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Bober, Delia ASingled Out for Success: A Narrative Inquiry of Single Mothers in the Community College
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand single-mother community college students’ perceptions of their ability to succeed. The theoretical framework that guided this research was Bandura’s (1977) social cognitive theory concept of self-efficacy, defined as a person’s belief in his or her ability to succeed. Given prevalent deficit mindset surrounding the single-mother population, this study sought to flip the negative narrative and investigate these students through a strengths-based lens. In this narrative inquiry study, I collected data through semi-structured interviews of seven single-mother students at a large Midwestern community college. Utilizing a three-dimensional model, participants shared their life histories, current realities, and future visions leading to an understanding of participants’ perceptions of academic success. Data analysis was completed using narrative analysis techniques from both Connelly and Clandinin (1990) and Luttrell (2010). Seven themes emerged in relation to single mothers’ views of academic success: (a) Range in Parental Perceptions in Relation to Success; (b) Educational Upbringings—A Sense of Not Belonging; (c) Overcoming Abusive Environments; (d) The Community College Paradox—Barriers and Supports to Success; (e) Common Motivators to Success—Children and Single Motherhood; (f) A Positive Shift in Self-Efficacy; and (g) Perceptions and Future Aspirations of Success—”Finishing the Degree” and Paying It Forward.

Committee:

Susan Iverson, Dr. (Committee Co-Chair); Martha Merrill, Dr. (Committee Co-Chair)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

Single Mothers; Single Mother Students; Single Parent Students; Community College; Narrative Inquiry

Mark, Margaret WoodrowPracticing Sacred Encounters: A Narrative Analysis of Relational, Spiritual, and Nursing Leadership
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
This research examined one large health system that has, through a stated mission outcome that every encounter is a sacred encounter, sought to enhance relationships occurring within the health care environment. Seeking to understand the lived experience of sacred encounters through the lens of nurse leaders in one acute care hospital settings this study examined how nurse leaders experienced their leadership role in realizing sacred encounters. Participants were defined as nurse leaders from one hospital setting and included nurse managers, directors and one vice president. A narrative thematic analysis framed by situational analysis was the method of inquiry. Data was gathered through an intensive interview process eliciting an in-depth exploration of the experience of the participants, along with their personal interpretation of that experience. Two questions were asked to each participant, the first to gain an understanding about their personal experience with sacred encounters and the second to allow the nurse leader to reflect on his or her personal leadership behavior as it related to the realization of sacred encounters within their primary area(s) of responsibility. A review of research of current literature focused on relational leadership, spiritual leadership and nursing leadership theory. The major finding was that organizational culture can be defined from the top of the organization and, through well-defined and purposeful leadership behaviors, be realized at the point of bedside care. This study was limited to a one-faith-based hospital. Future research should focus on broadening the scope of inquiry about organizational culture and how espoused culture can be translated into action through purposeful leadership behaviors. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, https://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Hollaway, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Peter Vaill, D.B.A. (Other)

Subjects:

Health Care Management; Nursing; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

nursing; nurse managers; leadership; nurses; relational leadership; spiritual leadership; spirituality; organizational culture; narrative inquiry; organizational psychology

Groman, Jennifer LynnFrom Calling to Crisis: The Growth Process of Teachers Through Crisis-Like Incidents
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2015, Elementary Education
The phenomena of crisis in the formation and development of teacher identity is not unknown in the field of educational research, yet the study of these phenomena tends to focus on preservice and novice teachers. The purpose of this research is to discover through veteran teacher narratives, descriptions of crisis-like incidents, as well as any growth and transformation they may have experienced in the context of the profession. By studying teacher stories I hope to contribute to the understanding of how teachers navigate their teaching lives and shifting identities, especially in the face of difficulty, and gain insight into the value of collectively sharing and talking about the stories together. This Organic and Narrative based inquiry engaged three veteran teachers in conversations about the difficulties and challenges (crisis-like situations) of their teaching lives. The stories of crisis-like incidents (Veteran Stories) varied greatly, but themes emerged, such as: passion for the profession; varying needs for reflection; conflict of personal beliefs and institutional beliefs; conflict of belonging and not belonging; harmed and healed relationships; and the presence of a strongly held core belief. The process of sharing crisis stories in a safe and caring environment was quite transformative for participants. Their reflections indicated increased understanding of self and others, desire to be of service, a sense of wellbeing and personal implications, as well. They concluded that teachers often cause crisis-like incidents for other teachers, and that reflecting on incidents, while emotionally difficult, proved valuable to them. The researcher gained increased awareness of the vulnerabilities and risk in teaching, and now views herself as moving into teacher Elderhood. Early readers responded to the stories of crisis with stories of their own, demonstrating the truly widespread nature of crisis-like incidents in the lives of public school teachers. Recommendations for the profession include increased time and space for teachers to talk to one another about their philosophical beliefs and values and the value of a healthy, trusting school culture. Further research is needed to unearth aspects of critical incidents among teachers with varying philosophical viewpoints, as well as the phenomena of teachers causing critical incidents to other teachers.

Committee:

Gary Holliday, Dr. (Advisor); Renee Mudrey-Camino, Dr. (Committee Member); Alfred Daviso, Dr. (Committee Member); Sandra Spickard-Prettyman, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca McElfresh, Dr. (Committee Member); Diane Montgomery, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; Middle School Education; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Crisis, critical incidents, teaching, teacher training, organic inquiry, narrative inquiry, transpersonal psychology, stories, narratives, teacher stories, teacher identity, identity

Jacoway, Paul R.Are Documentaries Journalism? The Gap Between a Shared Truth and Verification
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Journalism (Communication)
This dissertation examines to what extent the most popular documentaries as ranked by Netflix conform to the principles of journalism as defined by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosentiel, vs. the shared truth of the documentary filmmaker as defined by narrative inquiry theory. Fifteen of the most popular documentaries were viewed twice in their entirety. Time-code was noted to mark events and sequences of the narrative for the sake of reference and comparison. They were selected from the documentary categories used by Netflix that most parallel the documentary categories of history, propaganda, art, style, entertainment, biography, and politics or dissident message, which have appeared as the most common categories in the literature. Qualitative analysis found that political documentaries were the most closely associated with a shared truth, while biographical and historical documentaries were most closely associated with journalistic standards. If documentary filmmakers edit fairly, such as by providing clear identification of speakers and sources, offering the facts and voices of more than one side, verifying their facts and claims, stating their premises clearly, and leaving the conclusion open to the viewer, then they are an example of a high level of verification associated with journalism.

