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Tomlan, Christopher J.The Building Skin: Recladding as Renovation
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
The building skin provides opportunity to significantly impact the success of a built project. It is responsible for serving a multitude of performative functions as well as providing the visiting card of the building. It mediates between the in and out. The façade is often exploited and developed as a marketing tool, representing the identity of the institution it serves. As Leatherbarrow stated, “The idea of the façade as a distinct representational face of the building has existed since the late medieval and early Renaissance periods.” My thesis inquires if existing, run-down buildings can be renovated and rehabilitated using the building skin as the primary tool for the renovation. As buildings deteriorate and fail to have the ability to accommodate its users and modern building systems, they are often demolished. This destruction fails to take advantage of the existing structure and economic conditions as well as completely eliminates cultural recognition and identity of the community in which it is built. Renovation through recladding achieves a number of established goals. The reclad accounts for higher performance and efficiency. It also allows the client to present the proper identity and image through a high level of aesthetic quality. The thesis suggests that a renovation through a recladding process will be able to achieve the said goals as well as maintain cultural recognition and the identity of the community.

Committee:

Patricia Kucker, MARCH (Committee Chair); George Bible, MCiv.Eng (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

building skin;recladding;facade;renovation;building envelope;performance

Finkel, Jennifer HMichelangelo at San Lorenzo: The “Tragedy” of the Façade
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Art History
This dissertation considers Michelangelo’s intended sculptural program for the never-realized façade of the Medici parish church of San Lorenzo in Florence, and how its iconography related to the Medici, the Papacy, and the city of Florence. In 1516, Pope Leo X de’ Medici commissioned Michelangelo to complete both the sculpture and the architecture of the façade. This project, which Michelangelo claimed would be the “mirror of architecture and sculpture of all Italy,” was to be the most prestigious commission of the sixteenth century and Michelangelo’s most ambitious creation. But, for the Medici patrons, the sculptural program for the façade would have been the ultimate expression of Medici propaganda. Chapter one is a study of the history of San Lorenzo and generations of Medici patronage at their parish church. The sculptural program for the façade would have visually communicated the Medici dynasty and their destiny, and thus, the account of the San Lorenzo façade project starts here. Chapter two provides an overview of the façade commission and Michelangelo’s involvement on the project from 1516 to 1520. Chapter three is dedicated to Michelangelo’s architectural façade drawings for San Lorenzo, and his figural drawings for statuary that have been previously unassigned to a known project or connected to his other sculptural projects. These drawings are considered afresh in conjunction with the vast extant correspondence from this period, with the primary focus on Michelangelo’s concern for the sculptural decoration of the façade. Chapters four and five use the methodologies of iconography and iconology to reconstruct the intended plan for the sculptures on the façade. Michelangelo greatly enlarged the original sculptural program from ten over-life-sized marble statues, to eighteen freestanding over-life-sized marble and bronze statues, and nineteen relief panels. This expanded sculptural program relied on a calculated arrangement of the saints and their placement on the façade, which had specific meanings and connotations for the Medici, for Florence, and for the Medici in the papal court in Rome. Appendix A of the dissertation is a detailed chronological account of the façade project as extrapolated and compiled from more than three-hundred extant letters.

Committee:

Edward Olszewski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Michelangelo; Medici; San Lorenzo; facade; Pope Leo X de'Medici

Wild, Matthew CDigital Derivation: the role of algorithms and parameters in building skin design
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
Despite all of the technical advancements in building skin design and generative design computing, there are many questions concerning the method by which computer generated skins should be designed and the meaning behind their shapes. While the seemingly endless possibilities of digital tools have allowed for the fluid patterning and manipulation of surfaces to become an icon of parametricism, they often fail to provide any deeper meaning or correlation between the formal and functional aspects of a building. To the current extent with which the profession has utilized parametrics and algorithmic thought, there is often a lack of depth or significance behind the flashy images of assumed intricacy it produces—falling far short of its rich potential to engage with the real problems, processes, and functions of today. This thesis explores the roles of algorithmic thought and computational methods in building skin design in an effort to establish a larger framework or methodology for the implementation of digital tools. By exemplifying how to acquire data and use it to inform design decisions, this document aims to shift complexity from the product to the process. Only then can we see the trend of computational design root itself in purpose and meaning and begin to engage with real issues. As a result, the representation of this data in and on buildings may become architecture’s new method of ornamentation— an ornamentation that stands for something beyond the mere image of the final product. Ultimately, this thesis looks to establish a meaningful methodology, guided by larger frameworks of design, that can be referenced by designers looking for help generating ideas for building skins through the use of digital tools.

Committee:

Michael McInturf, M.Arch. (Committee Chair); Ming Tang, M.Arch. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

skin;surface;facade;parametric;computational;algorithmic

Jakucyk, JeffreyA Study on the Preservation of the Historic Façade
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2003, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Architecture
History of the built environment in the United States is short in comparison to that of other countries around the world. Nevertheless, that history is a valuable part of the country's identity, and retaining elements from all parts of that history is worthwhile. Such a thought would be unheard of two centuries ago when preservation efforts focused on patriotic nostalgia. It wasn't until the 20th century that the inherent values of architecture began to receive some accolades. Only recently has any value been placed on older buildings that have little inherent architectural value. The question becomes how to treat such buildings in today's environment. Retaining only a fragment was once a common practice, but is this still a valid approach today?

Committee:

Dr. David Niland (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

facade; preservation