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Lindsay, Kristen ReneeSenior Student Affairs Officers' Perceptions Of Critical Professional Competencies
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Higher Education Administration
Literature describing the role of the senior student affairs officer (SSAO) is plentiful, but research studies describing the specific skills needed to successfully fulfill the role are fewer in quantity. Therefore, in order to better understand the skills needed to be a senior-level student affairs administrator, and how to acquire them, this study examined SSAOs' perceptions of the ACPA and NASPA joint competencies. The sample, comprised of SSAOs who hold ACPA membership, shared their perceptions, which were examined according to several variables including gender, ethnicity, professional experience, and institution characteristics. Findings indicated that a doctoral degree was particularly significant for developing the skills necessary to be a successful SSAO. Additionally, there were differences according to several of the variables, indicating the importance of different competencies at different types of institutions, although no clear-cut picture of specific competency importance emerged. The additional competencies suggested by the SSAOs who participated in the survey, although nearly all of them overlapped with the ACPA and NASPA joint competencies, provide reinforcement of skills important to SSAOs in today's higher education landscape. The findings provide a snapshot of the skills necessary for successful SSAOs, as well as implications for graduate preparation programs and future revisions of the ACPA and NASPA join competencies.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Dr. (Advisor); Steven Cady, Dr. (Committee Member); Michael Coomes, Dr. (Committee Member); Robert DeBard, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

ACPA and NASPA competencies; senior student affairs officers; student affairs competencies; SSAO; student affairs professionals; higher education competencies; senior-level student affairs administrator; student affairs skills; professional competencies

O'Connor Thomas, Karli MichelleDevelopment of the Gerontological Counseling Competencies Scale: A Self-report Measure of Counselor Competence with Older Adults
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2012, Counselor Education and Supervision
With the projected older adult population increase and the prevalence of older adults whose mental health needs are not being met, it is more important than ever that counselors possess the basic knowledge and skills to work with older adults. In order to meet the increasing demand for counselors with the knowledge and skills to work with older adults, an instrument needs to be developed to assess the current competence level of counselors and counselor educators in the field as well as counselor trainees. The purpose of the present study was to develop a reliable and valid measure of counselor competence when working with older adults. Items for the Gerontological Counseling Competencies Scale (GCCS; O'Connor Thomas, 2012) were generated using the rational/theoretical approach to scale construction. Feedback from an expert panel and focus group were used to formulate the initial 50-item GCCS and provide support for its validity (content/face validity). The initial scale was disseminated online via listservs and 268 counselors, counselor educators, and counselor trainees across the United States agreed to participate in the study. The data obtained from these participants was analyzed through a series of Principal Component Analyses and resulted in a final 21-item Gerontological Counseling Competencies Scale (GCCS) comprised of three subscales: Knowledge & Skills, Attitudes, and Bio-Cognitive Knowledge. Reliability analysis indicated that the GCCS and its subscales had good to excellent internal consistency reliability. Furthermore, results revealed that prior educational experience, prior work experience, and prior training significantly predicted counselor perceived competence when working with older adults. In addition, correlations of the GCCS full scale and subscales with social desirability, as measured by the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR), indicated that the GCCS was not influenced by socially desirable responding. Overall, the findings of the present study demonstrate that it is important that counselor education programs provide not only coursework in gerontology but also clinical experience with older adults and additional training opportunities such as seminars and/or workshops. The present study also discussed recommendations for future research in the area of counselor competence when working with older adults.

Committee:

Sandra Perosa, Dr. (Advisor); Linda Perosa, Dr. (Committee Member); Harvey Sterns, Dr. (Committee Member); Cynthia Reynolds, Dr. (Committee Member); John Queener, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Counseling Education; Gerontology

Keywords:

gerontological counselor competencies; counseling older adults; multicultural counseling competencies; measure of gerontological counseling competencies

Putman, Paul G.Virtual Simulation in Leadership Development Training: The Impact of Learning Styles and Conflict Management Tactics on Adult Learner Performance
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2012, College of Education and Human Services

Adult learners can develop leadership skills and competencies such as conflict management and negotiation skills. Virtual simulations are among the emerging new technologies available to adult educators and trainers to help adults develop various leadership competencies. This study explored the impact of conflict management tactics as well as learning styles on the efficacy of virtual leadership development training.

In this quantitative study, participants (n=349) completed electronic versions of both the Power and Influence Tactics Scale (POINTS) and the Kolb Learning Styles Instrument (KLSI). Results of participant scores for both instruments were compared with scores from a virtual leadership simulation.

