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Pace, Christine RArt Museum Education and Well-Being
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of the Arts / School of Art
PACE, CHRISTINE, M.A., AUGUST, 2016 ART EDUCATION ART MUSEUM EDUCATION AND WELL-BEING (161PP.) Director of Thesis: Robin Vande Zande This research looks at how well-being manifests within art museum educational programming with non-traditional participants. The specific programming studied took place onsite at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) in Quebec, Canada, where this type of programming has been in practice for almost two decades. Museum educators, administrators, and program personnel were interviewed in order to explore the ways in which well-being is perceived, defined, and implemented within curriculum and teaching at the MMFA. Program observations, content analyses, and literature reviews were all conducted, coded, and analyzed as part of this qualitative, collective case study. The goal of this research is to allow those within, as well as those outside of, the field of art education to more fully understand art museum education programming for well-being, justify a need for this type of programming, and to apply information learned as a model for future programming.

Committee:

Robin Vande Zande, Ph.D. (Advisor); Linda Hoeptner-Poling, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Richard Adams, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Cultural Anthropology; Education; Museum Studies; Museums; Social Research; Sociology; Teaching

Keywords:

Museum Education; Museum; Well-being; Wellbeing; Art Education; community outreach; museum curriculum and development; art education curriculum; museum programming; museum programs; museum education curriculum

Jalkanen, Dayna MarieArt Around Town
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2010, Art Education

Art Around Town is a Columbus Museum of Art outreach program designed for family audiences. The program takes an authentic work of art from the Museum’s collection into different Central Ohio locations, along with a host of family-friendly activities such as artmaking, gallery games and discussions. Art Around Town was created to provide Columbus families with a fun, free, and accessible opportunity to experience authentic art in the comfort of their own respective communities, as well as raise awareness about the Museum and its family-oriented programs and initiatives.

The concept for Art Around Town was inspired by the notion of the democratic museum which is an idea championed by museum theorists John Cotton Dana, Stephen Weil, and George Hein. They argued that museums are inherently public institutions and, as such, are bound to serve and be active in their communities in meaningful ways. Museums’ collections belong to all of their community members; not merely to the ones who have the means or inclination to visit the museum buildings. Art Around Town was designed with this philosophy at its core and included only very high quality, important works of art – some of which were literally removed from the Museum’s walls specifically for the program. In addition, the activities included in Art Around Town were modeled on constructivist pedagogical principals, encouraging active participation for genuine learning and personal experience.

The central research question that I address in this paper is: What might a museum program look like that is both pedagogically progressive and socially conscious, that serves the community while encouraging learning through experience and meaning-making? I argue that Art Around Town is such a program, presenting the evidence I gathered through a survey that was distributed to the adult (parents, grandparents, guardians, etc.) participants of the program. I also supplement the survey findings with observational data and photographs.

The research showed evidence that Art Around Town successfully increased participants’ comfort level with authentic art, raised their awareness of the family-friendly nature of the Columbus Museum of Art, and was positively received by its participants. My observations provided incidences of families having meaningful social interactions with art and evidence of creative problem solving. However, more structured data needs to be collected to confirm these findings. I concluded, therefore, that the research I gathered regarding Art Around Town shows that it is a socially-conscious museum program that adheres to progressive educational philosophies. The program displays evidence that it is meeting many of its goals, however further research needs to be done in order to better understand to extent to which some of the goals are being accomplished.

Committee:

Candace Stout, PhD (Advisor); Karen Hutzel, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Museums

Keywords:

Art Around Town; Columbus Museum of Art; art museum; outreach; families; creativity; democratic museum; progressive pedagogy; museum education; museum program

Cady, Alyssa R.Representing the Holocaust: German and American Museums in Comparative Perspective
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History
This thesis explores the comparative historicization of Holocaust memory in Holocaust museums in the United States and Germany. This study compares four different museums – two German, two American – that have not previously been the subject of monographic, comparative investigation: the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum; the Holocaust Museum Houston; the Jewish Museum Berlin; and the Jewish Museum Frankfurt. I explore the way in which museums memorialize the Holocaust and are shaped by national histories and patterns of collective memory. Discourse analysis is used to analyze the text panels of the four museums to determine the differences between how the American museums and how the German museums compare the Holocaust, and offer reasons for why these differences occur. The use of text panels yields universality to the study, since each of the four museums utilize text panels to display the main educational information to the public. In this study, I argue that the Americanization of the Holocaust in the American museums and the different national memories of the Holocaust in the United States and Germany account for many of the major differences in the museums. To demonstrate this, evidence from three different parts of the museums – the sections that cover anti-Semitism, Jewish resistance during the Holocaust, and the conclusion of the Holocaust museums or exhibits – is employed.

