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Surrarrer, Caroline ABEHIND THE LABELS: LIBBY PAYNE, FASHION DESIGNER FOR "MRS. MAIN STREET AMERICA"
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of the Arts / School of Art
BEHIND THE LABELS: LIBBY PAYNE, FASHION DESIGNER FOR “MRS. MAIN STREET AMERICA” Abstract This research sought to explore the life and career of Elizabeth “Libby” Miller Payne (1917-1997). The history of American ready-to-wear (RTW) is filled with unknown fashion designers who worked “behind the scenes” for manufacturers. This was especially true in the mid-20th century between the advent of manufactured women’s clothing and the rise of the celebrity fashion designer. In downtown department stores and boutiques all over the country, consumers purchased moderately-price styles created by names that never appeared on a label. One of these was Elizabeth “Libby” Miller Payne (1917-1987), a prolific designer whose career spanned fifty years in the New York ready-to-wear industry. Libby Payne designed hundreds of garments for “Mrs. Main Street America” under well-recognized moderate price-point labels such as Bobbie Brooks, Jonathan Logan, Beau Baker, David Warren, and John Henry. Libby’s designs “sold like hotcakes.” One of Libby’s most successful, Bobbie Brooks Style #862, sold 100,000 in its first two months on the market. The purpose of this research study was to investigate the life and work of creative talent, Libby Payne, situating her in the context of the mid-20th century American fashion industry, and utilizing her history as a vehicle for understanding the evolution of moderate price-point labels, designers, suppliers, manufacturers, retailers, and consumers during this critical time. Although the name, Libby Payne was previously unknown, her creations filled the retail selling floors and closets of “Mrs. Main Street America” from the 1930’s through the 1980’s. Throughout her long career, Libby experienced the evolution of the fashion industry first-hand, from her first position in a New York manufacturer’s workroom to retirement as a sometime freelance designer with a showroom and offsite production. Her story can provide insights to the business behind accessible ready-to-wear clothing, the evolution of the fashion designer, and secrets to success in this role. Libby Payne worked in fashion for more than half of her life, and her experiences can be viewed as a lens that reflects the American industry’s growth and change. Her legacy can inform us of the way the ready-to-wear industry has evolved into what it is today.

Committee:

Catherine Leslie, Dr. (Advisor); Jean Druesedow (Committee Member); Pamela Grimm, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Home Economics; Marketing; Modern History

Keywords:

ready-to-wear industry; mid-twentieth century fashion designer; unknown fashion designer; moderate price point labels

Taylor, William DA Comparative Analysis of Problem Solving Approaches Between Designers and Engineers
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2014, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
Studying as a designer and working with engineers revealed differences between the disciplines that affect communication. The increasingly complex problems facing society require specialists to manage. Increased specialization can lead to confusion when communicating across disciplines. Designers and engineers both provide vital services to industry and it is important that they be able to work with each other as effectively as possible. With a focus on the two academic disciplines of design and engineering, I have attempted to explore whether collaboration between the two can be positively impacted. Participants from each field of study were asked to complete a series of evaluations to determine their problem solving tendencies, learning styles, and patterns in thinking. They were then asked to present their problem solving process for approaching a set of complex contemporary issues. Engineers tend to fall into logical and rational thinking patterns and are more likely to be seen as linear thinkers. Designers differ in their approach to problem solving when there is an opportunity for abstract and innovative thinking. A practical application of this information would require the contributions of both designers and engineers throughout the design and development process. Interaction between disciplines should take place in the form of information exchange, discussions, and informal dialogues. These goals can be achieved through common workspaces, support from management, and strong leadership.

Committee:

Paul Nini (Advisor); Elizabeth Sanders, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Philip Smith, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Engineering

Keywords:

design; designer; designers; engineering; engineer; engineers; problem solving; linear thinking; lateral thinking; collaboration; design thinking; complex problems; wicked problems;

Yeo, (Sue) Siew HoongUnderstanding The Practices of Instructional Designers Through The Lenses of Different Learning Theories
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Career and Technology Education/Technology

We are living in a wired and fast-paced world where we are surrounded with cutting-edge technologies that have consistently modernized and globalized society in many ways. How does this influence the destinies of the three primary learning theories—behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism—that were developed decades ago? Are the educators, trainers, and instructional designers on the same page with this modernized and globalized society to adequately deliver the knowledge and instructional materials to today’s learners? With this thesis, the researcher began to unfold the background information and key concepts in four learning theories—behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and connectivism—and related these theories to the instructional design models in use today. As we know, the instructional designers play crucial roles in creating efficient and innovative courseware for both online and offline training/educational programs.

The problems above led the researcher to explore whether the four learning frameworks—behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and connectivism—were being used by practicing instructional designers today and how they are being interpreted based on new and emerging technologies, learning theories, and models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to find out how applicable and commonly used these four learning theories—behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and connectivism—were by practicing instructional designers in the creation of learning design materials.

