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Henney, Pamela AnnActing the Author: Using Acting Techniques in Teaching Academic Writing
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2012, English-Composition

The process of becoming a writer – choosing the topic, recognizing the audience, acknowledging the facts and theories of the subject – is similar to that which an actor goes through to design a specific character for a specific role. This similarity, and its inherent potential for effective teaching and learning, has been neglected in the Composition/Rhetoric field’s literature and in the college writing classroom. Some students come to First Year Composition (FYC) with the understanding that writing is merely repeating what the instructor has told them, and writing in the way the instructor has told them, not realizing that they, too, have a voice. This is not a new observation, and composition theory has and continues to address the issue of developing a writerly voice, but the problem remains: students too often do not develop their own well-rounded author/character, but stick to a flat stereotype instead, producing writing that is uninteresting, disengaged, and ineffective. This project argues that there are various processes an actor might choose to create each character he portrays on stage or in film, and that understanding these processes could help the student writer develop his own author character during the writing process, thus producing more effective texts and enabling a more fruitful process for future writing.

Method Acting is one of the unique processes which make use of multiple influences and experiences that contribute to the forming and presentation of the self. A clear parallel may be found between the process a method actor goes through to create and present his character within the context of a play or film and the process an expository writer (journalist to essayist) goes through to create and present his text. Little has been written of this parallel thus far, and it may be useful to evaluate its potential for integration into the traditional implementation of the writing process, as well as the pedagogies used in composition and research courses.

Committee:

Julie Drew, Dr. (Advisor); Janet Bean, Dr. (Committee Member); Hillary Nunn, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition

Keywords:

Composition; Rhetoric; Writing; Acting; First Year Composition; Composition Theory; Performative Writing; Performative Composition; Performative; Teaching College Composition; Teaching College Writing;

Harris, Christopher SeanFIRST-YEAR COMPOSITION HANDBOOKS: BUFFERING THE WINDS OF CHANGE
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2006, English/Rhetoric and Writing
This dissertation discusses composition history treatments and the scant amount of scholarly research devoted solely to composition textbooks, though scholars such as Robin Varnum and Stephen North argue that studying textbooks cannot divulge much about the history of composition instruction. However, in “Handbooks” History of a Genre” and “Handbook Bibliography,” Robert Connors sets in motion detailed historical studies of composition textbooks. Composition textbooks can provide insight into how publishers think instructors should teach students or how colleges want instructors to teach students—merely how students should learn to write, what students should learn about writing. Most importantly, this dissertation explores structural changes of handbooks by: first, in Chapter Three, defining the composition handbook genre as one comprised of textbooks that help instructors mark essays and help students correct essays; Second, in Chapter Four, tracing the development of purely American composition textbooks from the 1800s to 2005, namely by describing how John C. Hodges's Harbrace College Handbook has evolved since it's first printing in 1941; and third, comparing features in the most recent editions of Harbrace to features in current textbooks: The St. Martin's Handbook and Penguin Handbook. Though the composition handbook genre has markedly changed during the last century, I conclude Chapter Four by arguing that the guiding theory behind composition handbooks has not changed. New handbook chapters dedicated to writing with computers or composing in a digital age merely come with corresponding correction codes. Though Connors argues in 1983 that composition handbooks have not changed although composition theory has, my exploration of handbooks shows that handbooks have remained largely similar to Woolley's Handbook, first published in 1907. Handbooks have since then and still exist as tools to assist grading (instructor) and correcting (student) compositions. Because composition handbooks still have structures similar to the 1941 edition of Harbrace, in Chapter Five I discuss hyperliteracy and propose further research into the usability of composition handbooks, as current students generally know how to navigate hypermedia though handbooks have retained their index-driven form.

Committee:

Kris Blair (Advisor)

Subjects:

Language, Rhetoric and Composition

Keywords:

rhetoric; composition; composition studies; writing; writing instruction; composition pedagogy; college textbooks; writing textbooks; rhetoric and composition

Lenz, Kent AlanThe Semiotics, Practical Application, and Assessment of the Modalities
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
This dissertation examines the influence digital composing spaces, e.g. networked technology, have on composition instruction, student composing practices, and assessment of student work. Recent conversations - Pamela Takayoshi and Brian Huot (2003), Cynthia Selfe (2007), Joddy Murray (2009), and The National Writing Project (2010) - recognize that the presence of technology has given rise to multimodality in composition curricula. Thus, this project first questions what can be considered multimodality by examining where print and digital composing spaces have differences and similarities. Second, whether the multimodal composition process occurs in print or digital composing spaces, the process of multimodality (either instruction or production) relies on Semiotics as a basis for visual interpretation and theory. To showcase this theory in practical application, this project analyzes advertisements for technology to map society’s history with various technological landmarks. Next, this project then considers how multimodality can be used in composition curriculum by exemplifying an Intermediate Writing. However, the presence of multimodality in the classroom raises the question of assessment. As a result, this project utilizes Semiotics in conjunction with theories of discourse as a foundation for assessing multimodal composition projects. Finally, this dissertation provides discussion that speculates on the future direction of composition. This speculation recognizes that the influence multimodality has is not just noticeable in popular composition textbooks. The influence reaches us as members of contemporary society.

