Search Results (1 - 25 of 116 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Gaudet, Chad R.Baptisms of Fire: How Training, Equipment, and Ideas about the Nation Shaped the British, French, and German Soldiers' Experiences of War in 1914
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, History

Training, equipment, and ideas about the nation shaped the British, French, and German soldiers’ experiences of war in 1914. Though current scholarship contained works that examined each of those topics separately or in combination, little research investigated the connection in a comparative model from the perspective of the soldiers. This work analyzed the British, French, and German soldiers of World War I during the initial phase (August – November 1914). This critical period of the war proved an excellent way to test these ideas. The project relied heavily on combatants' personal accounts, which included archival sources. The troopers experience with initial combat served as a test. How those soldiers reacted suggested the connections with training, equipment, and ideas about the nation.

The results supported the theory that the professionalism of the British soldier and the French soldier's devotion to nation and comrade outweighed the German Army's reliance on both equipment and the doctrine of winning at all costs. Nationalism, equipment, and training influenced soldiery. German equipment provided an edge, but it was not enough. Not only did nationalist sentiment among soldiers exist at the beginning of World War I, three different conceptions of nationalism were present. British and especially French nationalism proved stronger than the German variety, as demonstrated by the ordeal of combat. Professionalism in soldiery mattered; the British proved this point. A British nation existed, and it included soldiers of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Ideas about the nation as well as training led to success, but they also led to atrocities. Such was the case of the German Army. Camaraderie played no small role in all three combatants.

Larger conclusions stemmed from this work. Dissimilar ideas about the nation influenced soldiers differently. Divergent types of training experiences yielded distinct results. Camaraderie proved to be the most important component of effective soldiery. Disadvantages in equipment had a negative impact on the psyche of soldiers. German barbarism demonstrated the dangers of nationalism as well as the mentality of winning at all costs.

Committee:

Douglas J. Forsyth, PhD (Committee Chair); Nathan Richardson, PhD (Committee Member); Stephen G. Fritz, PhD (Committee Member); Beth A. Griech-Polelle, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

European History; Military History

Keywords:

nationalism; training; soldiery; camaraderie; equipment; World War I; British soldiers; French soldiers; German soldiers; professionalism; German atrocities; German barbarism; war; German nationalism; French nationalism; British nationalism

Murphy, Adam CPerpetuating Nationalist Mythos? Portrayals of Eighteenth Century Ireland in Twentieth Century Irish Secondary School Textbooks
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Cross-Cultural, International Education
This case study has sought to examine degrees of nationalist bias found in Irish secondary school history textbooks over an 80 year period (1922-2002). Specifically, this study will be examining textbook narratives of four major topics in eighteenth century Irish history: the Penal Laws, "Grattan's Parliament", the Rebellion of 1798, and the 1801 Act of Union. The eighteenth century was selected for study, as opposed to more comparatively recent and controversial events, such as the Easter Rising of 1916 or the partition of Northern Ireland, to look at an era that would be outside the living memory of textbook authors. These are topics that are also susceptible to distortion or appropriation by later generations of Irish nationalists to fit a teleological narrative of a centuries-long struggle for Irish independence from Britain. This study has sought to determine: whether nationalist bias is present in the narratives of the selected textbooks, whether levels of bias have changed over the course of the period studied, and whether bias found was found pervasively throughout textbook accounts or limited to isolated passages that do not reflect the rest of the text's account. A total of seven Irish secondary level history textbooks were selected, published at different times during the 80 year period. To conclude the extent to which the textbooks displayed levels of nationalist bias, the narratives were compared with a current historical consensus that was established through a comparison of relatively recent academic and popular works on eighteenth century Ireland. A theory forwarded in similar studies (Janmaat, 2006; Mulcahy, 1988) supports a relation between the age of a state and the nationalist tone of its historiography, with levels of nationalist bias decreasing as a state matures. The trajectory of textbook narratives found in this study does seem to show a trend toward more moderate accounts of the past. Pervasive nationalist bias was found in only one textbook, while the other textbooks evaluated saw only isolated passages that seemed colored by an Irish nationalist perspective.