Committee:

Michael Sweeney, Dr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Communication; Film Studies; Journalism; Mass Media

Keywords:

documentary; shared truth; verification; Kovach and Rosentiel; narrative inquiry theory; Netflix; history; biography; political speech; propaganda; filmmaker; journalism; timecode; narrative

Staley, Brenda EllenJourneying Beyond: Critical Multiculturalism and the Narrative Engagements of White Rural Youth at Shady Grove High School
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, EDU Teaching and Learning
This dissertation is a study of “non-college bound” student’s perceptions of their educational experiences at one rural high school, as investigated through their narrative engagements, namely their class assignments, conversational interviews, and the creation of a digital story (Lambert, 2009). Using a theoretical framework of critical multiculturalism (May & Sleeter, 2010), and narrative inquiry as my methodology (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), I examine the student’s stories as meaningful contributions to current knowledge about issues in education such as the relevance of standardized curriculum, college access and readiness, and educational inequity. Analyzing the narrative engagements of three students in particular - Greg, Claire and Alexa - revealed the complex and complicated ways in which students reflected on who they are, how they see themselves, and how they view their future aspirations. For all three of these students, their narratives relate to both their current day selves and their future selves and touch on the journeys that they must take to get to one from the other. For Greg, formal education is seen as irrelevant. For Claire, college is unnecessary, though training for her trade is essential and something she is planning to pursue. For Alexa, college and a 2-year medical licensure is her selected route to “become everything I ever wanted to be.” Collectively, my analysis of data exposes the ways in which some students are not fully encouraged to pursue their driving passions (e.g., racecar driving, cosmetology) as they participate in academic opportunities (e.g., preparing to attend college), and I conclude that educators—to include teachers, teacher educators, researchers and school administrators—should reflect on how meaning is assigned to activities (that get labeled as academic and/or social activities) by re-evaluating the goals and purposes of education for students like Greg, Claire, Alexa, and their peers. In this work, these students shared their thoughts on what education is, isn’t, and might be, and asked to be understood within the process of their schooling. I suggest that it is time to re-envision what high school might be for non-college bound, rural, high school youth. Through student’s narratives and place-based pedagogies, which include the critical examination of the educational supports and limitations students perceive in their lives, perhaps high schools can better serve this population so that future students when asked will say: high school is useful, engaging, for me, and pushes me to become who I want be.

Committee:

Valerie Kinloch, PhD (Advisor); Candace Stout, PhD (Committee Member); Cynthia Selfe, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

rural youth, adolescents, high school, narrative inquiry, digital storytelling, critical multiculturalism

Vasquez, Julian A.A Case Study of Conflicting Narratives of Language and Culture in a Foreign Language Teacher Education Program
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, EDU Teaching and Learning
The goal of this qualitative research project is to analyze the narratives of a foreign language student teacher who decided to join a masters program to become a certified foreign language teacher in the American K-12 setting. The research focus of this study used Narrative Inquiry as applied to teacher education (Clandinin and Connelly, 1995, 2000) where researchers record the experiences of their participants to find the relevant narratives that contribute to the construction of the teacher identity of the individual. Narratives contribute to the construction of identity, which is defined as a series of reifying, significant, endorsable stories about a person (Sfard and Prusak, 2005) In nine months, the researcher performed as a student teacher supervisor, while collecting data from several sources, such as student teaching practicum observations, in classroom assignments, researcher and participant journals, informal conversations and semi-structured entrance and exit interviews. Although previous research revealed that individuals use their existing narratives to find a meaning of those new experiences they face, the additional narratives of language proficiency and foreign language culture added yet two more layers to the already complex narratives of good teaching, successful learning and assessment in the foreign language classroom. The process of identity transformation is greatly affected by how interns visualize their role as teachers and their knowledge of the foreign language. In addition, due to the different needs of each student teacher, as well as the beliefs and perceptions of the interns towards the teaching profession, student teachers usually build a personalized definition of identity that shares some common aspects from one teacher to the next, but will never be the same for two of them. At the same time, Sfard and Prusak (2005) support this notion when they define identities as a collection of narratives that are significant and relevant. In the field of teaching education, therefore, interns construct their identity by means of the significant stories that are relevant to their experiences in their professional lives, inside and outside of the classroom. Findings suggest that although the participant has the skills required to succeed in the teacher education program where the study took place, her conflicting narratives do not necessary equip her with the tools to succeed in the teaching world. In addition, there seems to be a conflict in the narratives of the organizations that teach languages at the undergraduate level and language teaching at the teacher education scenario. It is necessary then, for teacher education programs in general, to keep in mind those existing conflicts and mediate between the challenges prospective teachers will face when exposed to different narratives inside and outside of the teacher education context. At the same time, it is important for teacher education programs to keep in mind the differences in learning a language in context and teaching a foreign language in the harsh reality of the American K-12 classroom. A solution for this challenge requires a closer partnership between the fields of humanities, language teaching and foreign language teacher education, to help prospective teachers to succeed in the teaching world.

