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Al musaiteer, Suliman SalehThe Saudi students' experience in intercultural communication
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2015, Educational Foundations-Social/Philosophical Foundations of Education
The purpose of this study was to explore the Saudi students’ experience and perceptions about the intercultural communication with American people. In particular, it concentrated on the factors that encourage and discourage the Saudi students to communicate with host national people. The researcher utilized the semi-structured interview to collect the data from three Saudi male students. The theoretical framework employed in this study was the Anxiety-Uncertainty Management (AUM) theory (Gudykunst, 2005). Four themes and twelve subthemes were emerged from the data. The four main themes were: detecting mutual interests, identifying what attracts Americans to communicate with you, what encourages Saudi students to communicate with Americans, and what discourage Saudi students to communicate with Americans. Furthermore, several recommendations were presented to enhance the intercultural communication by the participants and the researcher.

Committee:

Li Huey-Li, Professor (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Education; Higher Education; Multicultural Education

Keywords:

Intercultural communication, International Education

Ferguson, Chen WFactors Contributing to Students' Global Perspectives: An Empirical Study of Regional Campus, Business, and Study Abroad Students
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2013, Educational Leadership
This study was designed to identify factors that contribute to undergraduate students' global perspective development. Global perspective is defined as a viewpoint that the world is an interdependent complex system and interconnected multi-reality whereby certain values, attitudes, knowledge, experiences and skills are demonstrated through cognitive, intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions in an international, intercultural or global environment. This study utilized Larry Braskamp's Global Perspective Inventory (GPI) instrument and surveyed 1,637 students from regional campuses, school of business, and study abroad subgroups of a Midwest university. This dissertation included the much needed study of non-traditional students' global perspective development from regional campuses. GPI was informed by the holistic development theory in cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal dimensions by Kegan (1994), King and Baxter Magolda (2005). Accordingly, students' global perspectives were evaluated through the six subscales of Knowing, Knowledge, Identity, Affect, Social Responsibility, and Social Interaction. Hierarchical multiple regression models were utilized in this research after validity and reliability tests. The findings were that students' global perspectives were strongly related with their curriculum, co-curriculum, and sense of community factors, but were not related to most social location and academic factors, such as parents' education and GPA. One surprising finding was that students' global perspectives were not related to their study abroad participation for the all-university dataset as well as business and regional campus subgroups. When using GPI, five of its six subscales (Knowledge, Identity, Affect, Social Responsibility, and Social Interaction) are recommended together with the Global Citizenship subscale. Implications for higher education leaders include cultivating an environment that focuses on quality and aims for long-term effects of students' global perspective development.

Committee:

Kate Rousmaniere (Committee Chair); Sally Lloyd (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

global perspective; study abroad; Global Perspective Inventory; GPI; business students; nontraditional students; intercultural competence; international education; internationalization; global citizenship; global competence; global education

Weber, Donovan M.EVANGELICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS IN A CROSS-CULTURAL CONTEXT: AN EXAMINATION OF SHORT-TERM MISSIONS THROUGH THE LENS OF CRITICAL SERVICE-LEARNING
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2011, Educational Leadership
The practice short-term missions (STM) is a growing phenomenon amongst Evangelical Christians. It is conservatively estimated that over 1.6 million Christians participate in a STM experience each year with a cost of approximately 2.7 billion dollars (Wuthnow & Offutt, 2008) and yet there is very little research being produced on this trend. This research project explores the activities of a subset of this movement by asking “to what extent are the practices of those who plan and implement short-term mission trips for Evangelical university students in the United States congruent with perceptions of good practice in service-learning literature.” To answer this question data were collected through an online survey (n = 101) and follow up interviews (n = 14) with campus ministers who organize and lead STMs with their students. These data are evaluated through key concepts of reciprocity and reflection identified in the service-learning literature with special attention given to imbalances of power as a concern of critical service-learning. Findings reveal that an overemphasis on evangelism and poorly directed reflection opportunities can impede truly reciprocal relationships in STM programs, but that there are positive trends developing in Evangelicalism with the potential of overcoming the lack of reciprocity in STMs.