Committee:

Christopher Frey (Advisor); Margaret Booth (Committee Member); David Jackson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; European History; Secondary Education; Social Studies Education

Keywords:

Textbooks; History Education; Irish History; Eighteenth Century Ireland; Nationalism; Ethnic Nationalism; Cultural Nationalism; Nationalist Bias

FIeld, Nayomi GunasekaraMaking Extremism Pay? Centripetalism and Nationalism in Post-War Sri Lanka
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2016, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
The majority of countries turn to centripetalism or consociationalism after a settlement for a major conflict. Sri Lanka is an outlier because it adopted centripetalism before the twenty-six year (1982–2009) civil war. However, centripetalism was unable to foster moderation during and after the war. Why? Drawing upon a plethora of secondary sources, interviews, as well as translations of Sinhala-language political speeches and political manifestos, this thesis asks do post-conflict centripetalist institutions reinforce moderation across the ethnic divide? I argue that centripetalist institutions not tailored to a post-conflict environment tend to be unable to ameliorate ethnic conflict. As a result, various forms of exclusionary nationalism become a common feature of political competition.

Committee:

Brandon Kendhammer (Advisor); Myra Waterbury (Committee Member); Nukhet Sandal (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

Sri Lanka; centripetalism; nationalism; post war; alternative vote; electoral systems; Buddhist nationalism; Sri Lankan politics; Donald Horowitz;

Scott, Camille R“Outside People”: Treatment, Language Acquisition, Identity, and the Foreign Student Experience in Japan
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2014, Anthropology
In recent years, an increasing number of foreign students have been engaging in language and cultural immersion programs in Japan, raising issues of cross-cultural contact and exchange. Japan's enduring cultural nationalism produces an ethnocentric valuation of homogeneity, thereby affecting the ways in which Japanese natives engage with and respond to these students. This paper draws on two months of ethnographic research at two Japanese universities to examine how everyday, culturally embedded nationalism affects the experience, identity, and language instruction of western nonnative learners of Japanese with regards to the institution, the instructors, and the community around them. This discourse on issues surrounding the presence of foreign youth in a nationalistic society has application for discrimination reforms on the international level.

Committee:

Haley Duschinski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Asian Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Educational Sociology; Foreign Language; Language; Linguistics; Pacific Rim Studies; Social Structure; Sociolinguistics; Sociology

Keywords:

anthropology; linguistic anthropology; ethnography; linguistics; Japan; nationalism; language acquisition; Japanese nationalism; study abroad; SLA; language immersion programs; international education; foreigner students; foreigners; discrimination

Weisman, Chad M.Just Coverage and the Path to Peace: Reporting Operation Protective Edge in Haaretz, BBC Online, and The New York Times
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2017, Journalism (Communication)
This thesis pertains to media coverage of Israel/Palestine, with emphasis on The New York Times, Israeli publication Haaretz, and BBC Online’s coverage of the conflict in Gaza during the Summer of 2014. The thesis quantitatively delves into the material being studied, utilizing measures of bias, as well as indicators of peace journalism to accomplish the objective of thoroughly analyzing the 351 news stories sampled from the three publications at hand. The study employs eleven variables, six pertaining to news bias and five operationalized indicators of peace journalism. The thesis will argue that peace journalism is a partial yet powerful remedy for biased coverage. Although it is considered to be a form of advocacy journalism, it can, when translated onto the pages of conventional news outlets, shed objective light on even the direst and most intractable shades of conflict. The study found that The New York Times and BBC Online favored Palestinians in headlines and photographs, likely due to the dramatic devastation wrought upon Gaza. Haaretz was found to be more evenhanded, likely due to its market of Israelis and Jews throughout the world. BBC Online and Haaretz both relied heavily on official (military and government) sources, while The New York Times relied on experts. Measures of peace journalism were varied among the variables being analyzed.

Committee:

Michael Sweeney, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Bernhard Debatin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jatin Srivastava, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Journalism

Keywords:

Peace Journalism; War Journalism; Press Nationalism; Media Ethics; Cosmopolitanism; Cosmopolitan Journalism; Media Coverage of Israeli-Palestinian Conflict; Operation Protective Edge; Media Coverage of Gaza Strip; Media coverage of 2014 war in Gaza

Stavrianou, Jennifer DawnYinka Shonibare. Post Colonial Discord and the Contemporary Social Fabric of 2017.
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College of the Arts / School of Art
This thesis looks at artist Yinka Shonibare's satire of three iconic works in the history of western art. Through parody, Shonibare creates sculptures and photographs that expose the stereotypes that westerners contribute to and deal with in the social structure of 2017. By analyzing what Shonibare's work communicates about social stereotypes, insights about social normatives emerge, which is an activism that the artists work carries. This thesis analyzes how Shonibare creates social activism.