Committee:

Patricia Enciso, PhD (Advisor); Marcia Farr, PhD (Committee Member); George Newell, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Foreign Language; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

narrative inquiry; teacher education; language teacher education; language education; Identity; case studies; education; K-12 teacher education

Wells, Cynthia AliceEpiphanies of faith within the academy: a narrative study of the dynamics of faith with undergraduate students involved in intervarsity christian fellowship
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Educational Policy and Leadership
This narrative study describes the faith dynamics of undergraduate students involved in the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF) at a secular university. Nine students were interviewed using the Faith Development Interview—interview protocol developed by Moseley, Jarvis, and Fowler in 1993—and a Faith Experience Interview designed by the researcher of the current study. Analysis within the overlapping experiences of the IVCF and the university identified nine phenomena that influence epiphanies of faith. Three are evident within the IVCF context—affiliations of faith, mentors of faith, and choosing into faith. Inductive study, retreats, peer relationships, and staff advisers challenge and support students toward authenticity, commitment, and transformation of faith. Three of the nine phenomena are primarily evident within the university context—transition, encountering difference, and being set apart. The IVCF students were singled out both appropriately and inappropriately within classes, the peer culture of the university, and in interpersonal relationships. Lastly, three phenomena were evident in both contexts—studying faith, addressing questions related to faith, and making connections. Narratives of faith constructed for each participant highlight key findings of the research within the context of the individual stories and experiences. The findings are presented across the collective experiences and narratives of all participants. An emergent model of faith epiphanies within the IVCF on a secular university campus is presented. The findings indicate that the intersection of the two contexts within the lives of students influences faith. Characteristics of secular higher education offer valuable experiences for the formation of faith. The academy’s potential for influencing faith formation may be enriched rather than stifled by its secular orientation. The IVCF ethos and processes were found to construct a “holding environment” that influences faith formation and transformation. Authentic relationships within a mentoring community founded upon faith enable individuals to address personal struggles and faith questions in a manner that potentiates faith formation. Finally, this research suggests that embracing a narrative orientation may enrich faith inquiry.

Committee:

Robert Rodgers (Advisor)

Keywords:

faith development; InterVarsity Christian Fellowship; narrative inquiry; secular university; college students

Koo, Ah RanBeing and Becoming in the Space Between: Co-Created Visual Storying through Community-Based Participatory Action Research
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
The main goal of this study was to expand understanding of a Korean-American community’s cultural identities through storytelling and artmaking, which was conceptualized as Visual Storying in this study. Ethnic minority students in the United States often experience confusion or conflict between American and their heritage cultures. This study sought to identify the experiences of a contemporary Korean-American community through learning and teaching Korean language, history, culture, and/or art. The conceptual framework of this study combined the three following research backgrounds: (1) critical multiculturalism; (2) narrative inquiry and arts-based research; and (3) community-based participatory action research. Understanding cultural identities of Korean-American students is a complex process that required multiple approaches. In order to examine social and political backgrounds as well as power relations of the students’ multicultural settings, this study applied a theoretical framework of critical multiculturalism to the settings. In addition, narrative inquiry and arts-based research were used as basic means of this study. Both practices were effective ways to convey thoughts, emotions, and experiences in approachable ways, which revealed unknown stories of a Korean-American community in multicultural settings. Lastly, this study utilized a community-based participatory action research (CBPAR) approach. Exploring a cultural and social aspect required deep integrations and interactions with the community members to gain better understandings of the local context. Therefore, CBPAR was the main methodology in this study that explored the complexity of the Korean-American community’s cultural understandings through deep engagement in their local community. The Korean-American Community School of Central Ohio (KACSCO)’s students participated in this study via two classes, Advanced and Art & Craft classes. In the Advanced class, the students learned Korean language, history, and culture while in the Art & Craft class, they created visual images working with peers. Key school events and classroom activities were documented through participant observation with audio recordings, field notes, and photo documentation. Additional formal interviews were conducted with KACSCO’s parents and teachers, and informal interviews were held with students. Students’ written and visual works were collected, copied, and analyzed as main data. This study supported the Korean-American community members’ desire to teach/learn their cultural perspectives and express their feelings of being different while participating in collaborative learning and artmaking. It also opened conversations about unique experiences of a minority population, and brought out cultural aspects of a Korean-American community in the United States. Sharing stories and creating visual images with Korean-American students provided us with a better understanding of our multicultural society and a space for the youth to challenge notions of cultural differences.

Committee:

Karean Hutzel (Advisor); Shari Savage (Committee Member); Joni Acuff (Committee Member); Timothy San Pedro (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Art Education; Asian Studies; Ethnic Studies; Multicultural Education; Multilingual Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Visual Storying, Participatory Action Research, Critical Multiculturalism, Narrative Inquiry, Arts-Based Research, Culture, Identity, Diversity

Reid, Hannah MarieTeacher Self-Identity: A Narrative Inquiry Into the Lives of Teachers and the Influences on Their Interactions with Students
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2017, College of Education and Human Services
New teachers are supported extensively while participating in teacher training programs and during the first years of teaching. During this time, there are opportunities for the new teacher to explore their self-identity and determine how they will interact with students in the classroom. As teachers enter the later years of their careers and are considered experienced, they are forced to contend with changing political and societal factors that influence their experiences around teaching in the classroom, often times without the extensive support that is provided for the teachers in their first years. Through a lens of social constructivism, narrative inquiry was used to “story” the lives of four teachers in high schools around a Midwestern metropolitan area. The theoretical framework, constructed around theories of experience and self-identity formation, explored these teachers’ personal experience narratives and mapped their moral sources, traditions, and epistemological beliefs. The research found that the experiences teachers narrated were either stories of empowerment or stories of skepticism, and worked to influence the narrated self-identity and teacher/student interactions in both supportive and challenging ways.

Committee:

Frederick Hampton, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Anne Galletta, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mark Freeman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mary Frances Buckely, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Julie Burrell, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

teacher self-identity; high school teachers; teacher student interaction; teacher experience; narrative inquiry

Feola, Frank J.Culturally Responsive Professional Development through Conceptual Change: A Case Study of Substitute Teachers in Urban School Districts
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2009, College of Education and Human Services

The purposes of this research were to analyze the influence of participants’ experiences on their culturally responsive pedagogical development and consider the policy implications for higher education, schools and school districts, and the state. Four substitute teachers from three urban school districts participated in a professional development experience—autodidactic cultural diversity development—to learn about culturally responsive pedagogy and implement it in their classrooms. Participants’ upbringing, collegiate experiences, substitute teaching experiences, and the professional development influenced their development as culturally responsive educators. This research may also be used to inform policy discussions regarding the value and applicability of the substitute teaching experience for preservice teachers and cultural diversity professional development for substitute teachers.