Committee:

Kristine Blair, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Gary Heba, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Lee Nickoson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Becca Cragin, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Multimedia Communications; Rhetoric; Technology

Keywords:

Multimodal Composition; Composition; First Year Composition; Composition Theory; Pedagogy; Semiotics; Visual Rhetoric; Technology

Thomas, Brennan M.Composition Studies and Teaching Anxiety: A Pilot Study of Teaching Groups and Discipline- and Program-Specific Triggers
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2006, English/Rhetoric and Writing
Although previous studies on teaching anxiety have clarified the general characteristics and manifestations of this phenomenon and established the need for more effective teacher preparation programs, most do not reflect the practices or concerns of writing instructors or indicate how or why they experience anxiety. The purpose of this dissertation, therefore, was to determine how the rhetorical and situational elements of writing instruction contribute to teaching anxiety and to what extent composition instructors attempt to resolve or minimize the effects of potential triggers and symptoms. Over a period of sixteen weeks, five first-year composition instructors completed a series of interviews and surveys related to their teaching and met periodically in small groups to discuss instructional matters and strategies for handling them. Data yielded from interview and group session transcripts and survey responses indicated that a) general teaching anxiety triggers (that is, triggers found in any discipline and at any level) are often compounded by discipline- and/or program-specific anxiety triggers, b) the potential anxiety triggers instructors reported or exhibited seem to interfere with their abilities to successfully impart student learning, and c) instructors’ behavioral responses to such anxiety triggers are influenced by what they consider to be the likeliest and/or most addressable sources of their anxiety. These findings provide several starting points for a much needed in-depth look into the causes and manifestations of and possible remedies for teaching anxiety as well as the long-term effects of teacher preparation and faculty development programs on anxiety and job performance.

Committee:

Sue Carter Wood (Advisor)

Keywords:

teaching anxiety; communication apprehension; teacher efficacy; efficacy; composition instruction; writing instruction; composition studies; rhetoric and composition; first-year composition; teacher-student communication; writing program administration

Harker, Michael WarrenThe Lure of Literacy: A Critical Reception of the Abolition Debate
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, English

“The Lure of Literacy: A Critical Reception of the Abolition Debate” uses the century-long tradition of proposals for the abolition of compulsory composition to uncover pervasive assumptions about literacy. Chapters of this project revisit touchstones in the debate to show how arguments on all sides of the issue depend on ambiguous and contradictory attitudes about literacy as well as exaggerated expectations of the consequences of possessing it. This project re-contextualizes calls to abolish compulsory composition and proposes questions that may be used to inform a new model for first-year writing, one aspiring to complicate students’ attitudes about literacy more generally. In arguing for a different model for compulsory composition programs, this dissertation offers a way out of an unproductive debate that has gripped composition for over a century.

Following a prologue that surveys relevant literature in the abolition debate, Chapter 1 demonstrates how exaggerated expectations of the powers of literacy underline calls to abolish compulsory composition. Using principal contributors of the New Literacy Studies, I reread the first printed calls to abolish compulsory composition. I show how the period of academic specialization (1865-1920) and exaggerated understandings of the ostensible powers of literacy inform these proposals, complicating attempts to bring about lasting reform in the teaching of composition. Chapter 2 supplements existing histories of the abolition debate by incorporating overlooked voices of both abolitionism and reform. I question the validity of a distinction posited by contemporary receptions of the abolition debate; namely, between “abolitionists” and “new abolitionists.” My view is that this division is only possible if we ignore persistent continuities in the debate, especially with respect to the attitudes and definitions of literacy that inform these studies.

In Chapter 3, I challenge dominant narratives of abolitionism in composition by examining proposals that seek not to abolish the requirement but to reform the course on various levels. Taken together, these essays demonstrate that like abolitionists, arguments employing the rhetoric of “cooperation,” “continuity,” and “reform,” rely on problematic attitudes about literacy. Chapter 4, focusing primarily on Sharon Crowley’s call to abolish compulsory composition(1998), is situated more specifically in the context of materialist critiques of the conditions of teaching writing. By examining the rhetoric of academic discourse surrounding Sharon Crowley’s call to abolish compulsory freshman composition, I explain how her proposal has gained notoriety in English studies. This chapter argues that her role in the abolition debate deserves greater critical attention.

My conclusion makes two moves: First, I discuss Stanley Fish’s “What Should Colleges Teach?” (2009). Fish’s article demonstrates that complaints about composition continue today. I contend that his study rehearses the same arguments and criticisms that have been levied against composition since its inception in 1874. I turn, in the second part, to a series of questions that may be used to inform a new model for first-year writing, one based on interrogating the very idea of literacy itself.