Committee:

Kathleen Knight-Abowitz, Dr. (Committee Chair); Sally Lloyd, Dr. (Committee Member); Richard Quantz, Dr. (Committee Member); Judy Rogers, Dr. (Committee Member); William Boone, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership

Keywords:

short-term missions; campus ministry; critical service-learning; international education; Evangelical

McCallum Beatty, Krista L.Selected Experiences of International Students Enrolled in English Taught Programs at German Universities
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2010, Higher Education (Education)

Higher education is becoming increasingly internationalized, and a significant aspect of the internationalization of higher education is student mobility. A relatively new feature in international student mobility is the offer of English taught programs. Wächter and Maiworm (2008) define English taught programs as “programmes taught in English in non-English speaking countries in Europe, i.e. in countries where English was not the domestic language” (p. 9). Increasing numbers of universities are offering these programs, yet the existing research on them is limited.

This study contributes to the literature by exploring the levels of importance of and satisfaction with selected experiences expressed by international students enrolled in English taught programs at German universities. A concurrent mixed methods design was used. Quantitative data were collected by administering an on-line questionnaire; qualitative data were collected by conducting on-site interviews. The data were collected concurrently and analyzed separately. Finally, the data were integrated in the interpretation phase.

The findings of this study suggested that the salient experiences of international students were centered on their academic program, living in Germany, and being a member of a cohort of international students. Experiences as non-native speakers of German and a sense of isolation were interwoven with these experiences. Students expressed overall satisfaction, however, they were less satisfied with certain aspects of their experience. Differences in levels of satisfaction existed by world region of origin and students’ self-assessed German proficiency.

Committee:

Dr. Valerie Martin Conley, PhD (Committee Chair); Dr. Peter Mather, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Gary Moden, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Josep Rota, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

international students; foreign students; English taught programs; German universities; international education

Rychener, Melissa AnneIntercultural experiential learning through international internships: the case of medical education
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Educational Policy and Leadership
From 1971 to 2000, 2,500 medical students at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health participated in a clinical internship program. Of these interns 231 worked in international settings and the rest participated in domestic internships. In 2002, a survey focusing on the participants’ perceptions of their intercultural sensitivity development and other aspects of the experience was mailed to all alumni of the international internship program and a stratified sample of domestic interns, yielding a return rate of 81% of the international interns and 55% of the domestic interns. Survey data was quantitative and qualitative in nature and demonstrated that international interns were significantly more likely to say that they developed intercultural sensitivity as a result of the internships than domestic interns. International interns were also more likely to demonstrate intercultural competency in medical practice in terms of their career and volunteer choices as well as their intercultural skills in working with patients from different cultural backgrounds. The study findings that international interns were more likely to demonstrate intercultural competence in medical practice may indicate that medical students who participate in an internship abroad are better suited to work with a diverse patient population in the U.S. than their peers who have less intercultural experience. The focus on intercultural sensitivity and intercultural competence in medical practice sets the current study apart from the more broadly conceptualized literature about international internships in medical education. Bringing theoretical perspectives from within and outside of medical education to bear on the study further establishes its place in this literature, which does not draw as extensively upon theory. The literature about medical education for intercultural sensitivity and intercultural competence in medical practice does not consider intercultural internships. Although internships should not take the place of this curriculum, this study confirms that internships have a place within this curriculum.

Committee:

Leonard Baird (Advisor)

Keywords:

Medical Education; International Education; Medical Internships; International Internships; Experiential Learning; Intercultural Curriculum; Intercultural Sensitivity; Intercultural Competence; DMIS

Schaner, Rita LouiseLearning from the Educators: Creating a Global Curriculum in a Virtual Space
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, ED Policy and Leadership

Between April, 2007 and March, 2008 two teachers, one in northeastern Ohio, the other in Israel, began an uncertain collaboration in the construction of a virtual, technically-mediated interactional space for the conduct of a social studies curriculum for each of their two sixth grade classes. I was centrally involved in establishing the possibility for their collaboration, and then in documenting and analyzing an emergent path, whereby they came to ‘tame’ the technology, discover its possibilities and limits, trim their curriculum to those realities, and discover still others they had not anticipated.

This research project was initially conceptualized to establish a technically-mediated, visual platform where the teachers could routinely interact to develop teaching and learning strategies for use with their students. Instead of its original focus on curriculum, the inquiry became a descriptive case study of the work of these two teachers. A majority of the studies described in the educational technology literature report occasions that focus on the potential use of the tools as an extension of the classroom, rather than an exploration of how these connective, multimedia technologies encounter actual classrooms and curricula, in the hands of teachers.