Committee:

Richard Steigmann-Gall (Advisor); Shane Strate (Committee Member); Mindy Farmer (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Museums

Keywords:

Holocaust; museum studies; anti-Semitism; Jewish resistance; United States Holocaust Memorial Museum; Holocaust Museum Houston; Jewish Museum Berlin; Jewish Museum Frankfurt

Cengel, Lauren MarieMaking Meaning and Connections: A Study of the Interpretation and Education Practices for the Medieval Collection at the Cleveland Museum of Art
MA, Kent State University, 2014, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History
For nearly a century, Ohio's Cleveland Museum of Art has stood as a world-renowned collector of works of art from all corners of the earth, including ones from the European Middle Ages (ca. 500-1500 AD). The CMA has also recently undertaken a massive reinstallation project begun in 2005, which allowed it a rare opportunity to rethink its presentation of the entire collection, to refocus goals of making it more relevant and engaging for visitors, and to implement the use of interpretive technology to provide visitors an opportunity to access more information. Through a museological framework, the basic question this project examines is how the staff at the Cleveland Museum of Art has presented the history and art of the Middle Ages through the new medieval galleries, and through their interpretive and educational tools and techniques. This study argues that the interpretive and educational practices for the medieval galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art demonstrate how opportunities for meaning-making are created for visitors. This is done with various elements of interpretation, which includes grouping and arrangement of objects, aesthetics of the galleries, informational labels and panels, and supplemental technology. These all stress a connection to the people of the Middle Ages to help visitors experience what the world was like for people who saw and used the art in that time. There are also many educational programs that focus on teaching visitors about the Middle Ages specifically, including classroom programs, traditional programs, and programs designed for all ages to make learning fun while also providing context. A study of the educational and interpretive practices at the Cleveland Museum of Art that pertain to the medieval collection demonstrates that they aim to facilitate visitor-object interactions, increase opportunities to make meaning and learn from objects, and to make the art accessible to the public. This has been done through crafting a narrative of the Middle Ages that focused on the stories of the people that lived during that time period, through providing context, and through a variety of classroom and traditional programs.

Committee:

John R. Jameson, PhD (Advisor); Kiersten F. Latham, PhD (Committee Member); Kim M. Gruenwald, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Art History; Education; Educational Technology; History; Information Science; Medieval History; Middle Ages; Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

Museum; museum education; interpretation; museum interpretation; Cleveland Museum of Art; resinstallation; museum reinstallation; Middle Ages; medieval; medieval art; art museums; museology

Montgomery, Susannah PattonThe Playful Art Museum: Employing Creativity as a Tool for Visitor Engagement
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, Arts Policy and Administration
Using Simon Sinek’s `Golden Circles’ framework, this study begins by identifying what a hub for creative engagement is—a space that provides opportunities for visitors to foster creativity through participatory engagement. This study then explores how large regional art museums implement hubs for creative engagement. Using the Wonderkamers in the Gemeentemuseum in the Netherlands and the Center for Creativity in the Columbus Museum of Art in the United States as case studies, this study relies on a mixed-methods approach of synthesizing publicly available sources, curator interviews, and participant observations to understand how these spaces impact visitor creativity and visitor engagement. Participant observations reveal that visitors of all ages are attracted to hubs for creative engagement, that visitors are more likely to choose participatory over passive engagement when given the option, and—per Stuart Brown’s (2010) typology of play—that social, creative, and object play occur most frequently when they participate. By comparing these findings to the curators’ intentions for these spaces, this study also reveals how effectively these hubs for creative engagement meet their intended goals. Finally, this study finds that creativity and innovation are understood in largely the same way in both the United States and the Netherlands, making hubs for creative engagement an asset for art museums in more than one region of the world. Consequently, this study provides a framework for how to implement a hub for creative engagement that can be utilized by any applicable art museum.

Committee:

Joni Acuff, PhD (Advisor); Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

play; creativity; innovation; art museum; participatory museum; participatory activities; visitor engagement; museum exhibition design; visitor-centered museum; Columbus Museum of Art; Columbus, OH; Gemeentemuseum; The Hague; The Netherlands;