Committee:

Kay Halasek (Committee Co-Chair); Harvey Graff (Committee Co-Chair); Cindy Selfe (Committee Member); Louie Ulman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition

Keywords:

composition; literacy; literacy studies; the literacy myth; rhetoric and composition; academic specialization; rhetoric; first-year writing; educational reform; compulsory composition;

Ryder, Robert MonierCan Instructional Videos Influence Perception of Plagiarism Among First Year Composition (FYC) Students?
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Findlay, 2016, Rhetoric and Writing
The purpose of this study is to examine whether video intervention influences student perception about plagiarism and to test whether students rank different forms of plagiarism and originality infraction by degree of severity. Plagiarism is often unintentional. Honor codes do not do much, but intervention might. Similarly, studies have suggested that the term plagiarism is outdated, and that the term incorrectly encompasses a wide range of writing practices, some major and others far less severe. The study’s scope was limited to first year composition (FYC) students at The University of Findlay (UF), a small Midwestern comprehensive university in Findlay, Ohio. The study utilized survey research of a control group and two experimental groups. Classes were administered a pre- and post-survey in the Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 semesters, and different video interventions were shown each semester. In addition to survey data, two study participants were also interviewed about their perception of different forms of plagiarism. While results did not lead to conclusive determination of whether videos result in a perceptual change about plagiarism, they did show that students do rank different forms of plagiarism and originality infraction by degree of severity. Study results led to two conclusions. First, videos that provide students with instructional variety and engaging content can be an excellent supplement to in-class writing exercises and face-to-face instruction. Second, students do not consider all types of plagiarism and originality infraction to be equally problematic. This necessitates use of a more extensive meta-language about plagiarism and originality infractions rather than categorizing all infractions as plagiarism.

Committee:

Elkie Burnside (Committee Chair); Sarah Fedirka (Committee Member); Nicole Williams (Committee Member); Christine Tulley (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Community College Education; Composition; Education; English As A Second Language; Ethics; Language; Rhetoric; Teaching

Keywords:

plagiarism; originality infraction; rhetoric and composition; scale; hierarchy; first year composition; freshman composition; Ryder Scale of Originality Infraction; pedagogy; survey; originality; infraction; severity; plagiarism scale; original authorship

Mahaffey, Cynthia JoWearing the Rainbow Triangle: The Effect of Out Lesbian Teachers and Lesbian Teacher Subjectivities on Student Choice of Topics, Student Writing, and Student Subject Positions in the First-Year Composition Classroom
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2004, English/Rhetoric and Writing
This dissertation examines out lesbian teachers in the college composition classroom from a viewpoint of feminist teacher research and “queer geography”. Employing composition history, the ideological erasure of lesbian teacher subjectivities in the composition classroom is outlined. Case studies of lesbian teachers and students in lesbian teachers’ composition classrooms indicate in a preliminary way that students’ choice of writing topics, student writing and student subject positions are affected by the presence of out lesbian composition teachers.

Committee:

Lovie Carter (Advisor); Rachel Vannatta (Other); Donna Nelson-Beene (Other); Valerie Rohy (Other)

Keywords:

homosexuality; lesbian teachers; lesbian composition professors; composition studies; college writing; college composition; empowerment pedagogies; critical pedagogies; Writing Across the Curriculum pedagogies; queer theory; cultural studies

McKay, Carol LandgrafWriting strategies in Spanish or French at the secondary level : a comparison of proficient second language learners identified as academically gifted with those not so identified /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1983, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Language and languages--Study and teaching;Spanish language--Composition and excersises;French language--Composition

Gooch, Jocelyn JoannWriting Values: Between Composition and The Disciplines
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2006, English-Composition
Writing Values: Between Composition and The Disciplines explores the differences I imagined between Composition and other classrooms, especially the social sciences. Three Composition instructors and instructors from History, Sociology, Political Science, and Economics explain their experiences with writing in their classrooms. They discuss revision, the student, the purpose of writing, and writing assessment. I compare their stories with my own experiences against a backdrop of theory in the field of Composition to find out the nature of the disconnect, if any, between writing in Composition and in other disciplines.

Committee:

Janet Bean (Advisor)

Subjects:

Language, Rhetoric and Composition

Keywords:

composition; writing; revision; writing assessment; purpose of writing; composition instruction; student as person; writing across the curriculum

Stanojevic, Vera D.An approach to the pedagogy of beginning music composition: teaching understanding and realization of the first steps in composing music
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2004, Music
Conducting a first course in music composition in a classroom setting is one of the most difficult tasks a composer/teacher faces. Such a course is much more effective when the basic elements of compositional technique are shown, as much as possible, to be universally applicable, regardless of style. When students begin to see these topics in a broader perspective and understand the roots, dynamic behaviors, and the general nature of the different elements and functions in music, they begin to treat them as open models for individual interpretation, and become much more free in dealing with them expressively. This document is not designed as a textbook, but rather as a resource for the teacher of a beginning college undergraduate course in composition. The Introduction offers some perspectives on teaching composition in the contemporary musical setting influenced by fast access to information, popular culture, and globalization. In terms of breadth, the text reflects the author’s general methodology in leading students from basic exercises in which they learn to think compositionally, to the writing of a first composition for solo instrument. The concept of universal applicability of techniques is carried through discussions on the nature of sound as an expressive resource, how to deal with first ideas, exploration and formation of motives, building phrases, and the notion of form in music. The approach and procedures in the text are based on the author’s own experiences teaching composition at The Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow, and Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. Examples and assignments serve to illustrate points in the text, and to assist the teacher in the classroom.

Committee:

Donald Harris (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

music composition pedagogy; beginning music composition

Mazzoleni, Melissa A. K.Digital and Paper-Based: The Complex Literacies of Composition Students and Instructors
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2012, English
This thesis, based upon literacy narratives collected through one-to-one interviews, explores the reading, writing, and technology experiences of four composition students and six composition instructors. This project elucidates how students’ and instructors’ digital and paper-based literacies are developed and sponsored in diverse contexts, by analyzing four literacy narratives in detail as well as discussing themes that emerged in the other literacy narratives. Implications for both the composition classroom and instructor training are discussed.

