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Hura, Geraldine M.The Effects of Rater and Leader Gender on Ratings of Leader Effectiveness and Attributes in a Business Environment
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2005, Secondary Education
Male leaders are viewed as more effective than female leaders as reported in the vast majority of research studies (Eagly & Johnson, 1990; Thompson, 2000; Vecchio, 2002). Research also supports the concept that supervisors of male and female leaders, if all else is equal, rate them equally effective (Eagly & Johnson, 1990; Powell, Butterfield, & Parent, 2002). With over 800 million (Schneider, 2001) spent on leadership development, training, and education in colleges, universities, and corporations the need and importance of quality and gender neutral curricula is increasingly important. The dollars spent on education and the disparity of perceptions of leader effectiveness precipitates the need to continue to examine the bases of these perceptions. The results of these examinations assist in the development of targeted leadership training and development. This study looked at both leader effectiveness and leader attributes of male and female leaders as perceived by male and female observers (peers and direct reports) and male and female supervisors. Using the Leader Effectiveness Index (LEI) and the Leader Attributes Inventory (LAI), this study examined the effectiveness and attributes of leaders in business and industry. Each leader in this study had a matching pair of male and female observers who provided their perceptions of leader effectiveness and attributes to determine the presence of gender bias. The study found that female leaders were viewed as more effective leaders than male leaders by both male and female observers while male and female supervisors found male and female leaders equally effective. Female leaders were perceived at having higher ratings on 17 out of 37 attributes and female observers and female supervisors rated both male and female leaders higher on selected attributes. Finally this study found that except for nine attributers where female leaders were rated higher, male and female supervisors rated male and female leaders equally on the remaining 28 attributes. The results of this study indicate that there may be a shifting of perceptions of effectiveness of male and female leaders. Leadership development programs and educational initiatives need to align the content of the curricula to foster gender-neutral perceptions of leadership effectiveness.

Committee:

Qetler Jensrud (Advisor)

Keywords:

Leadership; Gender Bias; Leadership Assessments; Leadership Effectiveness; Leader Attributes; Leadership Training; Leadership Education; Leadership Differences; Male and female leadership differences; Leader Attributes Inventory (LAI)

Amatullah, TasneemFemale Leadership Narratives in Higher Education in Qatar in the light of Islamic Leadership framework
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2018, Educational Leadership
The booming economic development and access to modern education are the key drivers that have recently changed the position of women in Qatari society. Research shows that increased motivation among women to pursue a career and enhance their skills and capabilities is helping the economy of all GCC nations. Despite the upcoming drastic increase in women's participation in the workforce, women still hold few leadership positions in the GCC. This study examines the experiences of women in educational leadership in Qatar in the field of higher education to further explore the ways they maneuver their leadership roles in the light of Islamic leadership theory and practice. Specifically, the intent was to understand the unique leadership narratives of three Qatari female leaders in higher education. To illuminate female leaders' experiences in Qatar, this study employs interpretivist narrative research methods. Interviews and meetings' observations helped construct detailed stories of leaders' lived experiences. While findings partially reiterated existing literature, this study shed light on several unique contributions to Muslim female leadership and embedding Islamic leadership in leadership roles resulting in implications for practice and research.

Committee:

Kate Rousmaniere (Committee Chair); Joel Malin (Committee Member); Brittany Aronson (Committee Member); Katherine Batchelor (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Educational Leadership; Islamic Leadership; Female Leadership; Qatari Women Leadership; GCC Leadership; Higher Leadership

Miller, Kimberly PietschDeveloping Instructional Leadership in Early Experience Secondary School Principals: A Case Study
Doctor of Education, Miami University, 2018, Educational Leadership
Since the inception of the role of school principal, the responsibilities of the position have evolved and changed. Early principals were managers; however, over time social issues and the accountability movement led to state and national policies that have impacted the role of the principal to include instructional leadership. Literature on the topic of school leadership has identified a relationship between instructional leadership and student achievement. However, little information on how to develop instructional leaders has been studied. Therefore, the purpose of this explanatory, mixed-methods case study was to determine to what extent a principal development program fostered perceived instructional leadership skills in secondary school principals who have five years or less experience in the role. The case study was conducted in a large, Midwestern, suburban school district that implemented a Principal Academy in the fall of 2015 in order to equip principals to lead the implementation of district-wide instructional goals. This study focused on early career secondary principals as I hypothesized that they would be more likely to perceive an influence from the professional development experience. Qualitative data was gathered via interviews with five principals and their supervisor. Quantitative data was gathered from an online survey of teachers in the buildings whose principals qualified for the study. One overarching question and four sub-questions guided my study. The overarching questions was: To what extent has District X’s Principal Academy strengthened the five identified instructional leadership behaviors of school principals with five years or less experience? The four sub-questions were as follows: • To what degree do early experience secondary principals perceive an improvement in their instructional leadership skills over time? • To what degree do early experience secondary principals who participate in job-embedded professional development perceive that their instructional leadership skills are enhanced? • Over time, to what degree do supervisors observe improved instructional leadership behaviors from their early experience secondary principals. • What instructional leadership behaviors do teachers observe from their principals? Qualitative findings suggested that participation in the Principal Academy led to a perception by both principals and their supervisor that instructional leadership skills were enhanced. Further, quantitative findings from the teacher survey indicated that they perceived that their principals demonstrated five behaviors that are associated with instructional leadership. These findings support the continued use of the Principal Academy by the district and suggest that other districts who expect principals to be instructional leaders invest in professional development aimed at developing those skills.