Kim, SujinA Case Study of Pages at the Wexner Center for the Arts and Its Implications for Collaborative Art Museum-School Programs
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2018, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze ways to expand the educational role of art museums in terms of their relationship with schools. Recently, art museums in South Korea began to emphasize their educational role and provide school programs. However, so far, these programs have only targeted to visual art education and art teachers, instead of all classroom teachers. After a yearlong internship at the Wexner Center for the Arts, located in Columbus, Ohio, I conducted a study of Pages, a yearlong collaborative art museum-school program between a contemporary art museum and school teachers who do not teach visual art. During my participation in Pages, I discovered several aspects with the potential to benefit collaborative art museum-school programs both in Korea and the U.S. Thus, overarching research question of the study was formulated as follows: What are the unique and essential components and practices of Pages that can inform collaborative art museum-school programs in Korea and the U.S.? To delve into the Pages program, I grounded this qualitative case study in constructivism. Specifically, I utilized the communities of practice framework, a contemporary version of social constructivism. This framework helped me explain the collaborative learning process of adult educators. In addition, constructivist learning theories helped me place art museums as legitimate learning institutions and to describe the practices of the educators which target meaningful student learning through connecting art museum education and school education. Finally, constructivism was used as an interpretive framework for the study: I co-created knowledge with the research participants and aimed to show their diverse perspectives. I utilized qualitative case study research as a methodology. Like Pages, several ongoing education programs at U.S. art museums require involvement of core classroom teachers. However, I chose Pages because it has several unique characteristics that are significant for this study. The major method I utilized was in-depth semi-structured interviews. I interviewed a museum educator, three teaching artists, and five core classroom teachers who participated in Pages in the 2016-2017 school year. Additionally, I used direct observation methods and unobtrusive measures like document analysis. Thematic analysis based on in vivo coding was used to authentically represent voices of the research participants. The results of the study generated two sets of jargon-free recommendations to art museum educators and school educators in Korea and in the U.S., based on their different educational contexts. The study provided a new perspective on sustainable practices through which art museum educators can work collaboratively work with school teachers who do not necessarily teach visual art. Also, this study will potentially inform core classroom teachers about how to utilize art museum content to enrich their curriculum. I hope the knowledge derived from this case study research will be shared with wider audiences who are interested in applying its findings to their own contexts.

Committee:

Joni Acuff (Advisor); Karen Hutzel (Committee Member); Jennifer Richardson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

museum education; collaborative art museum-school programs; contemporary art museum; constructivism; constructivist learning theories; constructivist museum; communities of practice; teacher professional development; arts integration

Osman, Ezz Eldin MRelevant Museum Experiences: A Proposed Visitor Categorization Matrix
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
This paper proposes a visitor relevance categorization matrix that will help museum designers achieve better relevant experiences for diverse museums visitors. First, the paper will explore museum definitions, museums’ different roles, and briefly monitor the museum transitions through history. It will also examine the factors that create and shape museum experiences, and introduce the possibilities of adapting information spaces in educational museums where diverse visitors will be able to decode and connect to given information in museum spaces. Then, it will analyze the existing museum visitors’ categorizations and consider who the visitors are and their different identity-related purposes of each visit. The paper will present an analysis of the fundamental structures, obstacles, and processes used for creating successful communicative environments for a diverse audience. The proposed visitors’ matrix is a tool for museum designers and educational museum institutions to consider while developing effective visitor experiences. This matrix will allow visitors to make connections, assess values, and create meaningful associations with museum subject matter or objects. It will drive visitor curiosity and encourage them to explore deeper and construct learning. Integrated with other methods, the matrix will assist museums’ role in achieving education and a well-informed society in the 21st century’s modern societies.

Committee:

Oscar Fernandez, M.F.A. (Committee Chair); Matthew Wizinsky, M.F.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Museum experience;museum visitor;visitor categorizations;relevant experiences;museum designers;museum institutions

Zajaczkowski, Erica LeaInformation, Design, and Technology: How They Work Together to Inform a Museum Visitor
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2014, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
Informative content and visual presentation are each critical when providing a meaningful museum experience for both the casual and sophisticated visitor. For an effective learning experience to take place, knowledge must be turned into information then work in tandem the principles of graphic and exhibition design to achieve successful visual communication. This topic is important to explore because although there are experts in this field, the concepts need to be distilled for a wider audience of museum administration professionals– in all key departments of the museum personnel structure. A succinct document will greatly enhance the collective understanding of the obvious public function of museums and exhibitions, to reveal their higher purpose, which is education. This paper could provide a museum director, education director, curator or an exhibition designer with the incite needed to put together a museum show that is interesting, engaging and educational. It would also be an informative resource for those interested in the new technology developments used to aid a museum visitor.

Committee:

Sapienza Neil, Mr. (Advisor); Durand Pope, Mr. (Committee Member); Gary Holliday, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Arts Management; Design; Museum Studies; Museums; Technology

Keywords:

museums, technology, types of learners, exhibition design, graphic design, exhibition, labels, museum texts, writing museum labels, types of museum labels, QR codes in museums, museum smartphone apps, typography

Rome, Nicole ReneeUniversity Students in the Museum: A Program Evaluation of the Spencer Museum Student Advisory Board
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Art Education
Designing and implementing programs for undergraduate students is one of the biggest challenges for university museums, due to a number of factors. In this thesis, I examined and evaluated one university program as a case study. The Spencer Student Advisory Board (SSAB) focused on connecting student to the museum through programs and events, giving students insight into the museum field, and expanding their knowledge of art and art historical issues in a social way. My overall research question was how has the SSAB impacted participants? I also had two sub-questions, which were if the mission and program objectives of the organization are being fulfilled and what areas are most memorable for participants/ what aspects of the organization need improvement. I approached my research from a social constructivist perspective in order to investigate how participants were impacted by the social nature of the organization. Through my research methods of interviews, a questionnaire and observations, I attempted to portray a holistic representation of the organization, including a brief history of the Spencer Museum of Art. I also examined the history of the SSAB, including the formation of the organization, major events, and organizational objectives and goals. My data showed that most participants were already pursuing artistic areas, such as fine art, art history or graphic design, thus making them already aware of museum practice and arts issues. I investigated participants’ motivation for joining the organization, which was organized into three categories: museum experience, personal interest and volunteer experience. My data analysis is concluded by how participants felt they were impacted by the organization, which was also organized into three categories: career development, expanding their knowledge of the museum field, and enhancing their leadership skills. In my conclusion section, I re-examined my data from a social constructivist perspective and discussed limitations of my project and further research ideas.

