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De Jong, Connie J.[Re]Focusing Global Gallery's Educational Programs: A Guide to Transforming Vision to Action for Fair Trade Organizations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, Art Education

This dissertation examines a Central Ohio Fair Trade arts organization, Global Gallery, and its capacity building process. The focus of the study primarily revolves around the educational aspects of the non-profit organization's mission, as understood by its constituents, artisans, volunteers, staff and board members. The methodologies for the study fall within qualitative research and include critical participatory action research and autoethnography. These methods were carried out within a pragmatist, feminist, communitarian theoretical framework.

The goal of this study was to improve Global Gallery's educational programming and the visibility of all shareholders' work toward realizing its mission and a broader effort to build organizational capacity. An appreciative inquiry approach prioritized building on strengths to achieve results. My data was collected through a series of four focus group sessions with Global Gallery constituents in Ohio and Bolivia. Additional data included board strategic planning processes and the researcher's autoethnographic narratives. These two data sources were integrated into the data findings and analysis to illuminate epiphanic moments in the capacity building process. Four themes emerged from the focus group and strategic building processes that were then developed into action plans that are to be carried out in collaborative committees made up of diverse constituents from at least three of the four categories. These themes turned into specific goals around educational programming, policies and procedures, earned income and fundraising.

The conclusion delivers a conceptual framework that incorporates the lessons learned from the research. This visual and narrative presentation provides a template outline for future Global Gallery projects, current action plan implementation, relationships with Global Gallery partners and other Fair Trade or international arts organizations. This template constitutes one manifestation of the goal to improve Global Gallery capacity and educational programming visibility through the study. I hope that the dissertation serves the Fair Trade and Global Gallery communities by creating democratic and functional structures for more just economic relationships in trade with indigenous cultural arts producers and dissemination of knowledge about these forms of cultural exchange.

Committee:

James Sanders, PhD (Advisor); Wayne Lawson, PhD (Committee Member); Amy Shuman, PhD (Committee Member); Karen Hutzel, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education

Keywords:

Fair trade; art; craft; non-profit organizations; appreciative inquiry; participatory action research; capacity building; marketing; indigenous aesthetics; art innovation; craft; handcrafts; justice; respect

Issah, MohammedCommunication of Organizational Values to Staff through Non-Formal Educational Activities: The Case of Not-For-Profit Organizations
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Cross-Cultural, International Education
Various methods have been adopted in teaching organizational values to employees. The traditional methods commonly used include orientation, organization's documents, and postings on walls of offices (Klein and Weaver, 2000). This study examined the communication of organizational values through non-formal educational activities at a non-profit organization. A convenience sampling method was employed, and a total of 23 employees were surveyed. The study tested the hypothesis that employees of Foundation to Mankind (FTM) rate organization's values higher than non-organization's values. The study also examined the degree of importance employees ascribed to the FTM values. The non-formal educational activities examined were, Yearly Staff Orientation, Supervisors' Orientation, and Farmer Recognition Day Celebration organized by FTM. These activities made the staff more aware of the organizational values. The t-test revealed a statistically significant difference between FTM and non-FTM values. In addition, mean ranking of the employee ratings revealed FTM values ranked higher than non-FTM values. Staff mentioned consistently diversity, social justice, building relationships, helpfulness, and unity as the values emphasized by the non-formal educational activities they participated in.

Committee:

Bruce A. Collet, PhD (Advisor); Michael Gillespie, PhD (Committee Member); Marc Simon, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Education; Multicultural Education; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Organizational values; not-for-profit organizations; universal human values; non-formal education; values

Rogers, Christian BryanBEST PRACTICES OF WEB-BASED HUMAN RESOURCE COMPONENTS IN NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Career and Technology Education/Technology
This thesis was a content analysis study of five not-for-profit websites analyzing their human resource development components. After analyzing these sites a list of best practices was defined for other not-for-profit organizations to follow. Each organization was selected based on a methodology of a technique called snowballing. Thirteen organizations were originally contacted. From the 13 organizations, five organizations were chosen to represent good quality organizations with HRD resource sites. Each of the sites was evaluated and conceptualized with common categories for later review. Each of the concept maps created were evaluated based on common themes and whether those themes matched with the literature that was reviewed. After this process took place an idealized model for a small and large organization was made. Each model was supported by both the literature and the organizations that were reviewed that contained the specific components in the model. After each idealized model was created, recommendations for further research were given.