Committee:

Kathleen Abowitz, PhD (Committee Chair); Lucian Szlizewski, PhD (Advisor); James Shiveley, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Leadership; School Administration

Keywords:

instructional leadership; secondary principals and instructional leadership; developing instructional leadership; secondary school leadership; principals and leadership; principal professional development

Hasan, Nadia T.Understanding Women's Leadership Interests and Goals Using Social Cognitive Career Theory
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2011, Counseling Psychology
Despite the recent increase of women as leaders and managers, women remain underrepresented in key leadership roles in the United States (Barreto, Ryan, & Schmitt, 2009; Catalyst, 2008; Center for American Women & Politics, 2009; Eagly, 2007). Researchers claim that women are underrepresented in leadership because they face a “labyrinth path” towards leadership (Eagly & Carli, 2007). This study examines women’s interests and goals for leadership to extend the research on women’s leadership development. Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) is used as a framework to examine a complex path model that includes person input variables (conformity of feminine norms, conformity to masculine norms, feminine personal attributes of leaders, and masculine personal attributes of leaders), contextual influence variables (perceived lifetime sexist experiences and race-related stress) and the key social cognitive variables of women’s leadership self-efficacy, women’s leadership outcome expectations, women’s leadership interests and women’s leadership goals. Path analysis was used to examine the fit of the data for all female, college student participants (N= 224) and for only ethnic minority, female college student participants (N= 170). The proposed models for all participants and for only ethnic minority participants were not a good fit for the data, but there were several significant correlations between the primary variables that did fit within the SCCT model. An examination of the correlations between variables revealed most notably a lack of significant correlations for the moderator variables of perceived lifetime sexist events and race-related stress and the primary variables. Thus, an exploratory model was tested for all participants and only ethnic minority participants that included all the primary variables, but trimmed these moderator variables. These exploratory models for all participants and for only ethnic minority participants were a good fit for the data. Study limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Committee:

Linda Subich, Dr. (Advisor); David Tokar, Dr. (Committee Member); John Queener, Dr. (Committee Member); Jan Yoder, Dr. (Committee Member); Susan Olson, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Ethnic Studies; Gender Studies; Higher Education

Keywords:

women's leadership; leadership development; Social Cognitive Career Theory; Latina leadership; leadership self-efficacy; leadership outcome expectations

Beutel, Lisa MasonFollow Her Lead: Understanding the Leadership Behaviors of Women Executives
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2012, Educational Leadership

Critics of business school education cite a widening gap between scholarship and practice, and suggest both are necessary to both educate and inform the other (Bennis & O’Toole, 2005; Mintzberg, 2004; Pfeffer & Fong, 2002, 2004; Tushman, O’Reilly, Fenollosa, Kleinbaum, & McGrath, 2007). By generating rigorous, relevant research and helping corporations integrate theory into practice, executive education and other business school leaders can lessen the gap, increase the impact, and mend the relationships between corporations and the institution (Tushman et al, 2007). This research on the leadership behaviors of women executives addresses a gap in both research and practice (Helgesen, 1990; Kanter, 1977; Levitt, 2010; Marshall, 1995; Rosener, 1990).

The Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) and a brief demographic questionnaire were completed by 320 executives (director, vice president or above) in a metropolitan Midwestern region of the United States in 2007-2008. The results determined that the frequency with which women executives demonstrated 29 of the 30 leadership behaviors did not differ from their male counterparts. Executive women reported that they used one leadership behavior, “find ways to celebrate accomplishments” significantly more frequently than executive men.

Additionally, individual follow-up interviews were conducted with ten women and two men in executive level roles. The data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using the grounded theory method. From the data, ten theories emerged as the essential leadership skills women need in order to be successful in an executive level role. These are a) Develop self awareness, b) Get results, c) Value relationships, d) Recognize and reward performance, e) Foster collaboration, f) Take risks, g) Be resilient, h) Learn to assimilate, i) Value lifelong learning, j) Find balance

This research may be valuable for current and aspiring women executives, their sponsoring corporations, and the executive education professionals who help women leaders develop the skills they need to be successful in executive roles. The findings inform executive education professionals and equip them to better meet the needs of their student population. Leveraging this research to inform practice also enables higher education to address a concern of critics of business school education.

Committee:

James Biddle (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Administration; Business Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Leadership; Gender; Gender Studies; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

leadership; gender; women; executive; executive education; LPI; leadership practices inventory; organizational behavior; leadership skills; managment; business education; c-level leadership; leadership development; succession planning; corporate training

Tufts, Winfield F.High People-High Mission: The Power of Caring Leadership as Experienced in the Air Force
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
On the surface, caring and the military appear to be opposites. The stereotypical image of the military giving and obeying orders does not conjure up images of leaders caring for their subordinates. In reality, caring for subordinates and caring for the mission could help leaders form stronger relationships with subordinates, because subordinates may have confidence that their leaders will not recklessly send them into harm’s way. Subordinates may develop confidence in their leaders based on their leaders’ care during non-combat environments. Yet, empirical studies of caring in the military are sparse. This study investigates how Air Force retirees characterize “great bosses” care for them and care for the mission. A mixed method study of 12 qualitative interviews with Air Force retirees, followed by a quantitative survey study of 226 Air Force retirees revealed that caring actions cluster into four themes: Caring for Subordinates Personally, Caring for Subordinates Professionally, Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Mission Execution, and Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Empowering the Unit. This study also examined how these subordinates responded to those bosses that cared for them through Stronger Job Performance and Stronger Relationship with the Boss. The dissertation findings operationalize caring, demonstrate correlations between caring actions and self-reported increases in performance and boss-subordinate relationship quality, and detail actions that an authentic, caring leader can take to pursue the flourishing of subordinates and mission success simultaneously. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Laura Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Davis, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Military Studies

Keywords:

Air Force; bosses; mixed methods; leadership; care; caring; caring leadership; military culture; military leadership; servant leadership; virtuous leadership

Putman, Paul G.Virtual Simulation in Leadership Development Training: The Impact of Learning Styles and Conflict Management Tactics on Adult Learner Performance
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2012, College of Education and Human Services

Adult learners can develop leadership skills and competencies such as conflict management and negotiation skills. Virtual simulations are among the emerging new technologies available to adult educators and trainers to help adults develop various leadership competencies. This study explored the impact of conflict management tactics as well as learning styles on the efficacy of virtual leadership development training.

