Search Results (1 - 25 of 906 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Alley, Zachary WMichael Praetorius's Theology of Music in Syntagma Musicum I (1615): A Politically and Confessionally Motivated Defense of Instruments in The Lutheran Liturgy
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Music History
The use of instruments in the liturgy was a controversial issue in the early church and remained at the center of debate during the Reformation. Michael Praetorius (1571-1621), a Lutheran composer under the employment of Duke Heinrich Julius of Braunschweig-Luneburg, made the most significant contribution to this perpetual debate in publishing Syntagma musicum I&minusmore substantial than any Protestant theologian including Martin Luther. Praetorius's theological discussion is based on scripture, the discourse of early church fathers, and Lutheran theology in defending the liturgy, especially the use of instruments in Syntagma musicum I. In light of the political and religious instability throughout Europe it is clear that Syntagma musicum I was also a response−or even a potential solution−to political circumstances, both locally and in the Holy Roman Empire. In the context of the strengthening counter-reformed Catholic Church in the late sixteenth century, Lutheran territories sought support from Reformed church territories (i.e., Calvinists). This led some Lutheran princes to gradually grow more sympathetic to Calvinism or, in some cases, officially shift confessional systems. In Syntagma musicum I Praetorius called on Lutheran leaders−prince-bishops named in the dedication by territory−specifically several North German territories including Brandenburg and the home of his employer in Braunschweig-Wolfenbuttel, to maintain Luther's reforms and defend the church they were entrusted to protect, reminding them that their salvation was at stake.

Committee:

Arne Spohr (Advisor); Mary Natvig (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Praetorius; Michael Praetorius; Lutheran music; liturgical music; musical instruments; instruments in church; church music; music and theology; music and the Reformation; Reformation music; music and politics; instrumental music in church; Wachet auf

Ferrer, Alejandra JudithMusic Therapy Profession: Current Status, Priorities, and Possible Future Directions
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, Music
The purpose of this study was to examine and understand the present status of the field of music therapy by investigating important areas that affect the daily experience of music therapists across the United States and impact the development of the profession. The field of music therapy is in a constant state of change, relentlessly setting new goals in order to advance as a profession and to further its acceptance. Six overarching questions guided the study: 1) what experiences affect the professional growth of music therapists? 2) what are the opinions of music therapy faculty and members of the American Music Therapy Association regarding the undergraduate music therapy education requirements? 3) what are the most important achievements of the music therapy profession and what are its current challenges? 4) what are current research trends in music therapy and are there areas that require further research attention? 5) what are the long-term goals of the music therapy profession? and 6) how is music therapy portrayed in the media? Participants for this study were ten music therapy faculty, seven active leaders of the American Music Therapy Association, and one additional individual who had served the field in a leadership capacity for many years but was currently neither a music therapy faculty nor active leader. Hour-long individual interviews were carried out over the telephone with each of the eighteen participants. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and mailed for a member check. Results indicated that music therapists’ professional growth is directly influenced by their years of formal education, their mentors, and communities of practice. Participants consider the strength of the undergraduate curriculum is that it is built upon articulated competencies. At the same time, most feel the curriculum is very full, leading to students graduating with underdeveloped skills in certain areas. The unification of the National Association for Music Therapy and the American Association for Music Therapy was considered one of the field’s most important achievements to date, while the small size of the profession was perceived as the biggest challenge. Some participants would like to see increased use of qualitative methodology in music therapy research, as well as studies that clearly describe the music therapy process. Additional research in the areas of autism and teaching and learning was deemed necessary. The top goals for music therapy include growing the size of the profession and gaining greater levels of respect, recognition, and acceptance within the medical field. Participants of this study think that media portrayals of music therapy have improved in the last few years. Many attributed the general public’s greater awareness of the profession to recent representations in books, movies, and news broadcasts, suggesting these are effective means of educating the public about music therapy.

Committee:

Patricia J. Flowers, PhD (Committee Chair); Robert A. Gillespie (Committee Member); Jan H. Edwards (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

music therapy profession; current status of music therapy; music therapy curriculum; professional growth of music therapists; long-term goals of music therapy; music therapy in the media; music therapy research; American Music Therapy Association

Harris, Austin W.Oh Ewe Mohobelo for Orchestra
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2016, Music Composition (Fine Arts)
Oh Ewe Mohobelo for Orchestra is an orchestral composition featuring a strong rhythmic pattern suitable for dance. Although Mohobelo is a genre of traditional African folk dance, my piece does not strive to imitate the traditional African music accompanying Mohobelo dancing. Rather, Oh Ewe Mohobelo evokes the spirit of the African dance through multiple musical techniques in the context of a Western orchestra. The opening theme’s strong rhythmic profile and tempo are the foundation for developing musical ideas in the remainder of the work. Other sections of the work borrow melodic elements from the main theme, but they also develop new material unrelated to the main motive. The material in the middle sections of the work transcend the influence of the opening motive to develop wildly and freely in the same way a traditional African dance might transport its participants to a wild and ecstatic state as the dance develops. An altered version of the main theme appears at the end of the work as the energy of the developmental sections dissipates.