Committee:

John-Micheal Warner (Advisor)

Subjects:

African History; African Studies; Art History

Keywords:

Dutch Wax fabric; Yinka Shonibare; Post Colonial Discord; stereo-types; satire; racism; globalism; nationalism

Ciucevich, Justin ThomasHonor among Thieves: Negotiation of the Haiduc in Ceausescu's Romania (1968-1982)
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, Slavic and East European Studies
In Nicolae Ceausescu’s Romania, the haiduc enjoyed an elevated status in the national pantheon alongside the greatest rulers and revolutionaries of the past – celebrated through film, songs, literature, and architecture. Romania’s producers of culture (particularly privileged intellectuals working within the highly-centralized state) used the haiduc figure as an embodiment of the ideals espoused by the regime – a protector of national identity; a guarantor of social justice and economic equality; defender against foreign oppression; an embodiment of paternity, masculinity, fraternity, and morality; and a champion of righteous revolutionary principles. However, the haiduc also served a practical purpose for the regime. The narratives of the two most renowned haiduc figures – Baba Novac (1530-1601) and Iancu Jianu (1787-1842) – were used, especially, to vilify ethnic minorities and the large peasant population in Romania. This thesis focuses on how these two figures were used most malleably in order to maximize public displays of national chauvinism via flamboyant glorifications and representations

Committee:

Theodora Dragostinova (Advisor)

Subjects:

East European Studies; History

Keywords:

Romania; haiduc; Ceausescu; communism; national identity; nationalism; Cold War

Ramirez-Barbot, JaimeA history of Puerto Rican radical nationalism, 1920-1965 /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Nationalism;Puerto Rico

Siavoshi, SussanThe failure of the liberal nationalist movement in Iran, 1949-1979 : an analysis of structural constraints and political choices /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1985, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

Nationalism

Lin, Yu-FangThe Cultural Construction of Taiwan in the Literatures of Taiwan, China, and the United States
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
This dissertation explores the complexity of the construction of Taiwan and Taiwanese identity through three literary texts: Wang Chen-ho’s Rose, Rose, I Love You (1998), Chan Koonchung’s The Fat Years (2009), and Brenda Lin’s Wealth Ribbon: Taiwan Bound, America Bound (2004). Drawing on these literary works, this dissertation’s purpose is to examine the cultural construction of the modern nation-state of Taiwan in relation to the geopolitical poles in which it is situated: China and the United States. Through theoretically-informed readings, the dissertation explores the discursive emergence of modern-day Taiwan in order to make sense of a Taiwanese identity that is constructed through a long history of colonization and manipulated by contemporary neoliberal capitalism and geopolitical interests. Caught in the middle space between the East and the West / China and the United States, Taiwan and its people struggle to be Taiwanese and to make sense of what that might mean. At the same time, the polar opposites—Communist China and the Democratic United States—, likewise, try to define what Taiwan is according to their own national interests. Hence, Taiwan is a unique case of cultural construction of place, because the narratives about the territory are created both elsewhere and within its borders. Moreover, these narratives about Taiwan are in conflict with one another at the ultimate risk of being subsumed within the greater narratives of the Chinese and American superpowers. Further complicating the matter is the fact that Taiwanese people have different opinions about Taiwan; their differing views inspire the imaginative work of Chinese and Taiwanese immigrants in the United States. All of these narratives play a key role in the cultural construction of Taiwan.

Committee:

Babacar M'Baye (Committee Co-Chair); Masood Raja (Committee Co-Chair); Robert Trogdon (Committee Member); Mei-Chen Lin (Committee Member); James Tyner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian American Studies; Asian Literature; Literature

Keywords:

Taiwan; United States; China; literature; culture; discourse; Wang Chen-ho; Chan Koonchung; Brenda Lin; identity; globalization; nationalism; postcolonialism; fiction; capitalism; Asian American;

García Blizzard, Mónica del CarmenThe Indigenismos of Mexican Cinema before and through the Golden Age: Ethnographic Spectacle, “Whiteness,” and Spiritual Otherness
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Spanish and Portuguese
While indigenista films have been overwhelmingly understood as those that have an explicitly political message (tied to the Mexican revolution) about the plight of indigenous peoples, this dissertation contributes to the discussion of the representation of natives in Mexican cinema by adopting a broader definition of term indigenismo. Through an understanding of the term as the way in which the native has been imagined as Other for the purpose of reifying the nonnative national subject, this study analyzes a broader corpus of native-themed films from the 1910’s through the 1960’s, and considers the multiple discourses through which they have been presented on screen. Through social, historical and cultural contextualization, as well as detailed film analysis informed by film theory, the study proposes the saliency of the ethnographic discourse, the ubiquity of “whiteness,” and the centrality of spiritual Otherness in the representation of natives in Mexican cinema throughout the first half of the 20th century. By pointing to the variety of portrayals of indigeneity in the span of time that is associated with the postrevolutionary cultural and political climate, the study disrupts the idea that the representation of natives in cinema is clearly derivative of postrevolutionary indigensimo. Instead, the study points to the presence of contention and residual elements such as the veneration of “whiteness” and the championing of Catholicism, which suggest a presence of contradictory portrayals, and a lack of cultural consensus about the place of the native in the nation and the parameters of nonnative national identity. The study therefore has implications for histories of Mexican cinema, but in particular for Anglo-American film studies, which has tended to discuss race and cinema according to U.S. racial constructs and understandings.

