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Jamaliannasrabadi, SabaHigh Performance Computing as a Service in the Cloud Using Software-Defined Networking
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Computer Science
Benefits of Cloud Computing (CC) such as scalability, reliability, and resource pooling have attracted scientists to deploy their High Performance Computing (HPC) applications on the Cloud. Nevertheless, HPC applications can face serious challenges on the cloud that could undermine the gained benefit, if care is not taken. This thesis targets to address the shortcomings of the Cloud for the HPC applications through a platform called HPC as a Service (HPCaaS). Further, a novel scheme is introduced to improve the performance of HPC task scheduling on the Cloud using the emerging technology of Software-Defined Networking (SDN). The research introduces “ASETS: A SDN-Empowered Task Scheduling System” as an elastic platform for scheduling HPC tasks on the cloud. In addition, a novel algorithm called SETSA is developed as part of the ASETS architecture to manage the scheduling task of the HPCaaS platform. The platform monitors the network bandwidths to take advantage of the changes when submitting tasks to the virtual machines. The experiments and benchmarking of HPC applications on the Cloud identified the virtualization overhead, cloud networking, and cloud multi-tenancy as the primary shortcomings of the cloud for HPC applications. A private Cloud Test Bed (CTB) was set up to evaluate the capabilities of ASETS and SETSA in addressing such problems. Subsequently, Amazon AWS public cloud was used to assess the scalability of the proposed systems. The obtained results of ASETS and SETSA on both private and public cloud indicate significant performance improvement of HPC applications can be achieved. Furthermore, the results suggest that proposed system is beneficial both to the cloud service providers and the users since ASETS performs better the degree of multi-tenancy increases. The thesis also proposes SETSAW (SETSA Window) as an improved version of SETSA algorism. Unlike other proposed solutions for HPCaaS which have either optimized the cloud to make it more HPC-friendly, or required adjusting HPC applications to make them more cloud-friendly, ASETS tends to provide a platform for existing cloud systems to improve the performance of HPC applications.

Committee:

Hassan Rajaei, Ph.D (Advisor); Robert Green, Ph.D (Committee Member); Jong Kwan Lee, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering; Computer Science; Technology

Keywords:

High Performance Computing; HPC; Cloud Computing; Scientific Computing; HPCaaS; Software Defined Networking; SDN; Cloud Networking; Virtualization

Long, Coby E.Intrusion, Convenience, or Indifference: Investigating Attitudes of Community College Students Regarding the Use of Social Networking Software in College Coursework
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Instructional Technology (Education)
This study sought to understand the perception of community college students on utilizing social media as represented by Facebook as a tool in their community college courses. A demographic survey was administered to students in the researcher's courses and a group of six students were selected based on their survey responses to be interviewed. Transcripts of the interview dialogue were coded and responses were compared with each other as well as the demographic characteristics of the interviewees. The study found that the majority of community college students interviewed held positive preconceptions of using Facebook for purposes related to their college coursework. Five out of the six students interviewed reported that they would be open to the notion of using Facebook for educational purposes relating to their college coursework in the future. Their reasons for holding this positive preconception revolved around two notions: that Facebook is convenient because they are already using it compared to having to learn the Blackboard application for college use, contrasted with a mild disdain for Blackboard and utilization of the LMS being constrained to only when necessary. Further study recommendations include using larger sample sizes, studying across broader class rank and majors and analyzing student desires for different software.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Software; Educational Technology

Keywords:

Facebook; community college; Blackboard; learning management system; social networking

OZER, IPEKFACEBOOK® ADDICTION, INTENSIVE SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE USE, MULTITASKING, AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES, EUROPE, AND TURKEY: A MULTIGROUP STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELING APPROACH
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
Research has shown since 2008 that social networking site (SNS) use comprises the majority of time spent on the Internet. The age distribution and large amount of time spent on SNSs evoke a new research era: How students use SNSs and how the uses of SNSs impact their academic performance. The main objective of the pilot study was to investigate the relationship between time spent on SNSs, frequency of SNS use, multitasking with SNSs, time spent studying, and Grade Point Average (GPA). In the first part, the cross-cultural differences between the United States (US; n = 444) and European college students (n = 346) were examined using path models. After examining the path models, a new survey was administered with additional items (with existing reliability and validity evidence). The purpose of the main study was to define new constructs using observed variables. These constructs were Facebook® addiction, multitasking with SNSs while studying, using SNSs for school work, the amount of time spent on SNSs, college self-efficacy, and academic performance. A structural equation model (SEM) was developed using the above constructs. SEM has many advantages compared to path analysis, and it was used to compare two countries: the US (n = 226) and Turkey (TR; n = 200). This exploratory investigation focused on the following main goals: (a) testing if Facebook® addiction and intensive SNS use impact academic performance, (b) identifying the variables that directly or indirectly impact SNS use and academic performance, (c) understanding the impact of Facebook® addiction on general SNS use and academic performance, (d) indicating relationships between the variables, and (e) probing the differences between university students from different cultures (i.e., the US and TR).