Committee:

Dr. Jason Palmeri (Committee Chair); Dr. Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson (Committee Member); Dr. Heidi McKee (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Higher Education; Literacy; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

composition; pedagogy; literacy; literacies digital literacy; digital literacies; technology; digital technologies; instructors; first year composition; instructor training

Heizenrader, Katherine ParksCollege Student Retention and Composition: A Study across Contexts
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2013, English
This thesis explores relationships between college student retention and composition, through an analysis of research in both areas and a localized interview-based study. Chapter One consists of a literature review of retention research alongside major terms from composition studies concerning access and enrollment. Chapter Two describes a person-based research study, exploring major ideas that emerged from interviews with advisors, first-year composition instructors, and students distributed between Miami University's selective admission and open admission campuses in the form of a thematic conversation about retention: how it is defined, who is invested in it, and factors that may lead to its improvement. This conversation raises questions and possibilities for local retention efforts, especially for students who move between commuter-oriented and residential-oriented campuses. Chapter Three presents pedagogical and curricular implications for Miami's first-year composition program in light of the literature review and interviews, and advances suggestions for participating in institutional conversations.

Committee:

Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson, PhD (Committee Chair); Jason Palmeri, PhD (Committee Member); John Tassoni, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Education History; Higher Education; Literacy; Multicultural Education; Pedagogy

Keywords:

college student retention; college composition; college access; basic writing; enrollment management; composition pedagogy

Shepley, Nathan E.Composition at the "Harvard on the Hocking": Rhetoricizing Place and History
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2010, English (Arts and Sciences)
In this study, the author assembles and examines versions of composition history at one higher education institution, Ohio University (OU), focusing on the years 1825-1950. Primarily, the author studies texts housed in the OU archives and considers an eclectic array of source types, from students’ letters to local history books to course catalogs and notes from meetings of OU administrators. But rather than attempt to give a full, complete history of composition at this site, the author relies on a sophistic rhetorical tradition to surface and problematize rules that composition scholars abide by when they construct histories, and the author centers the study on sophistic principles that approximate the modern-day concepts of community, context, composition (variously defined), and communication (understood as oral and performance based). Emerging from this sophistic tradition, the results are tentative and potentially conflicting, showing that there is no single overarching narrative of composition history at OU. Instead, the study shows ways in which composition at OU has reflected the norms of the University and the Athens, Ohio, community; conformed to the commonplace attitudes and opinions of the local populace; assumed various forms for groups with varying degrees of power; and developed alongside and through an oral rhetoric used for public performances. The author uses this work to theorize an approach to composition historiography that takes into account the locatedness of writing and a sophistic understanding of textual meaning. Such a historiography would continuously critique the historian’s sources and interpretive tools and would join in a wider postmodern resistance to metanarratives.

Committee:

Sherrie Gradin, PhD (Committee Chair); Mara Holt, PhD (Committee Member); Josephine Bloomfield, PhD (Committee Member); Raymie McKerrow, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Rhetoric

Keywords:

rhetoric and composition; composition histories; local histories; neosophistic rhetorical theory; Ohio University

Schaffer, Martha WilsonAffective Possibilities for Rhetoric and Writing: How We Might Self-Assess Potentiality in Composition
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
My dissertation, Affective Possibilities for Rhetoric & Writing: How We Might Self-Assess Potentiality in Composition, presents a reconceived approach to teaching self-assessment practices to writing students in college writing classrooms by combining practices of reflection with consideration of potentiality. As defined in this project, potentiality is a quality of student writers and of their writing−a capacity for change, growth, and development into the future. These findings are built upon an empirical study of four first-year writing students, who were interviewed about their own assessment practices, both in terms of their writing processes with specific texts and in terms of their own conception of themselves as writers. I situate my data within contexts of writing assessment, feminist scholarship, affect studies, and liminality. At the crossroads of these varying conversations are concerns about literacy and agency, as well as about capacity and potential. Haswell and Haswell (2010) advocate for writing assessment practices that honor and encourage student writers’ sense of authorship. They conceive of this sense of authorship as being intimately tied to a notion of potentiality. How to define, identify, and attend to potentiality are the questions that I consider through the lenses of feminist scholarship and affect studies. Feminist scholarship promotes literacy as a means to achieve identity and agency in the spaces around us, in education and in practice. In the spaces between texts and agents, feminism finds possibility for change and for access to power that seems tied to fixed positions. Similarly, affect studies draws attention away from subject positions and subjects to focus on the interactions and expressions that pass between agents. My analysis of the data from my empirical study includes a definition of potentiality informed by these aspects of feminist scholarship and affect studies. My project demonstrates that potentiality can be defined as a quality in student writers and their writings, and that is it worthwhile to help students identify their own potentiality as a means of developing a sense of authorship that will enhance their use of writing and the impact that they might have on their environments through literate activity. This project also demonstrates that student writers function in liminal space, where their identities and their sense of authorship is neither determined nor fixed, but flexible and open to change and development. In this liminal space, writing students might learn practices that help them in defining and following their own trajectories as interactive and interaffective agents. As a result of these findings, I call for writing studies scholars to consider new practices of self-assessment for student writers that go beyond reflection on past writing projects, processes, and portfolios. By teaching and practicing self-reflection that attends to future goals and desires, writing instructors can promote a sense of authorship that imbues student writers with literacy and agency that extends further than the academy, fulfilling feminist and cultural goals for a liberatory education.

