Search Results (1 - 5 of 5 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Raei, Mohammed Development and Validation of the Adaptive Leadership with Authority Scale
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
A reliable scale to measure adaptive leadership with authority—leadership from a position of power—does not exist. This was an embedded mixed-methods study–QUAN(qual) with data collected through an online survey instrument that included the proposed scale items and an open-ended question. The quantitative part of the study, using data from 436 respondents (92.7% from Mechanical Turk, 7.3% from snowball sampling), involved the development and validation of a unidimensional scale that measures adaptive leadership with authority using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The 11-item scale had a Cronbach’s alpha value of .891 and thus displayed high reliability. In the qualitative part of the study, thematic analysis was used to analyze data from 550 respondents to confirm the presence of adaptive leadership with authority sub-constructs and identify possible adaptive leadership behaviors not included in the adaptive leadership framework. The analysis provided support for the following adaptive leadership with authority sub-constructs: Distinguish Between Adaptive and Technical Challenges; Identify the Stakeholders and Their Losses; Create the Holding Environment; Regulate the Distress to maintain focus on adaptive work; Give the Work Back; and Use of Self as a diagnostic and intervention instrument. The narrative data did not support Protecting Voices of Leadership without Authority. The combination of the narrative data and scale pointed to Give the Work Back, Use of Self, and Create the Holding Environment as the most important elements in adaptive leadership with authority. This dissertation is accompanied by a de-identified data file [xls] and the author’s MP4 video introduction. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Harriette Thurber Rasmussen, Ed.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Developmental Psychology; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Adaptive Leadership; Adaptive Challenges; Adaptive Change; Change Theories; Second Order Change; Leading Change; Wicked Problems; Leadership Development; Complex Adaptive Systems; Transformational Leadership; Scale Development; Mixed Methods

Vurdelja, IvaHow Leaders Think: Measuring Cognitive Complexity in Leading Organizational Change
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2011, Leadership and Change
The ability to lead complex organizational change is considered the most difficult leadership responsibility. Habitual linear thinking based on sequential procedural decision making is insufficient when responding to ambiguous and unpredictable challenges and interpreting systemic variables in the context of unforeseen problems, risks, and invisible interrelationships. The purpose of this exploratory multiple case study was to expand our understanding of the structure of the thinking employed by executive leaders as initiators and enablers of complex, large-scale organizational change. The researcher integrated knowledge of adult cognitive development and organizational leadership to examine the higher forms of reasoning abilities required for dealing with the complex and nonlinear nature of change. By using Laske‘s (2009) dialectical thought form (DTF) framework, the researcher explored the existence of dialectical thinking through structural analysis of interviews with 10 senior leaders who successfully transformed their respective organizations. Specifically, the study explored: (1) To what degree do the sponsors of organizational change engage in dialectical thinking in their work? (2) Is complexity of thinking related to complexity of sponsorship roles? (3) What phase of cognitive development must sponsors of transformational change attain to become effective change agents? (4) Does a higher level of dialectical thinking lead to more effective sponsorship of transformational, complex change? The results revealed that all 10 effective leaders were fully developed dialectical thinkers and that each one had a unique pattern of dialectical thinking. Data illustrated how metasystemic thinkers, despite their surface similarities, have deep epistemological differences that indicate profoundly different areas of strength and developmental needs. The potential application of the DTF framework as a developmental tool for expanding cognitive capabilities to deal with complex change is addressed and explored. The study opens an array of opportunities for another, richer way of looking at adult development. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open-access OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Daryl Conner, MA (Committee Member); Linda Hoopes, PhD (Committee Member); Sara Nora Ross, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Epistemology; Management

Keywords:

multiple case study; senior executives; complexity; CEOs; change leaders; adult cognitive development; change sponsorship; leading change; dialectical thinking; metasystemic thinking