Committee:

Tricia Niesz (Committee Co-Chair); Jian Li (Committee Co-Chair); Christopher A. Was (Committee Member); Aryn C. Karpinski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Evaluation; Educational Technology; Technology

Keywords:

Facebook addiction; social networking sites; multitasking; academic performance

Li, DongEnabling Smart Driving through Sensing and Communication in Vehicular Networks
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Computer Science and Engineering
An increasing number of vehicles are getting equipped with radios and sensing devices. The radios enable Inter-Vehicle-Communication (IVC), which can broaden the vision of the drivers and extend the ability of the sensing devices. However, implementing many collaborative applications in vehicular networks, such as autonomous cruise control, collaborative driving, and pre-crash sensing, needs additional services such as 1) service discovery when there are limited contact opportunities; 2) relative localization of neighboring vehicles; 3) communication addresses of the vehicles in vision; and 4) collaboration with neighboring vehicles. In this dissertation, we propose the concept of smart driving with the goal of providing the fundamental services for the real world cooperative vehicular applications based on IVC. This dissertation presents four schemes towards achieving the goal of achieving smart driving: RBTP, MARVEL, ForeSight and RoadView. RBTP allows radios to quickly discover each other in a mobile environment. RBTP is a scheme that determines how the devices should wake up and sleep to achieve minimal contact latency with other nearby devices. RBTP achieves provable performance bound and outperforms state-of-the-art asynchronous protocols for mobile devices. When compared with the optimum scheme, the contact latency is shown to be within a factor of 9/8 in the expected case and 2 in the worst case. MARVEL is a system by which a vehicle can identify the relative lane positions of the neighboring vehicles. Access to relative locations of nearby vehicles on the local roads or on the freeways is useful for providing critical alerts to the drivers, thereby enhancing their driving experience as well as reducing the chances of accidents. MARVEL is a novel antenna diversity based solution. Unlike existing technologies such as camera and radar, MARVEL can also determine the relative locations of vehicles that are not in the immediate neighborhood, thereby providing the driver with more time to react. Further, due to minimal hardware requirements, the deployment cost of MARVEL is low and it can be easily installed on newer as well as existing vehicles. ForeSight is a system that identifies the communication addresses of neighboring vehicles. We observed that the on-board camera and sensors can observe different features of the vehicle itself and some of the neighboring vehicles. The vehicle can use the radio to broadcast its features to other vehicles. ForeSight takes advantage of the diversity of the features of different vehicles, to match the vehicles observed through the camera and the information received over the radio. ForeSight is designed to work robustly in presence of legacy vehicles. Finally, the dissertation discusses RoadView, which can collaboratively create the global view of all vehicles based on their local detection results. The global view faciliates cooperative applications between the adopted vehicles by providing the relative location of the vehicles and the global identities of the adopted vehicles. RoadView allows a participating vehicle to detect vehicles in the regions that are not covered by its sensors. RoadView has low hardware requirement and is designed to work in low adoption rate scenarios.

Committee:

Prasun Sinha (Advisor); Kannan Srinivasan (Committee Member); Dong Xuan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering; Computer Science

Keywords:

vehicle, networking, smartphone, collaboration, system design

Baginski, James DanielFriending the Feds: Governmental Social Media Use in the Neoliberal Era
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Geography
Web 2.0 applications such as social networking sites and other types of social media have seen tremendous growth in popularity throughout the past decade. Facebook has become the world’s most popular social networking platform. First adopted by individuals and then the private sector, President Obama’s (2009) “Transparency and Open Government Memo”pushed for federal-level public sector adoption of privately-owned social media platforms as a way to push e-government forward and enable more direct interactions between government entities and citizens. This research examines the use of the social networking site Facebook by agencies of the United States federal government. The research is divided into two parts. First, data were collected from citizens who have interacted with five selected federal agencies through an online questionnaire survey. Demographic data reveal the existence of and even exacerbation of well-documented digital divides along lines of race/ethnicity, age, and educational attainment. Though touted as a way for individuals to interact more directly with the federal government, most respondents expressed frustration in the practice as their comments never elicited a response or other tangible outcome. This calls into question the degree to which governmental social media adoption has contributed to a more participatory form of government, as it tends to occur in a similarly one-directional, informational manner as previous e-government efforts. The second part of this research was through in-depth interviews with social media managers in federal agencies. Results of these interviews indicate a lack of clarity in the actual purpose of social media use at the federal level. Several notable challenges with public sector reliance on privately-owned and operated Web platforms were identified. Managers’ attempts to provide their audiences with as much information as possible are hindered by the underlying profit-seeking structure of social media platforms, such as Facebook’s EdgeRank algorithm, which promotes a shallow form of engagement. The ease of use of Facebook for citizens in navigating to an agency’s Facebook page and offer an opinion or comment is, in a way counterproductive; due to federal-level official comment policies, public input through social media is not taken into account in decision-making processes. Thus, an obvious contradiction is apparent; on one hand, social media applications are celebrated as a way to increase direct interaction between citizens and federal agencies, but on the other hand, citizen comments through Facebook on rule-making issues cannot be considered. Finally, interviews revealed social media managers’ struggles with determining who their audience is, and also a lack of consideration given to the highly uneven nature of the Web and Internet usage. The final substantive chapter then broadens the focus to look at Web usage more generally, highlighting some key issues related to the Internet being both the product of and purveyor of neoliberalism. The focus of the chapter includes considerations of: access issues; self-branding; digital enclosures; marketing governmentality; surveillance, and the recent erosion of the Internet’s network neutrality principle.