In this quantitative study, participants (n=349) completed electronic versions of both the Power and Influence Tactics Scale (POINTS) and the Kolb Learning Styles Instrument (KLSI). Results of participant scores for both instruments were compared with scores from a virtual leadership simulation.

Performance within a virtual leadership simulation was not found to be significantly impacted by diverse learning styles, indicating that virtual simulations can be effective for adult learners with any learning style. Statistically significant correlations were found between all seven conflict management tactics and key virtual leadership simulation scores, indicating that virtual leadership simulations can be effective tools for practicing multiple conflict management tactics.

Experiential learning techniques are becoming commonplace and the use of technology is growing within the field of adult and leadership education. This study elucidates the effectiveness of new technologies such as virtual simulations as tools for leadership development. This study contributes to leadership education best practices by exploring the effectiveness of virtual simulations as a method for training leaders that will allow educators to incorporate emerging best practices into their repertoire of methodologies.

Committee:

Catherine Monaghan, PhD (Committee Chair); Jonathan Messemer, EdD (Committee Member); Catherine Hansman, EdD (Committee Member); Selma Vonderwell, PhD (Committee Member); Sanda Kaufmann, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education

Keywords:

leadership development; virtual simulation; learning styles; conflict management; adult learners; simulation; leadership; leadership training; leadership competencies; leadership skills; technology; Kolb Learning Styles Instrument; experiential learning

Strausbaugh, Jerry RA Phenomenological Study of the Developmental Experience of Community Mental Health Directors in Ohio
Doctor of Education, Ashland University, 2013, College of Education
This dissertation is a study of the leadership development process of community mental health center (CMHC) executive directors in Ohio. CMHCs are tasked with providing services to individuals struggling with complex mental and emotional diagnoses. In Ohio these centers are nonprofit organizations that offer a multifaceted array of services paid for by a variety of third party funding sources. Many executive directors of Ohio CMHCs begin their careers as clinicians and must acquire the skills necessary to effectively lead their organization. In this study six Ohio CMHC executive directors who began their careers as clinicians were interviewed to discover the clinician-to-director developmental process. The data revealed two primary themes each with subthemes that describe the phenomenon experienced by the directors.

Committee:

Constance Savage, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); James Olive, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Alinde Moore, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Business Administration; Developmental Psychology; Health Care Management; Management; Mental Health; Public Administration; Social Work

Keywords:

leadership development; community mental health leadership; adult development; adult learning; organizational leadership; public administration; phenomenology; business administration; authentic leadership; transformational leadership

Lockard, Frederick W.Perceived Leadership Preparation in Counselor Education Doctoral Students who are Members of the American Counseling Association in CACREP-Accredited Programs: A Survey Examining the Next Generation of Leaders in the Profession
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2009, Counselor Education
The purpose of this investigation was to examine the perceived leadership development, training, and education of counselor education doctoral students enrolled in CACREP-accredited universities and colleges. Participants of this study were 228 members of the American Counseling Association (ACA) who were doctoral students enrolled in CACREP-accredited counselor education programs in the United States. The participants were chosen using a database of names obtained from the ACA. The general research questions investigated were: To what degree do counselor education doctoral students believe they are being prepared in the domains of leadership? Is there a relationship between the number of courses completed and the perceived leadership ability of counselor education doctoral students in the domains of leadership as listed? To what degree do counselor education doctoral students believe they are receiving the prescribed CACREP leadership training and education as listed? Is there a relationship between the number of courses completed and the degree to which counselor education doctoral students believe they are receiving the prescribed CACREP leadership training and education as listed? What do counselor education doctoral students think are important influences in their leadership development? What do counselor education doctoral students think are the most important influences in their leadership development? What do counselor education doctoral students think can be done to better prepare them for the roles of leadership? Do the sexes differ on what they think they need in terms of formal leadership training? Are there differences between doctoral students who have a master’s degree in school counseling, community counseling, psychology, or other, and what they think they need in terms of formal leadership training and education? Do years of clinical experience predict the student’s response to survey items 10-14? The respondents indicated they were confident in their ability to provide leadership in the six commonly cited domains of leadership in counselor education. They were less confident in their knowledge and ability to provide leadership in the three domains of leadership proposed by the investigator. A majority of respondents acknowledged they were being taught leadership according to the CACREP standards. The study demonstrated current doctoral students’ perceived leadership ability was attributed in large measure to leadership experience and education received prior to their admittance into a doctoral program. Respondents also reported a strong desire to have more leadership training and education afforded them during their doctoral studies. Students believed their career goals and the advancement of the counseling profession could be positively impacted by the addition of leadership training and opportunities.

Committee:

John Laux, PhD (Committee Chair); Martin Ritchie, EdD (Committee Member); Nick Piazza, PhD (Committee Member); Jean Heafner, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Higher Education; Mental Health; Teaching; Therapy

Keywords:

counselor education; counselor educator; counseling; leadership; leadership development; domains of leadership; leadership in counselor education

Sharp, Charis EireneSmall School Leadership: A Q Method Study of Elements of Leadership Specific to a Small School Setting
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2008, Leadership and Change
Smaller schools have become an extremely popular school reform model. Research that connects them to student achievement is being used to support and create autonomous small schools as well as schools-within-schools. While it would seem to be a logical application, the schools-within-schools model is not performing at the levels expected as indicated by the small schools research. Research on these two different school settings needs to be separated, examined, and applied independently. Areas lacking research include questions about which aspects of schools support the functioning of the school, such as leadership. This study used Q-methodology to study leadership in a small private school in Seattle, Washington. The school has 84 students and ranks at high levels on several scales of leadership and climate that have been correlated to high levels of student achievement. Q-method quantifies the opinions of study participants in such a way as to find groups of similar responses represented by factors. This study found an unusually high degree of consensus among the participants of the study and that there were no clear distinctions between the perspectives of the groups. The resulting single factor in this study is characterized by identifying the actions and leadership of the teachers as being most important to smaller school leadership. Also, student leadership and making leadership a part of the whole school program was given a high degree of importance. Leadership by the head of school and leadership actions of the parents were rated lower, respectively, in terms of importance for an effective smaller school. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Pamela Kraus, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Elementary Education; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; School Administration; Secondary Education; Teaching