Committee:

Dr. Vesta Daniel (Advisor); Dr. Margaret Wyszomirski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

university museum; program evaluation; student advisory board; university of kansas; spencer museum of art; museum program; museum evaluation

Pienoski, Christine MariePyramids of Lake Erie: The Historical Evolution of the Cleveland Museum of Art's Egyptian Collection
MA, Kent State University, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History
"Pyramids of Lake Erie" uses the Cleveland Museum of Art's Egyptian collection as a case study that illustrates how museums balance the organic nature of the institution and its connection to the community in which it resides and serves with the static nature of its ancient collections, examining the dynamic relationship between American museums and historical trends from the early 20th century to the present day. The founding of the museum, and its Egyptian collection, in 1916 is examined first, arguing that an Egyptian collection is vital to the museum's power and legitimacy in the museum world and the city of Cleveland. The 1950s shifts the focus from collecting to preserving this collection due to the threat of destruction during the Cold War. Then, in the 1990s, during the museum's 75th Anniversary celebration, a travelling exhibition brought visitors and integrated technology into the museum. Finally, in 2016, a new lack of relevance of the Egyptian relics to the museum is investigated. The Cleveland Museum of Art's acquisition and display of its Egyptian collection exemplifies the modernist struggle to both understand and convey knowledge about the ancient past as well as demonstrate how current events and trends affect the manner in which museums operate.

Committee:

Kenneth Bindas (Advisor); Mindy Farmer (Committee Member); Mary Ann Heiss (Committee Member); Leslie Heaphy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Archaeology; Art History; Fine Arts; History; Middle Eastern History; Modern History; Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

Egypt; Egyptian; museum; museums; Cleveland; Cleveland Museum of Art; art; art history; Egyptian relics; Egyptian art; Egyptian artifacts; Egyptology; foreign relations; America-Egypt relations; museum studies; history;

CARDASSILARIS, NICOLE RUTHBringing Cultures Together: Elma Pratt, Her International School of Art, and Her Collection of International Folk Art at the Miami University Art Museum
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Art History
Cora Elma Pratt (1888-1977) educator, collector, artist, and philanthropist spent much of her life building her innovative International School of Art (ISA) in Europe, Mexico, South America, and the United States. Pratt first established her ISA in 1928 in Zakopane, Poland and later organized locations throughout Europe and Mexico. From her travels with the ISA, she acquired a notable 2,500-piece collection of international folk art, which she gave to the Miami University Art Museum in Oxford, Ohio in 1970. This study includes a mini-biography, recounting incidents and experiences that molded Pratt into a devoted art educator and promoter of international folk art in the United States and abroad. As a promoter of folk art, she aligned herself with the Brooklyn Museum, a premier institution that was setting the pace for folk art and children's art exhibitions, acquiring artwork to sell in their gift shop and organizing folk art exhibitions from the 1930s through the 1960s. During Pratt's years of involvement with the Brooklyn Museums, she and the ISA organized the first exhibition of Polish folk art in the United States, Polish Exhibition, 1933-34. This study analyzes Pratt's ISA and looks at a couple of the most prominent artists who taught with her and the workshops they conducted. This thesis also examines some of the popular pedagogical theories promoted by Franz Cizek (1865-1947) and John Dewey (1859-1952) that heavily influenced Pratt's ISA, her educational mission, and eventually, how she believed the collection needed to be interpreted in a traditional art museum environment. While today Pratt's collection remains in storage at the Miami University Art Museum, the implication of this study could allow for Pratt's collection to be interpreted as material culture instead of folk art.

Committee:

Theresa Leininger-Miller, PhD (Committee Chair); Mikiko Hirayama, PhD (Committee Member); Anne Timpano, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Art Education; Art History; Fine Arts; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Elma Pratt; International School of Art; Zakopane, Poland; Miami University Art Museum; folk art; material culture; art education; museum collections; Polish folk art; women in art education; Brooklyn Museum; Franz Cizek

Howard, Courtney L.Special Exhibitions, Media Outreach, and Press Coverage at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Chicago Art Institute, and the National Gallery of Art
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2010, Journalism (Communication)
Special exhibitions are today an integral part of museum operations, with some exhibitions attracting upwards of five-hundred thousand visitors at a single museum. Often supported by prominent corporations and foundations, special exhibitions provide both the museum and the sponsor with the benefit of mutual positive publicity. This thesis sought to better understand the publicity relationship between the museum and its exhibition sponsors by examining the influence of certain exhibition factors on exhibition promotion by the museum, on resulting coverage of such exhibitions, and on visitor attendance. To do so, it examined exhibition promotion at three museums in the United States, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the National Gallery of Art, and local exhibition coverage in, respectively, the New York Times, the Chicago Sun-Times, and the Washington Post. Results showed that exhibitions with corporate and foundation sponsors were more likely to receive aggressive promotion from museums and aggressive promotion garnered more local newspaper coverage.