Committee:

Edward Malecki, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Geography

Keywords:

Internet; Web 2 0; social networking; online participation; digital divide

Wagner, Lisa MarieIdentity: Girls Everyday, On and Offline
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2011, Mass Communication (Communication)
This dissertation examines the culture of adolescent girlhood and identity performance as they coexist with social networking. Through application of adolescent development theory, identity performance theory, and girls’ studies, the dissertation answers the question, “How do adolescent girls perform identity to their peers both in everyday life and using social networking sites like MySpace.com?” By incorporating participant observation, textual analysis and guided conversation interviews, I explore the culture of girlhood at an all-girls’ high school, and the performance of identity, adolescence, and gender of twenty-two participants. This dissertation differs from the previous literature on adolescent girls’ identity performances on social networking sites by including the actual voices of the girls. I allow the girls to talk about the way they present themselves both to friends and family as well as through their social networking “MySpace.com” pages. Grounded in theory, I expand the developmental theories of Erikson (1985), Bronfenbrenner (1979) and Elkind (1981, 2001) by demonstrating the need for an addition to the ecological systems of development with a “cybersystem” as well as explore Elkind’s “imagined audience” and argue that this “imagined audience” has been “actualized” through social networking. Identity performance, as delineated by Goffman (1959), is used to discuss the ways in which both the changing and overlapping social contexts of teenage girls requires a constant readjustment of performing self, a fluid identity practice. Finally, using the emerging field of girls’ studies this work is informed by the feminist work of Gilligan (1982) and McRobbie’s (1982, 1991, 2000) who understood the importance of foregrounding the culture of adolescent girls. Overall, this dissertation recognizes the changing social environment for teens as they move into adulthood and looks to acknowledge the increasing struggle for performing identity in girls’ everyday lives.

Committee:

Norma Pecora, PhD (Advisor); Christina Beck, PhD (Committee Member); Eugene Geist, PhD (Committee Member); Beth Novak, MFA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Gender Studies; Mass Communications; Mass Media; Womens Studies

Keywords:

identity; girls; adolescence; social networking; online

Fearon, Jordan CielThe Technology of Grief: Social Networking Sites as a Modern Death Ritual
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2011, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
Technology plays a significant role in the socialization and development of society. One popular technology includes Facebook, a Social Networking Site (SNS). As Facebook has become a common site for reaching out to others for a sense of support and connection, it has also become a site to express grief and bereavement through the creation of Memorial Groups. Through a qualitative survey design, descriptive information regarding the impetus to create a Memorial Group as well as the desired utility was examined through the perspective of the creator. An online questionnaire consisting of open and closed-ended questions was completed by 68 individuals. Results indicate that creators of Memorial Groups are heavily invested in the technology, using the group to support the bereavement process. Thematic analysis, utilizing interpretative phenomenological analysis, identified six organic themes within the personal narratives including in memoriam, connection to others, connection to the deceased, personal mourning, and culture of technology as well as a number of concerns associated with the Memorial Group. Additionally, 98.5 % of responders would recommend the creation of a Memorial Group to others. Further, 59% of responders rated the Memorial Group as more helpful than other traditional death rituals. This study suggests that individuals who actively utilize the technology appear to identify significant personal benefit. Facebook Memorial Groups include the necessary components of traditional rituals, as well as several advantages such as accessibility and continuity, combining to create a modern death ritual that has been embraced by popular culture. The electronic version of this dissertation is freely accessible through the OhioLINK ETD center (http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/).

Committee:

Roger Peterson, PhD ABPP (Committee Chair); Barbara Belcher-Timme, Psy.D. (Committee Member); William Slammon, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Mental Health; Social Psychology; Technology

Keywords:

social networking sites; Facebook; grief; death ritual

Sims, Zack A.Deployment, Management, & Operations of Internet Routers for Space-Based Communication
Master of Information and Telecommunication Systems (MITS), Ohio University, 2015, Information and Telecommunication Systems (Communication)
This thesis addresses certain technical and financial challenges associated with the deployment and operation of relay spacecraft using the Internet Protocol as the primary routing protocol. Though IP in space has been a hot topic for nearly a decade, few studies address the capabilities of management protocols being used to operate a geostationary fleet. Likewise, few have addressed the real-world cost structure of replacing a traditional bent-pipe fleet with an IP-enabled fleet. Within our research, we investigate whether SNMP, TFTP, and SCP are capable of meeting the Tracking, Telemetry, and Command requirements set by a real-world geostationary relay service provider. We also investigate the driving forces of relay deployment and operational costs, identify Rough Order of Magnitude costs for a geostationary IP-enabled relay, and define a financial profile categorizing the costs of replacing a bent-pipe fleet with an IP-enabled fleet.

