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Phillips, Noelle VeronicaA Phenomenological Study of the Impacts of Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) on Soldiers During Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies /Leisure and Tourism Studies
This study examined the phenomenological impact of military Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) on individual and troop readiness. This study utilized both a quantitative survey and a qualitative interview process. A basic model was proposed and supported through an analysis of previous literature. This model purports that MWR offers increased levels of perceived organizational support and self efficacy which leads to the phenomenon of increased readiness. Readiness is then defined as cohesion, commitment and motivation/effort. Each individual participating in the study filled out a survey determining base line MWR usage. Then they were interviewed using a protocol designed to expose the phenomenon of MWR and readiness. This study found that participation in MWR during OIF does positively impact soldiers in a number of ways. However, it did not support the link between MWR and readiness, and several alternate models are developed and proposed to replace the original.

Committee:

Julie Lengfelder (Advisor)

Keywords:

MWR; Morale; Welfare; Recreation; Military Morale; Military Welfare; Military Recreation; Military; OIF; Operation Iraqi Freedom

Long, Nathan AndrewThe Origins, Early Developments, and Present-Day Impact of the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps on the American Public Schools
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2003, Education : Educational Foundations
The Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (Junior ROTC) has been a part of the American educational system for nearly ninety years. Formed under the 1916 National Defense Act, its primary function was and is to train high school youth military techniques and history, citizenship and discipline. The organization has recently seen its stature elevated and its reach widened once Congress lifted caps on its expansion in 2001. The Junior ROTC’s proliferation has led to criticism from peace activists who denounce military training and tactics in schools and political leaders who claim the benefits are suspect. Conversely, the program has earned the praises of varied school and government officials. What becomes clear is that little consensus on the program has been reached. It is my contention that Junior ROTC’s current popularity within the American educational system is multifaceted and cannot be simplistically embraced or summarily discounted by disparate analyses. One must understand the organization’s historical roots to comprehend its current manifestation. Thus, three related questions have guided my research. First, what, if any, prerequisites existed relevant to Junior ROTC? Second, how does recruitment correspond to the purpose of Junior ROTC’s inception and consequent growth? Third, has the program focused on the recruitment of working class and racial minorities over its ninety-year history? First, two dialectically related historical constructs – preparedness ideology and economic imperialism-expansionism – serve as prerequisites to Junior ROTC’s inception and consequent growth. The antecedent relationships of military philosophy, education, training and drilling are explored in relation to these constructs. Second, the historical record points to a program designed primarily to recruit high school aged youth. Primary data in various forms aptly illustrate the point. Third, the combination of historical and recent demographic data confirm Junior ROTC’s recruitment focus on working class and disadvantaged youth, primarily in urban centers, which provides the military a ready reserve of labor. Junior ROTC while an attractive program to ‘reach’ at-risk high school students is a quick-fix approach to the numerous structural and social barriers placed in front of our youth. Thus, attention is devoted in the last chapter to potential alternatives.

Committee:

Dr. Marvin Berlowitz (Advisor)

Keywords:

Education; Social Foundations of Education; Educational policy; Educational history; military; military-industrial complex; military education; military academy; Junior ROTC; ROTC; Reserves; Reserve Officers' Training Corps; school inequality

Perrin, James K."Knavish Charges, Numerous Contractors, and a Devouring Monster": The Supply of the U.S. Army and Its Impact Upon Economic Policy, 1775-1815
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, History
This dissertation explores the idea that the heightened level of economic activity required to supply the army acted as a powerful force engendering economic change within early America. The central question driving my research places the supply of the early American army in conversation with the nation's financial development. How did efforts to supply the army evolve over time and what role did this activity play in influencing the nation's changing economic policy in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries? How indeed did military procurement impact American economic development during the early years of the republic? It is my argument that supply by contract emerged as the principal means by which to feed the army during the early republic due to expediency. Quite simply, early government officials reduced significant overhead procurement and distribution costs by turning over these responsibilities to credible bidders in a manner that fit well with the prevailing tenets of republican ideology yet acknowledged the advent of liberal motivations. Leaner government, for example, especially in those offices intimately connected with the military, appealed to those revolutionaries concerned about large standing armies. Reliance upon contractors, moreover, minimized in theory the likelihood that the military would need to forcibly impress supplies from the civilian population from which it so dearly needed support. These negotiated agreements shifted considerable burden away from the government while shielding it somewhat from any criticism accompanying failure. The relative merits of the system never endured sustained scrutiny—more often than not, the end of a campaign or conflict obscured those inadequacies of the system that continued war would likely have exposed. The interaction of government official, supply contractor, and army officer suggested a society struggling to reconcile values in a changing economic world. The triangular nature of their relationship revealed considerable tension in early America as the government sought to harness the forces of nascent capitalism to better supply armies made up of leaders who embraced a republican ideology. The results proved not always agreeable. Military leaders questioned the actions of even the most reliable contractors, doubting that any other motivation save profit could explain their behavior. Contractors in turn, while certainly driven by the desire to achieve a return on their investment, more often struggled to break even once the friction of war had its way with paper agreements. Finally, government officials, while ecstatic about the perceived savings accompanying supply by contract, wrestled with the question of how to ensure adequate supplies for the army now that they had relinquished a large amount of control to enterprising businessmen. Most importantly, the support of the United States' early military efforts came at a high cost. Contracting, as the principal method by which to feed the army, played a substantial role in generating these expenses. The importance of paying these bills drove the financial reform that created the conditions for the country's rise to both economic and military power.

Committee:

Mark Grimsley (Advisor); Peter Mansoor (Committee Member); John Brooke (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Economic History; Finance; History; Military History

Keywords:

US Military History; logistics; financial revolution; military contractors; army supplies; Continental Army; Revolutionary War; War of 1812; fiscal-military state

Marotte, Kenneth R.Crime in Perspective: The Effects of External Phenomena on U.S. Military Behavior in Japan and the Republic of Korea, 1965-1995
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, East Asian Studies

Though forged in the mid-twentieth century, America’s alliances with Japan and the Republic of Korea (ROK) continue to be of vast importance. Though economic linkages have produced close ties between these states, the foundation of relations lies in security cooperation—most notably seen in the stationing of U.S. troops in Japan and the ROK.