Committee:

Joseph Bernt (Committee Chair); Patrick Washburn (Committee Member); Michelle Honald (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Journalism; Museums

Keywords:

Museum special exhibitions; museum media relations; Metropolitan Museum of Art

Chrisman, Lainie MInteractive Technology & Institutional Change: A Case Study of Gallery One and the Cleveland Museum of Art
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2014, Arts Policy and Administration
This research focuses on the implementation of participatory and interactive digital media in the museum setting and the impact on different parts of the museum which react and change differently. This qualitative case study aims to explore the inclusion of educational technology in the Cleveland Museum of Art and how the implementation affects different departments within the museum differently. Rather than using traditional institutional change theory which references the institution as a whole, this research shows that an institution as the sum of various moving parts. This research will serve to fill a hole in the current literature of nonprofit arts and be available as a resource to those in the field. By understanding how the different parts are affected in different ways, a greater understanding of “institutional change” as a changing of parts rather than the whole can be gained.

Committee:

Margaret Wyszomirski (Advisor); Wayne Lawson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Museum Studies

Keywords:

new media; museum; museums; art museum; interactive technology; gallery one; cleveland museum of art

Alhadi, EsameddinTransforming School Museum Partnership: The Case of the University of Florida Harn Museum Teacher Institute
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2008, Curriculum and Instruction Cultural Studies (Education)

This study examines the teacher museum institute experience at the Harn Museum in Gainesville, Florida. The proposal this study is built on is that museum education in general and museum teacher programs could function as effective tools that the school system can utilize to help promoting the educational reform movement. The ultimate argument this study attempted to make is that developing educational programs and activities will help to make museums more open towards their communities and will help to attract more audiences.

The study focused on the first five teacher institutes that have taken place at the Harn Museum in the years 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006. The idea of choosing this number of institutes is to acquire enough data that will make it possible to make comparative study between these institutes in terms of the organizational and administrative aspects as well as in their professional outcome. Also choosing this many number of museums made it possible to examine different teachers' experiences based on their year of participation.

The decision of using a combination of qualitative methods including questionnaire and documents analysis in this study was tied to the interest in reaching an interpretive and descriptive analysis of the museum teacher institutes' experience.

The qualitative methods employed in this study have proven to be flexible and allowed developing a level of contact with the institutes' participants that eventually made it possible to learn about their perspectives and expectations. They also made it possible to produce rich and detailed data that provided a solid ground for analysis evaluation of the final results.

The study showed that a well-planned and carefully executed museum teacher program will result in positive results relating to the advancement of teachers' professional development and the creation of better teaching and learning environments.

The findings of this study highlighted the fact that museum and schools share similar objectives and missions, and any effort to strengthen their joint ties and partnerships will be in the best interest of the educational system and the teachers' professional development.

Committee:

William S. Howard, PhD (Committee Chair); Rosalie Romano, PhD (Committee Member); Francis Godwyll, PhD (Committee Member); Andrea Frohne, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Education; Museums

Keywords:

Museum education; museum teacher programs; museum school partnership

Hollis, Alan D.Implementing Best Practices of Museum Exhibition Planning: Case Studies from the Denver, Colorado Art Museum Community
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2010, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration

Exhibitions are at the core of museums’ public functions and successful exhibition planning is necessary for museums to thrive. Institutions in the Denver art museum community continually challenge themselves to offer unique, world-class exhibitions to their audiences, but often they must struggle against pre-conceived notions that they are not up to the task. This paper examines three exhibitions, chosen for their variety in scale, objectives, presentation, and the background of the curators and presenting institutions.

The first exhibition studied in this paper is Masterpieces of Colorado: A Rich Legacy of Landscape Painting, presented by Foothills Art Center in Golden, Colorado and the Colorado Council on the Arts, and curated by Rose Fredrick. The second case study is based on Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Prints and Objects, presented by the Metro State College Center for Visual Art (CVA) in Denver, Colorado, and curated by Jennifer Garner. The third exhibition examined is Clyfford Still Unveiled: Selections from the Estate, presented by the Clyfford Still Museum, and curated by Dean Sobel.

The primary research method is first-person interviews with the curators. Preparation for the interviews was done through site visits to the exhibitions, research on the artists, and research on Best Practices in museum exhibition planning. The results are an informed study on the methods and processes undertaken by these curators, and the conclusion that it is nearly impossible to define one set of rules for exhibition planning. There are many variables and every institution must find a system that fits its situation.