Therefore, this project aims to study the practical worlds of two teachers who would be given sustained access to the technically-mediated tools, reliable technical support throughout the study, and the freedom to control their decisions about the pedagogies they were constructing. The findings suggest that teachers, given the opportunity to learn these tools, are receptive to the technologies and innovative in developing learning opportunities for their students within the virtual space, as they negotiate the technically-mediated environments within the practical exigencies of their local classrooms.

Committee:

Douglas Macbeth, PhD (Advisor); Sebnem Cilesiz, PhD (Committee Member); Richard Voithofer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Multicultural Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

videoconferencing; virtual classrooms; professional development; international education; technically-mediated environments

Doughty, Jeremy R."The other side": A narrative study of south African community members' experiences with an international service-learning program
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of my narrative study was to hear stories about how community members are affected by international service-learning programs. At a time when universities and colleges in the United States emphasize internationalization efforts and the civic purpose of higher education, more institutions are designing and delivering international service-learning programs. More questions must be raised regarding how these programs affect communities. Despite the centrality of reciprocity in the service-learning paradigm, the extant literature primarily focuses on the effects of international service-learning programs on students. I spent two weeks collecting data at a primary school in Ithemba, a predominantly Black African, Xhosa-speaking township in South Africa characterized by one of my participants as “the other side.” Three participants at Korhaan School—Bhejile (the principal), Dunyiswa (the deputy principal), and Peline (a teacher)—engaged in two semi-structured interviews and one focus group. To mask the identity of my participants, I selected pseudonyms for the two universities, the primary school, and the community where the primary school is situated, and I use the names selected by my participants throughout the manuscript. Three key findings emerged from the data. First, my participants’ stories underscored the interconnectedness of the community and the community-based organization. Second, the students who participate in the international service-learning program bring a myriad of benefits to Korhaan School, and the students’ actions align with ubuntu, a cultural framework that shapes an individual’s engagement with others. Third, areas for improvement exist for the international service-learning program. A number of implications for higher education professionals are presented as a result of the findings. First, faculty members and practitioners must involve community members as co-educators in the long-term life cycle of an international service-learning program. Second, U.S. higher education professionals must learn from international models of service. Third, faculty members and practitioners who design international service-learning programs must restructure pre-departure programming to include domestic service opportunities, academic preparation beyond surface-level knowledge, and the postcolonial perspective. These strategies will help higher education professionals construct meaningful partnerships with community-based organizations that are characterized by thick reciprocity—partnerships that are more inclusive, just, and reciprocal.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Ksenija Glusac, Ph.D. (Other); Christina Lunceford, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

international service-learning; service-learning; study abroad; South Africa; international education; community; community engagement; reciprocity; higher education; student affairs; narrative inquiry

Boggs, Christy F.Where do we go from here? The impact of immigration on the educational pathway of Sri Lankan women growing up in Italy
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Cross-Cultural, International Education
This multiple case study of five Sri Lankan women explored their lived experiences as second generation immigrants in Rome, Italy, in order to better understand their various pathways to higher education and their choice of whether to pursue that education in Italy or elsewhere. The study attempted to explore the financial, political, cultural, and educational challenges that impacted the decisions these women made, including the process of navigating between the Sri Lankan and Italian cultures. Utilizing an interpretive qualitative approach and a combination of purposeful and convenience sampling, I selected and interviewed women who had either been born in Italy or moved there prior to or during primary education, conducting interviews with them via Skype at their various locations around the globe. From these interviews, a narrative of each participants’ life was constructed, followed by cross case analysis of themes brought to light by the participants themselves. Findings indicate that although economic opportunity was a significant factor in the participants’ decisions to pursue higher education and career outside of Italy, the greatest motivation was their parents’ desire for them to move beyond the constraints of Sri Lanka and Italy and into the best possible future they could have. The women navigated the tension between conservative Sri Lankan culture and western Italian culture in different ways, but their parents’ decisions to enroll them in an international school profoundly impacted both their integration into the Italian system and their expectations of moving beyond Italy post-graduation as much or more than other potential that exist within the Italian immigrant experience.