Keywords:

transformational leadership; small schools; schools-within-a-school; middle schools; teacher leadership; student leadership; parent leadership; q method; private schools

Annor, GraceExploration of the Organizational Culture of Selected Ghanaian High Schools
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
The purpose of this study was to explore the organizational culture of two high schools in Ghana, examine the unique influence of cultural components on the schools’ outcomes, identify the exceptional contributions of the schools’ subcultures, investigate the emergent leadership styles of the schools’ leaders, and determine how these approaches promoted their work. This qualitative dissertation examined the various ways that the schools defined culture; how the schools’ subcultures participated in school governance; and how school leaders approached school governance. The description of the cultural components focused on the physical structures, symbols, behavior patterns, and verbal expressions, beliefs and values; and expectations. These descriptions were based on Edgar Schein’s diagnosis of the levels of culture. Efforts to improve school outcomes have not considered school culture, as a strategy in Ghana, neither has any educational research focused on the organizational culture of schools. This study was based on the premise that the inclusion of the cultural approach to school reform produces more sustainable results than the technical or political approaches, used in isolation. The sample size for this study was 26 and comprised two school leaders, six teachers, two PTA chairpersons, two alumni, and 14 students. The study employed the case study tradition and garnered data through one-on- one interviews, focus group interviews; observation at morning devotions/assembly, Sunday church services, classrooms, dining halls, orientation, sports festival, staff and academic board meetings, and the physical environment; and review of relevant documents. Results indicated that although the Ghana Education Service managed both schools, and the schools were similar in some ways, they each demonstrated some unique characteristics. The major factors that influenced the achievement of school outcomes included the tangible and intangible cultural components; the involvement of subcultures in school governance; and three emergent leadership styles (participative, servant, and supportive) of school leadership. The schools targeted realization of outcomes through West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) results, national quizzes, religious and moral growth, and extracurricular activities such as sports and clubs. This data fills the gap in literature about organizational culture in Ghanaian schools. It also provides reference for educational practitioners, policy makers, school administrators, and teachers for their respective roles. The data guides parents concerning their roles in their children’s schools and also provides guidance for alumni about how they could give back to their alma maters.

Committee:

David Moore (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Organization Theory; School Administration; Secondary Education; Sub Saharan Africa Studies

Keywords:

School organizational culture; tangible culture; intangible culture; visual culture; behavior culture; verbal culture; stakeholders; subcultures; parents; alumni; emergent leadership; participative leadership; supportive leadership; servant leadership

Ferguson, Kimberly M.Exploring Black Women's Character Development and Ethical Leadership Development at Spelman College
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, Higher Education (Education)
Character development is a central function of higher education. This phenomenological study describes Black women’s personal lived experiences with character development and ethical leadership development at Spelman College, America’s oldest historically Black college for women. The following research question guided the study: How do students at a historically Black women’s college describe their experiences with character development and ethical leadership development? The study also explored student’s thoughts about the academic and co-curricular programs that best prepared them to be ethical leaders. Interviews were conducted with 10 graduating seniors from the Class of 2014 Women of Excellence Leadership (WEL) series offered by the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement at Spelman College. Eight alumnae members of the WEL program were also interviewed to provide their thoughts about character development and ethical leadership development. Participants were asked to share the learning and skills they attributed to their experiences as undergraduate students and campus leaders. Finally, the Director of the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement was interviewed to provide an administrative perspective on character development and ethical leadership development. The theory referenced in this study is Gilligan’s (1988) work on women’s development which illustrates that women are more concerned with care, relationships, and connections with other people as they engage in moral and ethical development. The findings of this study suggest that a supportive environment and expectations for success, educational programs that focus on conscious Black feminist-activist development, opportunities to become leaders and learn about leadership, and faculty and alumnae interaction, mentoring and support influence character development and ethical leadership development of students at Spelman College. In addition, the participants shared expectations for seeking excellence in themselves, paying it forward or giving back to the community, and being a part of the Spelman legacy of global leaders. Thus, the findings of this study will contribute to understanding women’s character development and ethical leadership development in a historically Black women’s college setting, and expands the available research on college and character development. This study also provides insight into an integrated educational approach to the delivery of programs and services that support women’s character development and ethical leadership development in college and university settings.

Committee:

Peter Mather, Dr. (Committee Chair); Gordon Brooks, Dr. (Other); David Horton, Dr. (Committee Member); Valerie Martin Conley, Dr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

African Americans; Black Studies; Ethics; Gender; Higher Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

character; character development; ethics; ethical leadership; ethical leadership development; leadership; moral development; student leadership

Light, Ann MAn Examination of the Ascension to and Experiences in the Metropolitan Chief Fire Officer Position: Implications for Leadership, Policy and Practice
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Leadership Studies
This dissertation is a phenomenological examination of the experiences of nine metropolitan Chief Fire Officers in the ascension to and in the highest leadership position at metropolitan fire departments. An extensive review of literature showed a dearth of literature relative to how individuals ascend to the position and what they experience in the position. Research indicates that there is no widely recognized or shared path of preparation for Chief Fire Officers. Several key concepts emerged from the analysis of the in-depth qualitative interviews with nine participants including, operational training and experience, discovery of leadership and management, developing leadership skills, responsibility and accountability, institutional complexity, and motivation and inspiration. From the six key concepts four overarching themes arose: the unique characteristics of the Chief Fire Officer position; the ability to master technical,human, and conceptual skills; significant developmental leadership experiences; and the importance of self-awareness. The findings of the study revealed implications for policy and practice including the need to develop policies to outline a clear expectation and agreed-upon understanding of the components and complexity of the Chief position; to develop agreed upon practices to support skills mastery at milestone points, such as Lieutenant, Battalion Chief and/or moves to administrative positions, Assistant Chief, and Chief Fire Officer. Finally, the results of this empirical study represent a substantial addition to the existing literature base and provide a deeper and more robust dialogue relative to the ascension of metropolitan Chief Fire Officers.