Performance within a virtual leadership simulation was not found to be significantly impacted by diverse learning styles, indicating that virtual simulations can be effective for adult learners with any learning style. Statistically significant correlations were found between all seven conflict management tactics and key virtual leadership simulation scores, indicating that virtual leadership simulations can be effective tools for practicing multiple conflict management tactics.

Experiential learning techniques are becoming commonplace and the use of technology is growing within the field of adult and leadership education. This study elucidates the effectiveness of new technologies such as virtual simulations as tools for leadership development. This study contributes to leadership education best practices by exploring the effectiveness of virtual simulations as a method for training leaders that will allow educators to incorporate emerging best practices into their repertoire of methodologies.

Committee:

Catherine Monaghan, PhD (Committee Chair); Jonathan Messemer, EdD (Committee Member); Catherine Hansman, EdD (Committee Member); Selma Vonderwell, PhD (Committee Member); Sanda Kaufmann, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education

Keywords:

leadership development; virtual simulation; learning styles; conflict management; adult learners; simulation; leadership; leadership training; leadership competencies; leadership skills; technology; Kolb Learning Styles Instrument; experiential learning

Oliver, PatrickWhat Are the Key Competencies, Qualities, and Attributes of the African American Municipal Police Chief?
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this dissertation was to identify and understand the dimensions of leadership of those African Americans, who are effective as the chief executive officer (CEO) of a municipal law enforcement agency, and thereby to educate and inform both those aspiring to be police chiefs and those presently serving as police chiefs, particularly African Americans. Four content areas were examined to gain a better understanding of the research question: (1) Police executive leadership literature; (2) African American leadership; (3) The trait theory of leadership; (4) emotional intelligence. Study participants were all African American police chiefs with the expertise and requisite knowledge of municipal police chief leadership. The Delphi method was used, resulting in the emergence of judgments based on anonymous responses during multiple iterations. Consensus for the purpose of this study was defined as exceeding an 80% overall composite score of agreement among the panel of experts. The study results produced 34 consensus dimensions based on each receiving a composite score of 85% or higher. This resulted in the panel of experts identifying 12 competencies, 12 qualities, and 11 attributes of management and leadership for an effective African American municipal police chief. While the study does not claim to identify a set of qualities that will ensure that an African American municipal police chief will be effective in the job, the identified dimensions should enhance the professional development of an aspiring African American municipal police chief. Additionally, the findings of the study support the assumption that African American municipal police chiefs are likely to encounter specific race-based challenges on their leadership journey and, therefore, should plan and prepare to overcome them. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Roberts, PhD (Committee Member); Gary Cordner, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Management; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Public Administration

Keywords:

African American Leadership; Police Leadership; Police Executive; Law Enforcement Leadership; Police Chief Competencies; Delphi Method; Delphi Technique; Black Police Executives

Fete, Emma MDeveloping cosmopolitanism: Realizing the power of intercultural media and international experiences in a globalized world
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Communication
As globalization continues an inexorable reach across the world, intercultural competency and tolerance has become ever more important for all aspects of modern day life. Some societies and individuals react in defense, while others embrace a cosmopolitan outlook. Governments, corporations, education systems, and individuals have sought ways to understand the impact of different intercultural interactions and activities as well as the possibility for a cosmopolitan outlook to predict communication behavior. While the development of global orientations has been a point of interest for quite some time, there still remains no comprehensive concept or measurement instrument to examine it. This research study focuses on understanding what the cosmopolitan outlook is, how to measure it effectively, what impact it has on communication behavior, and how it can be reinforced or developed via intercultural experiences. First, the concept and theoretical relationships of cosmopolitanism are defined and scale development for measuring the cosmopolitan outlook is proposed and examined. Second, intercultural interactions via interpersonal and media experiences are tested to predict impact on the cosmopolitan outlook. This research indicates that the proposed reconceptualization and model show important promise in explaining communication behavior as well as filling in gaps from previous research. In a world fraught with intercultural tensions demanding more nuanced and tolerant interactions, this paper provides a road map in how to examine and develop these competencies.