Committee:

Hans Kruse (Advisor); Shawn Ostermann (Committee Member); Philip Campbell (Committee Member); Wesley Eddy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering; Communication; Information Science; Information Systems; Information Technology; Technology

Keywords:

Space Internetworking; Delay Tolerant Networking; DTN; IP; Internet Protocol; Solar System; Telecommunications; Tracking Telemetry and Command; Network Management; Deployment Management and Operations; Financial Analysis; Technical analysis

Chesnut, Lauren J.Raising a Monster Army: Energy Drinks, Masculinity, and Militarized Consumption
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2010, American Culture Studies/Popular Culture
In this project, I seek to explore the ways in which contemporary aspects of militarism and capitalism are expressed and exploited by energy drink manufacturers as part of their efforts to attract young men to buy their products and identify with their brand. Numerous larger and ongoing social, economic, and political shifts are at work here, and I find that examining the visual and textual rhetoric of energy drinks can help us identify how consumer culture reflects as well as perpetuates these forces. I draw from a variety of disciplines, sources, and sites in my efforts, which will ultimately serve to help explicate the content of energy drink advertisements, packaging, web projects, and the self-styled online identities of their consumers. The widespread adoption of masculine-centric rhetoric by nearly all the purveyors of energy beverages, as well as their ever-growing popularity, prompt me to wonder why these messages seem to be so appealing and effective and what that might tell us about masculine gender identity in a post-9/11 era.

Committee:

Radhika Gajjala, PhD (Advisor); Stephen Ortiz, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Armed Forces; Gender; Labor Economics; Packaging; Rhetoric; Social Research; Womens Studies

Keywords:

energy drinks, masculinity; gender; militarism; consumer culture; digital labor; social networking

Fisher, Michael TA Theory of Viral Growth of Social Networking Sites
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2013, Management
Social networking platforms, systems designed to provide digital content services specifically for social network sites (SNS), continue to develop through a rapid combination of components forming a service ecology that is much more than a single tool or service. These SNS have experienced tremendously rapid growth rates and traditional economic factors put forward to explain growth such as pricing are inadequate. Explanations offered by platform scholars for the exponential growth of SNS such as Facebook do not go far enough in explaining why some platforms such as Facebook grow while others such as Friendster do not, despite following somewhat similar growth strategies advocated in the literature. In this thesis I develop a theoretical model that offers greater power and detail than previous models – that focus on single user-tool technology adoption – in explaining the growth of SNS. It builds upon the work on two-sided economic models but seeks to expand them using social exchange theory to situations where the exchanged value is not monetary. The dissertation covers the motivation, prior research, theoretical foundations, research methodology, findings, and contributions. Following mixed methodology utilized a grounded theory approach by first conducting semi-structured interviews with technology executives and users of two SNS that have experienced dramatically different growth patterns to identify and explain user related behaviors that drive growth. Informed by this study, I next hypothesize a research model that draws upon platform processes of co-creation and co-production as well as user features of voyeurism and exhibitionism to explain SNS growth – measured by fan out and retention. The model posits that the growth of SNS is mediated through the participation in the co-creation and co-production processes. In a second study, I analyzed to what extent the ratios of user propensity towards either voyeuristic or exhibitionistic behaviors affect the fan out and retention of SNS. To validate my theory, I tested the models with survey data from 1449 users of eight different SNS using clustering techniques and structural equation modeling. The thesis makes several theoretical, methodological, and practical contributions to research on technological innovation diffusion and the growth of two-sided markets. Service-dominant logic models have typically predicted that co-production is a component of co-creation and in contrast I demonstrate a chained mediation through co-creation to co-production for the construct of retention on SNS. I provide support for the technology adoption theory with a focus on multi-user, multi-technology contexts such as SNS platforms and amend the explanations with additional individual and platform constructs as to improve its predictive power of technology adoption as examined through the lens of viral growth.

Committee:

Kalle Lyytinen, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Dick Boland, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jerry Kane, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rakesh Niraj, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Toni Somers, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Information Systems; Information Technology; Management; Marketing; Social Research

Keywords:

Social networking sites; co-creation; co-production; voyeurism; exhibitionism; social exchange

Shakya, RosishOptimal Placement of Video Caching Routers for Minimization of Retransmission Delay
Master of Science in Engineering, University of Akron, 2011, Electrical Engineering

Video traffic is growing in prominence on the Internet. It is desired to optimize the performance of the Internet for video delivery. Maintaining a small end-to-end delay is a critical factor for acceptable delivery of real time video. The retransmission requests on packet losses, however, can result in significantly large delays which are often unacceptable making the retransmitted packets obsolete for the current playout. By the use of caching at some intermediary routers, the delivery path for video packets upon retransmission requests can be shortened and hence, the retransmission time can be reduced by a significant amount making it feasible for timely redelivery of lost packets. This retransmission time can be further minimized if optimal placement of caching routers is considered.

This thesis presents the detailed analysis on reduction of the retransmission delay for video traffic using video caching routers. The expression for the average retransmission delay is formulated in the presence of video caching routers which is used to define a mathematical program to minimize the average retransmission delay. Finally, a dynamic programming solution is obtained that finds the optimal placement of caching routers in a given network path for video delivery that minimizes the average retransmission delay. The results obtained from the dynamic programming solution are then verified against the experimental exhaustive enumeration performed with a simulation model of the system.

