due to the influence of densely attached mesogenic groups.

For nematic mixtures of copolysiloxane SCLCP in 5OCB, a metastably extended miscible nematic range is observed at low SCLCP concentration upon cooling. Onset of an induced smectic phase occurs upon cooling at 60%wt SCLCP concentration which corresponds to 48:52 molar ratio of mesogens. Dielectric spectra of these mixtures over a wide concentration range exhibit two distinct regimes of relaxation behavior reflecting the crossover from dilute and semidilute to concentrated regime.

Rheological behavior of a metallo-supramolecular gel with thixotropic feature is explored to understand the viscoelastic behaviors of self-assembling networks consisting of “living polymers”. A well-defined yield point and non-linear viscoelasticity at small strain are probed via the controlled-stress and controlled-strain measurements, respectively. The self-assembled network is readily presheared into a Newtonian sol and displays a three-stage kinetic recovery process, closely associated with the metal ion-ligand binding kinetics and related phase behaviors.

Finally, we investigate the viscoelastic properties of a novel colloidal gel in which macrocycles self-assemble into interconnected self-organized clusters. A series of rheological experiments are combined to reveal the shear responsive nature as well as linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of this gel. Certain features of observed viscoelastic properties demonstrate the characteristics of the behavior of colloidal gels which show slow glassy dynamics. The negative temperature dependence of the storage modulus at low frequency suggests that enthalpic contributions to elasticity need to be considered, presumably due to internal energy changes upon deformation.

Committee:

Alexander Jamieson (Advisor)

Keywords:

Liquid Crystal Polymer; Self-Organizing Gels; Rheology; Electrorheology; Chain Conformation; Dielectric Relaxation

GELTER, ADAM MEXPLORING THE SPECTRUM OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES: A TYPOLOGY OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MODELS
MCP, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Community Planning
This thesis examines models of community development in order to determine the areas in which they are most effective at impacting communities. Community development researchers and practitioners often ignore the wide range of possible approaches to community development by choosing to focus on a particular model. This thesis broadens the perspective of community development literature by focusing on the wide range of possible approaches and the specific aspects of community development in which each is most successful. To accomplish this task, five models are selected, organized based on levels of community participation, and examined in regard to their ability to impact communities based on a systematic evaluation framework. The result is a typology of ommunity development models that highlights the differences between different models of community development and identifies the aspects of community development to which each is uniquely well suited.

Committee:

Michael Romanos (Advisor)

Subjects:

Urban and Regional Planning

Keywords:

Community Development; Community Organizing; Community Development Corporations; Comprehensive Community Initiatives; Local Government; Business Leadership Coalitions

Pavez, IgnacioEnacting the Oak: A Theoretical and Empirical Understanding of Appreciative Organizing
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2017, Organizational Behavior
This dissertation is composed of three sequential and complementary studies, and focuses on extending theory in the field of positive organization development (POD)—an approach to organizational change that uses the power of positivity and appreciation to enable flourishing states in organizations. The guiding theme of the research project is the study of appreciative organizing (AO), which I define as a dynamic state of reflection and action that configures flexible—yet stable—patterns of interaction that enable the emergence of a life-enhancing collective functioning. I explore this phenomenon by conducting a team development intervention in ten construction projects teams—five of them implementing a traditional diagnostic approach (control group), and five of them implementing an appreciative process of team development. To build theory around AO, I used the principles of action research as the method for intervening in teams, and grounded theory methods for data collection and theory building. In Study 1, I explore the developmental mechanisms of an appreciative process of team development, in order to understand the effect of appreciation at the level of team interactions/processes. This study extends current theory by proposing an alternative way of reaching higher levels of group maturity and performance, where positivity—instead of conflict/problem resolution—is the main catalyst of the developmental process. In Study 2, I build a theoretical elaboration of a diagnostic (problem-based) and an appreciative (strengths-based) mode of organizing. This study extends current theory by illuminating the unique features that might characterize AO, and by proposing a path to integrate—at the micro level of interactions and narratives—both diagnostic and appreciative approaches. In Study 3, I explore the concept of flourishing as an appreciative process of organizing rather than an outcome or end state (i.e. a dynamic perspective). This study provides empirical evidence about the processes that distinguish AO, and shows how these processes allow the emergence of flourishing states at the level of a team. These set of studies are integrated in the final chapter of the dissertation, where I formally propose a construct of AO based on theory and empirical data.