However, if man is imperfect, then so are the military institutions to which he belongs. With bases in Japan and the ROK housing thousands of service personnel, members of the U.S. military have committed several acts—from the embarrassing to the appalling—inviting harsh rebuke from host countries and their populations. While the most horrendous crimes (e.g., rape, murder) are not commonplace, they have occurred repeatedly, triggering governments and citizens to wonder aloud: is the benefit of this alliance worth the crime it entails?

Viewing military crime as a static, isolated issue does not afford us the entire picture. My goal, therefore, is to explore trends in Japan- and ROK-based U.S. military crime as relates to external historical and social phenomena. I do this by using a vast assortment of primary and secondary sources—the former to collect trend data and the latter to juxtapose those trends against external factors.

The findings of this thesis demonstrate that such trends can be profoundly affected by social factors, like drug use and prostitution, as well as historical events, like the reversion of Okinawa in 1972 and Korea’s Kwangju Uprising in 1980. Afterward, I also review and examine some of the best methods of crime prevention: bridge-building between cultures, educating GIs, and engaging GIs in constructive activity. Finally, survey data show that U.S. rhetoric against military crime does not always translate into legitimate methods of crime prevention.

In summary, these findings suggest that U.S. military crime is not always a problem originating in military ranks; rather, it is a multifaceted dilemma that can be deeply affected by outside occurrences. For U.S. security relationships to improve in this era of globalization, it is essential for decision makers and researchers to look beyond immediate causes in favor of larger, overarching possibilities.

Committee:

James Bartholomew (Advisor); Robert McMahon (Committee Member); J. Marshall Unger (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; International Relations; Political Science

Keywords:

military crime; military misconduct; U.S.-Japan; U.S.-ROK; military behavior

Talkington, Brigit K.Communicating Support: Where and how Army Spouses Seek Community
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Media and Communication

Army spouses, both male and female, experience life stressors unparalleled in other populations. This thematic analysis of qualitative data from the 2004 US Army Research Institute’s Survey of Army Families V uncovered ten main themes while exploring how Army spouses communicate and constitute social support. Through grounded theory framework, suggestions are made for supporting this understudied population (96% of whom are female) from the 1,823 open-ended responses received. Ten themes radiate out from the heart of the research question, how do Army spouses communicate and constitute social support? These are: the level of support perceived (or lacking), the types of support perceived (and lacking), support providers, information, knowledge, Family Readiness (Support) Groups, consistency, attitude toward the military lifestyle, media and the internet, and issues with the military itself. This study discusses those ten themes and then focuses on five additional findings.

As the first of those findings, utilizing a pentad of social support aspects (emotional, informational, instrumental, belonging, and nurturing social support) allowed for a legitimate assessment of the construct of social support; all five aspects applied in this study are necessary and sufficient. Also, future focus group research of this population ought to contain consistency, hypocrisy, rank, and FRG reform to be thorough. Additionally, extrapolation of findings to other populations might be acceptable, given certain considerations uncovered in this research. Communication scholars can and should apply their knowledge to assist army spouses in a myriad of ways discussed in the study in detail. Perhaps most importantly, social support of the army spouse could and should be increased by using a cultural lens which considers the Military Culture and the Military Dependent Culture as distinct and interrelated entities.

Committee:

Catherine Cassara (Committee Chair); Timothy Pogacar (Committee Member); Lynda Dee Dixon (Committee Member); Mark A Earley (Committee Member); Lara Martin Lengel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Communication; Military Studies

Keywords:

Social support; grounded theory; thematic analysis; military spouse; military wife; military dependent; army spouse; army wife; army dependent; Army Research Institute; Survey of Army Families

Tufts, Winfield F.High People-High Mission: The Power of Caring Leadership as Experienced in the Air Force
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
On the surface, caring and the military appear to be opposites. The stereotypical image of the military giving and obeying orders does not conjure up images of leaders caring for their subordinates. In reality, caring for subordinates and caring for the mission could help leaders form stronger relationships with subordinates, because subordinates may have confidence that their leaders will not recklessly send them into harm’s way. Subordinates may develop confidence in their leaders based on their leaders’ care during non-combat environments. Yet, empirical studies of caring in the military are sparse. This study investigates how Air Force retirees characterize “great bosses” care for them and care for the mission. A mixed method study of 12 qualitative interviews with Air Force retirees, followed by a quantitative survey study of 226 Air Force retirees revealed that caring actions cluster into four themes: Caring for Subordinates Personally, Caring for Subordinates Professionally, Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Mission Execution, and Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Empowering the Unit. This study also examined how these subordinates responded to those bosses that cared for them through Stronger Job Performance and Stronger Relationship with the Boss. The dissertation findings operationalize caring, demonstrate correlations between caring actions and self-reported increases in performance and boss-subordinate relationship quality, and detail actions that an authentic, caring leader can take to pursue the flourishing of subordinates and mission success simultaneously. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Laura Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Davis, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Military Studies

Keywords:

Air Force; bosses; mixed methods; leadership; care; caring; caring leadership; military culture; military leadership; servant leadership; virtuous leadership