Committee:

Durand Pope, Mr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History; Fine Arts; Museums

Keywords:

museum exhibition planning; exhibition planning; exhibition; art exhibition; Christo; Jeanne-Claude; Clyfford Still; Colorado art; Center for Visual Art; Clyfford Still Museum; Masterpieces of Colorado; art; Best Practices

Genshaft, Carole MillerSymphonic poem: A case study in museum education
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Art Education
In this case study, I examine the extraordinary work of contemporary artist Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson and the intersection of my experience as an educator serving as a co-curator for Symphonic Poem, a major retrospective exhibition of her work in 2003. I examine the role of museum educators in developing and presenting exhibitions that empower visitors to discover their own meaning in Aminah’s complex and layered work. My examination of the case and my research related to it highlight the challenges and opportunities that face museum educators and all museum workers in an era when museums are examining their relevancy as they compete with all types of cultural and commercial events and venues for people’s time and attention. This collaboration between a curator of contemporary art and an educator provides an alternative approach to traditional museum practices and organizational structures and raises important questions concerning the training and practice of museum professionals. In addition to examining the role of museum educators in exhibitions, this work presents strategies to encourage K-12 students and visitors of all ages to critically confront issues of identity, race, and oppression that hover just below the rich patterns and button-encrusted surface of Aminah’s work. In the world the artist has created, being black is the norm, but everyone is invited to participate by sharing their memories, stories, and dreams. Art like that of Aminah Robinson helps to fill in the gaps that the modern museum created in regard to marginalizing and ignoring the voices of women and minorities. Educators in the post-museum can become border-crossers themselves in creating exhibitions, linking them with a broad range of communities, and encouraging visitors to become border-crossers as well.

Committee:

Christine Ballengee Morris (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Art

Keywords:

art education; museum education; educators and exhibitions; museum educators and curators; critical pedagogy in museums; Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson; museums and civic dialogue; art and poetry; African-American spirituals

Higgins-Linder, Melissa M.Case Study of the Columbus Museum of Art's Teaching for Creativity Summer Institute
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College of the Arts / School of Art
Teacher quality is a decisive factor in a student’s educational experience. In turn, a teacher’s continued professional development is crucial to his/her capacity for high quality instructional practice. Recent research indicates that school districts’ heightened focus on standardized tests as a measure of student and teacher achievement has resulted in art teachers having fewer subject-relevant opportunities for high quality professional development within their schools and districts when compared with peers teaching “tested” subjects. Counter movements seeking to challenge the rise of “testing culture” in K-12 schools centralize the processes of student creativity, critical thinking, and other 21st century skills—along with the disciplines, subjects, and professional development experiences that are intrinsically predisposed to model and support them. A compelling example of such efforts is found in the work of the Columbus Museum of Art’s education department staff, who successfully effected change first within the museum’s institutional vision and framework, and next in issues of art education and schooling within their community. This case study of the museum’s 2015 Teaching for Creativity Institute indicates that museums are uniquely situated to provide high quality professional development opportunities and create communities of support for art teachers and their non-art teaching colleagues. These professional development experiences also have the potential to serve as powerful advocacy tools for arts education and art museums.

Committee:

Linda Hoeptner Poling, Ph.D. (Advisor); Koon-Hwee Kan, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Juliann B. Dorff (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Elementary Education; Museum Studies; Museums; Secondary Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Art Teacher Professional Development; Museum Education; Art Museums; Creativity; High Quality Professional Development for Teachers; Art Teacher Professional Development; Art Museum Professional Development Programs for Teachers; Inquiry-based Learning

Lange, AndreasThe Surreal Museum: An Intervention for the Cincinnati Art Museum
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
The comprehensive public art museum may be considered a surreal space. A reinterpretation of surrealism as an aesthetic methodology based in the cultivation of the unheimlich can help inform and direct an approach to museum planning and design so that modernization highlights and emphasizes the multiplicitous nature of the museum. As a staged environment that surpasses direct functionality and rationality, the surreal museum is a scripted space for the performance of cultural identity. The amalgamative development of museum buildings, the embedded typological forms, the strange relationship between displaced objects and display space, and the anxious overlaps in program make the comprehensive art museum a very complex and incredibly rich architectural space. The Cincinnati Art Museum is an exquisite corpse of a building illustrating all the qualities of the surreal museum. A strategic architectural intervention into the Cincinnati Art Museum can expose and emphasize this surreality.