Committee:

Larry Hatch (Advisor)

Keywords:

not-for-profit; nonprofit; non-profit; organizations; human resource development; HRD; training; portal; online; intranet; volunteer

MINICH, LISAMEASURING COMMUNITY CHANGE IN OUTCOMES-BASED INITIATIVES: A COMPARATIVE CASE STUDY OF SUCCESS BY 6 SITES
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2004, Arts and Sciences : Psychology
One of the challenges facing nonprofit organizations today is the demand for measurable results. Increasingly, these organizations are focusing less on program outcomes in favor of community outcomes, or changes demonstrated in the larger community. Examples of community outcomes include changes in social norms, policies, laws, and social, environmental, and economic conditions. However, these changes are not always easy to define or measure. Success By 6® is a popular United Way initiative that emphasizes defining and measuring community outcomes. In speaking with representatives of 24 initiatives around the country, it became clear that not all initiatives are measuring community outcomes. Those initiatives experiencing some success with community outcomes research demonstrated several similarities, including using pre-existing data sources and a consistent evaluation team. Evaluators working with community-wide initiatives must find a way to communicate the differences between program outcomes and community outcomes to key stakeholders and funders, as not all community changes can be described empirically.

Committee:

Dr. Steven Howe (Advisor)

Keywords:

Evaluation; Community Outcomes; Non-Profit Organizations

Oyakawa, MichelleBuilding A Movement In The Non-Profit Industrial Complex
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Sociology
Today, democracy in the United States is facing a major challenge: Wealthy elites have immense power to influence election outcomes and policy decisions, while the political participation of low-income people and racial minorities remains relatively low. In this context, non-profit social movement organizations are one of the key vehicles through which ordinary people can exercise influence in our political system and pressure elite decision-makers to take action on matters of concern to ordinary citizens. A crucial fact about social movement organizations is that they often receive significant financial support from elites through philanthropic foundations. However, there is no research that details exactly how non-profit social movement organizations gain resources from elites or that analyzes how relationships with elite donors impact grassroots organizations’ efforts to mobilize people to fight for racial and economic justice. My dissertation aims to fill that gap. It is an ethnographic case study of a multiracial statewide organization called the Ohio Organizing Collaborative (OOC) that coordinates progressive social movement organizations in Ohio. Member organizations work on a variety of issues, including ending mass incarceration, environmental justice, improving access to early childhood education, and raising the minimum wage. In 2016, the OOC registered over 155,000 people to vote in Ohio. I conducted 55 semi-structured interviews with staff members of OOC and allied organizations, including funders. I also observed 330 hours of OOC meetings and events and collected over 1300 documents pertaining to OOC’s history and fundraising. Using funds from foundations, the OOC has made progress toward their goal of building social movement infrastructure in Ohio. However, the OOC faces tension between the demands of its elite funding sources on one hand and its mission to organize communities on the other. This work illuminates the mechanisms through which elites impact efforts to organize poor people and people of color. Non-profit organizational fields, often referred to by social movement leaders as the non-profit industrial complex (NPIC), are governed by a technocratic political logic wherein elite experts determine strategy and decide what issues to prioritize. The Ohio Organizing Collaborative, on the other hand, is governed by a populist political logic, which holds that political leaders should prioritize the demands of ordinary people. I find that the NPIC limits nonprofit organization leaders’ ability to build trust and authentically engage ordinary citizens in the political process. The structure of the NPIC distorts accountability, making organizers beholden to elite funders instead of grassroots leaders. Issue-based funding and short-term grants make it difficult for organizers to focus on their primary mission, which involves recruiting and mentoring community members and building relationships across race, class and geography to strengthen social movement infrastructure.

Committee:

Korie Edwards (Advisor); Andrew Martin (Committee Member); Lopez Steve (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

social movements; politics; elites; organizing; race; mobilization; non-profit organizations; philanthropy; elections