Vandegrift, David W.Lived Experience of Military Mental Health Clinicians: Provided Care to OIF and OEF Active Duty Service Members Experiencing War Stress Injury
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Military mental health clinicians (MMHCs) have been essential to Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. They served in extreme stress conditions, including on the frontlines. As co-combatant/clinician, the MMHC bridged unique perspectives on the effects of war stress experienced by Active-Duty Service Members (ADSMs). To date, no study has focused uniquely on MMHCs narratives as they provided care from this multiple perspective. This investigation was carried out from a phenomenological “Duty to military mission or service member?” This dilemma could not be reconciled that resulted in unrealized fulfillment of duty. MMHCs responses to unrealized duty defined an overarching polarity of Integrity—Corruption. A hermeneutic approach was used to identify the author&perspective. A single, open-ended question was asked of seven MMHCs about lived experiences while serving, resulting in in-depth interviews. These were textually coded. Though clinician positive and negative experiences were consistent with previous research, significant differences bear discussion. Following data analysis, participants identified duty as the superordinate theme that led to the question, #x2019;s relevant understandings before, during, and after the interview process. In reconstructing and contextualizing interview material, one finding was that MMHCs were required to operate in a place of turbulence between contradictory military and psychological traditions. Another finding concerned a growing divisive fissure between military and the public at-large, impacting reintegration efforts for those who serve. Public and governmental silence about traumas of ADSMs and MMHCs suggests a parallel, cultural dissociation occurring about war trauma. A question is posed if diagnosing trauma as pathology is a further way that external, contextual forces are consistently kept unformulated, distanced, or denied. Rather than locating the etiology and treatment entirely within the individual—resulting in blaming and isolating of those who serve—the suggestion is made for widespread discussion of socioeconomic and political factors that are behind psychological war injury. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Mark Russell, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Philip Cushman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Li Ravicz, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Behavioral Psychology; Mental Health; Military History; Multicultural Education; Public Policy; Therapy

Keywords:

military history, military psychology, deployment, phenomenology, resiliency, trauma, Adjustment Disorders, PTSD, war stress, evidence based treatment, hermeneutics, unformulated experience, moral pain, dissociation, demobilization

Leech, TimothyThe Continental Army and American State Formation: 1774-1776
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, History
This dissertation explores the nascent state-formation process that was under way in America from 1774 through the middle of 1776. Central to that process was the establishment of the Continental Army as a conventional military institution. The political processes and military events surrounding and set in motion by the founding of the army combined to actuate a military-state dynamic that shaped further choices, led to the decision to declare independence, and profoundly influenced the political economy of the subsequently developing American state. The primary approach of this work, which is informed by sociological and political science theories of state formation, is historical argument through a narrative structure which is substantiated by both primary source research involving published and archival materials along with a synthesis of historiographic literature primarily from the fields of political and military history.

Committee:

John Brooke (Advisor); Joan Cashin (Committee Member); Peter Mansoor (Committee Member); Edward Countryman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History

Keywords:

American Revolution; Revolutionary War; Military History; State Formation; Political History; US History; Early Republic; Military-State Dynamic

Kurtz, Michael J.Of Course a Handgun Can Take Down A Helicopter: Cultivation Effects of Military-Style Video Games
Master of Applied Communication Theory and Methodology, Cleveland State University, 2012, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
The goal of this study is to add to the literature that extends the theory of cultivation into the realm of video games. Video game studies incorporating cultivation stress the importance of specifying a single genre of video games and measuring the cultivation effect, due to the lack of homogenous content between video games. It is possible that video games are actually an antithesis to the theory of cultivation because of content that is user-generated, which not only dissolves homogeneity between different games, but also the same game. Cultivation research has also suggested that second- order cultivation effects (on attitudes and beliefs) are moderated by factors that affect the experience during the encounter of information. This study looks at exposure to military-style video games to help better understand how video games may lead to a variety of cultivation effects. It includes measures of the independent variables of video game habits, gaming skill, traditional media use, political orientation, and contact with the military, and the dependent variables of first- and second-order cultivation effects, and self-efficacy.

Committee:

Paul Skalski, PhD (Committee Chair); Dalisay Francis, PhD (Committee Member); Neuendorf Kim, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Mass Communications; Mass Media

Keywords:

video games; military; gaming; games; military games; cultivation; cultivation theory; cultivation effects; self-efficacy; first-order effects; second-order effects; first-order judgments; second-order judgments.,

Keith, Matthew EThe logistics of power: Tokugawa response to the Shimabara Rebellion and power projection in 17th-Century Japan
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, History
How would America react if today’s top news story told us that over three million U.S. soldiers, sailors, and marines, sent to southern Florida to quiet a regional rebellion against Federal authority, executed nearly 650,000 of their fellow countrymen in a single day? Violence of this scale and severity seems almost beyond our comprehension. However, a scenario of exactly these hideous proportions played out in southwestern Japan almost four centuries years ago. After a generation of peace in Japan, in 1637 peasants on Kyushu Island in southern Japan, distraught over horrible treatment at the hands of cruel lords, killed the local magistrate and took control of their village. The rebellion soon spread as peasants in village after village rose up against the taxation and collection methods that left them destitute, starving, and subject to routine torture. Christianity, introduced a century earlier by Portuguese Jesuits, re-emerged as a rallying ideology for the peasants whose numbers swelled to over 30,000. Within just a few weeks the Tokugawa Shogun, the central authority in early modern Japan, assembled and deployed an army of perhaps 150,000 soldiers to Kyushu (750 miles from the capital in present-day Tokyo) to confront the rebel peasants who took refuge in an abandoned castle. After a three-month siege, the castle fell to the central government army, and a general slaughter followed as almost 30,000 Japanese peasants were beheaded, burnt, or drowned. This dissertation examines the mechanics of how the Tokugawa were able to project military and political authority by fielding one of the largest, and potentially forceful, armies in the early modern world to confront and massacre their own subjects. It details the military, political, and economic apparatus used by the Tokugawa to mobilize, equip, and deploy an army greater than any European state could have at that time. This study will argue that the ability to maintain tremendous logistical ability, even during prolonged periods without war, underpinned the Tokugawa ability to project power, and thereby impose their authority on Japan for over two centuries.