Committee:

Bruce Collet (Advisor); Hyeyoung Bang (Committee Member); Timothy Messer-Kruse (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Gender; Higher Education; Multicultural Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

immigration; higher education; Sri Lankan women; second generation; Italy; integration; cultural navigation; international education; transnationalism

Scott, Camille R“Outside People”: Treatment, Language Acquisition, Identity, and the Foreign Student Experience in Japan
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2014, Anthropology
In recent years, an increasing number of foreign students have been engaging in language and cultural immersion programs in Japan, raising issues of cross-cultural contact and exchange. Japan's enduring cultural nationalism produces an ethnocentric valuation of homogeneity, thereby affecting the ways in which Japanese natives engage with and respond to these students. This paper draws on two months of ethnographic research at two Japanese universities to examine how everyday, culturally embedded nationalism affects the experience, identity, and language instruction of western nonnative learners of Japanese with regards to the institution, the instructors, and the community around them. This discourse on issues surrounding the presence of foreign youth in a nationalistic society has application for discrimination reforms on the international level.

Committee:

Haley Duschinski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Asian Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Educational Sociology; Foreign Language; Language; Linguistics; Pacific Rim Studies; Social Structure; Sociolinguistics; Sociology

Keywords:

anthropology; linguistic anthropology; ethnography; linguistics; Japan; nationalism; language acquisition; Japanese nationalism; study abroad; SLA; language immersion programs; international education; foreigner students; foreigners; discrimination

Stauffer, Mildred Louise JamesThe impact of study abroad experience on prospective teachers /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

International education;Foreign study;Teachers

Stauffer, Mildred Louise JamesThe impact of study abroad experience on prospective teachers /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

International education;Foreign study;Teachers

Bruce, Gonzalo R.Institutional Design and the Internationalization of U.S. Postsecondary Education Institutions
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, ED Policy and Leadership

Postsecondary education institutions are increasingly affected by their external environment and more specifically, global forces. Among such forces is the acknowledged global labor market of education, fierce competition between educational systems, and the need for colleges and universities to expand their resource base. In response to such forces, college administrators are challenged to steer institutions toward a more global focus and thus internationalization is becoming central in the agenda of U.S. colleges and universities.

This study examines the organizational structures that help shape internationalizing efforts of postsecondary education institutions. Informed by strategic management and institutional theories, the study advances the concept of institutional design to fill a gap in the literature, which has left unexamined the role of organizational structures and agents in internationalizing efforts. The study is based on a simple random sample of 157 U.S. research universities, according to the Carnegie classification.

Informed by the literature, the study proposes the degree of internationalization as dependent variable, which is comprised of ten relevant measures and indicators. A factor analysis of the ten measures resulted in three outcomes variables: 1) the international openness, 2) the international focus of academics, and 3) the international attractiveness of postsecondary education institutions. Grounded in the literature, the study proposes a research model, which operationalizes institutional design of postsecondary education institutions in two categories: 1) organizational structures, which includes leadership, staff, administrative units, and the concentration of structures and 2) international networks, which includes the type of international network and the network size.

Through regression analyses, the study offers empirical evidence that some organizational structures are positively associated with internationalization processes of postsecondary education institutions. Among such organizational structures are: 1) the presence of a specialized leadership for championing internationalization processes, 2) the presence of shared governance that provide oversight to internationalizing efforts, 3) adequate staffing levels, and 4) the size of the international network.

The study suggests policy implications and opportunities for future research. The findings suggest that administrators must focus on two critical dimensions to secure progress in the international agenda of postsecondary education institutions. First, they need to focus on generating positive routines and capabilities that help institutions to respond more effectively to international pressures. Second, they need to put in place adequate organizational structures that help these routines to generate and to entrench in the core of the organization.

Committee:

Tatiana Suspitsyna, PhD (Committee Chair); Jaideep Anand (Committee Member); Leonard Baird (Committee Member); Lauren Krivo (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Multicultural Education; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Internationalization; institutional design; international education; organizational theories; network

Gaines, Nykia D.Exploring the Perceptions of Study Abroad Among Black Undergraduates at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Higher Education Administration

International education helps students become more engaged within the United States and abroad. Black undergraduates continue to be underrepresented in study abroad despite two decades of increased enrollment by Black students in higher education in the United States. This study had three purposes: (1) to explore how Black undergraduates attending historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) perceived study abroad programs, (2) to understand how individual and institutional characteristics related to the desire of Black undergraduates at HBCUs to study abroad, and (3) to determine to what degree individual and institutional variables predicted Black undergraduates’ desire to participate in study abroad.