Committee:

Terry Herman, Dr. (Advisor); Paul Cesarini, Dr. (Committee Member); Fei Gao, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Instructional Design

Keywords:

instructional design; learning theories; instructional designer

Craft, BrandanWhy Branding Can Increase a Professional Athlete's Value: A Rationale for Designer Engagement
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2008, Industrial, Interior and Visual Communic Design

Brands allow consumers to make choices. They help them differentiate one individual, business, or product from the other by delivering a promise that leads to expectations and perceptions. The value of a brand is measured by this perception.

What the consumer perceives a business to be, not the business's perception, is that business's brand. Designers play a large part in influencing this perception by creating brand identity systems that become the tangible expression of a business's identity. There is an opportunity for designers to play a larger role in a business's success by capitalizing on the increasing reliance on branding to assist in wealth generation.

Professional athletes are small businesses. They are distinct individuals that ultimately rely on their fans to build wealth. The fan's perception of an athlete, that athlete's brand, influences the differentiation of one player from another. The decision to invest in the brand, whether it is to watch a game on television, buy tickets to the game, or purchase a player's jersey after the game, rests on this perception. Designers can help professional athletes formulate strategies to positively influence their brand.

Strong branding could go a long way in increasing an athlete's off-the-field opportunities. Since the career span of a professional athlete is relatively short, shared productivity between athletes and designers could generate increased, and more sustainable income for athletes. Designers could also benefit from these increased opportunities. If brands allow consumer's to make choices, designers influence what choices these consumers make with keen knowledge of consumer behavior and sound design principals.

Committee:

R. Brian Stone (Committee Chair); Noel Mayo (Committee Member); Peter Chan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Marketing

Keywords:

brand; brands; athlete; professional athlete; virtual team; designer; brand value

Stuckey, Rachel E.Creating a Model for Developmental, Cross-Cultural Design
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Cross-cultural situations are challenging, but a greater challenge is the task of designing for a user of a different culture. Every situation is different and, without a plan, full of cross-cultural pitfalls. How can the designer enter any culturally different situation and create an effective design solution that brings social or behavioral change? By mining the areas of cross-cultural design, development communication, and education, a potential model can be created for developmental cross-cultural design. This model is then tested and modified through a cross-cultural design project. The project was developing hygiene curriculum for children in resource-poor areas of Mumbai, India. Through this project the model for developmental cross-cultural design is tested and refined.

Committee:

Paul Zender, MFA (Committee Chair); Omotayo Banjo, PhD (Committee Member); Stephen Kroeger, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

cross-culural;design;development;designer;process;;

Bland, Kasey DawnThe Life and Career of Fashion Designer, George Stavropoulos
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2008, Family and Consumer Sciences-Clothing, Textiles and Interiors

George Stavropoulos, a New York fashion designer, built a multi-million dollar business on his signature, floating chiffon dresses. His self-titled label produced eveningwear and daytime styles for the wholesale, ready-to-wear market, from 1961 to1991. While he was known for his use of chiffon, Stavropoulos also created notable designs in lace, lamé, suede, and taffeta.

Stavropoulos, born in Greece, believed in classic design and found inspiration in the simplicity of ancient Greek sculpture. Renowned for his innovative draping techniques, Stavropoulos created every piece in his collection and produced the entire line in his 57th Street atelier. For each spring and fall runway presentation, Stavropoulos created about one hundred designs and held his shows at the luxurious Regency Hotel, in Manhattan. Buyers from the most important stores in New York attended each show, as well as socialites and celebrities. Stavropoulos initially became know for dressing Lady Bird Johnson during her White House years and created looks for other popular figures throughout his career.

Fiercely independent, Stavropoulos did not participate in the licensing agreements popular with other designers of his time nor did he join the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). Stavropoulos believed in his own fashion philosophy and refused to adhere to the ephemeral nature of fashion, creating sophisticated designs that were innovative rather than shocking or avant-garde.

Committee:

Virginia Gunn (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History; Design; Fine Arts; Home Economics; Marketing; Museums; Textile Research

Keywords:

George Stavropoulos; fashion designer; chiffon; fashion; Greece; Greek; New York; Nikis 13; couture; ready-to-wear; dresses; women's wear; high-end; Upper East Side; Regency Hotel; Manhattan; Lady Bird Johnson; Sophia Loren; society; chic; 1960s; 1970s

Zhou, ShuaiUsing Hassenzahl Model as a Design Method to Improve User Experience for Health Care Information Television App
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Some of the products provided a discontented experience for users. Some of the user experience design model can help designers to redesign the product from designer perspective. In order to improve a better experience for users, designers should more focus on the user’s perspective and try to figure out the problems in product. The cases studies presented in this paper describe one examples which is about how to adopt hassenzahl model into product design process to improve the user experience.

Committee:

Renee Seward (Committee Chair); Paul Zender, M.F.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

user experience;Hassenzahl Model;designer perspective;user perspective

MARTY, MELISSA LAURENJAMES M. ALEXANDER, JR., ARCHITECT AND DESIGNER: A STUDY OF HIS MODERN HOUSES IN WYOMING, OHIO
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2002, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Design
The focus of this thesis is on the life, education and practice of architect and designer, James M. Alexander, Jr. This thesis explores the prolific architectural career of Alexander, including an overview of his modern architectural designs. More specifically, this thesis examines the thirteen houses Alexander designed in Wyoming, Ohio.