Further, the performance of the optimal caching router placement is analyzed against the worst case cache placement by varying the size of the problem. It is observed that the optimal placement of caching routers reduces the network cost in a significant manner by minimizing the number of caching routers for meeting a desired retransmission delay performance.

Committee:

S. I. Hariharan, Dr. (Advisor); Joan Carletta, Dr. (Committee Member); George Giakos, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Computer Engineering; Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

Multimedia networking; video caching router; optimal cache placement; dynamic programming solution

Watson, Kimberly AnnThe Role of Mentoring, Family Support and Networking in the Career Trajectory of Female Senior Leaders in Health Care and Higher Education
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Leadership Studies

This life history study provides insight into the career paths of six females who attained the highest career level – president – in their organizations by exploring the influence of mentoring, family support, and networking in their career trajectories.

Three female senior leaders from Health Care and three female senior leaders from Higher Education in the Midwest participated in the study. The leaders’ personal experiences were captured in narrative form through personal interviews with the researcher and coded and analyzed for patterns and themes. Daniel J. Levinson’s adult development stages (Levinson, Darrow, Klein, Levinson and McKee, 1978) were used to frame the four phases of career progression in the participant’s lives and provide a foundation for a conceptual model depicting the influence of mentoring, family support and networking.

Findings showed that the support of family was apparent throughout the female senior leaders’ lives and their career trajectories. Mentors were most prevalent during pre-adult, early adult and the first part of middle adult stages. As the careers of the female leaders progressed into the later parts of early adult and throughout the middle adult stages, the importance and active use of networking was critical to obtain and maintain their current senior leadership position.

Three themes emerged in this study: (1) Informal mentoring facilitated the women’s climb up the administrative ladder to senior levels, (2) Strong family support was essential throughout the women’s career trajectories, and (3) Networking was important as a career management strategy.

Recommendations include that employers integrate mentoring and networking programs into their human resource policies. Secondly, that educators integrate these findings into course curriculum to inform females of the importance of mentoring, strong family support and networking in their career progression. Recommendations for future research include interviewing women who are relatively “new” to senior leadership positions. In addition, it is recommended that researchers explore strengths and limitations of informal and formal mentoring programs for women aspiring to senior leadership positions and to expand beyond the two sectors explored in this study, and use the themes in this study as variables for a quantitative research study.

Committee:

Dr. Julie H. Edmister (Advisor); Dr. Mark A. Earley (Committee Member); Dr. Diane Frey (Committee Member); Dr. Judy Jackson May (Committee Member); Dr. Martha Shouldis (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community Colleges; Education; Gender; Health Care; Higher Education; Management; Womens Studies

Keywords:

life history; leadership; women; female; senior leaders; health care; higher education; president; career trajectory; career progression; career path; mentoring; family support; networking

Young, David A.Compression of Endpoint Identifiers in Delay Tolerant Networking
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2013, Computer Science (Engineering and Technology)
Delay and Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) was developed to deliver network communications to so-called "challenged environments." These include space, military, and other networks that can be described as having extremely long link delay and frequent disconnections. The DTN paradigm implements a store-and-forward network of nodes to overcome these limited environments as well as delivering "bundles" of data instead of packets. The bundles nominally contain enough data to constitute an entire atomic unit of communication. DTN introduces the Endpoint Identifier (EID) to identify bundle Agents or groups. The EID can imply naming, addressing, routing and network topology, but these features and flexibility come at the cost of verbosity and a per-packet overhead introduced by large and descriptive EIDs. In this document, we apply lossless text compression to EIDs using Zlib's DEFLATE algorithm. We develop a novel method for generating a large sample of verbose EIDs based upon Apache access logs, allowing testing over a larger, more varied, and more realistic data set than would be possible with the current DTN testing networks. Analysis of the processing overhead and compression ratio lead us to the conclusion that Zlib reduces the overhead of EIDs substantially. By compressing the dictionary, more featureful EIDs can be used without increasing overhead in the form of larger bundle dictionaries due to syntactical verbosity.

Committee:

Shawn Ostermann (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

DTN; delay-tolerant networking; EID; endpoint identifier; data compression; text compression; zlib; huffman; addressing; naming;

Pupino, Alyssa M.Uses and Perceived Credibility of Social Networking Sites for Weight Management in College Students
MS, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Health Sciences
This study examined the use of social networking sites (SNS) as tools for weight management in college students (n=1138), as well as the perceived credibility of these sites as information sources. An anonymous, online, self-administered questionnaire was emailed to 10,000 random students, both undergraduate and graduate, to examine their SNS use for weight management information. They also were asked about their perceived credibility of SNS as an information source, the types of weight management-related search keywords used on SNS, their posting and browsing habits, and their perceptions about social support available on SNS. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographics and total SNS usage. Fisher’s exact tests were used to examine gender and age differences in SNS usage, and independent t-tests were used to examine gender differences between perceived credibility, search keywords, posting and browsing habits, and social support perceptions. Two-thirds (n=739) of participants reported using SNS to access weight management information. Female college students were more likely to be Instagram and Pinterest users (p≤0.001), while male college students were more likely to be Twitter users (p≤0.01). There were no gender differences in Facebook usage. The most frequently searched keywords on SNS pertained to healthy recipes and exercise information. Forty-six percent of participants reported that weight management information on SNS was trustworthy, and there were no gender differences in perceived credibility. There were no gender differences in posting and browsing habits and perceptions on social support.