Committee:

Mark Phillips (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Music; Music Composition; classical music; new music; modern music; atonal music; orchestra; mohobelo; experimental music; dance music;

Young, David M.Adaptive Game Music: The Evolution and Future of Dynamic Music Systems in Video Games
Bachelor of Science of Media Arts and Studies (BSC), Ohio University, 2012, Media Arts and Studies
Examination of the history, development, and future of adaptive, dynamic, and interactive music in video games. Discussions include nonlinear music historical developments, compositional approaches for adaptive music, generative music, testing methods in the compositional and implementation stages, the evolving industry of adaptive music composition, future technological developments in music production and gaming, and adaptive music beyond games. Also included is an appendix of video game case studies, as well as an appendix of professional insight from game industry veterans.

Committee:

Eddie Ashworth (Advisor); Arthur Cromwell, Dr. (Other)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Mass Media; Music; Technology

Keywords:

adaptive music; video games; games; gaming; video game music; dynamic music; interactive music; nonlinear music; generative music; composition; composers; game soundtracks; game scores; interactive; game audio; game music; game sound; audio middleware

Bazan, Dale EdwardTEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES USED BY STUDENT-DIRECTED TEACHERS OF MIDDLE SCHOOL BAND
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2007, Music Education
The purpose of this study was to describe the teaching and learning strategies demonstrated by middle school band teachers in Northeast Ohio who reported a student-directed teaching style. This study used a two-stage mixed methods design prioritizing quantitative data and statistical analyses, but also employing qualitative data collection methods in a second stage to enrich perspective and discussion on student-directed teaching and learning strategies (Creswell, 2003). In the first stage, quantitative data was gathered using a researcher-designed demographic questionnaire and Gumm’s Music Teaching Style Inventory (MTSI) (Gumm, 2004b). These surveys were delivered online to 120 middle school band teachers in Northeast Ohio, with hard copies administered to two participants who requested them (N = 122). Forty-nine respondents returned completed surveys, representing a return rate of 40.2%. In Stage One, data were analyzed to determine participant teaching styles so that the most student-directed middle school band teachers could be identified and observed during Stage Two. Relationships and differences among selected demographics and MTSI scores were also analyzed, yielding several significant results, including a significant, positive, moderate relationship (p = .00; r = .52) between teacher- and student-directed MTSI scores. Stage One results also revealed that teacher-directed instruction was more prevalent than student-directed instruction; middle school band teachers in Northeast Ohio seemed to prioritize a more teacher-directed rehearsal. In the second stage of the study, three of the most student-directed band teachers were observed and videotaped during five rehearsals, and interviewed following observation. Based on the analysis of videotapes, observational field notes, interview transcripts, and interview notes, quantitative computations and qualitative descriptions of student-directed band teachers were possible. The teachers observed and interviewed during Stage Two of the study utilized teacher-directed instruction most frequently. However, student-directed philosophies and strategies were discussed by Stage Two participants and information was gleaned that could inform future use of student-directed teaching and learning strategies in band programs. Stage Two findings included documentation of the challenges band teachers may face when implementing student-directed instruction and potential student-directed band rehearsal strategies. A possible link between band instruction and the theory of adaptive expertise was also noted.

Committee:

William Bauer (Advisor)

Keywords:

music education; student-directed instruction; music; music education pedagogy; instrumental music; instrumental music education; band directing; teaching and learning strategies; music instruction; music teaching style; teaching styles; mixed methods

Pereira da Cruz Benetti, LuciaInfant vocal imitation of music
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, Music
Infant vocalizations have been described mostly from the perspective of language acquisition. There is little systematic research on infant production of music sounds. This study investigated infants’ music production by identifying and analyzing vocal imitation of music produced by one infant throughout one day. One 15-month-old infant wore a portable recording device that captured 16 continuous hours of sounds produced within hearing distance of the infant, as well as sounds from the infant’s own vocal production. Instances of music imitation were identified through extensive and intensive listening of the audio file. Physical parameters of the imitative vocalizations were collected through acoustic analysis. A selection of imitations was presented to adults in a validation study involving perceptual similarity judgments between the infant’s imitation and the model that was imitated. Results from acoustic analyses and the validation study supported the perceptual identification of the imitations. The findings show that the infant imitated music that he had heard that day. The infant imitated music features such as pitches, intervals, and rhythms of songs that were sung to him and of a melody produced by a toy. Some imitations occurred many hours after the infant had heard the melodies that served as models. These results reveal the ability of infants to (a) develop accurate representations of music melodies, (b) recall such representations at will hours later, and more importantly, (c) express these music representations vocally. In summary, the findings show that infants are capable of producing music imitations.

Committee:

Eugenia Costa-Giomi (Advisor); Julia Shaw (Committee Member); Laura Wagner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

infant vocalization; infant vocal imitation; LENA; music production; singing; music vocalization; music learning; music education; music development; vocal imitation of music

Makonnen, KarynThe Interdisciplinary Approach: A Music Education Methods Course Component For Preservice Education and Music Education Majors
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2000, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education
The purpose of this study was to develop a music education methods course component which could serve as an introduction to collaborative and integrative procedures for preservice education and music education majors. The design for the course component was two-fold: to provide preservice teachers with strategies for (a) the development of collaborative partnerships to facilitate the integration process, and (b) the development of interdisciplinary units. Four categories of teacher participants were designated: (a) the methods course instructor, (b) the preservice elementary education major, (c) the preservice music education major, and (d) the inservice elementary general music teacher. Preservice education and music education majors participate in heterogeneous teams. Each team includes one music education major and three elementary education majors from a variety of disciplines. methods course. Visual models and guidelines to facilitate collaboration and critical thinking are included. Implications and suggestions for implementation of this action thesis are discussed in Chapter Four.