Committee:

Noel Parker (Advisor)

Subjects:

History, Asia, Australia and Oceania

Keywords:

Tokugawa Japan; Military History; Military Logistics

Storms, MelissaWives Left Behind: Factors that Impact Active Duty Wives' Psychological Well-being while Experiencing Deployment-Related Separation
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Social Work
Current world events have led to increased deployments among military members. While these deployments are a necessary part of military service, separations create changes within the family dynamics and add stress to an already stressful situation. Military wives' psychological well-being is negatively impacted by these increased levels of stress. Specifically, military wives become isolated from their husbands and are required to accept roles previously held by their husbands. These types of circumstances can undermine the quality of the spousal relationship. Furthermore, communication between a wife and her deployed husband is often unpredictable and infrequent, which creates more strain on the marriage and has the potential to continue decreasing military wives' psychological well-being. Ultimately, these decreases in military wives' psychological well-being tax the individual, the family, and the military community, as well as increase the burden on the health care system. This study developed and tested an integrated conceptual model to show how the quality of spousal relationship and frequency of communication with the husband predict military wives' psychological well-being while experiencing separation caused by deployment. This study further examined how informal support networks, formal support networks, wives' satisfaction with employment opportunities, and wives' satisfaction with community moderate the associations between the quality of spousal relationship, frequency of communication with the husband, and wives' psychological well-being. Specifically, structural equation modeling was used to analyze the direct relationships between each of these factors and military wives' psychological well-being. Additionally, this study tested the moderating effects of the interactions between the variables. Other contributing factors (i.e., branch of service, paygrade, age, and if a service member's deployment was extended or not) were controlled for in this study to further isolate the effects of the factors of interest. The results show there are several factors that predict military wives' psychological well-being during deployment-induced separation. While all of the factors directly predict military wives' psychological well-being, some of them also moderate the relationships between the quality of spousal relationship, frequency of communication with the husband, and wives' psychological well-being. These findings provide insight into the nature of military wives' psychological well-being and how it is affected by separation. Additionally, the results of this study have implications for policymakers and mental health professionals by highlighting factors that should be focused on when creating and implementing programs designed to prevent and offset the negative impacts of separation caused by military deployments. Precisely, the results show the areas where resources can be focused to enable military wives to overcome the increased stressors present during separations caused by military deployments.

Committee:

Mo Yee Lee, Ph.D. (Advisor); Tom Gregoire, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Cynthia Buettner, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

Military wives; deployment; psychological well-being; separation; military families; spousal relationship; informal support; formal support; employment opportunities; community; interaction moderation; structural equation modeling

Hicks, Manda V.Negotiating Gendered Expectations: The Basic Social Processes of Women in the Military
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Media and Communication
This research identifies the basic social processes for women in the military. Using grounded theory and feminist standpoint theories, I interviewed 39 active-duty and veteran service women. Feminist standpoint theories argue that within an institution, people who are the minority, oppressed, or disenfranchised will have a greater understanding of the institution than those who are privileged by it. Based on this understanding of feminist standpoint theories, this research argues that female service members will have a more expansive and diverse understanding of gender and military culture than male service members. I encouraged women to tell the story of their military experiences and used analysis of narrative to identify the core categories of joining, learning, progressing, enduring, and ending. For women service members, the core variable of negotiating gendered expectations occurred throughout the basic social processes and primarily involved life choices, abilities, and sexual agency. This research serves as a forum for the lived experience of women in the military; through these articulations a set of particular standpoints regarding gender, war, and military culture emerge. Additionally, these data offer useful approaches to operating within male-dominated institutions and provide productive strategies for avoiding and challenging discrimination, harassment, and assault.

Committee:

Sandra L. Faulkner, PhD (Committee Chair); Ellen Gorsevski, PhD (Committee Member); Lynda D. Dixon, PhD (Committee Member); Vikki Krane, PhD (Committee Member); Melissa Miller, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

women in the military; feminist theories; grounded theory; military culture; gender

Matcham, William ArthurAssociation of Three Biomarkers of Nicotine as Pharmacogenomic Indices of Cigarette Consumption in Military Populations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Nursing
Tobacco-related diseases have reached epidemic proportions. There is no risk-free level of tobacco exposure. In the United States, tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in both men and women. Cigarette smoking alone accounts for approximately 443,000 deaths per year (one fifth of total US deaths) costing a staggering $193 billion per year in avoidable healthcare expenses and lost productivity. Literature shows military populations have rates of tobacco use two to three times higher than the civilian population. Military personnel returning from deployment in conflict areas can exceed 50% smoking prevalence. Research shows that genetic factors account for 40-70% of variation in smoking initiation and 50-60% of variance in cessation success. In the U.S., tobacco is responsible for more deaths than alcohol, AIDS, car accidents, illegal drugs, murders and suicides combined. This descriptive, cross-sectional study examined three of the biological markers used in tobacco research: the a4ß2 brain nicotinic receptors (nAChR) that contribute to genetic risk for nicotine dependence, nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) as a phenotypic marker for CYP2A6 activity, and bitter taste phenotype (BTP) to determine their impact on cigarette consumption in military populations. Sociodemographic and military variables were examined to determine if they impacted biomarker relationships. The availability of reliable biomarkers will facilitate development of personalized smoking cessation therapies for military personnel. The first chapter reviewed the state of the science related to the nicotine metabolism in the human body, nicotine acetylcholine receptor in the brain and perception of bitter taste as they apply to nicotine and smoking research. An in-depth description of CYP2A6 genetics and phenotype measurement is presented including identification of gene variation, problems with standardizing genetic testing, naming conventions and classifications. The function of nicotine acetylcholine receptor is reviewed with a detailed description of the rs16969968 single nucleotide polymorphism used to characterize risk of nicotine dependence. Bitter taste phenotype is reviewed in the context of cigarette smoking. The second chapter provided an overview of recruitment techniques used with military personnel. A timeline of recruitment activities was followed by a review of internal and external environmental influences that affected recruitment. An analysis of lessons learned is presented with a summary of strategies to overcome recruitment challenges which can be applied to broader populations than military personnel. The third chapter presents the method and procedures of the study. Inadequate subject accrual resulted in only 15 of the expected 160 participants completing the study. The results of the study were analyzed with biserial and Kendall’s tau coefficients but overall were not significant. The planned prediction modeling and interaction analysis could not be conducted due to low participant enrollment. Results did show some interesting relationships between military and sociodemographic variables. This study has provided valuable data to characterize the diverse individuals in the military and provides evidence for inclusion of this important group in future studies.

