Search Results (1 - 3 of 3 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Sencer, EmreVirtuous Praetorians: Military Culture and the Defense Press in Germany and Turkey, 1929-1939
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, History

The aim of this dissertation is to take a comparative and transnational approach to the formation of the military officer mentality and worldviews in interwar Europe by taking Germany and Turkey as case studies. It focuses on the years roughly from the Great Depression to the outbreak of the Second World War. The characteristics of military culture are examined through the publications of the defense press.

Germany and Turkey were allies in the First World War and shared a similar fate as losers of that war. Both went through rapid territorial and political change; both positioned themselves as the opposite of the winning powers, Britain and France. Yet they had different attitudes toward the international system that was formed following the war: Germany was a revisionist power, whereas Turkey was an example of interwar countries that rejected irredentism. While they had different political systems (Weimar Republic until 1933, followed by Nazi dictatorship in Germany; single-party state until 1946 in Turkey), the impact of total war and the technological and socioeconomic changes of the post-1918 era engendered similar responses in the officer corps of these countries toward politics, international relations, and technological development. These responses led to three major themes: fear of defenselessness in the age of total war; the role of the military in nation-building; and the urge to discover and fight the internal enemies of the nation.

A picture of self-conscious uncertainty emerged in the interwar military press, which betrayed signs of old institutions trying to adapt to a new world and fighting hard not to accept the changes. The German and Turkish officer cadres of the interwar era made the transition to the tactics and strategy of total war in the twentieth century, but most of their views on parliaments, democracy, and republicanism remained hostile and anchored in a previous era. These attitudes have influenced civil-military relations in both countries and had further implications for the future development of democratization.

Committee:

Alan Beyerchen (Advisor); Stephen Kern (Committee Member); John Guilmartin (Committee Member)

Subjects:

European History

Keywords:

Military culture; defense press; Germany; Turkey; 1929-1939; interwar

Hicks, Manda V.Negotiating Gendered Expectations: The Basic Social Processes of Women in the Military
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Media and Communication
This research identifies the basic social processes for women in the military. Using grounded theory and feminist standpoint theories, I interviewed 39 active-duty and veteran service women. Feminist standpoint theories argue that within an institution, people who are the minority, oppressed, or disenfranchised will have a greater understanding of the institution than those who are privileged by it. Based on this understanding of feminist standpoint theories, this research argues that female service members will have a more expansive and diverse understanding of gender and military culture than male service members. I encouraged women to tell the story of their military experiences and used analysis of narrative to identify the core categories of joining, learning, progressing, enduring, and ending. For women service members, the core variable of negotiating gendered expectations occurred throughout the basic social processes and primarily involved life choices, abilities, and sexual agency. This research serves as a forum for the lived experience of women in the military; through these articulations a set of particular standpoints regarding gender, war, and military culture emerge. Additionally, these data offer useful approaches to operating within male-dominated institutions and provide productive strategies for avoiding and challenging discrimination, harassment, and assault.

Committee:

Sandra L. Faulkner, PhD (Committee Chair); Ellen Gorsevski, PhD (Committee Member); Lynda D. Dixon, PhD (Committee Member); Vikki Krane, PhD (Committee Member); Melissa Miller, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

women in the military; feminist theories; grounded theory; military culture; gender

Tufts, Winfield F.High People-High Mission: The Power of Caring Leadership as Experienced in the Air Force
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
On the surface, caring and the military appear to be opposites. The stereotypical image of the military giving and obeying orders does not conjure up images of leaders caring for their subordinates. In reality, caring for subordinates and caring for the mission could help leaders form stronger relationships with subordinates, because subordinates may have confidence that their leaders will not recklessly send them into harm’s way. Subordinates may develop confidence in their leaders based on their leaders’ care during non-combat environments. Yet, empirical studies of caring in the military are sparse. This study investigates how Air Force retirees characterize “great bosses” care for them and care for the mission. A mixed method study of 12 qualitative interviews with Air Force retirees, followed by a quantitative survey study of 226 Air Force retirees revealed that caring actions cluster into four themes: Caring for Subordinates Personally, Caring for Subordinates Professionally, Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Mission Execution, and Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Empowering the Unit. This study also examined how these subordinates responded to those bosses that cared for them through Stronger Job Performance and Stronger Relationship with the Boss. The dissertation findings operationalize caring, demonstrate correlations between caring actions and self-reported increases in performance and boss-subordinate relationship quality, and detail actions that an authentic, caring leader can take to pursue the flourishing of subordinates and mission success simultaneously. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Laura Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Davis, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Military Studies

Keywords:

Air Force; bosses; mixed methods; leadership; care; caring; caring leadership; military culture; military leadership; servant leadership; virtuous leadership