Committee:

Laura Podalsky (Advisor); Ignacio Corona (Committee Member); LaTorre Guisela (Committee Member); Martinez-Cruz Paloma (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Latin American Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern Language; Modern Literature

Keywords:

indigenismo, cinema, race, ethnicity, whiteness, Mexico, ethnography, spiritual Otherness, nationalism, mestizaje

Bekeny, Amanda KriskaThe trumpet as a voice of Americana in the Americanist music of Gershwin, Copland, and Bernstein
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2005, Music
The turn of the century in American music was marked by a surge of composers writing music depicting an “American” character, via illustration of American scenes and reflections on Americans’ activities. In an effort to set American music apart from the mature and established European styles, American composers of the twentieth century wrote distinctive music reflecting the unique culture of their country. In particular, the trumpet is a prominent voice in this music. The purpose of this study is to identify the significance of the trumpet in the music of three renowned twentieth-century American composers. This document examines the “compositional” and “conceptual” Americanisms present in the music of George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, and Leonard Bernstein, focusing on the use of the trumpet as a voice depicting the compositional Americanisms of each composer. The versatility of its timbre allows the trumpet to stand out in a variety of contexts: it is heroic during lyrical, expressive passages; brilliant during festive, celebratory sections; and rhythmic during percussive statements. In addition, it is a lead jazz voice in much of this music. As a dominant voice in a variety of instances, the trumpet expresses the American character of each composer’s music. A performance practice survey of professional trumpet players is included in this study in order to discuss performance preparation techniques. Personal interviews with orchestral performers provide further suggestions for approaching this music. This study is intended to encourage trumpet players to become more aware of the trumpet’s versatility in expressing a variety of scenes and emotions. It also offers suggestions for preparation and performance of American music. It is essential for trumpet players to identify their role in any music and recognize their importance, as either a supportive role or a primary role, thus achieving an effective performance.

Committee:

Timothy Leasure (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Americanism; Trumpet; Gershwin; Copland; Bernstein; Americana; Americanist; Nationalism

Lai, YangAfter March 14 Tibet Riots: A New Wave of Chinese Nationalism
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2010, International Development Studies (International Studies)
The thesis is a case study of the Chinese nationalist movements after the Tibet riots in 2008. It is a qualitative research study. I use critical theory to analyze the stimulus of the movement, the new characteristics of the movement, as well as its impact to the country and international society. My study indicates that narrative bias in China and the West has been the main obstacle for dialogue between China and the West, as well as China and Tibet. Hence, more communicative actions are necessary for conciliation.

Committee:

Jie-Li Li (Committee Chair); Takaaki Suzuki (Committee Member); Vibert C. Cambridge (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Mass Media; Political Science; Sociology

Keywords:

Chinese nationalism; communication; critical theory; Tibet; narrative bias; mass media; cyberspace

Song, Seung-WonBack To Basics In Indonesia? Reassessing The Pancasila And Pancasila State And Society, 1945-2007
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2008, History (Arts and Sciences)
Both the Old and New Order governments in Indonesia declared that their state system was based on Pancasila and the 1945 Constitution. Most Westerners and many Indonesians believed that the Pancasila under the New Order was but a euphemistic disguise for authoritarian governance, re-articulated by cunning ideologues in army circles to suppress society and to consolidate the power of Suharto and the military. This dissertation argues that the continuous return to the Pancasila by successive regimes in Indonesia reflected the fundamental fears and anxieties of these leaderships as they grappled with the project of nation-building in Indonesia. The Pancasila was seen as a panacea to the obstacles posed by ethnic, religious, and regional differences. By emphasizing civic values and citizenship as the foundation of the Indonesian nation, the leaders of different regimes sought to transcend these so-called primordial forces. The history of the Pancasila in Indonesia was thus a history of the Indonesian nation, and ultimately the struggle between the state and what it perceived as the divisive forces in society. Despite the perceived authoritarianism of the New Order regime, its failure to implement its Pancasila program was, in fact, the manifestation of its weaknesses vis-à-vis the forces of religion, region, and ethnicity in Indonesian society and its failure to subordinate them.