Committee:

I. Barbara O'Hagin (Advisor); Ed Duling (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Elementary Education; Gifted Education; Higher Education; Middle School Education; Multicultural Education; Music; Music Education; Special Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

interdisciplinary, music education, methods course, teacher education, music education course component, integrate music, music education major, education major, integrate curriculum, Music Teachers, Music Projects

Faulhaber, Edwin F.Communicator Between Worlds: Björk Reaches Beyond the Binaries
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2008, American Culture Studies/Popular Culture
Icelandic pop star Björk has spent her career breaking down boundaries, blurring lines, and complicating binaries between perceived opposites. Examining a variety of both primary and secondary sources, this study looks at the ways that Björk challenges the binary constructions of "high" and "low" art, nature and technology, and feminism and traditional femininity, and also proposes that her uniquely postmodern approach to blurring boundaries can be a model for a better society in general. This study contends that Björk serves as a symbol of what might be possible if humans stopped constructing boundaries between everything from musical styles to national borders, and as a model for how people can focus on their commonalities while still respecting the freedom of individual expression. This is particularly important in the United States of America, a place where despite its infinite potential for cultural pluralism and collaboration, there are as many (or more) divisions between people based upon race, class, gender, and religion as anywhere else in the world.

Committee:

Kimberly Coates, PhD (Committee Chair); Robert Sloane (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Mass Media; Music; Technology; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Bj&246;rk; electronic music; Iceland; women and music; pop music; alternative music; popular culture; music genres; nature and technology; feminist music

Leo, Katherine M.Blurred Lines: Musical Expertise in the History of American Copyright Litigation
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Music
In March 2015, a jury awarded Marvin Gaye’s estate nearly $7.4 million, finding that Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams infringed on Gaye's 1977 song, “Got to Give It Up,” with their own 2013 hit, “Blurred Lines.” The highly publicized federal copyright lawsuit has raised concerns about the ramifications of this outcome for the legal protection of music and the future of artistic creativity. The question underlying this case, as in much of federal copyright litigation, involves negotiating the putative similarities and differences between expressive works. Although the court system has developed methods designed to assist triers of fact in such legal analysis, the unpredictable outcomes of these cases illuminate the problematics of this task. Triers of fact may hear testimony from expert witnesses, whose specialized knowledge, skill, and experience is intended to inform the decision-making process. The results of such testimony, however, are not only insistently variable, but they also reflect unsettled debates over how, and by whom, musical identity can best be defined. Given this situation, how should we understand the historical and contemporary role of the musical expert witness in American music copyright litigation? Drawing on research methods from musicological and legal scholarship, the present dissertation examines extant court records and judicial opinions of prominent cases chronologically from their origins in the mid-nineteenth century through to recently-decided lawsuits. In situating the role of the musical expert in the context of the legal similarity inquiry and considering their contributions to it, the study reveals the essential role that experts have historically played. It then recasts contemporary problems with case outcomes as a result of the similarity inquiry itself and looks to expert testimony as one potential area of reform. Such study of musical expertise sheds light on the courtroom as a forum for musical experts, particularly contemporary musicologists, and elucidates their understudied, yet often significant, relationship to the American judicial system. It is through a greater understanding of this role that musicologists should be better equipped to assist courts in resolving the blurred lines that separate, and bind together, so many works of music.

Committee:

Graeme Boone, PhD (Advisor); Charles Atkinson, PhD (Committee Member); Guy Rub, SJD (Committee Member); Mark Rudoff, MM (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Law; Music

Keywords:

music; musicology; music history; historiography; musical analysis; copyright; evidence; expert witness; law; legal history; American music; American law; popular music; Tin Pan Alley; sheet music; music theory

Abril, Carlos R.Beyond content integration: multicultural dimensions in the application of music teaching and learning
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Music
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two instructional approaches on fifth-grade children’s attitudes toward and preference for music sung in various languages. Specific questions included: Are there differences in children’s attitudes toward music as a result of instruction? What is the relationship between familiarity with a language and general attitude toward songs in that language? How do music preference decisions differ by language of songs and instructional group? Twelve intact classes from four suburban elementary schools in Columbus, Ohio (N = 209) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: concept-based multicultural instruction, sociocultural-based multicultural instruction, or concept-based instruction with no multicultural content (control group). The dependent measures consisted of music attitude and preference scores. A test was developed consisting of nine musical excerpts, three sung in Spanish, in English, and in Mandarin Chinese. Students responded to nine statements about each musical excerpt using a Likert-type scale and answered one open-ended question. Pretest scores revealed that participants were significantly more positive toward the English-language songs than the songs sung in the other languages. There was also a significant difference between the Spanish- and Chinese-language examples, in favor of the Spanish. Self-reported familiarity with a language was found to positively correlate with subsequent attitude toward songs in that language. After the treatment period, children in the sociocultural instructional group expressed significantly more positive attitudes toward the foreign language songs than were those in the other groups. There was no difference between groups on the English-language songs. Musical preference scores were consistently lower than attitudes scores in each language. These scores generally paralleled the patterns of attitudes toward language in the context of song, although there were no significant differences in preference between the two foreign language songs. These results have implications for music educators who strive to instill values that facilitate openness to and tolerance for music and people of diverse cultures.

