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Corn, ShekinahSuperiors’ Conflict Management Behaviors and Its Relationship to Their Level of Communicative Competence
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2013, Communication
The purpose of the proposed study was to examine the relationship between superiors and subordinates with respect to communicative behaviors. This study focused on subordinates’ perceptions of their superiors’ levels of communication competence; communication competence was studied as a function of the use of the five conflict management styles. In addition, this study addressed the following question: Is there a significant relationship in terms of superiors’ styles of conflict management and their respective subordinates’ perceptions of their ability to effectively communicate? The study was based on the communicative behaviors that leaders of an organization display and their potential to influence the manner in which they are perceived by those they lead. The underlying theories that framed this study are those of conflict management and communicative competence. The results of the study showed a significant relationship between the conflict management styles displayed by a supervisor and how he or she was perceived as a competent communicator by his or her subordinates. The post hoc analyses also demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the subordinates’ perceived communicative competence level of the supervisor between the conflict management styles of competing and accommodating and between the conflict management styles of avoiding and accommodating. Finally, the analysis revealed that supervisors who used an accommodating style of conflict management had significantly better communicative competence levels than the supervisors that used either competing or avoiding styles of conflict management. Discussion of these findings and recommendations for future research are provided. ¿¿¿

Committee:

Heather Walter, Dr. (Advisor); Julia Spiker, Dr. (Committee Member); Andrew Rancer, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

conflict; conflict management styles; communication; communicative competence; superior’s style; conflict management

Chapman , Jessica American Exceptionalism and its Malleability: An Examination of Presidential Rhetoric in State of the Union Addresses
BA, Kent State University, 2016, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Applied Conflict Management
This honors thesis aimed to look at the changeability of American Exceptionalism over time by examining presidential rhetoric in in State of the Union Addresses from 1965 to 2016. This thesis asked the questions, does American Exceptionalism rhetoric decrease during times of failed military intervention, do Republican presidents use more American Exceptionalism rhetoric than Democratic presidents, and is presidential rhetoric of American Exceptionalism increase during times of war compared to times of peace. State of the Union Addresses were coded by groups (i.e. times of failed military intervention and times in the absence of failed military intervention, for the first research question.) and group means were compared using independent samples t-tests. For the qualitative analysis the Constant Comparative method was used to code the statements into three categories: uniqueness, superiority (social identity theory), and miscellaneous. This research found that Republican presidents use American Exceptionalism rhetoric more often than Democratic presidents and that intensity of American Exceptionalism increases over time (from 1965-2016). Further research is needed to develop more coherent conclusions on the finding of a detected increase in intensity over time

Committee:

Landon Hancock (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research

Keywords:

American exceptionalism; Vietnam War; Iraq War; presidential rhetoric; greatness; social identity theory; social psychology; conflict management; state of the union address; presidential speeches

Dowell, Remona JeannineCulture, Gender, and Agency: What Anthropology of the Arab World Offers Conflict Management
BA, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Anthropology
This thesis discusses the intersection between gender and the Arab world through the lens of anthropological theory and conflict management. The first chapter identifies the dominant streams of universalism and relativism within conflict management and anthropology. The second chapter traces gender through anthropological theory of the late twentieth century. The work of scholars Leila Ahmed, Saba Mahmood, and Lila Abu-Lughod are used in the third chapter to analyze how certain ideas about relativism and culture can be used in a variety of contexts dealing with communities of Muslim women and concluding with a series of questions revolving around how conflict management can utilize and benefit from these ideas and the works of the three scholars.

Committee:

Richard Feinberg, Dr. (Advisor); Landen Hancock, Dr. (Committee Member); Jung-Yeup Kim, Dr. (Committee Member); Susan Roxburgh, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cultural Anthropology

Keywords:

Universalism; relativism; Leila Ahmed; Leila Abu-Lughod; Saba Mahmood; Orientalism; Edward Said; Worldview Analysis; Islam; gender; anthropology; conflict management; liberal imaginary; agency; Arab world

Ray, Andra RaisaMediating and Moderating Factors in the Pathway from Child Maltreatment to Interpersonal Conflict Management in Young Adulthood
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2018, Clinical Psychology (Arts and Sciences)
Child maltreatment has been found to increase the risk of psychopathology and maladaptive functioning such as relationship problems (e.g., Larsen, Sandberg, Harper, & Bean, 2011) across multiple developmental stages. Considering that not all individuals with histories of maltreatment develop negative outcomes (e.g., Howell & Miller-Graff, 2014), understanding the process by which factors beyond the experience of maltreatment contribute to the development of social difficulties in young adulthood can be critical for the design of prevention and intervention efforts. Social-cognitive theories point to mechanisms such as rejection sensitivity and emotion dysregulation as potential sources of interpersonal vulnerability. Furthermore, theories of normative development indicate that the timing of child maltreatment may determine the magnitude of deleterious effects. This study was an investigation of the developmental psychopathological pathway between child maltreatment and interpersonal conflict management in young adulthood. The mediating roles of both rejection sensitivity and emotion dysregulation were considered, with findings primarily supporting the former mediation. Additionally, the moderating role of age of onset of child maltreatment was examined within the context of the aforementioned mediation models. None of the moderated mediation hypotheses were confirmed. Research and clinical implications, as well as future directions are discussed.