Damle, Shilpa C.Institutionalizing Reform: The Ford Foundation, The I.I.P.A., and Administrative Reform in India, 1950-1970
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, History
The period after World War II was the high point for American Foundations abroad. This was especially true for the Ford Foundation, which was just emerging on the international stage, ready to use the benefits of American modernization techniques and institutional strategies for the newly independent nations in Asia. They believed that poverty caused instability and a rise in radical ideologies, which were a threat to democracies around the world. The Cold War heightened the Foundation’s concern towards these outcomes. Consequently, the Ford Foundation decided to support the development programs of governments, especially in nascent democracies like India, in the 1950s. Foundation actions are criticized or lauded by scholars who primarily focus on Foundation motivation and expectations, not taking the recipients’ realities and context into consideration. This study expands the study of Foundation programs in developing countries by adding the recipient’s history and culture to the analysis thereby providing a fuller understanding of Ford Foundation’s institutionalizing strategies in India and its expectations of these institutions in the area of administrative reform between 1950 and 1970. Due to the circumstances surrounding Indian independence, nationalist leaders decided to situate the new Indian nationalism in the centralized State and its development program. Consequently, they decided to continue the centralized bureaucratic structure of the colonial government. However, Prime Minister Nehru realized that this system needed to be reformed and asked the Ford Foundation and Paul Appleby to study India’s administration and suggest changes. Given the constraints of the centralized administrative structure and Appleby’s own beliefs, he recommended the setting up of an Institute of Public Administration, serving as a professional society for academic Public Administration and as a forum for scholars to study administrative problems and discuss possible solutions with administrators, leading to better practices. The Foundation helped create the Indian Institute of Public Administration (I.I.P.A.). However, due to changes in political environment, the Ford Foundation altered its expectation of the Institute and pushed it to become more aggressive pursuing administrative reforms. The Institute, however, did not change its essential character and continued to serve as a professional society thereby frustrating Foundation expectations.

Committee:

David Hammack, C (Advisor); Kenneth Ledford (Committee Member); Rhonda Williams, Y (Committee Member); Kelly McMann (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; History; Modern History; Public Administration; South Asian Studies

Keywords:

Ford Foundation; Indian Institute of Public Administration; Paul Appleby; Administrative Reform; India; Indian Administrative Service; Douglas Ensminger; American Foundations; Non-Profit Organizations; Public Administration

Hanada, NanahoA Bridge between Civil Society and Electoral Politics? Political Integration of Women in the Japanese Non-profit Organizations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, Political Science

I tackle the issue of under-representation of women in legislative body in Japan. In spite of its stand in economy, Japan lags behind other western democracies in the women’s representation. Scholars have argued structural, cultural and political opportunity explanations for the women’s under-representation. However, these theoretical explanations take women’s political efficacy for granted and fail to explain why and how women become politically efficacious in the first place. This step has to be examined since even though the structural, cultural or political barriers are removed, women will not entertain the idea of running for office if they are not politically efficacious. I argue for the importance of non-profit organizations (NPOs) in raising political efficacy of the Japanese women since they are currently active participants in these organizations. This, in turn, can translate into the consideration to run for office by the female members.

Contrary to a popular scholarly claim that civil society organizational participation raises political efficacy of the members, and the members become politically active outside the organizations, I hypothesize that the effect on the members’ political efficacy depends on the NPO-Government relationship. Focusing on female members, I specifically hypothesize that NPOs which provide their members with opportunities to have face-to-face interaction with government officials through organizational activities are more likely to raise their political efficacy and act as a bridge between civil society and electoral political sphere than NPOs that do not provide such opportunities. This is critical since the NPO-Government relationship has transformed in Japan since the late 1990s. I test the hypothesis using the Japan General Social Survey of 2003 and conducted semi-structured interviews with 62 women from 41 NPOs in Osaka to shed light on mechanism in which women become political efficacious in the organizations.

Committee:

Anthony Mughan, PhD (Committee Chair); William Liddle, PhD (Committee Member); Craig Jenkins, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Political Science; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Japan; women; Non-profit Organizations; civil society; political efficacy; candidacy

Dumdum, Leodones YballeThe interhuman side of interorganizational partnership among internationally active non-profit organizations
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2003, Organizational Behavior
This research explored interorganizational partnerships among non-profit organizations that were internationally active. The inquiry intended to gain insight into the nature of and identify the factors that enhance the potential for such partnerships. Utilizing unstructured interviews and observations informed by an appreciative inquiry philosophy, interorganizational partnership was found to be driven by forces whose strength has been largely underestimated. Interorganizational partnership was discovered to be founded on friendship and interhuman linkages. Friendship served either as a foundation upon which partnership was began or made to grow. The relationship between organizational representatives was important to the exploration of values and co-creation of shared reality. This included a future look into the development stages of groups of representatives and their effect on partnership quality. Strategies for effective participation in partnership efforts were suggested, including the careful selection of organizational representatives who are able to develop friendships with other representatives of organizations in the interorganizational group. Close interpersonal linkage was therefore also essential among organizational representatives and the leaders of the represented organization

Committee:

David Cooperrider (Advisor)

Keywords:

Interorganizational partnerships; Non-profit organizations, internationally active