Autodidactic cultural diversity development is comprised of the culturally responsive pedagogical taxonomy (Feola’s taxonomy) and literature-integrated, autoethnographic reflection. The taxonomy includes nine facets for learning the attitudes and skills of culturally responsive pedagogy. Participants read nine excerpts from the culturally responsive teaching literature, which illustrated aspects of the taxonomy, over 15 weeks and used an autoethnographic reflection form to analyze eight substitute teaching experiences. The structured reflection promoted the integration of the literature and their teaching experiences. Case study and narrative inquiry methodologies informed data collection and analysis. Utilizing data from two focus groups, two individual interviews, and eight written reflections, participants’ culturally responsive pedagogical development was analyzed through a conceptual framework of the conceptual change model. NVIVO, a qualitative research analysis software, was used to facilitate data analysis.

Each participant’s case highlights her or his development and the aspects of this experience that promoted the learning and implementation of culturally responsive teaching. Lived-experiences heavily influenced participants’ learning, suggesting that efforts should be made to individualize learners’ experiences when attempting to teach culturally responsive pedagogy. Data analysis indicated that the professional development program increased three of the participants’ awareness of their students’ cultures and influenced their implementation of culturally responsive practices in the classroom. The policy implications suggest that teacher preparation programs and school districts consider the pedagogical potential of the substitute teaching experience when providing professional development.

Committee:

James Carl, PhD (Committee Chair); Catherine Hansman, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Frederick Hampton, PhD (Committee Member); Judith Stahlman, PhD (Committee Member); Ana Maria Villegas, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Higher Education; Multicultural Education

Keywords:

autodidactic cultural diversity development; autoethnography; case study; conceptual change model; culturally responsive teaching; culture; narrative inquiry; professional development; policy; qualitative research; substitute teachers; urban schools

Bird, Jennifer LynneWriting A Teaching Life
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2005, Educational Leadership
This qualitative interpretive dissertation consists of five acts. Each act uses the theory of narrative inquiry and the practice of multigenre writing to investigate the stories teachers at the Ohio Writing Project tell as they complete their own writing, as well as the classroom implications when teachers view themselves as writers. Prologue: Provides an overview of the dissertation. Act I: A fictional story based on the author’s life and factual research experiences at the Ohio Writing Project. Act II: End notes which illuminate issues introduced in the fiction and elaborate on what is fact and what is fiction in the research. Act III: Writing from the author’s past presented in multiple genres to highlight the theoretical foundation of narrative inquiry. Act IV: End notes which examine existing literature and the author’s rationale for writing a dissertation from a different methodological approach. Act V: The author’s Ohio Writing Project Portfolio that provides additional critique of teaching, writing, and curriculum. While an abstract may provide an initial outline of this dissertation, it cannot effectively capture the creativity and risk of the author’s writing style. To learn more, keep reading.

Committee:

Tom Poetter (Advisor)

Keywords:

multigenre writing; narrative inquiry; fiction writing; English education; curriculum innovation; teacher research

Titus-Becker, Katherine C"Make That Gift": Exploring the stoical navigation of gender among women fundraisers in higher education
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Educational Policy and Leadership
This dissertation illuminated how women fundraisers in higher education stoically navigated gender in their positions as development officers. Narrative inquiry was used to understand the experiences and stories related to the intersection of work and gender from eleven women development officers. This research suggests that women development officers continuously, and stoically, navigated gender in their positions. These women creatively employed agency, in acquiring donations, thus enjoying success in their work. They utilized agency by reappropriating gendered skills such as subservience, active listening, acknowledging others, being the dutiful daughter, and utilizing sports as a fundraising tool. Some participants were also able to exercise agency by appropriating femininity to their advantage. The women fundraisers in this study, also faced harassment and marginalization in the workplace. The women employed various techniques to deal with this degradation and marginalization including silence and stoicism. Silence was a theme throughout this study and included the strategic use of silence which the women chose as a method of resistance that helped them succeed in their position. The fundraisers were also silenced by harassing donors and the structures of oppression that existed at their institution and in the fundraising profession. These women fundraisers constantly walked a fine line between expressing agency and encountering the barriers set forth by structures of inequality. They negotiated these experiences on an everyday basis and were remarkable in their survival and resiliency. The women fundraisers were not always able to exercise agency in their positions, yet still they endured, and constantly navigated gender.

Committee:

Leonard Baird Susan R. Jones (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Higher

Keywords:

women; gender; feminism; narrative inquiry; agency; silence; fundraising; development officers