A survey research design was utilized to understand the perceptions and characteristics of Black undergraduates attending four HBCUs. Two hundred ninety-eight students responded to the survey during the spring and summer of 2011. Findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between students who initiated discussion about study abroad with their advisor or professor and their desire to study abroad at their current institution. There was a significant relationship between professors who initiated conversations about study abroad with students outside the classroom and the respondents’ desire to study abroad. There was a significant relationship between professors who discussed study abroad outside the classroom and respondents’ perceptions of study abroad. Students who had interactions with faculty or advisors regarding study abroad were less represented among students who did not desire to study abroad.

Respondents who were born or raised abroad were less likely to desire to study abroad than those that did not report they were born or raised abroad and education majors were more likely to desire to study abroad than those in other majors. Respondents who initiated discussions about study abroad with their professors were more likely to desire study abroad than those who did not discuss study abroad with their professors and respondents whose advisors discussed academic planning for study abroad were less likely to desire to study abroad than those who reported that their advisor did not discuss academic planning for study abroad. Implications for research and practice in higher education and student affairs are discussed.

Committee:

Dafina Stewart, PhD (Committee Chair); Patrick Pauken, PhD (Other); Michael Coomes, EdD (Other); Robert DeBard, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African Americans; Higher Education

Keywords:

education abroad; study abroad; historically Black colleges and universities; HBCUs; international education; Black undergraduates; African Americans; higher education

Stiles, James W.From chameleons to koalas: exploring Australian culture with pre-service teachers through children's literture and international experience
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Teaching and Learning
Peoples and cultures have been interacting since the dawn of history, but global conflict, recent advances in technology, and the changing demographics of the United States make peaceful coexistence in a multicultural world a matter of urgency for this and future generations. Although education is often cited as the key to the global village of tomorrow, little research has been done to explore how the lifeblood of literacy—the books of childhood that teach and entertain—can bridge cultures to connect worlds. This study seeks to address that very question by comparing the literary and lived experience of Australian culture with five pre-service teachers from the Midwestern United States. Children’s literature was the foundation for the project, first as the focus of pre-departure readings in the home country, and then as the basis for a researcher-led three-week study tour where participants met with authors, illustrators, students, teachers, and others as they experienced Australian culture first-hand. Reflective journaling, class discussions, participant observation, and a post-program debriefing yielded data that were analyzed through grounded theory. The developmental model of intercultural sensitivity, and its associated inventory, was used to contextualize response to the phenomenological experience of culture in both literary and lived experience. Results of the study show that children’s literature can be an enjoyable and dynamic means to facilitate cross-cultural learning, serving as common ground and catalyst for intercultural exchange through each phase of the program. Theoretical benefits were argued then demonstrated for children’s literature as a tool in furthering global education with pre-service teachers. A five-stage model for cultural relativity is proposed that reflects the disparate ways in which culture is reflected in children’s literature, thus laying the groundwork for further study on national identity and cultural imperialism in global publishing for children.

Committee:

Barbara Lehman (Advisor)

Keywords:

International Education; Global Education; Children's Literature; International Literature; Pre-service Teacher Training; Cross-cultural Learning; Experiential Learning; Literary Theory; Cultural Studies

Shaheen, StephanieThe effect of pre-departure preparation on student intercultural development during study abroad programs
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Educational Policy and Leadership
The question addressed in this project is whether pre-departure preparation can help students to gain intercultural competencies when they study abroad, especially on shorter length programs. Specifically, the following research questions were examined; 1) How does a pre-departure orientation course titled Intercultural Experiential Learning (IS 693) affect the cultural learning for students on study abroad programs? 2) How do the changes in intercultural learning of students on study abroad programs compare with students who studied abroad without the pre-departure orientation course, and with students who did not study abroad, as measured by the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) post-test scores on the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS)? 3) What dynamics or factors influence the nature of student learning about intercultural competence on study abroad programs? A mixed method comparative study using qualitative and quantitative research was conducted with three groups of students. A pre-test/post-test measured change in participant behavior. The IDI and DMIS scores showed change in intercultural development. Both qualitative (interviews and observations) and quantitative (IDI instrument and questionnaires) research methods were used to gain greater insight into the experience of the participants. The statistical analysis showed that students who had the treatment did not have significant increases on their post-test scores over non-treatment students, and no significant difference on post-test scores existed for students who studied abroad when compared with non study abroad students. The statistical analysis also showed that two different conditions increased the likelihood that students would have a significant increase in sensitivity: 1) having parents who have had overseas experiences and 2) being non-minority students (racial and ethnic minorities as well as international students). The qualitative data analysis illuminated other factors that encouraged intercultural growth including: 1) significant intercultural interactions with international peers, 2) not having prolonged negative experiences with international people, 3) having the goal of gaining cultural understanding and students seeing an applicable use in their future career for their experience, 4) the chance to speak with international peers in English on a variety of cultural topics, and finally, 5) being members of the majority race and ethnic groups in the U.S.