Committee:

Eun-Jeong Ha (Advisor); Natalie Caine-Bish (Committee Member); Karen Lowry Gordon (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Health Sciences; Mass Communications; Mass Media; Nutrition; Web Studies

Keywords:

nutrition; weight management; social networking sites; social media; Facebook; Twitter; Instagram; Pinterest; credibility; college students

Vendemia, Megan AshleySeeing Is Believing? Perceptions of Interactivity in Company-Consumer Interactions on Social Networking Sites
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Communication
Previous research on interactivity has focused on active engagement with a source and feature-based aspects of online platforms. This study seeks to clarify how merely viewing the interactions of others can meaningfully influence impressions of the source. Specifically, this study explores responsiveness and tailoring as key facets of interactivity. The results indicate that viewing specific types of interactions impact perceptions of interactivity. In addition, there is a significant indirect effect of the source providing responses to existing messages, through participants’ perceptions that they could receive a response, on attitudes toward the source and behavioral intention. There is also a significant indirect effect of the source providing tailored responses to existing messages, through participants’ perceptions that they could receive a tailored response, on assessment of quality of future interactions with the source, attitudes toward the source, and behavioral intention. The implications of this study’s results for interactivity, interactivity perceptions, and further research are discussed.

Committee:

David DeAndrea, Ph.D. (Advisor); Roselyn Lee-Won, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

interactivity; perceived interactivity; social networking sites; Facebook; online impression formation; consumer behavior

Rush, Andrew JPartial Destination Resolution in Multicast Elastic Optical Networks: A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Approach
Master of Science, Miami University, 2016, Computational Science and Engineering
This paper explores the spectral assignment problem and proof of value of partial destination resolution (PDR) in multicast elastic optical networks using a supplied tree approach. The partial destination resolution method allows for subsets of destination nodes in multicast calls to be connected with lower than optimal bandwidth requirements. This method allows additional connections to be tailored around this flexibility, resulting in an increased amount of total throughput of the system at the expense of a subset of the nodes receiving lower bandwidth connections. The study is performed by adding PDR capabilities to existing elastic optical networking systems and performing a comparison study of the effects on percent demand throughput for a variety of network topologies and spectral slice and demand sizes. Limitations of the implementation of integer linear programming techniques with respect to runtime and memory usage are examined to determine the bounding of system sizes.

Committee:

Gokhan Sahin (Advisor); Donald Ucci (Advisor); Chi-Hao Cheng (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

Partial Destination Resolution; Elastic Optical Networks; Multicast; Networking; Supplied Tree; Spectral Assignment; Mixed-Integer Linear Program; MILP

Tahboub, Omar YTHE PRINCIPLE OF DATA FLOW EQUILIBRIUM FOR RESERVOIR MINIMIZATION IN PERIODIC INTERMITTENT NETWORKS
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Computer Science
Network with link intermittency is a growing class of emerging networks of interest. Such networks exhibit long data transfer delay caused by discrete communication services. A particular challenge in such networks is the requirement of very large intermediate storage – or “reservoir” - in all the transit elements at their core infrastructure. In this dissertation, we investigate a forwarding principle called “data flow equilibrium,” which aims to substantially reduce transit reservoir consumption compared with conventional Classic IP data forwarding in periodical intermittent networks. We show that this principle can drastically reduce the transit reservoir requirement without degrading the delay. We validate the result in two ways: analytical and simulation. First, we analytically derive the transit reservoir capacity requirement and transfer delay upper bounds of a single dataflow and critical hop case both, with the equilibrium principle and without it. We devised a data flow equilibrium algorithm, which aims to gear link-hop capacities to preserve transit reservoir. Second, we validated by simulation the analytical reservoir capacity requirement and transfer delay upper bounds for the general multi-flow case with and without data flow equilibrium. We experiment a data backup drill scenario over a simulated network, whose links are periodically intermittent. We devised two types of Constraint Resource Planning (CRP) routing solvers: Classic and Optimized. Classic solvers are based on the conventional greedy routing and Classis IP forwarding. Optimized solvers are based on scheduling-based intelligent routing and data flow equilibrium forwarding. Simulation results have revealed that data flow equilibrium achieves a near-optimal performance, where the majority of reservoir demands were within their analytical upper bounds. We also shown that data flow equilibrium did not adversely impact data flow transfer delay. Surprisingly, the presence of data flow equilibrium played the deciding factor in the achievement of perfect completion schedulability. Finally, the most distinguishing aspect of this work is the formal treatment of network intermittency, which, has not been undertaken before.

Committee:

Javed Khan, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering; Computer Science; Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

Networking; Routing; Forwarding; Data Flow; Equilibrium; Protocol

Stahl, Jacqueline F.Exploring the Role of Identity Development in Social Networking Web Pages
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
This study investigates young adults’ social networking web pages for aspects related to identity development. The study is primarily based on the theory of identity development presented by Berzonsky (1997). Raters assessed selected web pages for characteristics associated with different styles of identity development. A principal component analysis was used to determine that there are three components that relate to identity development that are manifested in the web pages. It was established that there were three main components that described aspects of identity within the social networking pages. These components were determined to be a “Self Focused Type,” an “Inconsistent Type” and a “Withholding Type.” Though these components were statistically distinct, the items included in each component were not the items that were hypothesized to be correlated. Implications of the results are discussed.