Wirza, YantyIdentity, Language Ideology, and Transnational Experiences of Indonesian EFL Learners and Users: A Narrative Study
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Teaching and Learning
This study was motivated to provide a thick narration (Christou, 2006; Shenhav, 2005) of life experiences of English language learners and users from one of the Kachru’s (1990) Expanding Circles, Indonesia. The Indonesian government’s official political position dictates that English be granted a foreign language status. Within these sociocultural and political circumstances, the study examined the life histories of seven Indonesians regarding their identity construction, language ideology, and their transnational experiences. The participants were undertaking their doctoral degree in Indonesian universities and came to a US large university in the Midwest for a semester-long study abroad program called PKPI. The study utilized narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000; 2006) and case study (Merriam, 1998; Stake, 1997) methods in its attempt in understanding the meaningful real life events (Yin, 2011) in their landscape of action and consciousness (Brunner, 1986) throughout the participants’ life-long and life-wide (Duff, 2012) experiences as English language learners and users. This study contributes to a better understanding of EFL learners and users’ unique, profound, and rich stories from a periphery context regarding their identity constructions, language ideology and transnational experiences to fill the voids in SLA, TESOL and related fields (e.g Firth & Wagner, 1997; 2007; Kumaravadivelu, 2012; Pavlenko, 2001). The scholarship of identity and identity construction has been at in the center stage in the L2 research in the last few decades (e.g. Block, 2007; 2009; Gee, 2001; Norton Peirce, 1995; Norton, 2000; 2007; 2013). In this study, the participants’ identity construction is described through the themes of (1) the emergence of identities, (2) moments of realization, and (3) establishing membership and affiliation. Throughout the themes, the participants indicated that the stories of their identity construction were complex, multiple, contradictory, a site of struggle, and constantly changing; and that assertion of agency and investment were crucial in the identity construction process (Norton Pierce, 1995; Norton, 1997; 2000; 2007). The participants often found themselves in immense struggles in their legitimate peripheral participation essentially because their “claim to competence” (Wenger, 2010) was perceived as insufficient, or incompatible with the accepted norms of the global English users’ landscape Community of Practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991). In terms of language ideology, the study argues that the interplays of language ideology between the participants’ perceptions, values, and aspiration toward the English language with the larger ideologies at work at the local, national, regional and international are extremely complex. The participants constantly found their practices within the tensional liberatory and oppressive power of English (Alexander, 2003; Canagarajah, 2000); the victims and the beneficiaries of the ideology of English as a global language (Gee, 2010) that possesses the high-status knowledge (Apple, 1990). Furthermore, with regard to the tensional relations between the Indonesia’s conservative outlook on English language and the cultural values associated with it and English global hegemonic power, the study found that English, Bahasa Indonesia, Arabic, and other ethnic languages were constantly in contested spaces within and beyond the participants’ lived experiences. Despite all the odds, through many years of accumulated efforts, English had transformed into forms of capital for the participants (Bourdieu, 1986). In this regard, the participants’ language ideology mainly served as instrumental in securing the economic, cultural, and, social, and symbolic capital English has to offer. The PKPI as a transnational experience the participants were engaged in was suggested to be one of the participants’ landmarks in their trajectories as English language learners and users. Three major themes emerged from the participants’ experiences before, during and after the program. First, the program had presented valuable opportunities in engaging the participants into some of the academic and research practices at a US university as well as social and cultural engagements (Allen, 2010; Alfred, Byram, &Flemming, 2003, Kinginger, 2008; 2009). Second, the participants indicated that the challenges regarding the requirement to produce manuscripts for international publication were enormous (Hyland, 2016). Lastly, the group dynamics showed that the imbalanced status differentials had caused a major conflict involving lawsuit threats. This conflict, as well as others of different issues involved, had negatively affected the group cohesion (Forsyth, 2009; Wageman, 1995). The trajectories of participants’ lived experiences entailed that identity, language ideology, and the transnational experiences were interconnected in nature. Upon examining the larger sociocultural and political contexts of how these intersected, the study inferred that first, participants’ identity and the language ideology espoused by the multiple levels of institutions in Indonesia significantly impacted their identities as EFL learners and users. Second, it was evident that EFL as a literacy practice assumed the valency and polycentricity of English language (Blommeart, 2010). Lastly, there had been multiple sponsors and campaigns in EFL literacy practices (Brandt, 2001), ranging from the individual participants, institutions of various scales, to the multinational and international entities that ran their campaigns to serve their purposes and ideology. The study conferred that the most powerful sponsors for the participants were the self, the Indonesian government with its apparatus, and the English hegemonic power (Phillipson, 1992; 1994; Pennycook, 1994). Through detailed and nuanced analysis and discussion, the study has demonstrated the pervasive influences of English in the participants’ lives. That said, the participants’ life trajectories as EFL learners and users remained to be observed in the legitimate peripheral participation (Wenger, 2010). The tensions and contradictions would be most likely to remain, and the struggles continue. Some important theoretical, pedagogical, and methodological implications were drawn to stimulate further research and discussion.

Committee:

Keiko Samimy (Advisor)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Education; Education Policy; English As A Second Language; Foreign Language; Higher Education; Language; Literacy; Sociolinguistics; Teaching

Keywords:

English as a Second Language; English as a Foreign Language; Literacy Practices; Language Ideology; Identity; Transnationalism; Study Abroad; Linguistic Imperialism; Literacy Sponsors and Campaign; SLA; TESOL; ELT; Indonesia; Narrative Inquiry

Denton, Jesse MichaelLiving Beyond Identity: Gay College Men Living with HIV
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2014, Educational Leadership
The lives of college students who are HIV positive in the United States have received little attention. This study addressed this lack by inquiring into the self-cultivation and institutional experiences of gay college men living with HIV. Informed by AIDS activism and queer theory, I used narrative and arts-based methods to explore participants’ self-cultivation I placed particular focus on participants’ discourse given that American sociopolitical discourse associates HIV/AIDS with gay men. I conducted over sixty hours of in-depth interviews with nine gay college men of various ages, races, geographic locations, and institutional settings. Six of the nine participants created artwork to express their relationship to HIV/AIDS. Using poststructural narrative analysis, the major findings of this study include: higher educational silence about HIV/AIDS; an affective structure to participants’ discourse; and an askesis of shame. Most participants encountered a silence or lack of discourse around HIV/AIDS in their institutions. Institutional silence complicated participants’ ability to discern whether to seek support or to disclose their HIV status on campus. Although participants called upon distinct discourses, they shared a common affective structure. Having an affective structure means that these men represented and discussed HIV/AIDS as driving the way they live, although differently at different times and with various intensities determined by different events, objects and people. Like affect, their relationship with HIV varied, often unpredictably, except for its constant presence. While these men felt differently about having HIV, I describe their common affective structure as an askesis of shame. Askesis, or self-cultivation, is a response to social contempt for gay men with HIV/AIDS and homonormative discourses of compulsory happiness. Shame is an affect involving investment in the self and others along with covering discredited aspects of the self. Therefore, an askesis of shame describes how participants covered the discrediting aspects of HIV while still investing in themselves and others. This study carries implications for using affect theory in conceptualizing college students’ lives and implications for queer social science methodology. I explore the complexities and difficulty of supporting this student population for institutions and faculty. Participants also supply their own recommendations for faculty and students.