Committee:

Karen Ahijevych, PhD (Advisor); Donna McCarthy, PhD (Committee Member); Kristine Browning, PhD (Committee Member); Yvette Conley, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Genetics; Nursing

Keywords:

CYP2A6; Tobacco; Military smokers; rs16969968; Bitter taste; BTP; nicotine biomarkers; nicotine research; military tobacco research; CYP2a6 allele frequency; Nicotine metabolite ratio; NMR;

HENRY, HEATHER FRENCHSOCIALLY CONSCIOUS FASHION
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2001, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Design
"While the 1990's produced a strong urge for eclecticism and sensuality, people are attaching a greater importance to longer lasting and deeper concerns. There is search for meaning and spiritual content and, as a result, the addiction to fashion change is likely to give way to a more thoughtful use of clothing." (Jarnow 1997: 96) The inspiration for this thesis project began with my community involvement working with military veterans' issues and the establishment of the Heather French Foundation for Veterans. The concept of this project has been to develop a contemporary line of women's clothing to help benefit the foundation with a percentage of its proceeds. My work gives references to the history of the military uniform from 1754 to the present. The attempt was not the directly copy form or pattern but to utilize style for inspiration of unique and innovative use of patterns and silhouettes. My collection reflects my respect and understanding of the military through, not only style, but of rank and tradition. Uniforms were provided to offer uniformity and function. Military uniforms have long inspired civilian clothing; however, I feel I have captured a more practical applied design to today's fashion industry and market. After studying this unique history of military uniforms I am confident that I have portrayed a new and fresh approach to military inspired clothing. Recurring shapes and patterns have translated from their military origins into a functional wardrobe with a purpose to help those who served our country.

Committee:

Margaret Voeker-Ferrier (Advisor)

Subjects:

Design and Decorative Arts

Keywords:

military uniform history; fasion design; socially conscious fashion; military uniforms; fashion

Tollefson, Julie JoJapan's Article 9 and Japanese Public Opinion: Implications for Japanese Defense Policy and Security in the Asia Pacific
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2018, International and Comparative Politics
The Asia Pacific power structure is facing numerous challenges. Scholarship demonstrates Japan has encountered arduous obstacles as it balances Chinese and North Korean activity. As Japan attempts to expand its military capabilities, polling data shows that defense policy has conflicted with Japan's citizens and neighboring countries. The focal point of these contentions is Article 9 of the Japanese constitution which restrains the Japanese military to self-defense purposes. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has vowed to revise Article 9 by 2020. However, revising Article 9 is no simple task. Research demonstrates that for decades Japanese public opinion has been opposed to the revision of Article 9. This research examines trends in Japanese public opinion and its influence over Japanese defense policy. The research additionally suggests possible outcomes of the public referendum required before revising Article 9. Finally, this analysis provides implications for the Asia Pacific's security environment if Article 9 is revised.

Committee:

Laura Luehrmann, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Kathryn Meyer, Ph.D. (Committee Member); December Green, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Asian Studies; History; International Relations; Military History; Military Studies; Pacific Rim Studies; Political Science; Regional Studies

Keywords:

Japan; Article-9; Article-ix; constitution; Japan-US-relations; constitutional-revision; China; defense-spending; public-opinion; Japanese-Self-Defense-Forces; foreign-military-sales; defense-policy; Asian-studies; Japan-China-relations; JSDF; military;

Bilger, Kristie A.The Women's Army Corps and Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service: A Fashioning of American Womanhood and Citizenship
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2009, History

The focus of the study was to theorize and answer the question of why existing fashion theory in the U.S., as well as abroad, has not tackled the question of American womanhood and citizenship as evidenced in the images of the WACs and WAVES during WWII. Thorough examination of original source materials from pamphlets, recruiting booklets, memoirs, magazine articles, books, case studies,editorials, letters, photos and scrapbooks, a study of fashion has shown historical connections between existing gender systems, social orders, and political ideologies in WWII America. The present study focused on how women's relationships to fashion transformed the evaluation of women's roles and status during WWII and what clothing and adornment meant concerning women in the armed forces. The research also examined the concept of the new woman, and explored how the U.S. government successfully constructed a female appearance that satisfied both public and private concerns.

The ways in which women's roles and status changed during WWII was the result of the government promoting visual identity that typified traditional gender ideology and feelings of national belonging as women contributed to an American victory in the armed forces. An evaluation of fashion was important to see how life in WWII America changed in ways that no other sources of material culture could show. The use of original research material and its application contributes to and builds upon existing scholarship on WWII as well the development of the WACs (Women's Army Corps) and WAVES (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service). Not only is cultural and social history examined through the creation of WAC and WAVE uniforms but the social conditions, the political power shifts, as well as how the civilian population and female military personnel viewed themselves.

Research shows design changes in uniforms of the WACs and WAVES by a number of interested parties successfully reconciled the initial discord which arose between female recruitment needs and the opinions and perceptions of the public, male recruits, and participant families. Resolving misconceptions regarding the roles and expectations of women during WWII between what was considered acceptable and the changing roles of women and gender in American fashion culture was key to the eventual success of having women assisting the war effort. The roles of women and gender in WWII America alongside American fashion culture were considered within the social, economic, political and cultural implications of the creation of the WACs and WAVES in the 20th century. The military and the families of those women enlisting fulfilled their wartime duty, yet remained feminine and acceptable both in the public and private cultural and social spheres, through the careful fashioning of American women serving their country in WAC and WAVE uniforms.