Chesson, DaniDesign Thinker Profile: Creating and Validating a Scale for Measuring Design Thinking Capabilities
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
This study developed a scale for assessing design thinking capabilities in individuals. Many organizations today are turning to design thinking to tackle the complex challenges they face. As organizations move toward adopting this way of working the need to develop design thinking capabilities in individuals becomes imperative. The capabilities needed for engaging in design thinking are skills that we all have to some varying degree, but we do not all use them to their full potential when solving problems. The scale developed in this study measures the degree to which an individual uses design thinking capabilities when engaged in problem solving. The research process involved a two-phase mixed methods design. In Phase 1, 536 individuals responded to an online survey. The data collected were analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. A new scale was developed that identified the three core capabilities needed to engage in design thinking: Solution Optimism, Visual Expression, and Collaborative Discovery. In Phase 2, 10 respondents from Phase 1 were selected to participate in follow-up interviews. Findings from the second phase of the study indicated the scale was perceived to accurately measure the use of design thinking capabilities in individuals when engaged in problem solving. Participants commented that this profile was unlike any other assessments they have taken in the past because this profile focuses on skills not emphasized in other assessments. Therefore, the new scale could be used along with other assessments to get a complete view of an individual’s skill set. The findings also indicate that this profile will be useful for executive coaches, change management practitioners, educators teaching design related courses, leaders engaged in team development, and for researchers exploring design thinking capabilities. This dissertation is accompanied by an Executive Summary [pdf] and the author’s MP4 video introduction (for transcript see Appendix I). This dissertation is available in open-access at OhioLink ETD Center, etd.ohiolink.edu, and AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy (Committee Chair); Carol Baron (Committee Member); Shannon Finn Connell (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Business Administration; Business Education; Design; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Social Research

Keywords:

Mixed-Methods; Scale Development; Design Thinking; Design Thinker; Design Thinking Capabilities; Design Thinking Skills; Complex Problem Solving; Innovation; Leading Change; Leadership

Mattison, MerriEmancipation from Affluenza: Leading Social Change in the Classroom
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine if one's level of affluenza could be reduced through education and awareness. In particular, this study measured whether or not exposure to the benefits of community involvement, and the harm of overconsumption could alter the intentions that college students have regarding their behavior, as it pertains to materialism, consumption, and civic responsibility. The data were collected from college students in the form of pre-tests and post-tests utilizing an affluenza scale created for this research. Over the course of a semester, information and activities that elucidated the benefits of community involvement and the harm of overconsumption were integrated into the course curriculum. The post-test served to measure whether or not the curricular intervention altered attitudes and intentions regarding affluenza. Analysis data revealed that while individual statistical tests were not significant, some overall trends were evident, suggesting that the treatment may have influenced students to move further away from the ideals and attitudes associated with affluenza. Moreover, the affluenza scale was validated and refined. The results of this study have curricular applications for faculty and administrators at colleges and universities interested in implementing and carrying out a similar intervention, or implementing a program that focuses on reducing affluenza. Likewise, the findings offer sociological and social implications for faculty, activists, and community organizers interested in reducing consumption, wastefulness, materialistic attitudes, and those interested in encouraging civic responsibility, by offering additional insight into the issue of affluenza as well as means to begin to address it. Additionally, the Mattison Affluenza Scale itself can be utilized as a diagnostic tool, for instance as part of a needs assessment to determine where more programmatic attention or changes are needed. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Richard Appelbaum, PhD (Committee Member); Andrew Christopher, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Higher Education; Social Research; Sociology; Sustainability; Teaching

Keywords:

quasi-experimental; action research; college students; community colleges; sociology education; leading change; overconsumption; consumption; materialism; consumerism; affluenza scale; consequences; curricula; sustainability; teaching

Foster, Charles A.Getting Back to My Life: Exploring Adaptation to Change Through the Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
The holding environment concept, developed by Donald Winnicott, has been used to represent the type of support that encourages adaptive change during psychosocial transitions. The leadership and change literature posited that the holding environment had the ability to shape the trajectory of the transition, yet did not test this empirically. The psychosocial breast cancer literature empirically researched support during and after treatments ended, but did not incorporate the holding environment concept. This presented the opportunity to inform both the leadership and breast cancer fields by studying holding environments in the breast cancer setting. This study had a twofold purpose: 1) to explore empirically the adaptation process using the context of the breast cancer psychosocial transition, and 2) to consider if the holding environment concept, as it is used in the leadership literature, is supported by the results of this study. Grounded theory methodology was used to interpret interviews, diaries, and observation data gathered from breast cancer survivors during the after treatment transition period. This study presented the grounded theory categories in two organizing frameworks, a transition phase diagram and a person-environment situating diagram. The results suggested that the leadership adaptive change literature should integrate an understanding of coping and searching into organizational change interventions. In addition, incorporating the social interaction represented by situating would enrich any attempts to intervene in adaptive change, including the psychosocial breast cancer literature. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Mitch Kusy, PhD (Committee Member); Tish Knobf, PhD (Committee Member); John Adams, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Health Care; Oncology; Psychology; Social Psychology

Keywords:

holding environment; adaptive change; psychosocial transitions; breast cancer; grounded theory; leadership; organizational change; neoplasms; Winnicott; cancer survivors; survivor; social support; qualitative research; leading change