Committee:

Erik Nisbet (Advisor); R. Kelly Garrett (Committee Member); Michael Slater (Committee Member); Kerim Yasar (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; International Relations; Mass Communications; Mass Media; Multicultural Education

Keywords:

cosmopolitanism; cosmopolitan outlook; globalization; global media; intercultural media; foreign media; intercultural communication; global orientation; global competencies;

Yang , Yuan A Study of Hotel Management Financial Competencies with the Focus on Revenue and Cost Management
MS, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
The objective of this research is to investigate the core financial analytical competencies that hospitality managers must possess. Similar measurement was employed in both the industry practitioners’ and the educators’ survey, as the aim was to explore the importance and use of revenue and cost management competencies among manager participants and compare the findings with those obtained from the educators’ survey. The results of this study showed that cost control, followed by revenue management, budgeting, forecasting, pricing, and asset management, are the essential financial competencies of hotel managers. The perception gap was found between hospitality managers and educators on the importance of these financial competencies. The findings of this study could provide suggestions for hospitality education and industry training programs.

Committee:

Ning-Kuang Chuang (Committee Chair); Amy Gregory (Committee Member); Aviad Israeli (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Management

Keywords:

financial competencies; revenue management; cost management; pricing; forecasting; budgeting; asset management

Smith, Donna M.Physician managerial skills: Assessing the critical competencies of the physician executive
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 1990, Management
In a rapidly changing health care environment physicians are increasingly called upon to assume complex management responsibilities, both in new forms of health care delivery systems and in traditional hospital settings as obsolescent boundaries between Administration and Medical Management disappear. Few physician managers feel well-prepared to assume these responsibilities and little agreement exits about what management skills they must have to insure competence. This research is designed to identify competencies critical to performance of the Executive level physician managerial job. Five major questions were developed to guide this research which focus on the types of skills which are most critical, current level of physician managerial skill development, gaps that exits between job demand and skill level and whether critical skills vary by managerial level or type of health care setting. Data were collected from a local and national sample, including physician managers holding mid- to high-level physician executive positions in hospitals/health care settings and physician organizations. A secondary comparison sample was used which included a questionnaire version of the primary methodology. Method of data collection included th e Executive Skills Profile, a Q-sort instrument developed for this research, and a modified version of the Behavioral Event Interview, a form of critical incident interviewing. Of the Executive Skill Profile's four major skill areas: Interpersonal, Action, Information Management and Analytical, Interpersonal and Action Skills were rated highest in Job Demand, Skill and Learning Need. Other high-level Job Demands included Entrepreneurial, Relationship, Leadership, Creativity/Change Management and Helping and Delegating. These results were largely supported by secondary sample Questionnaire data and by critical incident data. Fifteen job priorities differentiated Department Director from CEO/Medical Director level physician executives, and Job level was found to be a greater determinant of job priority than was type of health care setting. These data resulted in the creation and partial validation of a competency model for Executive Level Physician Mangers which establishes Interpersonal and Action Skills as the two most critical job priorities.

Committee:

David Kolb (Advisor)

Keywords:

Physician managerial skills; critical competencies

Deffenbaugh, Anne M.Self-Perceived Grief Counseling Competencies of Licensed Professional Counselors
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, Physical Activity and Educational Services

The purpose of this study was to assess the self-perceived grief counseling competencies of practicing counselors and to explore the relationships between the participants’ demographic characteristics and their competencies. The study used descriptive and multiple regression analyses to examine the data gathered from the completion of the Death Counseling Survey (DCS), the Grief Counseling Experience and Training Survey (GCETS), the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief (TRIG), and a demographic questionnaire. The sample consisted of practicing counselors from the state of Ohio (n = 369) who completed the survey. The predictor variables included: gender, years experience as a licensed counselor, experience and training on grief (as measured by the GCETS), and personal experiences with grief (as measured by the TRIG). The criterion variables included grief counseling competencies as defined by the five scales of the DCS: Personal Competencies, Conceptual Skills and Knowledge, Assessment Skills, Treatment Skills, and Professional Skills.

The analyses found experience and training with grief contributed significantly to the variance in the scores for each of the DCS scales. Gender was found to contribute significantly to the variance in the Personal Competencies, Assessment Competencies, and Treatment Competencies scales. The variable of years of experience as counselor, specifically the category of counselors who have practiced for more than 20 years (Master Practitioner), was found to contribute significantly to the variance in the Conceptual Skills and Knowledge and Assessment Skills scales. Specifically, Master Practitioners reported statistically lower average scores on these two scales than their less experienced peers. The variable of personal experience with grief was not found to be a statistically significant contributor in any of the regression models. Counselors rated themselves highest in Personal Competencies and lowest on competencies related to Conceptual Skills and Knowledge and Professional Skills. This study helped to identify those specific content areas in which training is needed, including: Personal Competencies (i.e. personal understanding of death, self-care, and sense of humor), theories, definitions of grief, bereavement, and complicated grief, identification of effective and ineffective coping skills, and seeking support from professional peers to manage reactions to working with grieving clients.