Committee:

Beth Griech-Polelle, Dr. (Advisor); Susan Voso-Lab, Dr. (Committee Member); Stephen Charter (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Armed Forces; Gender; History; Textile Research; Womens Studies

Keywords:

WAC; WAAC;Women's Auxillary Corps; WAVE; Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service; women's military uniforms; American Womanhood; citizenship; military uniforms;apparel history;female citizenship

MOSS, JAMES C.BRITISH MILITARY BAND JOURNALS FROM 1845 THROUGH 1900: AN INVESTIGATION OF INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTENT WITH AN EMPHASIS ON BOOSÉ'S MILITARY JOURNAL
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2001, College-Conservatory of Music : Conducting, Wind Emphasis
In the United Kingdom, the tradition of the wind band is primarily found in the military. Great Britain, in 1845, published almost no music for wind band. It fell upon each bandmaster to compose or arrange suitable music for the regiment's band. Carl Boosé, bandmaster of the Scots Fusilier Guards Band, tried to have his arrangements published. Failing that he, himself, printed the parts for each arrangement and distributed them on a subscription basis. The immediate success of his journal induced Boosey & Co. to take over the publication of Boosé's Military Journal (BMJ), retaining Boosé as editor. A short history of the military band in Great Britain begins with the Crusades. What may be considered a true wind band, however, came from the Prussian and German harmonien (wind ensembles of six or more musicians). From 1760, British regiments began to hire harmonien in total or recruited continental musicians to form the regiments' military bands. The growth in number and kind of instruments in British military bands is traced through the nineteenth century. Also studied are changes in instrumentation of BMJ from 1846 to 1900. Instruments, keys, and number of parts per instrument, however, had become somewhat stabilized by 1851. So innovative was Boosé's instrumentation that there was little change after that date. Fourteen to seventeen British military band journals sprang up in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Most were begun with arrangements of bandmasters who also served as editors of the journals. Descriptions are given of each journal including publisher, editor, instrumentation, and a sampling of pieces. An extremely interesting discovery is that the British Library dates Jullien's Journal for Military Music as having begun in 1844, one year before Boosé began his journal. An analysis of the contents of BMJ from 1846 to 1900 is broken down by category and genre. Changes in importance over time are noted and compared with BMJ and other major British military band journals of the nineteenth century.

Committee:

Dr. Robert L. Zierolf (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music

Keywords:

MILITARY BANDS; MUSIC PUBLISHING - UNITED KINGDOM; NINETEENTH-CENTURY MUSIC; MILITARY BAND MUSIC; BRITISH MUSIC

Doehne, Bryce ASupporting Student Veterans Utilizing Participatory Curriculum Development
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
An organizational level program utilizing Participatory Curriculum Development (PCD) (Taylor, 2003) is presented to assist postsecondary institutions with development, implementation, and evaluation of programs to support student veterans. Postsecondary institutions are provided with a “how to” program manual that includes literature-based core and supplemental programs, trauma-informed theory, and a methodological framework to implement programs. Practical program evaluation measures are offered to assist postsecondary institutions with evaluating the outcomes of their efforts to support student veterans. The electronic version of this dissertation is at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Bill Heusler, Psy.D. (Committee Chair); Shana Hormann, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Peter Schmidt, Psy.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Mental Health; Military Studies; Organization Theory; Psychology

Keywords:

student veterans; support program; participatory curriculum development; military-connected students; program; military veterans; non-traditional students; program manual; innovative program; trauma-informed care; post-secondary institution

Romaneski, JonathanImporting Napoleon: Engineering the American Military Nation, 1814-1821
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, History
As the War of 1812 drew to a close, the American nation was economically exhausted and politically upended. The great crisis of the war loomed over the American shorelines from mid-1814 onward, when British reinforcements under a new and more aggressive British commander threatened offensive thrusts into U.S. territory at multiple points. Americans were completely unprepared to meet the British invasion attempts; the United States parried all British thrusts in 1814 almost in spite of itself. Thus, by the end of 1814, the Madison administration (with strong input from James Monroe) began to seek to reform the American military establishment to ensure a more disciplined and uniform militia system, a better-educated and “professional” officer corps, and a stout system of seacoast fortifications. The reformers looked no further than the Napoleonic military system for all their answers. In order to convince the American people and their congressional representatives that greater investment in a Napoleonic-style army was necessary, the reformers relied on a narrative of the War of 1812 that emphasized the frailty of the militia and the heroism of the regulars. Complicating the reformers’ narrative was, first, the strong antimilitary ideological traditions that Americans had held so closely since the Revolutionary era, and second, a counternarrative of the war that arose from Andrew Jackson’s victory at New Orleans. Despite the abounding case studies to which reformers could appeal in support of their position—most notably the regulars’ performance at the Battle of Chippewa and the militia’s apparent failure at the Battle of Bladensburg—the single case of Jackson at New Orleans carried greater emotional weight and had the additional benefit of reinforcing Americans’ pro-militia, anti-army biases. This dissertation covers the difficulties that a relatively small group of men in the executive branch of the U.S. government faced when they tried, between 1814 and 1821, to strengthen the federal apparatus by adopting Napoleonic military practices. It is a study, therefore, of top-down policy implementation and of the role of war’s memory in that process. “Importing Napoleon” proved difficult in the political arena because Andrew Jackson’s folk-heroism seemed to repudiate the need for such measures, but it was comparatively more successful within the U.S. Army itself because the military structure lent itself better to top-down change. By 1821, when Congress rejected Secretary of War John C. Calhoun’s “expansible army” concept and the army was reduced in size, it was a political setback for the reformers. Within the regular army, however, a new generation of competently-educated officers was emerging from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point—they were the agents who would engineer the United States’ path westward toward its imperial destiny.

Committee:

Mark Grimsley (Advisor); John Brooke (Committee Member); Jennifer Siegel (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Early American republic; military reform; War of 1812; Seminole War; Battle of Chippewa; Battle of New Orleans; US Military Academy history