Committee:

Judith Jackson May, Dr. (Advisor); Patrick Pauken, Dr. (Committee Member); Matthew Kutz, Dr. (Committee Member); David Neal, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Management; Public Administration

Keywords:

Fire Service Leadership; Leadership; Fire Chief; Chief Fire Officer; Credibility and Leadership; Competence and Credibility; Credibility in Fire Service Leadership; Metropolitan Fire Chiefs; Fire Officer Development; Fire Chief Development

Murray, Kaitlyn AnneExploring the Leadership Development of Undergraduate Students of Agriculture at The Ohio State University
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2017, Agricultural and Extension Education
There is a need for more leaders who are working to disrupt pervasive, systematic injustices and promote positive social change in agriculture and higher education. Colleges of agriculture and related sciences have recognized their role in preparing future leaders and responded to this charge, yet students of agriculture are not exhibiting the leadership behaviors that society and employers need. In a series of three studies, the author explored the leadership development of students of agriculture at The Ohio State University. The first study was a secondary analysis of campus data from the 2010, 2012, and 2015 Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) in order to explore the trends, similarities, and differences in leadership outcomes by major field of study. Results indicated that respondents who identified their major as agriculture did not differ from non-agricultural students in leadership capacity or leadership self-efficacy. However, while at college, students of agriculture reported significantly lower levels of engagement in socio-cultural discussions that non-agriculture students, but higher levels of mentoring by others. The results of this study imply a greater need for opportunities for students in agriculture to engage in conversations of personal and global importance with their peers. By conducting this study, the researcher was able to identify an additional need to specifically investigate how mentoring relates to leadership development in students of agriculture. In the second study, a four-phase scoping review of the literature sought to identify, appraise, and summarize existing knowledge and knowledge gaps in the instrumentation and assessment of soft skills. The result of this study, a systematic map of soft skill assessment instruments, were used to form recommendations for appropriate instruments to measure soft skill development based on a hierarchical assessment of psychometric evidence, generalized construct validity, composite relevance to college students and peer mentoring, lowest cost, and fewest questions. The results of this study were used to undergird the Peer Mentoring Instruments developed in the third study. The final study aimed to address the need for further understanding of peer mentoring and leadership development of students of agriculture. The purpose of this study was to lay the background for a systematic program evaluation of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) Peer Mentoring Program through the co-initiation and co-construction of a participatory program evaluation plan. As a result of this study, two contextually-relevant instruments were developed to measure mentor leadership and soft skill development, program impacts, and participant perceptions. The instruments developed in this study are recommended for further reliability testing and the use in a program evaluation of the CFAES Peer Mentoring Program. This study holds implications for others who wish to engage in a participatory evaluation with college student program participants.

Committee:

Jeff King (Advisor); Jeff Hattey (Committee Member); M. Susie Whittington (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Agricultural Education; Education

Keywords:

leadership; leadership development; college student; peer mentoring; leadership assessment; program evaluation; agriculture; college of agriculture; social change; peer leadership; participatory evaluation; evaluation; systematic map; scoping review

Winter, Carol LWomen Superintendents, the Feminist Ethic, and Organizational Leadership
PHD, Kent State University, 2016, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
This qualitative study investigated the research question: How does the feminist ethic interact with the leadership of women superintendents as they address the demands of leading in the current educational climate? Data generated from six participants’ interviews, journal entries, and writing samples were used to formulate a leadership theory using Charmaz’s (2011) constructivist grounded theory approach. Data analysis resulted in ten common themes among participants, which fell into three main areas: leadership disposition, feminist approaches to leadership, and purpose in leadership. The following theory, grounded in participants’ data was developed: When authenticity, self-efficacy, and empowerment are present, women superintendents are better able to succeed in the masculinized culture of school district leadership and the current climate of educational reform. The essence of women’s leadership is manifested in the feminist ethic of care, justice, and critique, which allows leaders to bring better outcomes for the individuals and the organization under their stewardship. The theory developed may allow school boards and universities to better understand the preparation of, hiring of, and support for women in the superintendency. The recommendations of this study and theory may inform educational leaders of both sexes and add to the current body of literature on women in educational leadership in general and in the superintendency specifically. Recommendations for future research include further study regarding the efficacy of using the theory developed to grow and support the ranks of women superintendents nationally.

Committee:

Catherine Hackney, PhD (Committee Chair); Rosemary Gornik, PhD (Committee Member); Jennifer Kulics, PhD (Committee Member); Steve Rainey, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Ethics; Gender; Gender Studies; School Administration

Keywords:

superintendents, women superintendents, women leaders, educational leadership, feminist ethic, feminist theory, organizational leadership, organizational culture, moral leadership, ethical leadership

Graham, Daria-Yvonne J.Intersectional Leadership: A Critical Narrative Analysis of Servant Leadership by Black Women in Student Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2018, Educational Leadership
Little research exists that centers the experiences of African American women student affairs administrators in higher education. The challenges and barriers that exist for African American women student affairs administrators are complex and directly connected to the history of slavery, race and racism in the United States. Concepts such as mentorship, success, and leadership are situated in normative practices informed by White narratives and privileged vantage points. The aim of this qualitative study is to illuminate how the experiences of African American women student affairs administrators at predominantly White institutions support or contradict leadership models often used as frameworks for development and strategy. The research questions are as follows: What are the experiences of African American women student affairs administrators at predominantly White institutions in higher education as they relate to race and gender? How do participants describe reflecting on, considering, or implementing leadership models in their work as student affairs administrators? And how do the experiences of African American women within student affairs at predominantly White institutions reflect or problematize the Servant Leadership model? The research questions were answered using critical narrative to provide voice to a marginalized population. My dissertation challenges colleges and Universities to consider the impact of using White narratives to standardize behaviors and strategies across all social identities. The findings also urges universities to address environments that continue the oppression and exploitation of Black women student affairs administrators in higher education.