Committee:

David Cooperrider , Dr. (Advisor); Stephens John Paul, Dr. (Committee Member); Laszlo Chris, Dr. (Committee Member); Peck Simon, Dr. (Committee Member); Spreitzer Gretchen, Dr. (Committee Member); Bright David, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Business Administration; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Organization development, appreciative inquiry, group development, team building, positive change, organizing and sensemaking in organizations, grounded theory, collective flourishing

Ramadas, ManikantanDetecting Anomalous Network Traffic With Self-Organizing Maps
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2003, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science (Engineering and Technology)
Intrusion detection systems are aimed at distinguishing malicious network attacks from genuine network traffic. Integrated Network-Based Ohio University Network Detective Service (INBOUNDS), is a network based intrusion detection system being developed at Ohio University. The Anomalous Network-traffic Detection with Self Organizing Maps (ANDSOM) module for INBOUNDS detects anomalous network traffic based on the Self-Organizing Map algorithm. Each network connection, characterized by six parameters, represents a vector in six-dimensional space. The ANDSOM module creates a two-dimensional lattice of neurons for each class of network traffic, with each neuron in the lattice specifying a six-dimensional vector. During the training phase, six-dimensional vectors of genuine network traffic are input into the ANDSOM module. The neurons in the lattice are trained to capture the characteristic patterns of genuine network traffic. During real-time operation, each network connection represented by a six-dimensional vector is input into the lattice, and a “winner” is selected by finding the neuron that is closest in distance in six-dimensional space. The network connection is then classified as an intrusion if this distance in six-dimensional space is more than a pre-set threshold.

Committee:

Shawn Ostermann (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Intrusion Detection; Self-Organizing Maps

Adams, RyanBomb Cyclones of the Western North Atlantic
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Geography
“Bomb” cyclones represent a small subset of mid-latitude cyclones characterized by rapid intensification and frequently are associated with extreme weather conditions along the eastern coast of North America. Like other extreme phenomena, bomb cyclone predictions are prone to error leading to inadequate or untimely hazard warnings. The rare nature of bomb cyclones and the uniqueness of their evolutions has made it difficult for researchers to make meaningful generalizations on bomb cyclone events. This paper describes bomb cyclone climatology for the western North Atlantic, using data from the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis for 1948-2016, and uses a synoptic climatological analysis to relate these bombs to their associated atmospheric environments. A self-organizing map (SOM) of 300-hPa geopotential height tendency is created to partition the regional atmospheric environment. Thermodynamic fields are contrasted by each 300-hPa geopotential height tendency pattern for both bomb and non-bomb events in composite difference maps. The SOM patterns most significantly associated with western North Atlantic bomb cyclogenesis are characterized by both strongly and weakly negative height tendencies along the eastern United States. In both cases, these patterns exhibit strong meridional flow, a distinction marked by the weakening and breaking down of the polar vortex in the boreal Winter. The composite maps for each pattern show the mean differences in low-mid level ascent and near surface thermodynamics for bomb environments contrasted with non-bomb environments, resulting in diverse spatiotemporal distributions of bombs in the western North Atlantic.

Committee:

Scott Sheridan (Advisor)

Subjects:

Atmospheric Sciences; Geography

Keywords:

Explosive cyclones; bomb cyclones; cyclogenesis, synoptic climatology, SOMs, self-organizing maps, North Atlantic

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