Shaughnessy, Ceara D.Perceived Barriers to Seeking Mental Health Care and Provider Preference in a Sample of Air National Guard Members
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2018, Counselor Education (Education)
Mental Health services are underutilized by military members even when they are aware of a possible mental health disorder (Ben-Zeev, Corrigan, Britt, & Langford, 2012). The recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have significantly impacted the mental health of military personnel (Quartana et al., 2014). These wars have resulted in millions of deployments with over 800,000 military members having deployed multiple times (Zinzow, Britt, McFadden, Burnette, & Gillispie, 2012). Military members have significant fears related to stigma, confidentiality, and negative career impact when seeking mental health services (Christensen & Yaffe, 2012; Rowan & Campise, 2006). The following dissertation includes a literature review on the mental health concerns of military members and perceived barriers to care, as well as, a brief review of current strategies for decreasing barriers to mental health services. The aim of this quantitative study was to examine military members’ perceived barriers to seeking mental health care. The study seeks to determine whether (a) there are gender differences in perceived barriers to seeking mental health services; (b) whether there are differences between deployed members’ versus non-deployed members’ perceived barriers to seeking mental health care; (c) to determine whether differences exist in military members’ preferences for providers of mental health care; and (d) to determine if prior engagement in mental health care treatment reduces stigma. In order to investigate military members’ perceived barriers to seeking mental health care within the military population, the current study administered the Military Stigma Scale (MSS) and the General Help Seeking Questionnaire-adaptation (GHSQ-a) to members of the Kansas Air National Guard at the 184th Intelligence Wing (IW) located at McConnell Air Force Base (AFB) in Wichita, Kansas. The military members were asked demographic questions about themselves, followed by two scales which assessed their attitudes towards seeking mental health care. The results were analyzed using a non-parametric Mann-Whitney U and revealed that there were few significant differences in the population related to seeking mental health care. This suggests that the military culture itself may increase both public and selfstigma related to seeking mental health care. Investigation of the demographics showed that male military members experience greater self-stigma when seeking mental health care compared to female military members. Additionally, men reported a greater likelihood of not seeking care for an emotional problem. The results of this study are aimed at advancing knowledge about military members’ utilization of mental health care, barriers to mental health care, and preference for mental health delivery.

Committee:

Mona Robinson (Advisor)

Subjects:

Counseling Education; Mental Health; Military Studies

Keywords:

military; veteran; mental health; stigma; barriers; Military Stigma Scale

Smallwood, Amy LynnShore Wives: The Lives of British Naval Officers’ Wives and Widows, 1750-1815
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2008, History
This thesis provides an analysis of the lives of mid- to late-eighteenth century Royal Navy officers’wives and widows, including how they coped with the challenges of being separated from their husbands for extended periods of time. This separation forced them to accept additional financial and management responsibilities. By successfully managing these tasks, they proved that women were capable of managing money, purchasing property, rearing and educating children, working the patronage system, being political activists, dealing with bureaucracy, and networking. Shore wives performed these duties with the very real fear that their husbands might never come home alive. By taking up these burdens, the shore wives allowed their husbands to have successful careers and proved that women, seen by some as ‘the weaker sex,’ were more than capable.

Committee:

Carol Engelhardt-Herringer, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Paul Lockhart, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Noeleen McIlvenna, PhD (Committee Member); Edward Haas, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Economic History; English literature; European History; Gender; History; Military History; Personal Relationships; Welfare; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Royal Navy; women's history; military; navy; military wives; eighteenth century; Napoleonic Wars; Britain; Horatio Nelson; Frances Nelson; officer; naval officer; patronage; separate spheres; separation; admiralty; bureaucracy

Urban, CurtisAdversarial Allies: The Cultural Influence of the French Military in Rhode Island During the American Revolution
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2011, History
This thesis focuses on the influence of the French military on the residents of Newport, Rhode Island during the American Revolution by highlighting the impact of the French presence in New England on American cultural development. This study sets itself apart from the historiography by offering an innovative approach to understanding the Revolutionary era by demonstrating how military conflict influences the construction of a shared identity. By examining colonial newspapers, the correspondence of American and French military personnel, and Newport church records, this thesis illustrates the consequences of the changing relationship between two different cultures during the late eighteenth century. Exploring how the French as neighbors and allies influenced the construction of a shared identity for New England colonists, this paper argues that New Englanders defined their communal identities against the French military presence inserted into their lives, ultimately seeing themselves as no longer British subjects.

Committee:

Andrew Cayton, PhD (Advisor); Carla Pestana, PhD (Other); Stephen Norris, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

American History; History

Keywords:

Newport; American Revolution; Communal Identity; French Military; Cultural History; Military History

Nardulli, Bruce RichardDANCE OF SWORDS: U.S. MILITARY ASSISTANCE TO SAUDI ARABIA, 1942-1964
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2002, History

The United States and Saudi Arabia have a long and complex history of security relations. These relations evolved under conditions in which both countries understood and valued the need for cooperation, but also were aware of its limits and the dangers of too close a partnership. U.S. security dealings with Saudi Arabia are an extreme, perhaps unique, case of how security ties unfolded under conditions in which sensitivities to those ties were always a central —oftentimes dominating—consideration. This was especially true in the most delicate area of military assistance. Distinct patterns of behavior by the two countries emerged as a result, patterns that continue to this day. This dissertation examines the first twenty years of the U.S.-Saudi military assistance relationship. It seeks to identify the principal factors responsible for how and why the military assistance process evolved as it did, focusing on the objectives and constraints of both U.S. and Saudi participants.

Drawing heavily on U.S. primary source materials, the research traces the history of military assistance from 1942-1964. These years are explored using six time periods. The first is from 1942 to 1945, tracing early political relations, security developments, and the initiation of military activities and assistance by the U.S. during the war years. The years 1945 to mid-1950 examine the transition from world war to cold war, and the first serious long-term plans and actions between the two countries on military assistance. The period from mid-1950 through 1953 focuses on efforts to formalize U.S.-Saudi military assistance via written agreements, and to establish a regular military advisory group inside the Kingdom. The years 1954-1956 are investigated against the backdrop of what was a key phase of Arab nationalism and British decline in the region, all while the U.S. continued to seek containment of Soviet influence with Saudi assistance. The period 1957-1960 focuses on the effects of key developments inside Saudi Arabia on the military assistance process; the Saudi internal power struggle between King Saud and Crown Prince Faisal. Last are the years 1961 through 1964, characterized as an era of Arab polarization and direct security threats to the Kingdom, most notably the war in the Yemen. That war brought into sharp relief the many tensions inherent in the military assistance relationship. It also was the period of greatest internal conflict between Saud and Faisal, culminating in King Saud’s removal from the throne. The work concludes with a summary of the principal findings and patterns of behavior observed over the entire period. It also addresses the historically important question (and enduring policy issue) of how to evaluate the effectiveness of the overall military assistance undertaking with Saudi Arabia.