Committee:

Elizabeth Riorden (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture; Art History

Keywords:

Cincinnati Art Museum; Addition; Intervention; Surrealism; unheimlich; museum; Architecture

Graham, Tracy AnnA Preventive Conservation Guidebook
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2009, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
The discussion contained within “A Preventive Conservation Guidebook” outlines the basic philosophy of collections management, or rather what I refer to as the philosophy of “being a registrar.” We serve as collections managers because we believe in the benefit of cultural heritage and stewardship, and we follow through on this belief by respecting our collections and placing their needs as priorities. One of the most important ways in which we carry this out is by subscribing to the theories and practices of Preventive Conservation. This text serves as a guidebook for museum collection managers and registrars to begin subscribing to and integrating Preventive Conservation practices into their personal belief system and daily operations. In attempt of this, I discuss the term, present information pertaining to its practices and introduce a model for providing quality collections care through a combination of Preventive Conservation theory and continuing education. Additionally, this text introduces the results of a Ohio-wide survey of collection holding institutions and their collections care practices and current preservation and educational or professional training needs.

Committee:

Durand Pope (Advisor); Rod Bengston (Advisor)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Fine Arts; Library Science; Museums

Keywords:

Preventive Conservation; Museology; Museum Studies; Museum; Collection Management; Registrar; Preservation; Conservation; Survey; Continuing Education; Inventorying; Long-Range Planning; Emergency/Disaster Planning; Integrated Pest Management Program

Betancourt, Verónica E.Brillan por su ausencia: Latinos as the missing outsiders of mainstream art museums
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Art Education
This thesis articulates the importance of studying the experiences, identities, and perceptions of Latino visitors to mainstream art museums. Art museums visitorships are predominantly white, non-Latino, affluent and middle-class, and not even close to representative of the American populace. With the shifting demographics of the country and the static demographics of museum visitors, art museums find themselves in dire need of attracting new and more diverse publics. The Latino population is the fastest growing demographic in the United States, and one that has been grossly underexamined within museum scholarship. Given the paucity of research in this area, I drew primarily from work published by academics, industry researchers, museum evaluators, as well as from the exhibition histories and programming of varied art institutions across the United States, to develop an initial picture of how art museums have considered and engaged Latino audiences. I examine the usefulness the theoretical work of Carol Duncan and Gloria Anzaldúa in framing a study of Latino visitors to art museums, and conclude with recommendations for how art museums, researchers, and other interested scholars can work to build the field of Latino visitor studies.

Committee:

Karen Hutzel (Advisor); James Sanders, III (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Hispanic American Studies; Hispanic Americans; Museum Studies

Keywords:

Latino; museum studies; visitor studies; identity negotiation; art museum

Coldiron, Marly ECultivating Creativity: The Columbus Museum of Art and the Influence of Education on Museum Operation
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Arts Policy and Administration
This case study explores the nature of museum education and its capacity to influence the operations and functions of the museum as a whole. Specifically, I examine the operations of the Columbus Museum of Art in Columbus, OH, and the institutional changes that occurred in the early 2000s. By centering the education department around the philosophy of creativity, the education staff reimagined the role of education in the museum and the museum visitor’s learning experience. From this new focus on creativity came a museum-wide adoption of creativity as an institutional value, an adoption that was manifested in the Center for Creativity, a structural reorganization and new job titles, and a new function as a social service for the community and local groups. This study shows that significant institutional change can take place as the result of a focus on education in the museum.

Committee:

Candace Stout, PhD (Advisor); Wayne Lawson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

museum; education; Columbus Museum of Art; creativity; operations

Wonderly, MeghanA Son's Dream: Colonel Webb Cook Hayes and the Founding of the Nation's First Presidential Library
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, History
Today presidential libraries are expected from every former president. Presidents begin to plan their libraries before exiting office. It was not always so. Over time, the American public and their government altered their views of presidential documents. For years, presidential documents had been considered personal property, so former presidents did as they wished with them. During his presidency Franklin D. Roosevelt created the National Archives to preserve presidential papers. His presidential library was the first in the federal presidential library system and therefore receives much recognition for being the first presidential library. However, twenty years before Roosevelt’s library existed there was the Hayes Memorial Library and Museum. Now known as the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library & Museums, Roosevelt used it as a model for his presidential library. Therefore, it influenced the federal system of presidential libraries. This project argues the Hayes Memorial Library and Museum exists due to the determination and resourcefulness of its founder Colonel Webb Cook Hayes. It further states that by creating the first presidential library, Webb influenced the federal presidential library system. This project analyzes the creation of the Hayes Memorial Library and Museum, following its journey from conception to fruition. This thesis first outlines the life of founder Colonel Webb Cook Hayes, revealing what led him to create the memorial: influences that shaped his interests, sources of his power, and passions that drove him. Then the text examines the difficulties surrounding the creation of the Hayes Memorial. It was managed and owned by the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society. Because no presidential library existed before it, the Hayes Memorial had to become the model for others to follow. This project follows the complications that arose due to the innovative concept of a presidential library and how Webb assisted in managing them. The sources for this project include Hayes family papers, local collections and historical newspapers. It also includes various texts on the history of presidential libraries, place, local history, and memory. Gathering these sources and examining them together sheds new light on the creation of the presidential library concept.