Committee:

David Frego (Advisor)

Keywords:

multicultural music education; music education; elementary education; multiculturalism; social psychology of music; music instruction; world music; instructional approach; attitude; preference

Hartz, Barry C.Cultivating Individual Musicianship and Ensemble Performance Through Notation-Free Learning in Three High School Band Programs
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2015, Music Education
Playing by ear is a time-honored and effective means of music learning in many musical genres. Learning without notation has been a principal means of acquiring musical skills for generations of jazz, popular, and folk musicians. The sound to sign approach to music learning has been incorporated into classroom music instruction through the methodologies of Jacques-Dalcroze, Kodaly, Orff, Suzuki, and Gordon. At the same time, instruction in American school bands has remained predominantly reliant on notation at every stage of learning and performing music. There is a distinct lack of research regarding learning without notation in high school concert bands. The purpose of this multiple case study was to examine the use of notation-free learning (NFL) in three high school concert band programs to develop the musical skills of individual students and promote excellence in ensemble performance. The research was guided by four questions: (a) What aspects of musical performance do participating conductors address through notation-free learning (NFL)?, (b) How do participating conductors communicate and develop musical vocabulary without standard notation?, (c) What challenges and benefits of learning without notation do participants identify?, and (d) What personal and contextual factors affect the implementation of notation-free approaches? I spent three days at each of three high schools located in Texas, New York, and Ohio, collecting data through observation, individual interviews with conductors, focus group interviews with students, and document collection. Data analysis involved transcribing recorded interviews, generating and applying codes, and identifying emergent themes. Reports on individual cases were completed prior to conducting cross-case analysis. Themes generated by the research questions included aspects of musical performance, communicating and developing musical vocabulary, challenges and benefits of NFL, and factors influencing implementation. I asserted that fundamentals of ensemble performance can be effectively developed without notation in concert bands and that students experienced notation-free learning as more mentally engaging than learning from notation. More research is needed to determine the role of notation-free learning in helping students develop mental models and to develop ways of supporting individual musical skill acquisition in the absence of notation.

Committee:

Lisa Koops, Ph.D. (Advisor); Nathan Kruse, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Matthew Garrett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kathleen Horvath, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David Miller, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

band; music notation; band pedagogy; music literacy; aural skills; ensemble skills; listening skills; music improvisation; intonation; student engagement; mental representations; music education; music learning

Higotani Bies, AzusaEffectiveness of Music Therapy Education in Addressing Multicultural Competencies: Survey of Music Therapy Program Directors
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2011, Music Therapy (Fine Arts)
With the rapidly growing diversity in the United States, understanding cultural influence on human behaviors and becoming competent to work with culturally diverse populations have become important among human service professionals. The present study examined effectiveness and challenges of music therapy undergraduate programs in addressing multicultural competencies listed under AMTA Professional Competencies. A questionnaire was developed and sent to directors of undergraduate music therapy programs to assess their perception of effectiveness and challenges in teaching those multicultural competencies. Results indicated that a majority of directors perceived their programs effective; however, acknowledged the existence of multiple challenges. Although the results of the survey should not be generalized due to a low response rate, it provides insights into how to further develop multicultural education in the field of music therapy. Future research may utilize more objective tools and investigate correlations among different variables to pinpoint influential factors to effective multicultural education.

Committee:

Louise Steele, MMEd (Advisor); Richard Wetzel, PhD (Committee Member); Milton Butler, PhD (Committee Member); Kamile Geist, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Multicultural Education; Music; Therapy

Keywords:

music therapy; music therapists; music therapy curriculum; music therapy program; music therapy professors; culture; multicultural education; cultural competencies

Sauer, Vincent PhilipShort Opera for Five Voices
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Music Composition
Short Opera for Five Voices is a ten-minute music theatre piece for five unaccompanied voices of any gender or voice type. The performers do not sing, but rather phonate in such a way as to give the impression of conversational speech. The score is notated with specific rhythms and pitch contours that emulate the prosodic elements of speech: stress, intonation, cadence, etc. To place greater emphasis on the prosody, the performers’ text is limited to a small collection of syllables based on spoken American English. The syllables are distinct enough to differentiate the voices and add variety to the texture yet similar enough to give the text cohesion. While their words will be unintelligible to the audience, the characters’ emotions and motivations will come across through the prosody and acting. The plot is an informal gathering of five friends in which the increased tension between two of them results in a verbal altercation. In addition to the theatrical convention to showcase the most dramatic aspects of the human experience, this piece dwells on the pedestrian and mundane qualities of social interaction in an attempt to show audiences the quiet poignancy in everyday life. The notation for this piece was informed by Aperghis’s Recitations, Berio’s Sequenza III, and Ligeti’s Aventures while the textual and conceptual elements were inspired by Glass’s Einstein on the Beach, Monk’s Atlas, Reich’s The Cave, and Sciarrino’s Lohengrin. BGSU music students Hillary LaBonte, Nicholas Fox, Mavis MacNeil, Vincent Sauer, and Crystal Lau will perform the piece on Saturday, March 18, 2017.