Committee:

Molly Schaller (Committee Chair); Leslie Picca (Committee Member); Mary Ziskin (Committee Member); Michele Welkener (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; African History; African Studies; American History; Black History; Black Studies; Education; Education History; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Epistemology; Ethnic Studies; Gender; Gender Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

critical race theory; Black Feminist Thought; student affairs; Black women; administrators; leadership; Servant Leadership Theory; servant leadership; decenter; standpoint; standpoint theory; leadership development; intersectionality; race; social justice

Yost, Kimberly S.A Search for Home: Navigating Change in Battlestar Galactica
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
This dissertation explores the various ways in which the multiple leaders portrayed in the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica (2003-2009) navigate extreme conditions of continual change. In addition, the dissertation contains a discussion of the larger narrative themes of love, forgiveness, redemption, and embracing the Other as principles effective leaders must cultivate. Through an interpretation of this specific popular media text, a deeper emotional sensitivity to and understanding of leadership, positive and negative, during extreme crises is gained. Furthermore, the series serves as a vehicle through which viewers can reflect on and engage in their own self-awareness about issues surrounding leadership and reconsider personal paradigms based on the depiction presented in the narrative. The choice for using an interpretive hermeneutic method for this dissertation comes from the specific desire to understand the visual text of Battlestar Galactica in relation to leadership studies. The goal is neither to predict behaviors nor to examine an individual case against theory. My intent is to develop our further and deeper understanding of leadership in extremis, while questioning how the visual text may influence our perceptions of leadership theory and practice. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Holly Baumgartner, PhD (Committee Member); Kristin Bezio, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Management; Mass Media; Motion Pictures; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Religion; Social Structure; Spirituality

Keywords:

crisis leadership; charismatic religious leadership; emergent leadership; shared leadership; science fiction; television; Battlestar Galactica; love; forgiveness; redemption; otherness; home; interpretive hermeneutics; popular culture

Contat, Bradley D.Ethical Principal Leadership Through Acts of Virtue: A Phenomenology
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2018, Leadership Studies
This study addressed the lack of emphasis and understanding related to the benefits of the practice of ethical principal leadership. The purpose of this study, to address the noted problem, was to explore the practice of principal ethical leadership through acts of virtue and was viewed through the Framework of Foundational Virtues of Educational Leadership: consisting of the virtues of responsibility, authenticity, and presence (Starratt, 2004). This phenomenological study consisted of interviewing six principals in Northwest Ohio. Data were collected through interviews, observations, and written personal codes of ethics. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed in conjunction with other noted forms of data. This data produced the essence of the practice of ethical principal leadership through acts of virtue via the following five themes: the virtue of responsibility, the virtue of authenticity, the virtue of presence, the virtue of perseverance, and student centrality. The identified essence and themes of the study provide a greater understanding of, and benefits related to, the practice of ethical principal leadership through acts of virtue. Also, this study expands the literature related to ethical leadership and principal leadership by identifying practical and theoretical implications that impact both areas of leadership.

Committee:

Paul Willis, EdD (Advisor); Salim Elwazani , PhD (Other); Tracy Huziak-Clark, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken, PhD (Committee Member); Kevin Pfefferle, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Ethics

Keywords:

leadership; ethical leadership; transformational leadership; educational leadership; ethics; virtue; responsibility; authenticity; presence; perseverance; student centrality; education; principal; phenomenology; 21st century

Toth, Michele VeronicaExploring a Relationship between Worker' Perceptions of Leaders and Workers' Self-Efficacy in Social Services
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Leadership Studies

Social service programs have existed in society for decades, with many contemporary services tracing origins in Elizabethan times and practices to assist the vulnerable and poor. Philanthropic and government dollars have funded many of these programs. And while programs and social problems have changed over the years, the core of the system to address these issues has not. And while the services and programs have changed over time, the goal and purpose of these have always been to assist clients to change and improve their lives.

These services and programs are provided under the umbrella of many nonprofit social services agencies by front line workers. These front line workers provide a myriad of tasks within the structures of both the funding entity, the organization that employs them, and the supervisors and leaders who provide leadership to guide the process. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the front line workers' perceptions of their supervisors' styles of leadership and the self-efficacy level of those front line workers who motivate social service program clients to change and improve their own lives. The research question generated the following hypotheses: Perceived leadership styles relate to the front-line social service worker's levels of self-efficacy; Transformational and Transcendental/Spiritual leadership styles will have a stronger relationship to front-line worker levels of self-efficacy than transactional and Laissez-faire non-leadership styles; and there will be differences in levels of self-efficacy between subgroups based on gender, age, years in relationship to the supervisor, and education level.

Through the integration of several conceptual frameworks, including leadership theories and self-efficacy, this study used a random sampling method of United Way funded partners in major metropolitan cities in several Midwestern states. United Way funded agencies were invited to participate because of the Live United branding which suggests some degree of philosophical and missional consistencies. Permission from a number of regional United Ways was granted to access the chief executives of funded partner agencies identified as part of the United Way Agenda for Change Education Change Initiative. Chief executives were invited to share an integrated survey instrument composed of the General Self-efficacy Scale, Bass and Avolio's Multi-factor Leadership Questionnaire to measure Transformational, Transactional, and Laissez-faire Leadership, and Transcendental/ Spiritual Leadership Assessment with front line workers in these social service agencies. From the random sample of front line worker participants, 103 completed the survey.

Results of descriptive statistics showed that front line workers have a high level of self-efficacy, which was not related to any demographic variables as shown by Analyses of Variance (ANOVA) tests. However, review of the descriptive statistics revealed remarkable characteristics of these front line workers including length of service and age which demonstrated commitment and dedication to their work. Results of Pearson-r correlation tests showed that self-efficacy levels were positively correlated to Transcendental/ Spiritual, Transformational, and Transactional Leadership styles. However, self-efficacy was shown to have a negative correlation to Laissez-faire/ non-leadership.