Committee:

Dennis Puhalla (Advisor)

Keywords:

James M. Alexander, Jr.; ARCHITECT; DESIGNER; Modern Houses in Wyoming; Wyoming, Ohio

Martin, Kenneth J.The conception and production of the scenery design for Peter Barnes Red Noses
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 1991, Theatre
A paper detailing the design concept and execution of the scenery design for the production of Peter Barnes Red Noses as presented under the direction of Guest Director Paoli Lacy by the Department of Theatre at The Ohio State University. The objective was to create a design which emphasized the control instituted by religion over the masses while showing the ability of laughter to exist, and even flourish, in a world filled with pain and suffering. Included are discussions of the production process, design choices and an evaluation of the successes and failures of the realized designs.

Committee:

Russell Hastings (Advisor)

Keywords:

Red Noses; scene designer; production team; laughter; Scene; church

Houdyshell, LJThe conception and production of the scenery design for A midsummer night's dream
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 1990, Theatre

Committee:

Russell Hastings (Advisor)

Keywords:

Titania; MIDSUMMER; Oberon; Midsummer Night; palace; scene designer

KIM, EUN KYUNGPATTERN ANALYSIS ON THE WORKS OF BONNIE CASHIN FROM THE 1960S TO THE 1970S
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2002, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Design
Bonnie Cashin (1915-2000) was one of the most influential American fashion designers from the 1950s through the 1970s. Renowned for her casual sportswear, she was an early innovator incorporating functional elements into fashion design. The purpose of this study was to examine a selection of Cashin's garments in order to find unique or distinctive elements in the patterns of her work. This study focused on garments from the University of Cincinnati's collection that were produced from the 1960s through the 1970s. Fifty of Cashin's most significant designs were selected from the collection. Exact measurements were taken from the actual garments and flat sketches were drawn indicating size specifications in order to develop precise patterns. Each of the developed patterns was examined and analyzed by grouping into garment categories including coats, jackets, blouses, skirts, pants, dresses, ponchos, and capes. Based upon the pattern analyses, the predominant characteristics in Cashin's pattern work dating from the 1960s through the 1970s were determined. As a result, it was obvious that Bonnie Cashin always put functional elements in her patterns to meet the needs of active women's lifestyles. The patterns of her most distinctive garments were extremely simple and did not contain unnecessary seam shaping or darting. Her simplicity and cleanness of line consistently responded to the patterns of living. Because of this, Cashin's work has been defined as "functional minimalism."

Committee:

Injoo Kim (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History; Fine Arts

Keywords:

Bonnie Cashin; pattern analysis; fasion designer; pattern design; functional sportwear

Jeong, TaesikAn artificial mechanical designer based on an object-oriented approach
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 1992, Mechanical Engineering
An object-oriented programming technique is investigated along with Artificial Intelligence (AI) paradigms, such as artificial neural networks and expert systems, to develop the framework for mechanical design automation systems. A task oriented decomposition approach is also applied to conceptualize the task-performing object (or task-object) in which common behavior and communication protocols are encapsulated. Each task in the entire design process, either controlling design strategies or performing design methods, it made into a task-performing object. An Artificial Mechanical Designer (AMD) is simply a collection of those task-performing objects, which performs a mechanical component design. Once an AMD is constructed, it is treated as a single task-performing object and shares the same behavior and communication ability in terms of receiving a task-order and requesting a task. The task-performing object and AMD are designed to be compatible with each other, connectable to form more complex task-performing objects, and expandable to enhance their design functionalities. To emulate design methodologies used by human engineers in the real world practice, various AI applications are employed and made into task-performing objects. They can be furnished with various types of knowledge, inclu ding existing design data, formalized knowledge, and heuristic knowledge. Accordingly, the engineer is encouraged to build design systems, applicable to their design assignments, utilizing their own design knowledge. It is possible, since an AMD is a non-prefixed framework which can accept any kind of task-performing objects to form various design systems. Furthermore, a computer application, the AMD Development Kit (AMDDK), has been implemented to provide a set of tools to the engineer. The AMDDK has pre-built task-performing objects such as design-control objects, method-performing objects, and task-assistant objects, as well as user interface objects. The guidelines specified have been developed for all abstract task-performing objects. To demonstrate the capabilities of the AMD with the task-performing objects, a gear design task is investigated and successfully implemented. The application of a gear AMD provided the following three advantages: (1) Mechanical design can be fully automated utilizing an object-oriented programming along with Artificial Intelligence techniques, (2) any design systems developed based on the concept of the task-performing object are compatible to each other and interchangeable, (3) Expandability of the existing design systems is only limited by an engineer's design assignments.

Committee:

Thomas Kicher (Advisor)

Keywords:

artificial mechanical designer based object oriented approach