Committee:

Darcy Haag Granello, PhD (Advisor); Virginia Richardson, PhD (Committee Member); Joe Wheaton, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology; Psychotherapy

Keywords:

grief counseling competencies

Weems-Landingham, Velvet L.The Role of Project Manager and Team Member Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs) in Distinguishing Virtual Project Team Performance Outcomes
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2004, Organizational Behavior
Virtual teaming has become one of the most common interventions for organizations seeking to reduce costs and time to market, pool knowledge, and leverage skills. Previous research on individual behaviors contributing to virtual project team effectiveness has focused on contributions made by team leaders. The present study expands existing knowledge on individual competencies impacting virtual project team performances by looking at behaviors exhibited by both project managers and the team members who support them. Study findings were based upon semi-structured interviews of 23 project managers within one organization. Interviews yielded a total of 145 narratives describing salient situations where project managers felt virtual project team outcomes were either effective (n= 77) or ineffective (n=68). Narrative analysis was then enlisted to determine project manager and team member KSAs associated with differences in the achievement of task interdependent objectives. Three broad behavioral competencies were attributed to differences in virtual project team performance outcomes. They were discovery and preparation, leadership and team potency. Discovery and preparation behaviors refer to those project manager KSAs (pre-work, planning, understanding objectives and understanding action) associated with exerting sufficient effort and establishing clear and engaging directions. Leadership behaviors refer to project manager KSAs (client partnering, managing expectations, delegating, escalating, seeking approval and guidance, and determining team member resources) deemed central to building expert teams. And finally, team potency behaviors refer to those project manager and team member KSAs (confidence, competence, empathy, facilitation, and social presence) associated with the teams’ overall belief in their ability to perform. Results suggest increasing virtual project team effectiveness by bolstering team member responsiveness and facilitation, increasing project managers’ confidence and feelings of competence, finding and commandeering critical team member resources, and partnering with clients to ensure successful outcomes.

Committee:

David Kolb (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration, Management

Keywords:

Virtual Teamwork; Effectiveness; Competencies; Project Manager

Abu Hassoun, Laila AliGood Teachers Are Made and Not Just Born: Gifted and Talented Teachers’ Perspectives of Effective Teaching and Teacher Needs
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2015, Curriculum and Instruction
The perspectives of teacher effectiveness held by teachers of the gifted have not received much attention in the literature. This dissertation explores the perspectives of teachers of the gifted in relation to how they perceive competencies and characteristics of teacher effectiveness compared to NAGC&-CEC recommended standards of teacher education, how their reported and observed teaching practices relate to the standards and various models of teacher effectiveness, and what support needs they perceive. I compared these issues between cases based on educational level, type of gifted program, and region. I conducted one-on-one, semi-structured interviews in person with nine teachers of the gifted from Northern Ohio and Southeast Michigan using a case study approach. I analyzed the data using Atlas.ti qualitative analysis software using coding methods. Nine themes emerged, which I discuss in depth: time flies, money talks, uncertainty about expectations, practice is more meaningful than theory, unexpected opportunities, additional roles, teacher evaluation, personality characteristics are more important than academic competencies, and Ohio versus Michigan.

Committee:

Leigh Chiarelott, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Florian Feucht, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Demedio Dwayne, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Chandler Kimberley, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Gifted Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

teacher effectiveness; perspectives of teachers of the gifted; perceive competencies; recommended standards of teacher education; teaching practices; teacher Needs

Anderson, Alyssa S.Development and Validation of an Athletic Training Knowledge Assessment Tool
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2014, Athletic Training (Health Sciences and Professions)
The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) requires the integration of the fifth edition of the Athletic Training Education Competencies (Competencies) into the academic content of professional athletic training programs. CAATE also requires athletic training programs to provide outcomes measures that evaluate all aspects of the educational program, including student learning. While assessment tools have been developed based on earlier editions of the Competencies, a tool based on the fifth edition has not yet been published. Therefore, this project sought to develop and validate a knowledge assessment tool that effectively measures the material included in the fifth edition of the Competencies. To accomplish this aim, test items based on the Competencies were reviewed by an expert panel and then given to students enrolled in professional athletic training programs. Item analysis was performed on the results to establish a test blueprint.