Committee:

Kristine Blair (Committee Co-Chair); Lee Nickoson (Committee Co-Chair); David Tobar (Committee Member); Sue Carter Wood (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Rhetoric

Keywords:

rhetoric; composition; assessment; writing; affect; feminist theory; liminality; self-assessment; first-year composition; basic writing; potentiality; writing assessment

Arduini, TinaTools of Play: Developing a Pedagogical Framework for Gaming Literacy in the Multimodal Composition Classroom
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
Since the publication of James Paul Gee’s (2003) seminal text What Video Games Have to Teach us About Learning and Literacy, scholars in the field of rhetoric and writing have been looking at the ways video games have made an impact on modern literacies. Paralleling this research, rhetoric and writing teacher-scholars have also been exploring the benefits to teaching multimodal composition skills to their students. My dissertation examines the intersections of these two related fields of study in order to help construct a pedagogical framework that utilizes gaming literacies in the multimodal composition classroom. Using the gaming literacy narratives of three student gamers at a rural Midwestern university, I address the following research questions: How do students acquire gaming literacy? What kinds of multimodal skills are acquired through gaming literacy? What does one’s gaming literacy narrative reveal about his or her literate practices? The answers to these questions help to inform my approach to the more pedagogically-driven research question: How can gaming literacy be effectively used in the multimodal composition classroom? My findings are influenced by technofeminist research methodologies so that I explore not only the role that video games have played upon my research participants but also the social adaptations that the participants have exerted over their gaming experiences. Similarly, I help breakdown the rigid line between researcher and research participant by inviting my participants into a discussion of my findings, allowing them to maintain agency over their representations. My research reveals many connections between gaming literacies and the skills required to create and consume meaningful multimodal compositions. In my analysis of these findings, I establish the importance of these connections—specifically the social and technological skills obtained through gaming—and develop a pedagogical framework that utilizes the literate skills of gamers in order to institute practical course goals and objectives for the multimodal composition classroom.

Committee:

Kristine Blair (Advisor); Lee Nickoson (Committee Member); Sue Carter Wood (Committee Member); Gi Yun (Other)

Subjects:

Composition; Rhetoric

Keywords:

gaming literacy; multimodal composition; composition pedagogy; twenty-first century literacies; rhetoric and writing

Kinney, Kelly A.A Political Administration: Pedagogy, Location, and Teaching Assistant Preparation
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2005, English (Arts and Sciences)

This qualitative, participant-observation study examines the political dynamics that affect the preparation of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) by writing program administrators (WPAs) at a mid-sized public research institution, “Ridge University.” As my primary source of data, I recorded, observed, and participated in a teaching assistant preparation (TAP) seminar that prepared new teachers to teach college composition and that met twice weekly during the fall term of 2000. I also rely on data gathered in participant interviews and during GTA orientation, department meetings, graduate program colloquia, and public functions throughout the twelve-week data collection phase of this study.

Building most centrally on the scholarship of James Berlin, Bruce Horner, Margaret Himley, and Laura Micciche, I represent the experiences of graduate teaching assistants and writing program administrators and analyze their material, local, political, and emotional contexts. Examining formative events that took place in the teaching assistant preparation seminar I studied, I not only interpret the different ways GTAs and WPAs responded to political approaches to writing instruction, I explore how GTAs’ and WPAs’ respective institutional political locations affected their work. Through an investigation of research data and pertinent scholarship, I argue that GTAs’ lack of institutional authority, teaching experience, and familiarity with political discourse negatively influenced their perceptions about their work. I also demonstrate the ways WPAs inhabited a split subjectivity, one that positioned them to be both disciplinary-activists and manager-disciplinarians and, as a result, caused tensions in their work. In order to combat the disaffection associated with teaching assistant preparation, I suggest that preparation initiatives proactively surface the pressures that erupt in work surrounding the teaching of writing by historicizing relationships among cultural, institutional, disciplinary, and pedagogical politics.

Committee:

Sherrie Gradin (Advisor)

Keywords:

Teaching assistant preparation; Writing program administration; political approaches to writing instruction; political pedagogy; institutional political location; institutional critique; split subjectivity; Rhetoric and Composition; college composition