Committee:

William Frederick, H. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Collins (Committee Member); Katherine Jellison (Committee Member); John Brobst (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Pancasila State; Pancasila Democracy; Pancasila Economy; Indonesian Nationalism

Ryan, Angela RoseEducation for the People: The Third World Student Movement at San Francisco State College and City College of New York
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, History

When did the 1960s end? Scholarly opinion holds that the spirit, energy and optimism that characterize the decade succumbed to infighting and fragmentation as the decade came to a close in 1968. My dissertation challenges this assertion by examining two influential and understudied student movements at San Francisco State College and City College of New York in 1968 and 1969. Often overlooked in favor of student protests that occurred on elite Ivy League campuses, these protests were characterized by multiracial coalitions that challenged the Eurocentric curriculum and lack of diversity at their colleges. These protests were watershed moments in higher education, and they brought about the creation of ethnic studies and the increased acceptance of students of color. In addition, the philosophy, tactics, and rhetoric espoused by these students contributed to the creation of a Third World Left, which included these students and their allies, as well as other activists of color. The activism of the Third World Left continued into the 1970s and became an important site in the continuation of radical politics, thus belying the notion that “the sixties” ended in declension in 1968.

This dissertation will show that when diverse sites of activism are explored, rather than solely the white New Left, many movements outlasted the end of the 1960s, including many groups that were spawned as a result of the Third World student movement. This dissertation foregrounds the processes of coalition building among activists of color, as well as the rhetoric and philosophy developed by these students. By examining the many archival sources such as artifacts and documents from the strike, as well as interviews and oral histories with the activists, in addition to the sparse secondary sources that exist about the protests, I will argue for the seminal role of the Third World student movement in this period.

Committee:

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, PhD (Advisor); Lilia Fernandez, PhD (Committee Member); Hasan Kwame Jeffries, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; American History; American Studies; Black History; Education History; Higher Education; Hispanic Americans; History; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Native Americans

Keywords:

student movement; 1960s; sixties; Third World; Black Power; Puerto Rican; Chicano; Asian American; African American; Native American; Filipino; ethnic studies; black studies; protest; third world liberation front; nationalism; Black Panther Party

Strauss, MichaelTropical Africa and Generation Kalashnikov: The AK47’s Role in Shaping an African Identity
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2011, Geography

Many African nations became sovereign following the Second World War. The new African leaders were confronted by arbitrary boundaries and inherited state structures in ethnically diverse regions. Failing to realize their country’s potential, the first generation of leaders fell into kleptocratic methods of governing. Ethnic based grievances led to the quest for greed which boiled over into violence. Ethnic communities, political leaders, warlords and civilians soon discovered the most effective and efficient path to power and personal gain to be achieved with the simplicity and lethality of small arms, and in particular, the AK47.

Equatorial Africa has an abundance of natural resources and raw material, and illicit arms trade. Porous borders help facilitate movement of arms, combatants, and violence. The region continues to struggle to find an identity. Young men have little to few opportunities, except those opportunities using the AK47 as a tool. Governments provide no economic opportunities for the society. Individuals, groups and organizations form in order to seek wealth, security and an identity of their own. Simultaneously, governments struggle to provide for the people while seeking personal wealth, security and identity. Grievance, greed and small arms are prolific and ubiquitous throughout Equatorial Africa. The AK47 is the tool that shapes identity in Africa’s cycle of kleptocratic semi-democracies.

Committee:

David Nemeth, Dr. (Committee Chair); Bhuiyan Alam, Dr. (Committee Member); M. Beth Schlemper, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Studies; Geography

Keywords:

AK47; Tropical Africa; identity; nationalism; small arms and light weapons; political geography

Gulish, Rachael JeanThe Rediscovery of Galicia in the Revival of the Camino de Santiago: Changing Images of Galicia in Modern Pilgrim Accounts
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, Spanish and Portuguese

This study examines the ways in which narratives of modern pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago portray Galicia, the northwestern region of Spain whose cathedral in Santiago de Compostela has been one of the world’s most important pilgrimage destinations since the Middle Ages. The region has long been depicted as a backward, primitive culture by Spaniards and foreigners alike. These ideas have evolved in recent decades, however, and some of the very same traits for which Galicia was ridiculed are now celebrated. This new perspective emerges in several contemporary accounts written in the midst of a large international revival of the pilgrimage that began in the 1980s. Through an analysis of several modern pilgrim narratives, including "Road of Stars to Santiago" (1994) by Edward Stanton, "El Camino: Walking to Santiago de Compostela" (1996) by Lee Hoinacki, "Pilgrim Stories: On and Off the Road to Santiago" (1998) by Nancy Louise Frey, "I’m Off Then: Losing and Finding Myself on the Camino de Santiago" (2006) by Hape Kerkeling, "Tras los pasos del sol: Hasta el fin del mundo por el Camino de Santiago" (2008) by Mariano N. Encina Amatriain, and "Mochila y Bordón, reflexiones en el Camino de Santiago" (2004) by Teresa Simal, I aim to demonstrate how modern non-Galician pilgrims contribute to or dispel stereotypes of the region.