Committee:

Christopher Dietz, Dr. (Advisor); Mikel Kuehn, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

music composition; opera; vocal music; experimental music; music theatre; contemporary music; contemporary opera

Carter-Enyi, AaronContour Levels: An Abstraction of Pitch Space based on African Tone Systems
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Music
Based on data from two years of fieldwork in Nigeria, a new methodology for contour analysis is presented with two motivations: 1) extend contour theory into an applied computational approach appropriate for a wide range of symbolic and recorded music; 2) develop a new discretization of pitch, similar to solmization but without an association to a scale or tonal qualia, that can be used to measure pitch prominence (or markedness) in both music and speech. As an alternative to the conventional contour matrix for a segment of cardinality n which compares pitches at all degrees of adjacency up to n-1, a continuous matrix is introduced, with unspecified cardinality and a fixed number of degrees of adjacency. The continuous matrix is a series of contour slices. Each slice compares a pitch to the pitch before and after up to the degrees of adjacency. The elements in each contour slice (a column in the continuous matrix) can be summed creating a measure of relative pitch height, a contour level. The analysis implementation is based on a relationship between contour recursion and segmentation of pitch series. Thematic unity, as provided by contour recursion, is presumed to be intentional on the part of the producer and salient to the receiver. Non-overlapping iterations of a highly recursive contour are both semiotically and structurally important in a wide variety of monophonic signals. The analysis is made more robust by searching for transformations and using reductive processes that make it possible to compare segments of different cardinalities. Contour level analysis is applied to the phenomenon of “tone-and-tune”, wherein a single pitch series carries both linguistic and musical or paralinguistic communication. First the concept of a toneme (a pitch contrast in speech) is explored. Phoneticians and phonologists have described the toneme with paradigmatic (context-independent) and syntagmatic (context-dependent) features, but neither seems to satisfactorily formalize phonological equivalence of tone. Shortly before he died, prominent linguist Nick Clements asked “Do we need tone features?”, concluding that if we do, the ones we have are not working. A cue is taken from the folk heuristic and widely used pedagogical device for the Yoruba language: Low-Mid-High tones are called Do-Re-Mi. It quickly becomes clear that the comparison with solmization has nothing to do with a tonal system and everything to do with relative pitch. Contour levels are proposed as a formal heuristic for the toneme that captures the relevant pitch relativity of the do-re-mi folk heuristic, while freeing it from the misleading Western tonality association. The rich oral poetry tradition of Southwestern Nigeria is explored using this approach.

Committee:

David Clampitt (Advisor); David Huron (Committee Member); Udo Will (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Acoustics; African Studies; Linguistics; Music

Keywords:

music theory; contour theory; music cognition; ethnomusicology; Yoruba; Igbo; Niger-Congo languages; tone languages; phonology; Nigeria; poetry; choral music; popular music; African music

Carter, Paul ScottRetrogressive Harmonic Motion as Structural and Stylistic Characteristic of Pop-Rock Music
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2005, College-Conservatory of Music : Theory
The central issue addressed in this dissertation is that of progressive and retrogressive harmonic motion as it is utilized in the repertoire of pop-rock music. I believe that analysis in these terms may prove to be a valuable tool for the understanding of the structure, style and perception of this music. Throughout my study of this music, various patterns of progressive and retrogressive harmonic motions within a piece reveal a kind of musical character about it, a character on which much of a work’s style, organization and extramusical nature often depends. Several influential theorists, especially Jean-Phillipe Rameau, Hugo Riemann, and Arnold Schoenberg, have addressed the issues of functional harmony and the nature of the motion between chords of a tonal harmonic space. After assessing these views, I have found that it is possible to differentiate between two fundamental types of harmonic motions. This difference, one that I believe is instrumental in characterizing pop-rock music, is the basis for the analytical perspective I wish to embrace. After establishing a method of evaluating tonal harmonic root motions in these terms, I wish to examine a corpus of this music in order to discover what a characterization of its harmonic motion may reveal about each piece. Determining this harmonic character may help to establish structural and stylistic traits for that piece, its genre, composer, period, or even its sociological purpose. Conclusions may then be drawn regarding the role these patterns play in defining musical style traits of pop-rock. Partly as a tool for serving the study mentioned above I develop a graphical method of accounting for root motion I name the tonal “Space-Plot.” This apparatus allows the analyst to measure several facets about the harmonic motion of the music, and to see a wide scope of relations in and around a diatonic key.