Witmer, Mark DanielInside Out
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Music Composition
In partial fulfillment of the degree Master of Music in Composition at Bowling Green State University, I have composed Inside Out for large orchestra. A unifying trait of the the work is motion up and down the orchestra's register; thus, the title refers to the initial rising gesture being turned “inside out” in a later section based on descending pitches. It also relates to the body's awareness of acceleration and motion. Musical gestures perceived audibly with the outer ear are often described as moving “up” or “down,” a metaphor for sensations of the inner ear. I derived the pitch material for this piece from the twelve-tone row (46973A1580B2), which I use in a variety of ways throughout the piece. I derived this row from a twelve-note chord spanning the entire range of the orchestra, with wide intervals in the lowest register, decreasing to major and minor seconds in the highest register. The first section of Inside Out introduces the pitches of the row one at time with different instruments or groups of instruments until the entire orchestra is active. A sweeping gesture abruptly terminates this passage and leads to a new texture, where the woodwinds, each playing in a fixed register, trade notes in the main row while muted brass and percussion pulse underneath. The strings enter gradually and eventually drown out the rest of the orchestra with an enormous downward gesture blending pizzicato, glissandi, col legno battuto, and glissando techniques until they come to rest at a narrow cluster, which is then taken up by the horns. The rest of the orchestra returns for a brief coda, where a nervous gesture featuring pitches derived from the original row sounds in varied doublings and triplings. The opening music re-emerges in the background, leading to a quiet close. Inside Out is my first work for full orchestra; as such, it allowed me to address the challenges of selecting and combining from a wide array of instrumental timbres, of preparing a professional-quality score and parts, and of working with a conductor and orchestra to bring about a live realization of the music.

Committee:

Mikel Kuehn (Advisor); Marilyn Shrude (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Music

Keywords:

Composition; Contemporary Music; Orchestra; Music Composition; New Music

Kurlinkus, William CNostalgia and New Media: Designing Difference into Rhetoric, Composition, and Technology
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, English
In this project I construct a democratic model of new media composing education and production that uses nostalgia (a community, tradition, and emotion-focused lens) to uncover design lessons within a diverse set of techno-composing milieus: the hipster craft movement, the new capitalist workplace, debates in the field of composition studies, and several client-designer interactions. In doing so, I argue that because communities value diverse technological pasts, so, too, do they inevitably imagine diverse ideal futures. Sadly, citizens and students who value technological futures beyond efficient high-tech profusion are historically labeled technophobic and/or illiterate. Through such a dismissal, scholars of technology--from ER doctors to new media composition instructors--miss out on a wide array of design assets and possible futures that could make the world a better place. To counter this anemic thinking, I develop a cross-cultural rhetoric of technology, which uses nostalgia to identify, mediate, and design from techno-logical "contact zones" (see Pratt; Pfaffenberger; Selfe and Selfe; Canagarajah), spaces where different communities with different understandings, values, goals, and literacies surrounding writing technologies interact and clash in systems of uneven power. In doing so, I call for the expansion of definitions of technological literacy in new media composition; I argue for teaching composing students to mediate technological conflicts; and I illustrate how composers can learn from the contextualized memories of their audiences in order to create more inclusive, creative, and profitable texts.

Committee:

Cynthia Selfe (Advisor); H. Lewis Ulman (Committee Member); Beverly Moss (Committee Member); Nancy Johnson (Committee Member); Susan Delagrange (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Communication; Composition; Design; Education; Education Philosophy; Literacy; Philosophy; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Technology

Keywords:

nostalgia; new media; rhetoric; composition; literacy; technology; design; wicked design; new media composition; multimodality; multimodal composing; multiliteracy; philosophy of technology; technology; democratic design; metis

Kupferberg, Becky LynnThe Influence of Digital Multimodal Composition in First-Year Composition: A Moment in the 2015-2016 School Year
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Findlay, 2016, Rhetoric and Writing
A study of ten university writing program directors from a variety of institutions reveals the ways that digital multimodal composition has influenced first-year composition (FYC) programs. Most FYC programs in the study have implemented digital compositions in their curricula, and these range from assignment options to requirements for proficiency. The study also revealed that the digital movement in FYC is generally instructor-driven as classroom instructors seek ways to teach digital composing practices, create digital assignments, and assess digital compositions. In addition, FYC instructors are adapting alphabetic text composing practices to digital texts, and this practice in turn may help students become more intentional in applying appropriate academic conventions while composing digital projects.

Committee:

Christine Denecker, Dr. (Committee Chair); Nicole Diederich, Dr. (Committee Member); Allison Baer, Dr. (Committee Member); Christine Tulley, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Composition; Education; Education, General; Education, Teacher Training; Information Technology; Pedagogy; Rhetoric

Keywords:

digital multimodal composition; first-year composition; pedagogy; assessment

Nunes, Matthew J.The Theme System: Current-Traditionalism, Writing Assignments, and the Development of First-Year Composition
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, English (Arts and Sciences)
Rhetoric and composition histories have given considerable attention to first-year composition in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. However, they have primarily limited their attention to current-traditional rhetoric’s manifestations — especially its over-focus on superficial correctness. They have failed to give any significant attention to the writing assignments central to composition classes. To address this gap, this dissertation examines the history of composition instruction in the United States through the lens of writing assignment genres. I argue that such an examination can reshape our understanding of our field’s history and is significant for understanding the role and history of many writing assignments still in use today, which might influence current teaching and future developments in our discipline and our classrooms. Focusing on assignments, I utilize genre theory as a theoretical lens in analyzing and understanding their role and historical development. Examining and revising composition history through the lens of what I call a “theme system” and genre theory complicates the field’s conception of the period’s current-traditional focus and can inform our understanding of current pedagogical practices that have roots in the theme system. In making my argument, I first trace the history and development of theme writing from its roots in classical rhetoric and sixteenth-century English education to its forms when first-year composition was instituted at Harvard in 1885. I then examine how the spread and development of first-year composition, characterized by a theme writing approach, can be seen as the spread and development of an assignment genre system: the theme system. Following this, I reexamine the design of Harvard’s influential English A, focusing on the role and purpose of the course’s writing assignments. Finally, comparing the writing assignments in three popular current composition textbooks to assignments of the early twentieth century, I establish that despite a widespread condemnation and dismissing of current-traditional writing pedagogy of the beginning of the twentieth century, many current writing assignments are rooted in the assignments of the theme system.