Committee:

Steven Evans (Advisor); Christine Gidycz (Committee Member); Brian Wymbs (Committee Member); Nicholas Allan (Committee Member); Thomas Vander Ven (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

child maltreatment; rejection sensitivity; emotion dysregulation; conflict management

Mao, YupingDoes Culture Matter? Relating Intercultural Communication Sensitivity to Conflict Management Styles, Technology Use, and Organizational Communication Satisfaction in Multinationals in China
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2010, Communication Studies (Communication)

Communication is very complex in multinational companies due to the diverse body of employees with different social, cultural, and educational backgrounds. Organizational communication among employees in China branches of multinational companies remains largely unexplored in previous literature. Taking an Asiacentric approach, this study examines the relationships among intercultural sensitivity, organizational communication satisfaction, organizational conflict management, and use of technologies in China branches of multinational companies. This study also compares the organizational communication experiences of Chinese employees with overseas experience and those without overseas experience.

An online survey was conducted with Chinese employees of multinational companies. Comparisons were made between those with some degree of overseas living experience and those without any overseas living experience. The survey included the Intercultural Communication Sensitivity Scale (ISS) (Chen & Starosta, 2000), a revised version of the Technology Usage Scale (TUS) (Scott & Timmerman, 2005), the Organizational Communication Conflict Instrument (OCCI) (Putnam & Wilson, 1982), and the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ) (Downs & Hazen, 1977).The following pairs of variables were analyzed using Pearson product moment correlations: intercultural sensitivity and organizational communication satisfaction, intercultural sensitivity and conflict management styles, intercultural sensitivity and use of technologies, organizational communication satisfaction and conflict management styles, organizational communication satisfaction and use of technologies, conflict management styles and use of technologies. Significant correlations were found in the above six pairs of variables and their factors. Overall no significant differences between Chinese employees with overseas experience and those without overseas experience were found in the following key variables: intercultural sensitivity, conflict management styles, organizational communication satisfaction level, and use of technology in organizational communication. Although minor differences existed between those two groups of participants, in general, the two groups revealed similar organizational communication behavior.

This study is one of very few extant studies that focus on organizational communication in the Chinese context. This study enriches the literature on Asian organizational communication studies, and contributes to the development of the Asiacentric approach. The correlations among the variables identified by this study build the empirical foundation for future research to further develop communication models that include those variables and which will have significant theoretical and practical implications.

Committee:

Claudia Hale, PhD (Advisor); Andrew Ledbetter, PhD (Committee Member); Anita James, PhD (Committee Member); Gordon Brooks, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Chinese employee; intercultural sensitivity; conflict management; organizational communication satisfaction; technology use; multinationals

Galanes, Gloria J.The effect of conflict expression styles on quality of outcome and satisfaction in small task-oriented groups /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1985, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Small groups;Conflict management

Mitchell, Andrea LaurenConflict Management Styles and Aggressive Communication in Email: An Examination of Organizational Interactions
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2012, Communication
Organizational communication in today's workforce takes place through many communication channels, with face-to-face and email being two of the primary channels (Cheney, Christensen, Zorn, & Ganesh, 2004). While there is an abundance of research on conflict management styles in face-to-face contexts (Folger, Poole, & Stutman, 1997; Rahim, 1992; Thomas, 1976) and on argumentativeness and verbal aggressiveness in face-to-face contexts (Infante & Rancer, 1982; Infante & Wigley, 1986; Rancer & Avtgis, 2006), there is less research on conflict and these types of communicative behaviors in computer-mediated contexts, more specifically email (Martin, Heisel, & Valencic, 2001; Turnage, 2008). This study examined a) conflict management styles utilized between peers most often in organizational email interactions compared to face-to-face, and b) the levels of trait argumentativeness and trait verbal aggressiveness coworkers display when communicating via email in organizations between peers versus face-to-face. The findings of this study indicate that a) individuals are more likely to use the competing conflict management style in organizational email versus face-to-face, b) that trait argumentativeness and trait verbal aggressiveness show no differences in both email and face-to-face contexts., and c) verbal aggressiveness is endorsed more often in the email context.