Committee:

Elisa Abes (Committee Chair); Peter Magolda (Committee Member); Lisa Weems (Committee Member); Madelyn Detloff (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Glbt Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

identity; HIV; AIDS; gay men; gay college men; college men; gay college students; affect theory; queer theory; Foucault; narrative inquiry; arts-based inquiry; qualitiative inquiry; student affairs; self-cultivation; student development

Banda, Roselyn ChigondaEVERY WOMAN HAS A STORY: NARRATIVES OF SOUTHERN AFRICAN WOMEN IN U.S. HIGHER EDUCATION
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2015, Educational Leadership
My paper presents the tensions between the concepts of global feminism and transnational feminism and outlines the difficulties and contradictions of inclusions that continue to be characterized by power and hierarchical relationships that present (neo)-colonial tendencies. Attentively listening to the stories told by six women who are or have been through U.S. institutions of higher education, I sought to establish the availability of what I termed “global spaces” where difference is not only tolerated but accepted. The research questions that guide this study are what stories do Southern African women tell about their experiences in U.S. higher education in this era of globalization? What space is available for a healthy conversation that does not perpetuate the “them” “us” dyad that has complicated the formation of a global sisterhood? My theoretical foundations of transnational feminism and postcolonial theory challenge ethnocentrism, and implore curriculum to go beyond Tomlinson’s (1991) “zone of intelligibility” to learn, understand and accept our differences. My findings revealed that items of our “experience” are not in and of themselves unique phenomena in experience, but instead they are in relation to some other structures of meaning, in particular, location, space, and time. I also found out that identities can be ascribed due to stigma and stereotype, making it very difficult for some groups to claim a “global space”. Even though migration of women from Southern Africa, the so-called Global South, may cause a traumatic upheaval of dispossession of status, I argue for the possibility of locating oneself in a global context without erasing the cultural specificity of oneself. This study is particularly significant because these women speak of historicizing and denaturalizing the ideas, beliefs, and values of globalization such that the underlying exploitative social relations and structures are made visible.

Committee:

Lisa Weems (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Transnational Feminism; Post-colonial Theory; Globalization; Global Spaces; Global Feminism; Narrative Inquiry; Feminism; African Women; Intersectionality; Education; Migration; Identity Formation; Third World Women; Liminality

Pistorova, Stacey L.Project Study Group: A Narrative Inquiry into how Individual Epistemological Beliefs and Teaching Practices are affected by Participation in a Study Group Implementing the Project Approach
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2013, Curriculum and Instruction: Early Childhood Education
Narrative analysis opens up a pedagogical research space to investigate the questions of what do we teach and how, illuminating a deeper understanding of the complexity of embedding inquiry based, constructivist practices into the early childhood classroom. The following research represents a form of inquiry that exposes the tensions that emerged out of the context of a specific professional study group’s engagement in the study of the Project Approach between personal epistemological beliefs, classroom practices and the professional field of early childhood education. The narratives of four teachers tell the stories of early childhood educators seeking to implement projects into their classrooms and to open up a dialogue that invites us to take a deeper look at the findings of this research that challenge and uncover the following narrative threads: the role of experience in teachers’ ability to connect the theory of inquiry-based practices with implementation; the invitation to challenge teacher education and professional development models that disseminate content and information with the expectation that methods are assimilated into teachers’ epistemological perspectives and practices; and the need for additional, qualitative methods that expose the complexity of teachers’ lives and calls to view teachers holistically and as learners who approach teaching and learning from multiple perspectives. The stories found within this research are far from quantifiable or generalizable, but provide a new lens on project-based work and provide insight into the possibility and capacity for projects within the current field of early childhood educators. The challenge of this research is to pay close attention to the experiences of educators in the field and take the time to observe, document and tell their stories. We need to stop the efficiency model of labeling and engage in more narrative inquiry to gain a deeper understanding that can inform our practices and build the capacity for project-based, constructivist practices. When we stop isolating teachers and begin to investigate more deeply the systems within which they work then we open up a space that moves beyond prescribing teachers and their practices. This shift begins to describe the reality of teaching and learning and working within a system that often counters constructivist approaches to education and pushes the limits of pre-determined, mainstream paradigms in teacher education, educational practices and educational research. We must continue to challenge norms as the means of living in the tension and constructing new alternatives to pedagogical practices.

Committee:

Ruslan Slutsky, Ph.D. (Advisor); Sylvia Chard, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Susanna Hapgood, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Lynne Hamer, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Early Childhood Education; Education; Epistemology; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

inquiry-based practices; narrative inquiry; epistemology; personal, practical knowledge; study group

Salay, Joanne K.A Narrative Inquiry of Volunteer Experiences at a Midwestern Equestrian Facility For Individuals With Disabilities
MA, Kent State University, 2009, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
“Volunteers are the heartbeat of our organization,” remarked the director of Helping Hooves(HH). This Non Profit Organization, like others, realizes the impact that volunteers make on the services they are able to provide for their clients. The purpose of this study was to explore participants’ perceptions of benefits derived from volunteering, personal characteristics, motivations for volunteering, pathways to volunteering, and impact and interactions within the client/volunteer/staff community. A qualitative narrative inquiry approach was used at a Non-Profit Organization (NPO) that provides equine-assisted therapy for its clients. The 22 participants in this study ranged from 14 to 82 years of age and had volunteered at the NPO from 9 months to 15 years. Five of the volunteers were individuals with disabilities. Data collection consisted of observations and impressions made by the researcher as a participant, and field note observations and reflections. Field notes were analyzed and participant interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed to reveal themes. The findings of this research addressed the volunteers’ pathways to arrival at HH, their self-identified qualities and characteristics, their perceptions of benefits received, their relationships within HH, their sense of community, and their reasons for continued volunteering at Helping Hooves. This thesis has implications for those NPO’s who provide services similar to Helping Hooves and others who wish to increase and maintain their volunteer base.

Committee:

Tricia Niesz, PhD (Committee Chair); Andrea Adolph, PhD (Committee Member); Rafa Kasim, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Personal Relationships; Social Research

Keywords:

volunteer; volunteerism; disability; equestrian; youth; NPO;Narrative Inquiry

Sisson, Jamie HuffProfessional Identities: A Narrative Inquiry of Public Preschool Teachers
PHD, Kent State University, 2011, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies

Using narrative inquiry, the researcher examined how five public preschool teachers’ understand and negotiate their professional identities within the context of a major metropolitan school district. Based on the premise that identities are socially constructed, individually understood, and negotiated within social spaces, the researcher examined participants’ lived stories through the three dimensions of space: backward/ forwards, inward/outward, and situated in place (Clandinin and Connelly, 2000). These three dimensions provided insight into how participants have come to understand their professional identities throughout their life experiences and how they choose to author their identities in response to multiple constructs of what is professional.

Findings from this narrative inquiry suggest that participants draw from their personal histories to understand the significance of relationships and knowledge to their professional work. Findings also suggest that how participants understood relationships and knowledge were often competing with the constructs promoted by the district through dominant discourses. As a response, participants enacted their own understandings of their professional identities by asserting acts of agency within their classrooms and within social spaces.