Committee:

Theodore Ellenhorn, PhD (Committee Chair); Susan Hawes, PhD (Committee Member); Jim Graves, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

social networking; identity development; young adulthood; webpages

Murawski, RobertPractical Interference Avoidance Protocols for Cognitive Radio Networks
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Cognitive radios are devices which have the ability to adjust their communication parameters based on observations of the surrounding environment. Cognitive Radio Networks (CRNs) are envisioned for use in licensed communication channels, operating on ‘borrowed’ spectrum in a non-interference manner. This technology has the potential to revolutionize wireless communication and alleviate the overuse of certain unlicensed communication bands. Research in this area is relatively new, and significant effort must be placed into researching how cognitive radio devices can operate with a reasonably low effect on the licensed spectrum users. In this dissertation, three areas are researched, focusing on practical mechanisms which can provide service to CRNs while minimizing the impact on licensed users. First, a cross-layer routing selection algorithm is proposed which utilizes fuzzy-logic modeling to gracefully map network quality of service (QoS) requirements and CRN-aware requirements to a route cost function. The second method looks into utilizing cooperation between licensed users and cognitive radios to facilitate CRN communication while improving the throughput of licensed users. Finally, the use of directional transmissions is researched. Directional transmissions have the potential to significantly reduce the impact of cognitive radios on licensed users, however, directional transmissions introduce many complexities to the realm of wireless communication. Some of these complexities will be explored, along with practical and implementable solutions.

Committee:

Eylem Ekici, PhD (Advisor); Ümit Çatalyürek, PhD (Committee Member); Jin Wang, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Electrical Engineering; Engineering

Keywords:

Cognitive Radio Networks; Wireless Communication; Networking

Joldrichsen, Andrea M.Facebook and MySpace and LinkedIn, Oh My: A Recruiter’s Dream…..or Their Worst Nightmare? A Study of the Impact of Social Networking Sites on Hiring Practices
Master of Liberal Studies, University of Toledo, 2010, College of Arts and Sciences
Employers and job candidates have both found ways to utilize social networking sites (SNS) with regard to employment, transcending difficulties incurred with traditional processes utilized in the past. As the popularity of SNSs has increased, so have the ways in which this public domain can be analyzed. This study provides the reader with insight on how and why SNSs are being utilized by employers and job seekers. Some employers are tapping into SNSs, mainly the professional social networking sites, to connect with and recruit potential applicants. Some job applicants are also availing themselves to employers by connecting with them through SNSs. However, the more controversial practice of employers utilizing SNSs as a way to screen potential employees as part of their hiring process, dominated most of the literature currentlyavailable. The controversy is centered on ethical, privacy and legal issues and places employers in a precarious position of deciding whether to invite the possibility of law suits, discriminatory or negligent, with regard to their hiring practices. This research provides a basis to stage further study about this recent technological social phenomenon.

Committee:

Brian Patrick, PhD (Advisor); Sumitra Srinivasan, PhD (Committee Member); Paulette Kilmer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Community; Communication; Law; Management; Personal Relationships; Social Research; Technology

Keywords:

social networking sites; hiring practices; employment decisions; Facebook; MySpace; LinkedIN

Sun, TianyiEffects of Social Network Sites on Social Capital and Awareness of Privacy: A Study of Chinese and U.S. College Students' Usage of Social Network Sites
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2014, Journalism (Communication)
This thesis examined the effects of social network sites (SNS) on users' social capital and privacy awareness and tested if differences existed in intensity of SNS usage and its relationship with students' social capital and privacy awareness between Chinese and the U.S. college students. An online survey conducted among Chinese Renren Network users and the U.S. Facebook users showed that the usage of SNSs was positively related to users' social capital (both bridging and partially bonding) and privacy awareness. Significant differences were found in the intensity of SNS usage and bridging social capital between the users of Facebook and Renren Network.

Committee:

Jatin Srivastava (Advisor); Bernhard Debatin (Committee Member); Parul Jain (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Journalism

Keywords:

social capital; social networking sites; privacy awareness; cultural difference; privacy paradox; friendship

Gruesen, Michael GTowards an Ideal Execution Environment for Programmable Network Switches
Master of Science, University of Akron, 2016, Computer Science
Software Defined Networking (SDN) aims to create more powerful, intelligent networks that are managed using programmed switching devices. Applications for these SDN switches should be target independent, while being efficiently translated to the platform's native machine code. However network switch vendors do not conform to any standard, and contain different capabilities and features that vary between manufacturers. The Freeflow Virtual Machine (FFVM) is a modular, fully programmable virtual switch that can host compiled network applications. Applications are compiled to native object libraries and dynamically loaded at run time. The FFVM provides the necessary data and computing resources required by applications to process packets. This work details the many implementation approaches investigated and evaluated in order to define a suitable execution environment for hosted network applications.