In order to illustrate a change in perceptions of Galicia, I will compare these narratives to older pilgrim and travel accounts such as "The Way of St. James" (1920) by Georgiana Goddard King and "A Hand-book for Travellers in Spain and Readers at Home" (1845) by Richard Ford. More importantly, I will explore the reasons behind the transformation in pilgrims’ visions of Galicia by examining certain tendencies in Spanish and Galician literature, as well as several aspects of 20th-century Spanish society. Finally, I will discuss the impact of the Camino de Santiago on Galicia throughout its history, particularly in light of the recent and significant increase in pilgrims and the subsequent commercialization of many aspects of the route to Compostela. I hope that my study will contribute to an understanding of Galician identity today, and the ways in which this has been, and continues to be, shaped by the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.

Committee:

Salvador García Castañeda, Dr. (Advisor); Donald Larson, Dr. (Committee Member); Stephen Summerhill, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Literature; Modern Literature; Regional Studies; Romance Literature

Keywords:

Galicia; Camino de Santiago; Way of St. James; St. James; Gallego; pilgrimage; pilgrim; pilgrim narrative; Santiago de Compostela; Galician nationalism; Galician literature; Xacobeo 2010; Xacobeo 1993

Harmon Threatt, Elizabeth A.The Dreams of Daughters
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Arts and Sciences: English and Comparative Literature

The Dreams of Daughters is a collection of poems that explores the connections between family, domesticity, death, love and grief. Organized into four sections, the creative portion of my dissertation follows a trajectory that explores internalized and externalized grief and familial relationships. With a nearly consistent female narrator, the manuscript begins by looking at highly personal interactions between mothers, daughters, and sisters. As the sections progress, the narrator moves from the dreams of daughters, to those of lovers, husbands and wives, and fathers, ultimately returning to the moment that sparks the entire book – the mother’s death. Together, these poems provide a creative look at what happens to individuals and families when death alters the perspective of every relationship.

This dissertation also includes a critical essay that focuses on the poetry collection Domestic Violence by the Irish poet Eavan Boland. The essay argues that these poems work to critique and dismantle mythologies of women that nationalist rhetoric often creates. Through a close examination of several poems in this collection, I show how Boland poetically subverts the woman-as-muse trope and strives to create a new and empowered space for women.

Committee:

Donald Bogen, PhD (Committee Chair); Danielle Deulen, PhD (Committee Member); John Drury, MFA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

poetry;grief;nationalism;Boland;;;

Aguilar, Abigail PfisterVirtue nationalism: an aristotelian defense of the nation
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Philosophy
Nationalism, it is argued, is a bad ideology, responsible for much of the problems of the modern world. The proofs offered to support this are empirical, in the many reprehensible acts of actual nations. Yet this criticism neglects the possibility that nations may produce, overall, more benefit than harm. A stronger argument against nationalism is theoretical, which claims that all nations are necessarily either amoral or immoral. This argument relies on the set of inherent components that all nations have, and makes the case that these must combine to create a problematic ideology because they always lead to a political structure that allows unacceptable inequalities and unjustifiable partiality. A common response is to distinguish between good and bad forms of the nation, and then show that the theoretical criticism only applies to the bad forms. Although most of these distinctions fail, one distinction seems promising: liberal nationalism, which includes the values that modern liberal readers would want in any acceptable political theory, and argues that these values are compatible with nationalism. Yet I argue that liberal nationalism also comes up short as a response. In its place I offer a new version of nationalism that starts with some of the values of the liberal nation, but which is expanded by using some of the key ideas found in Aristotle’s ethical and political writings. I argue that Aristotelian ‘Virtue Nationalism’ is a form of nationalism that is not immoral. I also argue that Aristotle’s writings offer other ideas that can be useful today, ideas that would make the Virtuous Nation superior to other types of nations currently extant. As a practical tool, I propose that this ideal be used as a guide for improving actual nation-states. Although it is an ideal and is not found anywhere, it can serve as a standard for what is considered ‘good,’ and as a measure of how far existing nations fall short. Indeed, I believe that this is its primary value for the nationalist ideology that forms the political foundation of today’s world.