Committee:

Heather Walter, Dr. (Advisor); Carolyn Anderson, Dr. (Committee Member); Andrew Rancer, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

conflict; conflict management styles; trait argumentativeness; trait verbal aggressiveness; email

Putman, Paul G.Virtual Simulation in Leadership Development Training: The Impact of Learning Styles and Conflict Management Tactics on Adult Learner Performance
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2012, College of Education and Human Services

Adult learners can develop leadership skills and competencies such as conflict management and negotiation skills. Virtual simulations are among the emerging new technologies available to adult educators and trainers to help adults develop various leadership competencies. This study explored the impact of conflict management tactics as well as learning styles on the efficacy of virtual leadership development training.

In this quantitative study, participants (n=349) completed electronic versions of both the Power and Influence Tactics Scale (POINTS) and the Kolb Learning Styles Instrument (KLSI). Results of participant scores for both instruments were compared with scores from a virtual leadership simulation.

Performance within a virtual leadership simulation was not found to be significantly impacted by diverse learning styles, indicating that virtual simulations can be effective for adult learners with any learning style. Statistically significant correlations were found between all seven conflict management tactics and key virtual leadership simulation scores, indicating that virtual leadership simulations can be effective tools for practicing multiple conflict management tactics.

Experiential learning techniques are becoming commonplace and the use of technology is growing within the field of adult and leadership education. This study elucidates the effectiveness of new technologies such as virtual simulations as tools for leadership development. This study contributes to leadership education best practices by exploring the effectiveness of virtual simulations as a method for training leaders that will allow educators to incorporate emerging best practices into their repertoire of methodologies.

Committee:

Catherine Monaghan, PhD (Committee Chair); Jonathan Messemer, EdD (Committee Member); Catherine Hansman, EdD (Committee Member); Selma Vonderwell, PhD (Committee Member); Sanda Kaufmann, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education

Keywords:

leadership development; virtual simulation; learning styles; conflict management; adult learners; simulation; leadership; leadership training; leadership competencies; leadership skills; technology; Kolb Learning Styles Instrument; experiential learning

Hale, Patricia Manager Training: Professional Development Content for New and Newly Promoted Managers
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Ohio University, 2016, Business Administration
A paper outlining the importance of training managers separately in development courses within a firm. Four topics - emotional intelligence, communication between managers and subordinates, conflict management, and team formation - are presented in a manager-oriented perspective. This research contributed to four training modules which can effectively build managerial skills in a time efficient way.

Committee:

Jason Stoner, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Management

Keywords:

manager training;human resources;emotional intelligence;conflict management;communication;team formation

Nolan, Linda L.Conflict management : effects of perception and personality on strategies for handling conflict /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1985, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Conflict management;Perception;Personality

Chao, Chin-ChungCultural Values and Expectations of Female Leadership Styles in Non-Profit Organizations: A Study of Rotary Clubs in Taiwan and the United States
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Communication Studies
The present cross-cultural study applies leadership frameworks developed by Bass and Avolio and modifies the cultural dimensions proposed by Hofstede to explore and compare the relationships between cultural values and corresponding expectations of female leadership styles in a non-profit organization in Taiwan and the United States of America. In total, 550 Rotarians in Taiwan and another 550 Rotarians in the United States were invited to complete a survey so as to reveal the relationships between Rotarians' cultural values and their expected female leadership styles. In addition, for a deeper and insightful understanding of the female leadership styles in non-profit settings, the method of semi-structured interview is used to raise participants' as well as the researcher's consciousness of and critical reflections upon social practices regarding female leadership. The research results are five-fold: First, Rotarians in Taiwan have higher scores in all of the four cultural dimensions of collectivism, masculinity, customs, and long-term relationships than Rotarians in the United States. Second, among the three major leadership styles, Rotarians in both countries expect female leaders to display transformational leadership. However, laissez-faire leadership style can be better explained by the variables of cultural values and country than demographic factors. Third, the emerged seven qualities in the female leaders in Rotary Clubs in both countries correspond with the characteristics of transformational leadership style. Fourth, the interview data indicate a common use of obliging and integrating conflict management strategies among the female leaders in both countries. Finally, this research also manifests that, to successfully confront gender discrimination and break the glass ceiling, female leaders oftentimes need to be more progressive and active and sometimes make necessary compromises of their female qualities. The results of this study also reveal that culture is not the only factor to account for the expected female leadership styles. The future study of leadership concepts and styles should include more variables such as organizational culture, political system, language, and feminine or masculine characteristics. To ensure the validity of research findings, this study triangulates surveys and semi-structured interviews and injects breadth and depth in describing the relationship between cultural values and female leadership styles revealing the cultural perceptions of Rotarians in both Taiwan and the United States. The results of the study build an understanding of cultural values and expected female leadership styles in non-profit organizations while also contributing to the knowledge of organizational communication and cross-cultural leadership.

Committee:

Louisa Ha, PhD (Committee Chair); Alfred DeMaris, PhD (Committee Member); Srinivas Melkote, PhD (Committee Member); Canchu Lin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

cultural vlaues; expectations of female leadership styles; conflict management strategies; non-profit organizaiton of Rotary Clubs