Committee:

Dr. Robert Zierolf (Advisor)

Keywords:

Music; Music Theory; Harmony; Harmonic Motion; Pop Music; Pop-Rock Music; Rock Music; Harmonic Theory; Functional Harmonic Theory; Retrogressive Motion; Space-Plot Theory; Transformational Theory

Peersen, Hild BreienFranz Berwald and his quartet for piano and winds: its historical, stylistic, and social context
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2005, Music

The Quartet in E♭ for Piano and Winds by Franz Berwald (1796-1868) was written during a period and in a country that is under-represented in the clarinet literature. Composed for the unusual ensemble of clarinet, horn, bassoon, and piano, the work was written in 1819 and premiered in 1821. The quartet is an attractive piece in its own right, and provides an opportunity to explore the artistic atmosphere in Stockholm in the early nineteenth century, particularly as it applies to wind playing. Research for this document has revealed that three prominent wind instrumentalists, Bernard Henrik Crusell, Frans Carl Preumayr, and Johann Michael Hirschfeld, were the inspiration for this work as well as for works by other composers at this time. The document also explores Swedish history from roughly the period 1771 1872, highlighting the reign of Gustav III (1771-1792), with a special emphasis on its patronage of the arts.

Franz Berwald is considered Swedens best Romantic composer, although he has not reached the stature of the other well-known Scandinavian Romantic composers Grieg, Sibelius, and Nielsen. This document examines Berwald’s life and the social climate in which he lived in an attempt to achieve a better understanding of the circumstances that may have led to his relative obscurity. The majority of the literature on Franz Berwald is written in either German or Swedish. This document augments the English portion of Berwald research. It includes in its appendices several English translations from Franz Berwalds letters and other writings. The appendices also contain a family tree of the musical Berwald family.

Included in the document is an analysis of the Quartet in Eb for Piano and Winds. The analysis explores Berwald’s compositional style as it pertains to form, melodic development and orchestration. A live recording of a 2004 performance of the Quartet at The Ohio State University is available with the pdf file.

Committee:

James Pyne (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Music

Keywords:

Franz Berwald; 19th century Stockholm; wind chamber music; Henrik Bernard Crusell; Frans Preumayr; Johan Michael Hirschfeld; clarinet repertoire; 19th century chamber music; Scandinavian clarinet music; music criticism; Swedish music history

Ripley, Angela N.Surviving Set Theory: A Pedagogical Game and Cooperative Learning Approach to Undergraduate Post-Tonal Music Theory
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Music
Undergraduate music students often experience a high learning curve when they first encounter pitch-class set theory, an analytical system very different from those they have studied previously. Students sometimes find the abstractions of integer notation and the mathematical orientation of set theory foreign or even frightening (Kleppinger 2010), and the dissonance of the atonal repertoire studied often engenders their resistance (Root 2010). Pedagogical games can help mitigate student resistance and trepidation. Table games like Bingo (Gillespie 2000) and Poker (Gingerich 1991) have been adapted to suit college-level classes in music theory. Familiar television shows provide another source of pedagogical games; for example, Berry (2008; 2015) adapts the show "Survivor" to frame a unit on theory fundamentals. However, none of these pedagogical games engage pitch-class set theory during a multi-week unit of study. In my dissertation, I adapt the show "Survivor" to frame a four-week unit on pitch-class set theory (introducing topics ranging from pitch-class sets to twelve-tone rows) during a sophomore-level theory course. As on the show, students of different achievement levels work together in small groups, or “tribes,” to complete worksheets called “challenges”; however, in an important modification to the structure of the show, no students are voted out of their tribes. Challenges are graded individually, and these grades are averaged together to yield a score for each tribe. At the end of the unit, each member of the tribe that earned the highest cumulative average score on the challenges receives a modest gift card as a non-academic prize. While students’ grades are based solely on their own work, the game element promotes peer mentoring through cooperative learning (Johnson and Johnson 1999; Slavin 2012) and inspires constructive peer pressure that motivates all students to do their best. Aspects of the game designed to enhance student enjoyment and build tribe unity include tribe names, a customized logo, and an opening credits video. I present empirical results of implementing Set Theory Survivor in the classroom and discuss student responses to questionnaires exploring their attitudes toward post-tonal music, their self-perceived abilities to use set-theoretical analysis to study post-tonal music, and their views of Set Theory Survivor as a framework for studying pitch-class set theory. The self-reported ability of students to perform specific set-theoretical operations increased to a statistically significant extent during the unit, and the majority of students enjoyed the game-like format. By combining the peer support of cooperative learning with the motivational force of constructive competition and the fun of a pedagogical game, Set Theory Survivor provides an innovative approach to a subject that often sparks student resistance and presents a valuable tool with which to enhance the pedagogy of pitch-class set theory.

Committee:

David Clampitt, Ph.D. (Advisor); Anna Gawboy, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Johanna Devaney, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Theory; Music; Music Education; Pedagogy; Teaching

Keywords:

music theory; theory pedagogy; teaching music theory; pedagogical game; Survivor; pitch-class set theory; post-tonal music; atonal music; twentieth-century music; cooperative learning; constructive competition; intergroup competition; challenge; tribe