Committee:

Ada Demb (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Higher

Keywords:

study abroad; intercultural sensitivity; international education

LaFever, Kathryn S.Interdisciplinary Teacher Education: Reform In the Global Age
Doctor of Education, Miami University, 2008, Educational Leadership
The Global Age can be understood as an Age of Interdisciplinarity, as complex global problems increasingly require interdisciplinary approaches. Interdisciplinarity is a relatively nascent curricular approach yet one increasingly needed in the field of education. This study advocates postsecondary interdisciplinary teacher education reforms that effectively integrate discipline-based coursework with interdisciplinary courses to prepare future teachers to utilize interdisciplinary curricular approaches in P- 12 education. This is a study of interdisciplinarity but also an interdisciplinary study. It conceptualizes interdisciplinary teacher education based on a constructivist theoretical approach indebted primarily to Maxine Greene, and focuses especially on literature in the field of interdisciplinary studies, published in the United States since 1997. The confluence of interdisciplinary and constructivist approaches, as well as interdisciplinarity and disciplinarity are examined. Existing interdisciplinary teacher education programs, interdisciplinary teaching strategies, and curricular designs are explored. This study provides a conceptual model that addresses teacher professionalization, interdisciplinary vision, global consciousness and wide-awakeness, and the democratic dimensions of interdisciplinary teacher education. It conceptualizes critical and socioculturally relevant education, learning communities, student-centered education, novice and non-specialist interdisciplinary inquiry, Deweyan cognitive disequilibrium, interdisciplinary research questions and questioning skills, interdisciplinary integration, and alternative academic structures and resources in interdisciplinary teacher education.

Committee:

Dennis Carlson, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); William Newell, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Raymond Terrell, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Denise Baszile, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Teacher Education

Keywords:

interdisciplinary; teacher education; international education; educational reform; constructivism; Maxine Greene

Turos, Jessica M.EMPLOYMENT RECRUITERS’ DIFFERENTIATION OF CANDIDATE CHARACTERISTICS: DOES STUDY ABROAD MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Higher Education Administration

With the need for college graduates to be competitive in a global economy, it is both critical and timely to gain insight into what employers want and what might characterize a successful candidate who is prepared for the current job market. This study investigated recruiters’ selection of candidates for employment, with an eye toward whether the experience of study abroad advantages them in the process of being evaluated for positions in business, education, or government/non-profit/social service organizations.

This dissertation employed an analogue design in which study abroad length and location, along with internship experience, were rotated systematically through a series of profiles, evoking recruiter-generated ratings and rankings for each pseudo-candidate as to the likelihood of being invited for a subsequent interview. Independent variables included candidate profile factors and characteristics related to recruiter gender, study abroad experience, position level, and organizational type. Quantitative data were examined through frequencies, chi-squares, and two-way analyses of variance for effects of the independent variables on candidate evaluations submitted. Additionally, recruiters’ comments about factors influencing their decisions were solicited and categorized for thematic patterns and insights.

Among the findings were two principal outcomes. First, candidate profiles featuring study abroad experiences, in addition to relevant internships, were rated and ranked the highest among peers in recruiters’ evaluations, with preference being given to long-term, Western experiences. Second, however, some variation in these evaluations was related to differences in the study abroad experience itself, as well as recruiter characteristics. Overall, the effect of study abroad on recruiters’ evaluations of candidates was simply one part of a complex of other considerations.

Students have a number of options for increasing their marketability to potential employers, among them - pursuing an opportunity for study abroad. However, results of the present study suggest that such an experience has only an additive rather than compensatory effect, when considered in light of other criteria, such as relevant internship experience. Nevertheless, completion of an international encounter is clearly an important factor in a candidate’s evaluation, but only one among others of equal if not higher value in determining who is selected eventually for a subsequent interview.

Committee:

C. Carney Strange, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

study abroad; international education; higher education; recruitment; candidate selection; recruiter decision making process; selection process; analogue research