Conclusions that were drawn by this study were that front line workers showed high levels of self-efficacy for each of the three major leadership styles, with Transcendental/ Spiritual Leadership showing the strongest correlation. This suggested that perhaps front line workers in an organizational culture with a leader who articulates spiritual values may have a higher level of self-efficacy. Results also suggested that front lines workers have a high level of self-efficacy independent of leadership, indicating that perhaps their own professional and personal skills and individual resilience serve to complete the leadership experience rather than depend on it for their self-efficacy.

Implications for practice encourage leaders to seek out training opportunities to expand their own leadership skills and integrate the best practices of each of the three major leadership styles, and to seek out training that explores leadership styles and self-efficacy of workers in a simultaneous study. Further, recognizing the importance of self-efficacy for front line workers, leaders may wish to provide in-service training, professional development and personal reflective opportunities for their workers such as the ones they take for themselves. Lastly, important considerations for recruitment and retention of leaders and managers was offered, including identification of skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with Transcendental/ Spiritual and Transformational Leadership to assist organizations transitioning from periods of great difficulty and dysfunction.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor); Stephen Ball (Committee Member); Sandra Faulkner (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Judy Zimmerman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Educational Leadership; Ethics; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Social Work; Spirituality; Welfare

Keywords:

Leadership styles; self-efficacy; front line workers; Transformational Leadership; Transcendental/Spiritual Leadership; Transactional Leadership; Empowerment; Motivation; MLQ; Non-profit social service; United Way; Correlation; Analysis of Variance

Wagner, David N.LEADERSHIP EDUCATION RECONSIDERED: EXAMINING SELF-PERCEIVED LEADERSHIP STYLES AND MOTIVATION SOURCES AMONG UNDERGRADUATE LEADERS
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Leadership Studies
This study examined the relationships between undergraduate leaders’ self-perceptions of their transformational and transactional leadership behaviors and their sources of work motivation. The sample was comprised of 145 elected and appointed leaders at a mid-west university. The survey included both the Motivation Sources Inventory and the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Other survey items collected demographic and leadership-experience data. Participants overall scored higher for transformational self-perceived behaviors than for transactional, and higher for intrinsic motivation than extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation related positively to transformational self-perceived behaviors, and extrinsic motivation related positively to transactional self-perceived behaviors. By understanding undergraduates’ self-perceptions of their leadership behaviors and motivation, models and methods can be developed to foster and strengthen perspectives that embrace situational application of transformational and transactional behaviors.

Committee:

Mark Earley (Advisor); William Arnold (Committee Member); Judith Jackson May (Committee Member); Dafina Lazarus Stewart (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Theory; Gender; Higher Education; Organization Theory; Teaching

Keywords:

transformational leadership; transactional leadership; intrinsic motivation; extrinsic motivation; MLQ; Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire; MSI; Motivation Sources Inventory; undergraduate; student affairs; student development; correlation

Clark, Jonathan TylerDeveloping Collaborative Leadership: A Study Of Organizational Change Toward Greater Collaboration And Shared Leadership
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2008, Leadership and Change
Implicit in leadership behavior is the ability to work with others, to be in relationship, and to collaborate. Contemporary theories about leadership have shifted from a focus on the individual “leader” toward the collective act of “leadership.” A concrete understanding of collaborative leadership remains somewhat underdeveloped in the literature and theoretically. This dissertation is a case study of organization's efforts to change from autocratic organizational leadership to a more collaborative working environment. Taking the form of a literary portrait, the study analyzes an example of action learning about collaborative leadership. The portrait will be of the agency's change, with special attention given to the issues facing the leadership team as it wrestles to change from top-down to collaborative leadership practice. The primary research question is: In today's shifting landscape, what practices and conditions will optimize the development of a collaborative working environment? Findings were that the development of a collaborative working environment can be optimized through the careful cultivation of the ten themes that emerged from the study: (1) on-going learning and continuous development, (2) flexibility, (3) trust, (4) respect/esteem/ positive regard, (5) willingness/commitment, (6) facilitative process (establishment of norms, ground rules/agreements, inclusivity, process capability/tacit knowledge of functional group process), (7) realistic optimism/positive personality/resilience/solution/strength/future focus, (8) communication skills, (9) social intelligence (ability to transcend the ego and to self-organize and motivate) and (10) an appropriate level of technical competence. The electronic version of this dissertation is available at the Ohiolink ETD Center http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Paul Pedersen, PhD (Committee Member); Joyce Fletcher, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology; Sociology

Keywords:

Shared Leadership; Collaboration; Collaborative Leadership; Organizational Change; Organization Development; Action Learning; Experiential Learning; Portraiture; Ally based Leadership; Co-Inquiry

Johnson, Julie I.Museums, Leadership, and Transfer: An Inquiry into Organizational Supports for Learning Leadership
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
Given the rapid changes that 21st century museums must manage, flexible thinking about leadership forms and purposes is needed. Today's complex leadership landscape necessitates that staff engage in enacting leadership with positional leaders. Limited empirical literature exists that describes how the next generation of museum leaders is being nurtured and developed. The purpose of this study was to: describe museum professionals' perceptions of leadership practices; investigate museums as sites of organizational and leadership learning; and consider the experiences of museum professionals who have participated in leader development programs. The study involved an on-line survey with 310 professionals working in U.S. museums and follow-up interviews with a subset of 13 survey participants. Bolman and Deal's (1990) Leadership Orientations Inventory (BDLO) was used to assess museum leadership practices; Marsick and Watkins (1999) 21-item version Dimensions of a Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ-A) was used to assess supports for learning in the museum. Findings based on bivariate correlation and multiple regression analysis show a significant relationship between ratings for leadership effectiveness at the department and organization levels and scores on the BDLO and the DLOQ-A. While leadership effectiveness at both levels tended to be positive, over 60% of middle and non-managers did not perceive their museum’s leadership as mastering any of the BDLO Leadership Orientations Inventory frames. Statistically significant differences in the perception of museums as learning organizations were found with decreasing support from senior managers to middle managers to non-managers. With regard to learning leadership, findings indicate that the DLOQ-A Strategic Leadership for Learning dimension, Organization Support, and Peer Support are important for facilitating continued learning and application of new knowledge and skills derived from leader development programs. Finally, most leader development program participants indicated that they were immediately able to apply some skills learned; however sustaining incorporation of new knowledge was difficult. Implications for museum professionals, leader development program providers, museum studies programs, leadership and change, and future research are discussed. A digital introduction accompanies this dissertation. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Chair); Cynthia McCauley, PhD (Committee Member); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Claudine K. Brown, JD (Committee Member); Michelle C. Bligh, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Arts Management; Management; Museum Studies; Museums