Committee:

Martha Lash (Committee Co-Chair); Jennifer James (Committee Co-Chair); Janice Kroeger (Committee Member); Tricia Niesz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Early Childhood Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Narrative inquiry; Public preschool; Teacher professional identities; Cultural Models Theory; Competing constructs of professional; Teacher agency

Hunter, Jennifer J.Revealing Grace: The Lived Experiences of America's Post-9/11 Military Caregivers
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
This research focused on the lived experiences of fourteen military caregiving wives whose husbands were wounded, ill, or injured in a post-9/11 combat theater of war. All wives in this study had been vetted by and appointed to the Elizabeth Dole Military Caregiving Fellows Program and were either actively involved in the Fellowship or had become recent alumni of the two-year commitment at the time of this study. The purpose of this study was to provide a platform for their voices, understand their hopes, struggles, successes, and failures, and to give honor to their stories of military caregiving through the qualitative methodology of narrative inquiry. The stories as data were analyzed in two distinct ways. The first was using a plot analysis that exposed the story lines of the caregivers from the moment of their husbands’ final deployment home to the present day, ranging from three to 13 years post onset. Using eight plot line elements, the arc of the story lines revealed one continuous story that was consistent among all caregivers, yet highly nuanced and unique. Thematic analysis was conducted as the second way of looking at the data. Moving dynamically along the flow of the story line, topical themes and their subthemes deepened the understanding and sense making the caregivers expressed at each stage of their evolution, providing the thematic road map of each journey. It was within this roadmap that a holistic picture emerged of the wives’ journey through the emergent themes beginning with hope, to their own unraveling, to disillusionment with self, other, and the system, to the factors that eventually allowed them to turn toward a more empowered self, and finally, to the paradigm shift that ultimately allowed for transformative, inspired action. This dissertation is accompanied by the author’s MP4 video introduction. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Chair); Tony Lingham, PhD (Committee Member); Deborah Johnson Hayes, PsyD, LCSW, MPH (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; Mental Health; Military Studies; Psychology

Keywords:

military spouses; caregivers; PTSD; TBI; family members; polytrauma triad; secondary traumatic stress; veterans; narrative inquiry; lived experiences; Elizabeth Dole Foundation; Hidden Heroes; posttraumatic ; wives; brain injury

Ritz, Elizabeth ColemanWHAT PARENTS EXPERIENCE AS THEY NAVIGATE HOME AND SCHOOL SHARED LITERACY PRACTICES WITH THEIR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN: A NARRATIVE INQUIRY
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
How six parents navigated home and school shared literacy practices with their preschool children was the focus of this study. Participants’ lived stories were examined in three dimensions of space—backward¿forward, inward¿outward, and situated in place. Narrative inquiry yielded insights into the ways they prepared and assisted their children in navigating home and school literacy practices. Findings from this narrative study are important to reduce the ambiguity parents perceive with regard to their role in preparing their children for formal schooling. Parents, researchers, and educators often have conflicting ideas about what role parents play as first teachers as well as differing perceptions about the value placed upon that role as a result of personal histories, lived experiences, and other cultural or economic factors.

Committee:

Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); William Bintz, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Rebecca McElfresh, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Literacy; Multicultural Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

family literacy; narrative inquiry; home and school collaboration

Doughty, Jeremy R."The other side": A narrative study of south African community members' experiences with an international service-learning program
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of my narrative study was to hear stories about how community members are affected by international service-learning programs. At a time when universities and colleges in the United States emphasize internationalization efforts and the civic purpose of higher education, more institutions are designing and delivering international service-learning programs. More questions must be raised regarding how these programs affect communities. Despite the centrality of reciprocity in the service-learning paradigm, the extant literature primarily focuses on the effects of international service-learning programs on students. I spent two weeks collecting data at a primary school in Ithemba, a predominantly Black African, Xhosa-speaking township in South Africa characterized by one of my participants as “the other side.” Three participants at Korhaan School—Bhejile (the principal), Dunyiswa (the deputy principal), and Peline (a teacher)—engaged in two semi-structured interviews and one focus group. To mask the identity of my participants, I selected pseudonyms for the two universities, the primary school, and the community where the primary school is situated, and I use the names selected by my participants throughout the manuscript. Three key findings emerged from the data. First, my participants’ stories underscored the interconnectedness of the community and the community-based organization. Second, the students who participate in the international service-learning program bring a myriad of benefits to Korhaan School, and the students’ actions align with ubuntu, a cultural framework that shapes an individual’s engagement with others. Third, areas for improvement exist for the international service-learning program. A number of implications for higher education professionals are presented as a result of the findings. First, faculty members and practitioners must involve community members as co-educators in the long-term life cycle of an international service-learning program. Second, U.S. higher education professionals must learn from international models of service. Third, faculty members and practitioners who design international service-learning programs must restructure pre-departure programming to include domestic service opportunities, academic preparation beyond surface-level knowledge, and the postcolonial perspective. These strategies will help higher education professionals construct meaningful partnerships with community-based organizations that are characterized by thick reciprocity—partnerships that are more inclusive, just, and reciprocal.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Ksenija Glusac, Ph.D. (Other); Christina Lunceford, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

international service-learning; service-learning; study abroad; South Africa; international education; community; community engagement; reciprocity; higher education; student affairs; narrative inquiry

McConnell, Marcella KaySECONDARY MATHEMATICS PRESERVICE TEACHERS' BEGINNING STORY
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purpose of this study was to determine how four preservice secondary mathematics teachers' experiences in learning how to teach shaped their development as teachers of low-achieving students. This narrative inquiry focused on their expectations, efficacy, mathematical myths beliefs, mathematical knowledge for teaching, and ability to have a caring relationship with their students. Two sources of practice based belief development (high school experiences and helping others) were identified as affecting the participants' stories. From these experiences as students, they developed the tendency to teach the way they wanted to be taught. As a positive implication, the participants learned to communicate mathematics in multiple ways. Conversely, three of them indicated a deficit model approach where they othered low-achieving students because they were not like them and were perceived as needing to be fixed. Furthermore, the deficit model approach seemed to impede the formation of caring relationships and the development of classrooms focused on problem solving. These results help identify the importance of Knowledge of Content and Students (KCS) in teaching low-achieving students well. Additionally, the participants appeared to need cognitive conflict such as classroom management issues before they realized they had false efficacy and lacked sufficient KCS. The study also gives some insight that caring relationships are diverse, evolving, and difficult to investigate. Most importantly, the results identified possible issues that preservice teachers should be aware of and pay attention to if they are going to develop into effective teachers of low-achieving students.