Petrie, Jennifer L.Music and Dance Education in Senior High Schools in Ghana: A Multiple Case Study
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2015, Educational Administration (Education)
This dissertation examined the state of senior high school (SHS) music and dance education in the context of a growing economy and current socio-cultural transitions in Ghana. The research analyzed the experience of educational administrators, teachers, and students. Educational administrators included professionals at educational organizations and institutions, government officials, and professors at universities in Ghana. Teachers and students were primarily from five SHSs, across varying socioeconomic strata in the Ashanti Region, the Central Region, and the Greater Accra Region. The study employed ethnographic and multiple case study approaches. The research incorporated the data collection techniques of archival document review, focus group, interview, observation, and participant observation. Four interrelated theoretical perspectives informed the research: interdisciplinary African arts theory, leadership and organizational theory, post-colonial theory, and qualitative educational methods’ perspectives. The incorporation of multiple theoretical frameworks allowed for diverse perspectives on education to be acknowledged. The dissertation consists of five chapters, which include an introduction, literature review, methodology, presentation of findings, and analysis. The major findings of this study are organized into five thematic categories that examine: (a) the significance of music and dance education in Ghanaian SHSs, (b) the challenges of music and dance education in Ghanaian SHSs, (c) the influence of Ghanaian economic development on music and dance education in SHSs, (d) the role of educational administrators, teachers, and students in decision-making regarding music and dance education in Ghanaian SHSs, and (e) Ghanaians’ vision of the future of music and dance education in SHSs and the recommendations offered by study participants.

Committee:

William Larson, Dr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

African Studies; Dance; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Music Education

Keywords:

music and dance education; music education; dance education; performing arts education; music and dance education in Ghana; music education in Ghana; dance education in Ghana; senior high school education in Ghana; music and dance in Ghana

Lakner, KatieFormal and Harmonic Considerations in Clara Schumann's Drei Romanzen, op. 21, no. 1
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Music Theory
As one of her most mature works, Clara Schumann's Drei Romanzen, op. 21, no. 1, composed in 1855, simultaneously encapsulates her musical preferences after half a lifetime of extensive musical study and reflects the strictures applied to "women’s music" at the time. During the Common Practice Period, music critics would deride music by women that sounded too "masculine" or at least not "feminine" enough. Women could not write more progressive music without risking a backlash from the music critics. However, Schumann's music also had to earn the respect of her more progressive fellow composers. In this piece, she achieved that balance by employing a very Classical formal structure and a distinctly Romantic, if somewhat restrained, harmonic language. Her true artistic and compositional talents shine forth despite, and perhaps even due to, the limits in which her music had to reside.

Committee:

Gregory Decker (Advisor); Gene Trantham (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Clara Schumann; musical form; music by women; nineteenth-century music; piano music; romance; music; harmony; William Caplin; Leonard Ratner; music theory; Romantic harmony

Kozlova, Yulia VSources of inspiration in selected piano works by Sergei Slonimsky
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2005, Music
Sergei Slonimsky is an important composer, without whom Russian music would be incomplete and less controversial. It is not easy to find composers who, with the same success, utilize virtually every existing classical and modern music genre in their compositions. His output covers opera, symphony, ballet, oratorio, and sonata. He is the author of numerous chamber compositions, music for folk instruments, and teaching pieces for children. His vividly imaginative compositions show a brilliant composer's mastery. Slonimsky draws on many historical eras and cultural epochs: Antiquity, Middle Ages and Renaissance, Baroque, Classicism, and Romanticism. His music consists of a variety of images that contain an abundance of artistic information. However, most of Sergei Slonimsky's works are unpublished and rarely performed in the United States. Included in the document is a biographical background of the composer as well as a description of his compositional style and accomplishments. The document will focus on the composer's piano works and the extra-musical stimuli that inspired these compositions. The main emphasis of investigation will be related to the works inspired by music's sister arts - painting and sculpture (the suite Three Graces and Passing-by Beauty). The visual and sound images and the message both the artist and the composer try to convey will be compared and contrasted. The literary aspect of Slonimsky's piano works, his fascination with Romanticism, and his continuation of the Russian tradition of imitating bell sounds in music will also be explored.

Committee:

Steven Glaser (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Sergei Slonimsky; Russian Piano Music; Bells in piano music; Music inspired by Art; Music inspired by Literature

Davis, JosieThe Accessibility of a Classical Music Education to Youth in the United States
BA, Oberlin College, 2014, Sociology
The purpose of this investigation was to examine how classical music education is supported and made available to children in the United States, an underexplored area in the field of music and the arts. The paper examines the relationship between social class and the accessibility of classical music education to youth. The theoretical paradigms of Howard Becker, Annette Lareau, and Pierre Bourdieu argue that lower class families with reduced cultural capital have limited access to the arts and classical music in the U.S. The study incorporates a close examination of current literature, survey data collected from 50 parents who have children enrolled in private music lessons, four interviews of educators and music professionals, and draws on my own experiences teaching music in other parts of the world. The paper emphasizes potential barriers to receiving a music education, but also examines the merits of learning how to play an instrument and the kind of values music can teach. The research concludes that classical music is exclusive to children from lower social classes and that exposure to music can enrich the lives of youth in many meaningful ways.