Keywords:

Leadership; Leader Development; Leadership Development; Museums; Museum Leaders; Nonprofit; Transfer of Learning; Workplace Learning; Change; Dimensions of a Learning Organization Questionnaire; Leadership Orientations Instrument; Mixed-methods Research

Tolymbek, Almaz KarimPolitical Leadership Style in Kazakhstan
PHD, Kent State University, 2007, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Political Science
Since its independence from the former Soviet Union in 1991, Kazakhstan has undergone a slow political and psychosocial change, which is reflected in the coexistence of the former authoritarian and emerging liberal-democratic perspectives and public discourses. Currently, there are mounting pressures for democratization of the political system, which would furnish a more diversified structure of political opportunity for all aspiring political leaders. The important issue, however, is how both old and new leaders are perceived by citizens in terms of their leadership style, and to what extent their leadership style meets expectations of the Kazakh citizenry? This study sought to answer the question, What are the characteristics of perceived typical and ideal public leadership styles in Kazakhstan? Q methodology was utilized to measure perceptions of both the general citizenry and political experts concerning the characteristics of typical and desirable leadership styles. The theoretical framework and research design were based on Little’s (1985) psychosocial leader model in conjunction with best-practices leadership theory by Kouzes and Posner (2002). The resultant factorial design enabled examination of leadership styles based on three leader types (Strong, Group, and Inspiring) and five leadership practices (leader’s image, communication style, ways of getting work done, leader-follower relations, and ways of motivating subordinates/followers). Through the prism of public perceptions and preferences, the study sought to discern characteristics of typical and ideal leadership styles as reflective of actual and desirable leader-follower relationship patterns. Analysis included correlation, factor analysis, and interpretation of the emergent factors. Three distinct perceptions of typical leaders (Power-Wielder, Elite Leader, and Old Communist Guard) and one ideal leader (Inspiring Statesman) were identified, and each typical leader perception was compared to the ideal in order to gauge existing typical-ideal leadership gaps. Discussion focused on the implications for leadership development in Kazakhstan, and on the utility of the psychosocial approach and Q methodology for leadership studies in general.

Committee:

Steven Brown (Advisor)

Keywords:

political leadership; leadership style; typical leader; ideal leader; leader-follower relations; public perceptions and expectations; public ego-ideal; leader characteristics; public psyche; leader types; psychosocial approach; leadership practices

Romano, Stephen D.Leading at the Edge of Uncertainty: An Exploration of the Effect of Contemplative Practice on Organizational Leaders
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
The purpose of the study is to investigate how organizational leaders cultivate focus and calm in moments of uncertainty. There is significant literature discussing how individuals manage stress and enhance well-being through formal meditative practices, but few studies investigate informal strategies. Through single subject with multiple subject design, the research examines how specific mind body practices affect an individual's ability to pay attention, connect with others, manage stress, and enhance perspective-taking. This study suggests that being a leader, and by extension, leadership, is not merely a series of actions; rather, it is a way of thinking and being. The capacity to notice breath and listen deeply is understood as a pathway for increasing the mind body connection, and serves as an instrument for the practices. Six participants were selected and introduced to specific mindful practices. Participants applied these practices daily over a 10 to 12-week period. Participants met weekly with the researcher for coaching and developing reflective habits. The Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire and the Mindfulness Survey were administered, along with weekly self-assessments and journaling, to measure leader ability before, during, and after the intervention. All six leaders improved their relationship to breath, and as a result, their overall well-being and effectiveness. All participants reported decreased body stress by week eight or ten, respectively. The findings suggest meaningful change can occur over four months with consistent practice. This study may hold promise for innovative and holistic approaches to leader development, and specifically, how informal contemplative practices enhance effectiveness during times of uncertainty. This dissertation is accompanied by an MP4 author introduction video. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETC Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Alan Guskin, PhD (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Elaine Gale, PhD (Committee Member); Amanda Sinclair, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Management; Organizational Behavior; Psychology

Keywords:

Leadership Development; Mindful Leadership; Contemplative Leadership; Contemplative Practice; Mindfulness; Mind Body; Organizational Psychology; Stress Management; Adaptability; Meditation; Organizations; Contemplation; FFMQ; Qualitative; Quantitative

Klein, Edward TTHE EFFECTS OF TEACHER COLLABORATION ON DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP PRACTICE
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
The purpose of this study was to examine the application of formalized collaborative structures as a vehicle for distributed leadership practice. This study sought to understand if distributed leadership was inherent within organizations employing formal collaboration structures. Additionally, this study sought to understand if distributed leadership was able to develop within a traditionally organized, hierarchical school. This study employed a single case study to analyze the shared experience of teacher perceptions of leadership (both self and peer) within formalized collaborative structures. Additionally, participant responses gave rise to the consideration of teacher leadership within informal collaborative structures. Participant responses overwhelming noted the emergence of leadership within both formal and informal collaborative structures and considered the personal and organizational factors that both encouraged and limited distributed leadership. The implications of this study suggest connections with the viability of distributed leadership practice and professional networks. Additionally, there should be consideration for the role of teachers in propagating democratic values in educational organization.

Committee:

Catherine Hackney, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Mark Kretovics, Ph.D (Committee Member); Averil McClelland, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership

Keywords:

Distributed Leadership; Principal Leadership; Teacher Leadership; Democracy; Networks; Organizational Hierarchy

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