Committee:

Andrew Sutton, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Software Defined Networking; SDN; Execution environment; Virtual machine; Programmable network switch

Barritt, Brian JamesThe Modeling, Simulation, and Operational Control of Aerospace Communication Networks
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2017, EECS - Computer Engineering
A paradigm shift is taking place in aerospace communications. Traditionally, aerospace systems have relied upon circuit switched communications; geostationary communications satellites act as bent-pipe transponders and are not burdened with packet processing and the complexity of mobility in the network topology. But factors such as growing mission complexity and NewSpace development practices are driving the rapid adoption of packet-based network protocols in aerospace networks. Meanwhile, several new aerospace networks are being designed to provide either low latency, high-resolution imaging or low-latency Internet access while operating in non-geostationary orbits -- or even lower, in the upper atmosphere. The need for high data-rate communications in these networks is simultaneously driving greater reliance on beamforming, directionality, and narrow beamwidths in RF communications and free-space optical communications. This dissertation explores the challenges and offers novel solutions in the modeling, simulation, and operational control of these new aerospace networks. In the concept, design, and development phases of such networks, the dissertation motivates the use of network simulators to model network protocols and network application traffic instead of relying solely on link budget calculations. It also contributes a new approach to network simulation that can integrate with spatial temporal information systems for high-fidelity modeling of time-dynamic geometry, antenna gain patterns, and wireless signal propagation in the physical layer. And towards the operational control of such networks, the dissertation introduces Temporospatial Software Defined Networking (TS-SDN), a new approach that leverages predictability in the propagated motion of platforms and high-fidelity wireless link modeling to build a holistic, predictive view of the accessible network topology and provides SDN applications with the ability to optimize the network topology and routing through the direct expression of network behavior and requirements. This is complemented by enhancements to the southbound interface to support synchronized future enactment of state changes in order to tolerate varying delay and disruption in the control plane. A high-level overview of an implementation of Temporospatial SDN at Alphabet is included. The dissertation also describes and demonstrates the benefits of the application of TS-SDN in Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellite constellations and High Altitude Platform Systems (HAPS).

Committee:

Frank Merat (Committee Chair); Rabinovich Michael (Committee Member); Daniel Saab (Committee Member); Mark Allman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering; Computer Engineering; Computer Science

Keywords:

temporospatial; SDN; TS-SDN; aerospace; networks; satellites; LEO; NGSO; constellations; HAPS; high-altitude platforms; STK; wireless; mesh; networking; modeling; simulation; ns-3

Adkins, Angela M.Myspace, Facebook, and the Strength of Internet Ties: Online Social Networking and Bridging Social Capital
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2009, Sociology
Online social networking sites seem particularly well-suited to forming the loose connections between diverse social networks, or weak ties, associated with bridging social capital, but is using one site the same as using another? This study explores the user and usage characteristics of two popular social networking websites, Myspace and Facebook, and then investigates the relationship between online social networking and bridging social capital using survey data from 929 university students and faculty members. Myspace users tend to have less education and be more racially diverse, have lower incomes, and focus more on forming new social ties online. Conversely, Facebook users tend to be better educated, have higher income, and focus more on maintaining relationships with their existing offline ties. A positive association exists between the degree of online social networking and bridging capital, although there was no meaningful difference in bridging capital between those who used Myspace only and those who used Facebook only. However, the results indicate that the use of Myspace in conjunction with Facebook significantly increases bridging capital and moderates the effect of race, income, and degree of usage. Together, this evidence suggests that online social networking is a useful tool for enlarging and maintaining a diverse social network, but that the examination of online social networking in the aggregate may hide distinctions among sites. Different sites are used in different ways, and thus using more than one site might provide the greatest benefit in terms of increased bridging capital.

Committee:

Rebecca J. Erickson, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

online social networking; bridging social capital; Facebook; Myspace

Anderson, Sarah GStatistical Methods for Biological and Relational Data
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2013, Biostatistics
Methods for biological and relational data have pose challenges for statistical modeling. For biological data, gene expression data have high-dimensionality, and T-cell receptor (TCR) data under-sample receptor populations. For relational data, there are dependencies among the observations. This thesis outlines statistical methods for biological and relational data. The methods include classification, multiple testing and social networking. The models for classification are applied to gene expression data. The first method looks at variable selection to show the usefulness of sequential classification and regression trees to more advance methods. The second method uses Monte Carlo methods to calculate a rank for variable selection using supervised classification. Multiple testing methods are applied to gene expression and TCR data. The first method for gene expression looks at strong control of the familywise error rate without the assumption of the subset pivotality property, which is generally not met for gene expression data. For TCRs, the method extends the Poisson-lognormal model to the bivariate case to simultaneously analyze pairs of repertoires. The relational data uses social networking methods. The first uses exponential random graph models (ERGMs) with the application to political science. Solutions to two limitation of ERGMs, non-binary ties and longitudinal, are presented in examples. The last method proposes a latent position cluster model, an extension of latent class models that models clustering.

Committee:

Hong Zhu (Advisor); Abigail Shoben (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biostatistics

Keywords:

gene expression; T-cell receptors; classification; multiple testing; relational data; social networking

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