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Selan, Nicholas H.Survivability of Planetary Satellites During Uranus-Neptune Ejection
Master of Science, Miami University, 2008, Physics
Recent work has proposed that the ice giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, did not form where they are located today in the Solar System. Instead, they originated in the present region of the gas giants, Jupiter and Saturn, and then were later gravitationally scattered into highly eccentric orbits that took them out into the Kuiper belt. Interactions with the Kuiper belt objects would slowly circularize their orbits to their present semi-major axes and eccentricities. It is unclear if the ejection process has any effect on systems of planetary satellites that may have existed at this time. We investigate this possibility through a series of simulations that include satellite systems around both the gas giants and the ice giants. For initial conditions, we chose to duplicate those of Tsiganis et al. (2005) where the ejection is caused by a Jupiter/Saturn resonance crossing.

Committee:

Stephen Alexander, PhD (Advisor); S. Douglas Marcum, PhD (Committee Member); Paul DeVries, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Astrophysics

Keywords:

Uranus; Neptune; Moons; Satellites; Late stage formation

Hesselbrock, Andrew J.A PERTURBED MOON: SOLVING NEREID'S MOTION TO MATCH OBSERVED BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS
Master of Science, Miami University, 2012, Physics
Since its discovery in 1949, Nereid's photometric variations, orbit, and mass have been well established, however knowledge of its spin, orientation, and shape is lacking. We simulate Nereid's orbital and rotational motion, dependent on these unknown characteristics, in an attempt to match observations. We show how a time-dependent gravitational torque can cause the body to precess on a timespan as small as ~ 17 years, following a complicated coning nutation. Modeled as a uniformly reflecting body, we find that if the photometric variations are to be solely explained by geometry, Nereid cannot be either prolate or oblate. We have produced large amplitude, intra-night variations similar to those presented in Schaefer et al. (2008), but are unable to fully match their observations. Our study shows our strongest candidate to have an initial obliquity of 60 degrees, a spin rate of 144 hours, and semi-axial ratios of c/a ~ 0.5, b/a ~ 0.6.

Committee:

Stephen Alexander, PhD (Advisor); Michael Pechan, PhD (Committee Member); Paul Urayama, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Applied Mathematics; Astronomy; Astrophysics; Physics; Theoretical Physics

Keywords:

Nereid; Neptune; dynamical evolution; prolate moons; rotational stability; forced precession

Cortes, MichaelSymphony No. 1 “The Galilean Satellites”
MM, University of Cincinnati, 2010, College-Conservatory of Music : Composition
Symphony No. 1 "The Galilean Satellites" was written from 2008 to 2009. These four moons, discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilee are very unique objects in our solar system. Europa is one of the smoothest objects in the solar system and has the best chance of containing possible life. Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system and to this point is the only moon that has its own magnetic field. Io is one of the most geologically active objects in the solar system and contains many volcanoes. Callisto is one of the most heavily cratered objects in the entire solar system. As you can tell, each of these moons is very different so I wanted to try to make each movement unique on its own, but at the same time I felt it was important to do something to unify all of the movements together somehow because these moons, although very different from each other, are all part of the great discovery of Galileo Galilee. In addition, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are all believed to contain a liquid ocean beneath their surface. When listening to the music, a very familiar slow motive will play, which is my portrayal of the possibility of life. At the very end of the entire work, you will hear ideas/motives from all of the previous movements. The electronics in this piece use not only software synthesizers and edited sounds created in MAX/MSP, but there are real sounds taken from NASA that was actually recorded through data received from space equipment that were visiting these moons from outer space.

Committee:

Mara Helmuth, DMA (Committee Chair); Mike Fiday, PhD (Committee Member); Joel Hoffman, DMA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Symphony; Galilean Satellites; pipe organ; band; moons

Krystal, Kuhns R.Organizational Principles in Two of George Crumb's Chamber Works with Flute: Madrigals, Book II and Federico's Little Songs for Children
MA, Kent State University, 2011, College of the Arts / School of Music

George Crumb developed his mature style in 1962 and wrote eight chamber works with flute between 1965 and 1986. The first, Madrigals, Book II (composed 1965) was written for soprano, alto flute (doubling flute in C and piccolo) and percussion. The last, Federico’s Little Songs for Children (composed 1986) was written for soprano, flute (also piccolo, alto flute and bass flute) and harp. This thesis explores the organizational principles that are the essence of Crumb’s unique individual style with a detailed analysis of pitch-class content and contour, along with a general survey of rhythm and special effects in both pieces. Also included is an essay on the performance of the extended flute techniques throughout all eight of Crumb’s chamber works with flute.

Written 21 years apart, Madrigals, Book II and Federico’s Little Songs for Children employ many of the same organizational principles, including chromaticism, symmetry, dissonance, and disjunct motion. Both of these pieces are highly chromatic, often emphasizing pitch-class sets that are symmetrical and contain the tritone, such as (0167). Small sets are often expanded into larger supersets while large sets are generally fragmented and broken down into smaller subsets. The contour of the music is often disjunct, with displaced chromaticism and frequent large leaps of dissonant intervals such as tritones, sevenths and ninths. Crumb also utilizes irregular rhythmic patterns and special effects that contribute to his individual style. Irrational divisions of the beat, ties over barlines and radical time signatures often distort any sense of time and meter.

Committee:

Richard Devore, Dr. (Advisor); Ralph Lorenz, Dr. (Committee Member); Frank Wiley, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Pedagogy; Performing Arts

Keywords:

George Crumb; extended flute techniques; pitch-class content; intervallic contour; Madrigals, Book II; Book IV; Federico's Little Songs for Children; Night of the Four Moons; Vox Balaenae; Lux Aeterna; Idyll for the Misbegotten; Eleven Echoes