Committee:

Daniel Farrell (Advisor)

Keywords:

Nationalism; Aristotle; Politics; Ethics; Virtue; Rhetoric

Elkan, Daniel AcostaThe Colonia Next Door: Puerto Ricans in the Harlem Community, 1917-1948
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, American Culture Studies
This study examines the community-based political work of the pionero generation of Puerto Rican migrants to New York City from their collective naturalization under the Jones Act in 1917 to 1948, when political changes on the island changed migration flows to North America. Through discourse analysis of media narratives in black, white mainstream, and Spanish-language newspapers, as well as an examination of histories of Puerto Rican and allied activism in Harlem, I analyze how Puerto Ricans of this era utilized and articulated their own citizenship- both as a formal legal status and as a broader sense of belonging. By viewing this political work through the perspectives of a range of Harlem political actors, I offer new insights as to how the overlapping and interconnected multicultural communities in Harlem contributed to New York's status (in the words of historian Juan Flores) as a "diaspora city." I argue that as Puerto Ricans came to constitute a greater social force in the city, dominant narratives within their discursive and political work shifted from a search for recognition by the rest of society to a demand for empowerment from the bottom up and emanating from the Puerto Rican community outward, leading to a diasporic consciousness which encompassed both the quotidian problems of life in the diaspora and the political and economic issues of the island. A localized process of community-building bound diaspora Puerto Ricans more closely together and re-constituted internal social connections, supported an analysis of social problems shared with other Latinx people and African Americans, and utilized ideological solidarities to encourage coalitional politics as a means for mutual empowerment. In drawing Puerto Ricans into a broad and rich history of Harlem, I consider the insights of a range of neighborhood individuals and groups, including African American and West Indian (im)migrants, allied white populations such as progressive Italians and pacifist organizers, and Puerto Ricans themselves. The resulting analysis from the spaces between Harlem's diverse communities in the early 20th century offers contributions to a range of disciplines and fields, including Puerto Rican and Latinx Studies, African American Studies, Urban History, Media Studies/History, and Sociology.

Committee:

Susana Peña, Dr. (Advisor); Lara Lengel, Dr. (Other); Vibha Bhalla, Dr. (Committee Member); Nicole Jackson, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; American History; American Studies; Black History; Black Studies; Ethnic Studies; Hispanic American Studies; Hispanic Americans; History; Latin American History; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Sociology

Keywords:

Activism; African Americans; Anti-Colonialism; Citizenship; Coalitional Politics; Colonialism; Community-Building; Diaspora; Empowerment; Harlem; Immigration; Jones Act; Latinos; Media; Migration; Nationalism; New York City; Puerto Ricans; Urban Politics

Warhola, James WalterSoviet national relations : elite attitudes and perceptions in the 1970s /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1983, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

Nationalism;Elite;Soviet Union

Cobb, Morgan BSex, Chastity, and Political Power in Medieval and Early Renaissance Representations of the Ermine
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Art History
Since the early Roman Empire, the weasel, a small carnivorous mammal indigenous to Europe, has been an element of Western oral, literary and visual tradition. Classical writers were fascinated with the weasel, and recorded its behaviors in a way that lent the animal supernatural qualities, which were acknowledged throughout the Middle Ages and through the early Renaissance. As a result, the image of one weasel in particular, the ermine, was associated with two specific virtues: female chastity and male honor. This iconography was adopted by rulers who illustrated it in illuminated manuscripts, tapestries, paintings and sculpture. This thesis will examine how these rulers used ermine iconography as part of their fabricated identity to construct a political reality that would appeal to the morality of their subjects, who would then submit to the monarchy's absolute control.

Committee:

Diane Mankin (Advisor); Kristi Nelson (Committee Member); Teresa Pac (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ancient History; Animals; Art History; Classical Studies; European History; European Studies; Folklore; History; Literature

Keywords:

emblem; weasel; Petrarch; ferret; ermine; Italian Wars; Italy; France; Chastity; Nationalism; Gaston Phoebus; Poitier; Cathedral; Leonardo da Vinci; Queen Mary Psalter; Bourdichon; Anne of Brittany; Ursula; Helen; Carpaccio; Gubbio; Andrea Alciati