The Sword Dance or ‘Ardha’ is the national dance of Saudi Arabia. It is used here as a metaphor for the intricate moves required by the U.S. and Saudi Arabia in their military dealings, and to denote the distinct patterns of behavior that emerged.

Committee:

Allan MIllett (Advisor)

Keywords:

Arabian Penisula; Dhahran Airfield; Saudi Arabia; United States Military Training Mission (USMTM); U.S. Military Assistance; U.S.-Saudi Arabia Security Relations; Yemen Conflict

Greenwald, Bryon E.Understanding change: an intellectual and practical study of military innovation U.S. army antiaircraft artillery and the battle for legitimacy, 1917-1945
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, History
Military organizations are normally quite resistant to change the way they operate. For a number of complex reasons militaries have failed on occasion to anticipate, learn, and adapt to changes in the conduct of warfare. This work examines the anatomy of change and argues that achieving successful organizational change in the military results from garnering external support and winning internal consensus. It counters recent scholarship that maintains the Interwar Army was a hidebound organization, unable to overcome internal power struggles and achieve necessary reforms. It begins with an intellectual analysis of how and why organizational change occurs, examines the nature of revolutionary and evolutionary change, and offers one approach toward achieving lasting, meaningful modernization and innovation in the military. This work then examines the development of American antiaircraft artillery as a case study to illuminate the earlier discussion of theory as it relates to organizational and institutional change. Beginning in World War I and tracing the evolution of antiaircraft artillery through the Interwar Period and World War II, this study highlights the non-linear nature of change and the influence of technology, strategy, resources, and organizational politics on efforts to improve the American Army’s ability to defend against air attack. It also provides valuable insight into the ability of the Army to learn from its mistakes and adapt to changing combat situations. From the Interwar development of doctrine to the prewar production of new weapons, the antiaircraft artillery establishment accepted limited, incremental success and did not sacrifice its overall development on the altar of sweeping reform. National military policy, strategy, operations, and tactics are analyzed as the expanding antiaircraft establishment defended the Panama Canal, Pearl Harbor, and the Philippines from Japanese attack, and fought through stubborn German resistance at Kasserine Pass, on Normandy, and at the Remagen Bridge. Battles against the V-1 cruise missile, the V-2 ballistic missile, and Japanese kamikaze pilots tested antiaircraft units’ training and adaptability, while fire support missions to assist infantry and armor units brought the antiaircraft artillery independence from the Coast Artillery Corps and acceptance as a member of the family of arms.

Committee:

Allan Millett (Advisor)

Keywords:

World War II; World War I; Interwar Period; U.S. Army; Antiaircraft Artillery; Artillery; AAA; Antiaircraft; V-1; V-2; Kamikaze; Change; Military Innovation; Military Reform; Air Defense; Kasserine Pass; Pearl Harbor; Battle of the Bulge; Normandy

St Pierre, Catherine SacchiUniforms and Universities: A Qualitative Study of Post 9/11 Marine Student Veterans’ Literacy Practices
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, English
Since 2009, approximately 8 million student veterans have used $84 Billion in GI Bill benefits to attend college or university in the United States (U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs, “Annual Benefits Report” 2009-16). Student veterans represent 4% of students nationwide (Molina). Despite these numbers, 92% of composition faculty reported that they had experienced no professional development related to the military or veterans’ learning needs (Hart and Thompson, “Ethical Obligation,” 8). Patricia Bizzell wrote, “We in this field want to know who our students are” (442). This project works to help scholars in composition and literacy studies know more about who student veterans are. This project addresses the research questions: • How do student veterans from the same branch of service understand and describe writing, reading, and literacy sponsored by that service? • How do student veterans discuss the connections and relationships between military literacy practices and academic literacy? • What can be learned about transfer of learning and prior knowledge by studying the experiences of student veterans? • When individuals move between the military and higher education how do they recognize and negotiate expectations regarding reading, writing, and literacy? To answer these questions, I conducted a qualitative study of Marines, veterans, and reservists. Through surveys and interviews with current and former Marines, I collected data about their beliefs and memories about their literacy practices, their military service, and their experiences in college classes. I use these data to support a series of claims about the literacy practices of student veterans and how understanding those practices can improve composition instruction. In Chapter 1, I argue that an asset frame may allow composition and literacy studies to better understand student veterans’ literacy practices than hero/time-bomb dichotomies. In Chapter 2, I argue that the United States Marine Corps sponsors literacy financially, professionally, and incidentally, and that this sponsorship shapes service members’ literacy values, attitudes, and practices. In Chapter 3, I claim that, as a literacy sponsor, the Marine Corps affects individuals’ theories of writing through the resources Marine student veterans use to learn to write on the job (military schools, mentors, manuals, models) and through shared definitions of good writing (clear, concise, correct, current, and conscious of audience). In Chapter 4, I argue that dispositions and habits of mind from the Marine Corps, especially professionalism (time management, leadership, and being mission oriented), perspective (military service as a lens, global perspective, peers), and passion (experience as inspiration and appropriation) transfer to college settings, including composition classes. In Chapter 5, I claim that skills and dispositions from composition, including composing strategies, critical thinking, creativity, and confidence (resulting from success, measured by grades, speed and volume of writing, a sense of achievement, and faculty relationships) transfer to the Marine Corps, other college classes, and personal contexts. In Chapter 6, I conclude by presenting promising pedagogical recommendations and discussing areas of future research.

Committee:

Jonathan Buehl (Committee Chair); Daniel Keller (Committee Member); Cynthia L. Selfe (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Literacy; Military Studies; Rhetoric

Keywords:

Composition; Literacy Studies; Veterans Studies; Transfer; Theory of Writing; Literacy Sponsor; United States Marine Corps; Veterans; Literacy Practices; Marine Corps; Student Veterans; Transfer of Learning; Military; Military Studies; Writers; Writing

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