Committee:

Rebecca Mancuso (Advisor); Nicole Jackson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

president; Hayes; library; presidential library; presidential museum; museum; history; military; Ohio; Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society; Webb; Colonel Webb Cook Hayes; Rutherford Birchard Hayes; Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Stewart, Stacy MarieConnecting to the Art Museum Through an Educational Workshop: A Case Study
MA, Kent State University, 2010, College of the Arts / School of Art

Building a relationship with an art museum can provide an art teacher with a valuable tool for connecting students to art, thus promoting art museum awareness and providing unique opportunities for students to learn about art in their community. The primary purpose of this Action Research study was to examine my own teaching practices in relation to establishing a connection to an art museum, and through that relationship, develop opportunities for my students to experience the art museum as a way of learning about art. This thesis documents the experiences of a high school advanced art class and their teacher, myself, while they formed a connection to a local art museum, take part in the museum’s educational workshop, and use what was learned back in the art classroom. Through questionnaire responses, students’ reflective journaling, observations and field notes, and both student and art museum professional interviews, data was collected to discover that students do benefit from learning through the art museum and that learning continues long after their initial experience. Interesting themes that emerged from the data included: Connecting to the art museum; students’ preconceived notions versus actual experience; benefits of learning in the art museum versus learning in the classroom; and applying learned knowledge to classroom activities.

Through this research, my goal was to improve my teaching while actively seeking new ways to connect students to art in the world around them. I want my experience to encourage other art educators to seek out local opportunities to connect students to art. This study demonstrated how art educators can use the art museum to teach their students about art and create unique learning opportunities.

Committee:

Linda Hoeptner Poling, Ph.D. (Advisor); Robin Vande Zande, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Janice Lessman-Moss, M.F.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Music Education; Secondary Education; Teaching

Keywords:

art museum; museum education; workshop; high school art education

Buffington, Melanie LUsing the Internet to develop students' critical thinking skills and build online communities of teachers: A review of research with implications for museum education
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Art Education
This dissertation presents a Critical Content Meta Analysis of published literature related to using the Internet to develop critical thinking skills in students and to build online communities of teachers. An underlying goal of the research was to work toward the development of stronger connections between museums and public schools. Through analyzing the literature, I developed suggestions for museum personnel to implement when creating educational museum web sites. The analysis of the literature on critical thinking shows that there is no agreement among the authors as to the meaning of the term “critical thinking.” The literature largely endorses the view that thinking critically about the Internet involves accepting information because it is represented in multiple sites on the Internet and rejecting information that is not congruent with dominant cultural beliefs. Utilizing the concept of hyper-connective thinking, museum educators can build educational web sites that highlight objects that are the subject of controversy. The use of these web sites will enable students to access multiple perspectives relating to the objects, thus allowing them to learn about divergent interpretations and understandings. The literature on building online communities of teachers also has little agreement with regard to the use of the term “community.” Through online interactions, teachers may be able to overcome the often-cited feelings of separation from peers and find ways to improve their teaching practice. There are many power issues that must be considered when building an online community ranging from the ability of the community members to change the social interactions to the relative parity of the members of the community. Additionally, through online communities, museums have the opportunity to develop interactions among interested visitors relating to the objects in the collections. I argue that insufficient research has been conducted on using the Internet in K-12 classrooms with students. Thus, this research is an important first step in filling the void by creating numerous suggestions for museum educators to utilize when developing educational web sites. Museum web sites could become exemplars for helping students develop critical thinking skills.

Committee:

Michael Parsons (Advisor)

Keywords:

Museum Education; Critical Thinking; Online Communities; Communities of Practice; Internet; Museum School Partnerships; Technology

Wise, Emily D.Development Strategies of Historic House Museums
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2008, Arts Policy and Administration

What makes a house museum successful? Historic house museums are a vital integration of basic education for students throughout the country. These museums' fiscal well being must be sustained if they are to educate children and adults alike. By conducting case studies of two historic house museums' operational and development strategies, their successes and challenges are explored.

This research considers the testimonies of key house museum constituents including staff, current and former board members, and volunteers of a house museum located in a large Midwestern city, and one in a small rural Mid-Atlantic Southern city. Primary document sources and published accounts were also analyzed as data. Through these interviews, patterns of performance are identified and each institution's histories are told. By discussing each museum's relationship to supporting organization and operational context areas of success and challenge are explored. By ensuring participant testimonies and institutional identities would remain anonymous, they were offered opportunities to candidly recount their stories and consider why their museums were successful and in what areas they might need improvement.

Research data findings revealed current and past strategies for corporate sponsorship, foundation support, grants, individual donations, memberships, rental fees, government support, and public recognition.

After analysis of findings, they were contextually interwoven to construct an overall picture of what a historical house museum is and might be in the United States. This research demonstrates how two house museums were successful in sustaining their educational and cultural missions, and explored their importance, successes and potential vitality for sustaining institutions with value to future generations.

Committee:

James H. Sanders, III, PhD (Advisor); Barbara Zollinger Sweney, PhD (Committee Member); Christine Ballengee-Morris, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Museums

Keywords:

historic house museums; development strategies; museum education; museum programming

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