Guokas, Stephen VDe Profundis Clamavi ad Te, Lietuva: Elements of Lithuanian Nationalism in Ciurlionis’s De Profundis Cantata
MM, University of Cincinnati, 2016, College-Conservatory of Music: Music History
At the turn of the twentieth century, Lithuania received new freedoms from the Russian Czars, allowing for the creation of a distinct Lithuanian national identity The arts, especially music, played an important but as yet understudied part in the establishment of this national style, The Lithuanian composer Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis (1875–1911) displays this nationalism throughout his mature compositions., and this thesis will address the Lithuanian national movement in relation to Čiurlionis and his music. Čiurlionis worked tirelessly to establish and promote Lithuanian music. He organized exhibitions, concerts, and composition competitions to inspire Lithuanian composers to employ material from their folk tradition within new works. He also detailed in two articles the musical characteristics of Lithuanian folk music and how a composer could use these characteristics in classical compositions. This thesis examines Čiurlionis’s use of his self-prescribed Lithuanian folk music characteristics within his De Profundis and considers the integration of this folk tradition within his own compositional style, as stated in his 1910 article, “About Music.”. Additionally, it explores Lithuanian nationalism in music at the turn of the twentieth century, addressing issues of authenticity and a “national” style. Finally, through comparison with extant studies concerning Bartok and Sibelius, this thesis presents Čiurlionis within the greater context of European—particularly central European—nationalism.

Committee:

Jonathan Kregor, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Stefan Fiol, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Christopher Segall, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Lithuania;Nationalism;Ciurlionis;Europe;De Profundis

Szigeti, Thomas AndrewBridge Over Troubled Waters: Hungarian Nationalist Narratives and Public Memory of Francis Joseph
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, History
This thesis explores nationalist narratives and public memory of Francis Joseph and the Habsburg era in Hungary. In this work, Budapest’s Liberty Bridge serves as a lens and reference point of sorts in my examination of nationalist historical narratives and public memory of Francis Joseph and the era of the Dual Monarchy in Hungary. In particular, this paper will trace the way in which ruling governments have attempted to impose their own versions of history onto the public spaces of Budapest and into the minds of their citizens. Beginning with the years following the 1848 revolution, this thesis looks at changes in the memory of Francis Joseph during the Dual Monarchy, the Horthy era, and the Socialist era, ending with a discussion of Francis Joseph in modern Hungarian society. In Budapest, the reason that the Liberty Bridge never regained its pre-Socialist era name is due to a lack of popular positive memory of Francis Joseph, in contrast to several other important Hungarian historical figures. In the contested field of Hungarian national narrative the memory of Francis Joseph never truly found its place; for while he did gain a significant degree of popularity in the later decades of his reign, Hungary’s longest-ruling monarch never gained a place in the country’s imagination. By turns marginalized, vilified and ignored over the course of the twentieth century, the king who oversaw the creation of modern Budapest is today largely absent from public space and from public discourse.

Committee:

Steven Conn, PhD (Advisor); Jessie Labov, PhD (Committee Member); David Hoffman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Hungary; Austria-Hungary; Francis Joseph; Public Memory; Nationalism; Eastern Europe; Liberty Bridge; Budapest; 1848; 1896; Communism;

Pokalova, ElenaShifting Faces of Terror after 9/11: Framing the Terrorist Threat
PHD, Kent State University, 2011, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Political Science

This dissertation focuses on post-9/11 counterterrorism and analyzes how the “war on terror” has affected ways of addressing ethno-nationalist separatist conflicts. With the US-led counterterrorist operations in Afghanistan and Iraq following September 11, 2001, military means of fighting terrorism have become more widespread and more acceptable in the eyes of the international community. Ways of addressing terrorism have changed. However, such changes have not been limited exclusively to the threat of terrorism but have affected other phenomena, including ethno-nationalist separatism. The “war on terror” has presented governments with a discursive construct that some states have extrapolated to their separatist challenges. The dissertation analyses how the “war on terror” has enabled some governments to frame their ethno-nationalist separatist conflicts as a terrorist threat and to justify the use of military force against them under the banner of counterterrorism.

The findings of the dissertation indicate that the evolution of the concept of “new” terrorism following September 11 has resulted in a tendency to blur the distinctions between the different types of terrorist threats (ethno-nationalist, religious, left- and right-wing). The subsequent blurring of the boundaries between Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups has resulted in the extension of the application of the term terrorism to other phenomena. As the case study of the Russo-Chechen ethno-nationalist separatist conflict reveals, the “war on terror” has been instrumental in the efforts of the Russian government to frame the unpopular conflict as part of the war, and to justify the use of military force as a counterterrorist operation. Similarly, the dissertation investigates how governments in China, Turkey, and Sri Lanka have resorted to terrorist framing in efforts to employ the military solution against separatism while receiving domestic and international support for their actions.

Committee:

Andrew Barnes, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Landon Hancock, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Steven Hook, PhD (Committee Member); Karl Kaltenthaler, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Political Science

Keywords:

terrorism; counterterrorism; war on terror; Chechnya; ethno-nationalism; Uyghur; Kurdish; Tamil

Next Page