Committee:

Mara Holt (Committee Chair); Sherrie Gradin (Committee Member); Albert Rouzie (Committee Member); David Descutner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Education History; Pedagogy; Rhetoric

Keywords:

current-traditional; writing assignments; theme writing; first-year composition; theme system; composition history

SCOTT, L. BRETTWHEN WORDS SING: THE CHORAL MUSIC OF R. MURRAY SCHAFER
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2002, College-Conservatory of Music : Conducting, Choral Emphasis
This thesis focuses on the choral output of the Canadian musician, composer, educator and activist Raymond Murray Schafer. The purpose of this study is to show how the composer's artistic concerns are reflected in this significant body of work, which at the present time includes thirty compositions. The Introduction establishes Schafer's importance as a choral composer and lists the artistic concerns that influence his music. Chapter One gives a biography of the composer and a listing of his compositions in other genres, ranging from massive musical/theatrical works to solo piano pieces. Chapter Two provides a complete survey of Schafer's choral compositions, organized according to performance requirements. Chapter Three discusses the impact of Schafer's educational theories on his choral music, reflected most clearly in his innovative notational practices and his compositions for children and amateur musicians. Chapter Four reveals how the composer's extensive work with acoustical-environmental issues has influenced his choral compositions. Chapter Five explores the importance of other cultures - eastern, indigenous, or medieval - in Schafer's choral writing, A chronological listing of the composer's choral compositions is included as an appendix. The central purpose of this thesis is to provide, for the first time, a comprehensive study of the choral output of this internationally known composer and musician. Detailed analysis of numerous works is placed within the context of the major influences on Schafer's artistic career, which are as varied as the composer's output.

Committee:

Dr. Stephen R. Coker (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Raymond Murray Schafer; choral composition; children composition

Hayes, Kenneth JSocializing First Year Composition: A Study of Social Networking Sites' Impact on First Year Students
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
The primary argument of this dissertation is that Social Networking Sites (SNS) are an increasingly important part of our writing students’ personal, professional, social and civic lives, and, as a result, SNS continue to be important subjects for rhetorical study as well as potentially positive pedagogical tools in the first-year writing classroom. For this project I surveyed 107 and interviewed four first-year writing students at a mid-sized, Midwestern state university in order to listen to them discuss their use and views of SNS, as well as their views on the use of SNS as subjects for rhetoric study and as pedagogical tools in the writing classroom. In doing so, my goal for this project was to continue addressing how to responsibly, ethically, and effectively use SNS in the writing classroom in order to enhance students’ rhetorical composition skills and considerations of audience in the writing classroom and beyond. I began this project by engaging with and synthesizing the literature in the field of Composition and Rhetoric that considers the use of computer technologies, particularly SNS, in the writing classrooms, and the impact such use has on students and pedagogy in those classrooms. Engagement with this literature became the justification for this project and the foundation for the key considerations that made up the first chapter of this dissertation. In the second chapter I discuss my use of Grounded Theory and Actor-Network Theory as the primary methodologies that informed the methods of my study. By focusing on allowing the data derived from the participants’ voices to lead the direction of inquiry, and by taking into account the fluid and reciprocal nature of the interaction between the participants, SNS, and participants’ views and uses of SNS in and out of the first-year writing classroom, I used Grounded Theory and Actor-Network Theory in an attempt to create a space where the participants and their views of and engagement in SNS primarily shaped this dissertation. In the third and fourth chapters I share and analyze the data from the participant surveys and interviews, respectively, in order begin actively joining the conversations in the field regarding the use of SNS in the writing classroom. In the fifth chapter I conclude the dissertation by using the findings in the previous chapters to maintain the importance of SNS as subjects of rhetorical study; sharing lists of best practices and sample activities/assignments to consider when implementing SNS in the first-year writing classroom; and presenting suggestions for future projects regarding the study of SNS in the writing classroom.

Committee:

Kristine Blair, Dr. (Advisor); Lee Nickoson, Dr. (Advisor); Tracy Huziak-Clark, Dr. (Committee Member); Donna Nelson-Beene, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Rhetoric

Keywords:

Writing; Composition; Rhetoric; Multimodal Composition; Social Networks; FYC; FYW; College English