Committee:

Clovis White (Advisor); Daphne John (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Music; Sociology

Keywords:

Music Education, Music Accessibility, Cultural Capital, Social Mobility, Education Inequality, Classical Music, Non-Profit Music Schools

Acee, Dana F.Women in Sha'bi Music: Globalization, Mass Media and Popular Music in the Arab World
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Music Ethnomusicology

This thesis focuses on sha’bi music, a style of popular music in the Arab world. More specifically, it discusses the role of women in sha’bi music, focusing on singers Nancy Ajram and Haifa Wehbe as examples of female pop singers. I take a feminist approach to understanding the lives, images, and legacies of two of the most influential female singers of the twentieth century, Umm Kulthum and Fairouz, and then I explore how these legacies have impacted the careers and societal expectations of Ajram and Wehbe.

Several issues are explicated in the thesis, including the historic progression of popular music, the impacts of globalization and westernization, and the status of women as performers in the Arab world. The fan bases of the various female sha’bi singers are explored to examine why people are drawn to popular music, how youth cultures utilize music to define their generations, and why some people in the Arab world have problems with this music and/or with the singers: their lyrics, clothing, dancing bodies, and music videos. My ethnography on these issues among Arabs in Bowling Green, Ohio, reveals how members of the diaspora address the tensions of this music and the images of female performers.

I posit that, while there are many thousands of sha’bi fans of such female performers as of Ajram and Wehbe, the many critical voices are comparing these women to the constructed images and legacies of the luminaries, Umm Kulthum and Fairouz, and rejecting the notions of globalization that are influencing the current generations in most Arab countries.

Committee:

David Harnish (Advisor); Kara Attrep (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Arab music; popular music; feminist theory and music; women in music; globalization; mass media

Heinrich, Lisa M.MULTICULTURAL MUSIC EDUCATION: SECOND-GRADE STUDENTS’ RESPONSES TO UNFAMILIAR MUSICS
Master of Music, Cleveland State University, 2009, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ grouping and responses to unfamiliar non-Western musics. Eighty-five second-grade student participants from nine intact classrooms in an elementary school in rural Ohio received four consecutive 35-minute lessons over a two-week period on Japanese Gagaku ensemble. The four lessons included guided listening, performing kakko drum patterns, moving appropriately to music, and participating in discussions about Japanese culture. Following four lessons on Japanese Gagaku ensemble, students spent two weeks (four lessons) developing singing and rhythm skills in western music. After the four western music lessons were completed, the students listened to a recording of Ghanaian Adowe drumming. Students were asked to write a response: “Describe this music in the best way you can.” The majority of students refrained from labeling the music as coming from a specific culture. Students who did label the music as belonging to a particular culture, named cultures to which they had recent exposure. The results of this study suggest that second-graders apply knowledge of a familiar culture to a music culture that is unfamiliar. Music educators can use this information to promote student understanding of and differentiation between musics of Western and non-Western cultures.

Committee:

Rita Klinger, PhD (Advisor); Birch Browning, PhD (Committee Member); Eric Ziolek, PhD (Committee Member); Lily Hirsch, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music Education

Keywords:

multicultural music; multiethnic music; non-Western music; music education

MOSS, JAMES C.BRITISH MILITARY BAND JOURNALS FROM 1845 THROUGH 1900: AN INVESTIGATION OF INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTENT WITH AN EMPHASIS ON BOOSÉ'S MILITARY JOURNAL
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2001, College-Conservatory of Music : Conducting, Wind Emphasis
In the United Kingdom, the tradition of the wind band is primarily found in the military. Great Britain, in 1845, published almost no music for wind band. It fell upon each bandmaster to compose or arrange suitable music for the regiment's band. Carl Boosé, bandmaster of the Scots Fusilier Guards Band, tried to have his arrangements published. Failing that he, himself, printed the parts for each arrangement and distributed them on a subscription basis. The immediate success of his journal induced Boosey & Co. to take over the publication of Boosé's Military Journal (BMJ), retaining Boosé as editor. A short history of the military band in Great Britain begins with the Crusades. What may be considered a true wind band, however, came from the Prussian and German harmonien (wind ensembles of six or more musicians). From 1760, British regiments began to hire harmonien in total or recruited continental musicians to form the regiments' military bands. The growth in number and kind of instruments in British military bands is traced through the nineteenth century. Also studied are changes in instrumentation of BMJ from 1846 to 1900. Instruments, keys, and number of parts per instrument, however, had become somewhat stabilized by 1851. So innovative was Boosé's instrumentation that there was little change after that date. Fourteen to seventeen British military band journals sprang up in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Most were begun with arrangements of bandmasters who also served as editors of the journals. Descriptions are given of each journal including publisher, editor, instrumentation, and a sampling of pieces. An extremely interesting discovery is that the British Library dates Jullien's Journal for Military Music as having begun in 1844, one year before Boosé began his journal. An analysis of the contents of BMJ from 1846 to 1900 is broken down by category and genre. Changes in importance over time are noted and compared with BMJ and other major British military band journals of the nineteenth century.

Committee:

Dr. Robert L. Zierolf (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music

Keywords:

MILITARY BANDS; MUSIC PUBLISHING - UNITED KINGDOM; NINETEENTH-CENTURY MUSIC; MILITARY BAND MUSIC; BRITISH MUSIC

McMillen, Judith AsbellA feasibility study of a self-paced, performance-based, laboratory-centered music fundamentals course for prospective elementary classroom teachers /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1971, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Individualized instruction;Music teachers;Music;Music;School music

Next Page