Committee:

Joanne Caniglia (Committee Co-Chair); James Henderson (Committee Co-Chair); Michael Mikusa (Committee Member); David Dees (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Inservice Training; Mathematics Education; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

preservice secondary mathematics teachers; low-achieving students; narrative inquiry; expectations; efficacy; mathematical myths beliefs; mathematical knowledge for teaching; caring; equity

Nightingale, NaomiAfrican American Men Who Give Voice to the Personal Transition from Criminality to Desistance
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
The United States of America has more than 2.3 million persons incarcerated in state and federal prisons. In 2011 more than 700,000 prisoners were released from prisons back into the communities, mostly urban, from where they came. Upon their attempt to reenter society, persons released from prison are faced with overwhelming odds threatening their successful reentry at every critical element necessary for life and wellbeing—food, housing, health care, treatment for drug addictions, employment, counseling, family support and close personal relationships. This research reflects the voices of African American men who tell their personal stories of criminal life, imprisonment, recidivism, and the point at which they turned from crime to desisting—breaking the cycle of recidivism. African American Men Who Give Voice to the Personal Transition from Criminality to Desistance discusses the attractions of criminal life, challenges to desisting and finally making it through society’s unforgiving social, economic and political gauntlet. Narrative is story and narrative inquiry is a way to understanding and valuing lived experiences through story. Narrative inquiry methodology is the qualitative methodology used in reflecting the stories as voiced by the participants in this study. This dissertation is accompanied by 16 MP4 video files and a Dissertation Summary [PDF]. Six of the MP4 files are embedded in the Dissertation PDF and 10 are embedded in the Dissertation Summary. All are accessible as supplemental files. The electronic version of this dissertation is at AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Annie E. Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Aretha F. Marbley, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Black Studies; Criminology; Social Psychology; Sociology

Keywords:

African American men; criminality; recidivism; turning point; desistance; successful reentry; criminals; ex-offenders; redemption; narrative inquiry; storytelling; Black communities; Blacks; prison system; interviews; change;

Muhammad, Lameesa W.Un-Doing School, African American Homeschoolers: A Narrative Inquiry
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2011, Educational Leadership
The education of African Americans within the United States is a contemporary problem with historical roots. The struggle to achieve access, opportunity, and achievement within U.S. public, private, and charter schools remains an issue that leaves some African Americans making the decision to homeschool their children rather than leaving them in an educational system that continues to under-serve them. The purpose of this study is to gain a more in-depth understanding of the African American homeschool experience through the eyes of the parents, guardians, or caretakers who made the decision to opt out of a formal system of schooling. Specifically, this qualitative study explores through informal interviews, the self-narrated formal school and homeschool experiences of six African American women who are currently homeschooling their children after having attended a U.S. public, private, or charter school for a period of at least one academic year. This study also explores how their decision to homeschool their children relates to and reflects back upon the historical and contemporary problematic that underscores the overarching struggle which African Americans have and continue to face in attempting to gain access, opportunity, and achievement within the U.S. formal educational system. This study identified three root narratives as a result of the conversations with the participants. These roots narratives were gathered through a process of restorying their conversations for the five elements of plot: structure, characters, setting, problem, actions, and resolution. This resulted in a reconstruction of each of the study participant's individual lived stories as African American homeschoolers. Findings from this study reveal that the historical and contemporary problematic that African Americans and many other marginalized groups face within the U.S. educational system was not captured in every narrative from the participants of this study. However, this narrative inquiry into the lives of these women who made the decision to homeschool their children did reveal their unique understandings on why, what, and how they were un-doing school.

Committee:

Dr. Richard Quantz, PhD (Committee Chair); Dr. Denise Taliaferro Baszile, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Michael Dantley, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Sally Lloyd, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Sherrill Sellers, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Education

Keywords:

homeschool; homeschooling; African American education; African American homeschoolers; narrative; narrative inquiry

Gingrich, Randy ScottResponding To The Call To Teach: Preservice Teachers' Case Stories Of Teaching English And Language Arts
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Educational Theory and Practice
This study examines the effects of utilizing preservice English/Language Arts teachers' own case stories while student teaching and sharing those case stories with other preservice teachers on the perceptions of preservice teachers about teaching. The first objective of this study determines how preservice teachers conceive of teaching through their case stories of teaching. Studying the case stories of teaching provides a window to understand the connections between their individual field experiences, course work, and prior experiences. The second objective of the study is to understand how a collaborative framework for discussing case stories-the group- reflective interview-facilitates learning about teaching. Questions used to guide the study are: 1) What do preservice teachers reveal about their perceptions of teaching English/language arts through case stories of teaching? 2) How do sharing and discussing case stories of teaching with their colleagues in the English cohort affect their thinking about the teaching of English/Language Arts? Theories of narrative inquiry and activity theory are used to consider these questions. Findings suggest that case stories of teaching and the group reflective interview can be effective to teacher education and teacher research in several ways. The data contend that teacher educators and teacher researchers may use case stories and group-reflective interviews to: 1) provide opportunities for preservice teachers from diverse backgrounds and diverse teaching contexts to converse on issues related to teaching English/Language Arts; 2) break the isolation that preservice teachers feel by helping them to build community with other preservice teachers who are facing similar dilemmas; 3) provide preservice teachers with episodes of other preservice teachers in actual classroom experiences; 4) present preservice teachers with new models for thinking about their teaching practices; 5) increase preservice teachers' ability to theorize and interpret particular instructional situations; and 6) affect how preservice teachers evaluate themselves as teachers.

Committee:

Caroline Clark (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Language and Literature

Keywords:

Teacher Education; Narrative Inquiry; English Education; Activity Theory

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