Liu, YingUnderstanding Readership: American Students’ Perceptions of Evidence in Chinese Persuasive Composition
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, East Asian Languages and Literatures
Instruction in Chinese as a foreign language has historically been focused on the beginning and intermediate levels of proficiency; however, as a field we have just now begun to address the advanced levels of instruction where the ability to function in professional environments in China is a major goal. With the rise of the Internet and the fact that many young Americans are employed in Chinese work environments, it is time for serious research into how composition instruction in Chinese as a foreign language can help students create identifiable cultural performances. In order to highlight the concept of readership in the CFL field of Chinese L2 composition, this dissertation examines how a group of American undergraduate students interpreted evidence as they took part in an intensive study abroad program to learn Chinese persuasive composition. Participants in the study included nine Chinese L2 students from five American universities and the course instructor. I utilized various data collection method, such as questionnaires, classroom observation, field notes, audio recordings, document gathering, and (text-based) interviews. Results of the study suggest that while both the students and the textbook/instructor viewed evidence as the materials supporting the writer’s opinions, the actual student interpretations of evidence varied greatly from those presented in class. We found that what is convincing varies according to cultural background. The purpose of persuasive composition in L2 classes should, be to reach the reader in the L2 culture, rather than to reaffirm the writer’s positions in his or her base culture. This study highlights the need for Chinese L2 composition teachers to reexamine the role of the reader, which has been neglected in Chinese L2 composition classes. Readership is the result of certain socio-cultural interactions. As a greater number of Americans become part of the Chinese workforce, designers of L2 curricula have the formidable task of identifying those composition tasks that will be most beneficial to a foreigner’s career in China and developing efficient pedagogical approaches that prepare CFL students to meet their readers’ expectations while accomplishing those tasks. Chapter 4 analyzes the results of a survey of 51 Chinese L2 learners who were working in China or doing academic research there in the summer of 2012 or before. In this study we identified the composition performances typically found in professional and academic contexts in China and analyzed how the concepts of genre and genre colonies might be utilized to describe L2 writer’s composition performances in L2 communities for pedagogical purposes. In Chapter 5, we propose a performed-culture approach in Chinese L2 composition instruction. My intention is that this new approach will help Chinese L2 students realize professional goals by producing texts that meet the expectations of their Chinese readers.

Committee:

Galal Walker (Advisor); Mari Noda (Committee Member); Charles Quinn (Committee Member); Xiaobin Jian (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Foreign Language; Pedagogy

Keywords:

readership; Chinese persuasive composition; performed culture instruction; composition instruction

Murphy, Robin Marie MerrickPost-9/11 Rhetorical Theory and Composition Pedagogy: Fostering Trauma Rhetorics as Civic Space
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2007, English/Rhetoric and Writing
Though a recent series in JAC (24:1&2, 2004) featured special issue on Trauma and Rhetoric, little to no information is available in the Composition and Rhetoric field that provides instructors a writing curriculum by which to address social traumas. At the same time, only in the last several years has there been a noteworthy surge of theory and practice in the field calling for the inclusion of technology and visual rhetoric in composition production. Add to that lack of training available for teachers to maintain the knowledge to meet the growth of new media and its influences on current literacy demands and classroom practices, and these omissions constitute significant gaps in curriculum needs necessary for the 21st Century, post-9/11 writing classroom. Defining the needs of a post-9/11 writing student is a complicated process and requires a wide scope consideration of both ancient rhetorical traditions and contemporary composition pedagogies. This study uncovers the common characteristics of those traditions and pedagogies that best suit post-9/11 students by first considering the historic role linking rhetorical and composition education while explicitly concentrating on their shared function of teaching citizenry. Next, the text explores rhetorically resonant artifacts from WWII, The Vietnam War, and the Oklahoma City Bombing to indicate the shifts in literacy practices that seem to correlate with traumatic social events. The text triangulates Critical Theory, Culture Studies, and the Post-Process Movement to build a rhetorical theory and subsequent composition pedagogy based on three tenets: 1) the democratic values of traditional rhetorical education, 2) a complex citizenry that is both global- and cyber-responsible, and 3) the importance of multi-modal literacy. In the compilation of Post-9/11 Rhetorical Theory and Composition Pedagogy, it seemed sensible to describe the theory and pedagogy via three areas: literacy, rhetoric, and curriculum while also negotiating alternative production practices, teacher training, and assessment strategies. The result is a complex theory designed to utilize the intricate social and rhetorical situations derived from trauma events to provide students a commonplace by which to produce alternative compositions. Thereby, the theory and pedagogy developed here asks instructors to end the marginalization of students and their cultural and critical ability to engage in an advanced citizenry when met with trauma and rather to encourage them to be more involved in their education, their communities and their democracy.

Committee:

Kristine Blair (Advisor)

Subjects:

Language, Rhetoric and Composition

Keywords:

post-9/11 rhetoric; trauma rhetoric; civic education; rhetorical education; composition pedagogy; alternative composition; multi-modal literacy; writing curriculum

Harvey, Stephen PJazz Chamber Music: An Analysis of Chris Potter’s Imaginary Cities and a Musical Composition
Master of Music, Youngstown State University, 2016, Dana School of Music
This essay is a critical analysis of the mixed ensemble writing of jazz musician and composer Chris Potter, from his 2015 album Imaginary Cities. This analysis focuses on the compositional aspects of Potter’s music when incorporating a string quartet into his ensemble setting. The essay discusses topics such as pentatonic harmonization, rhythmic layering, harmonic development, 20th-century influences, and modern jazz composition, which are prevalent in his work. Along with this analysis, the essay also discusses an original composition by the author. This composition is a mixed ensemble piece with three movements. The essay reviews compositional methods, influences, and programmatic elements of the piece, as well as its relationship with the analysis preceding it.

Committee:

David Morgan, PhD (Advisor); Kent Engelhardt, PhD (Committee Member); Steven Reale, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Chris Potter;mixed ensemble;jazz composition;strings in jazz;original jazz composition

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