Committee:

Chad Starkey (Advisor)

Subjects:

Educational Tests and Measurements; Health Sciences; Sports Medicine

Keywords:

Athletic Training Education Competencies; Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education; CAATE; knowledge assessment

Smith-Heimbrock, Sydney E.Preparing Federal Managers to Govern by Network: Analysis of Federal Training Efforts
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2011, Political Science
This dissertation examines the effectiveness of current training programs designed to prepare Federal managers to “govern by network.” Filling a gap in the current literature, the study addresses the implications that emerging theories of network governance hold for federal workforce development. Review of the public management literature demonstrates that theories of network governance suggest a fundamental rearticulation of the public manager's role in producing public value - and a new set of competencies reflecting the unique approaches to program execution that network governance requires. The study uses criterion-referenced competency modeling techniques to present a validated competency model and role definition for mid-level Federal managers responsible for governing by network. The project designs a unique method for evaluating the impact of in-service training on development of these competencies and role definition; and presents findings from analysis of existing in-service training designed to prepare mid-level federal managers for 21st century public management.

Committee:

Phillip Russo, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Bryan Marshall, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ryan Barilleaux, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Gary M. Shulman, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Keywords:

public managers; Federal governance; governing by network; public management competencies

Cole, MiaA Critical Assessment of Professional Skills and Knowledge in Supplier Diversity: A Delphi Study
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2008, Leadership and Change
Today, many US corporations have made great strides to embrace supplier diversity as a social consideration, and most importantly, as a strategic business enabler. From the earlier years of mandating minority inclusion to the realization that diversifying the supply chain creates value by capitalizing on the diverse background and experiences of minority businesses, supplier diversity has emerged as a major business initiative. It is one of the initiatives that contribute to the welfare of the country by building minority communities and strengthening our society. By developing business coalitions and partnerships with minority suppliers there is tremendous opportunity to impact the economic development of minorities and make significant contributions to the growth and development of our nation. The goal of this research is to apply the Delphi methodology to a research study that identifies the skills and knowledge that marks a professional in supplier diversity in the private sector. Additionally, this study is intended to help shape the future of supplier diversity as a professional entity in the business environment. This research is honoring and advancing the cause and status of supplier diversity professionals who possess the drive and commitment to elevate supplier diversity to a profession. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Melvin Gravely, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Business Community; Business Education; Hispanic Americans; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Native Americans

Keywords:

Supplier Diversity; Minority Business Development; Minorities; Small Businesses; Suppliers; Vendors; Corporate Supply Chain; Diversity; Professional Skills and Competencies; Delphi Method

Stubbs, Elizabeth ChristineEmotional Intelligence Competencies in the Team and Team Leader: a Multi-level Examination of the Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Group Performance
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Organizational Behavior
This research examines the relationship between team leader emotional intelligence competencies, team level emotional intelligence, and team performance. It is argued here that team leader’s emotional intelligence (EI) will influence the development of group level emotional intelligence, which was measured by a teams emotionally competent group norms (ECGN). Secondly, it is hypothesized that the presence of ECGNs will positively influence group effectiveness. Data were collected from 422 respondents representing 81 teams in a military organization. Results show that team leader emotional intelligence is significantly related to the presence of emotionally competent group norms on the teams they lead, and that emotionally competent group norms are related to team performance. This research contributes to the field by offering support for the affects team leaders emotional intelligence has on the teams they lead as well as by showing team level emotional intelligence affects team performance. Propositions for future research and practice are offered.

Committee:

Richard Boyatzis (Advisor)

Keywords:

Emotional Intelligence; Emotional Competencies; Emotionally Competent Group Norms; Team; Team Performance; Team Effectiveness; Leader Behavior; Team emotional intelligence; Emotional self-awareness; Accurate self-assessment; Self-Confidence

Imhoff, Brad A.An Exploratory Study of Grief Counseling Training and Competencies in Counseling Students at CACREP-accredited Institutions
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, Counselor Education (Education)
Research suggests that graduate students in counseling and beginning counselors rate grief and death-related topics as those with which they are most uncomfortable (Kirchberg & Neimeyer, 1991; Kirchberg, Neimeyer, & James, 1998). Yet, historically, little training has been provided to students in the area of grief counseling (Allen & Miller, 1998; Ober, Granello, & Wheaton, 2012; Stephenson, 1981). This is concerning given that research also suggests professional training and experience is a strong predictor of perceived grief counseling competencies in helping professionals (Charkow, 2002; Ober et al., 2012). This study explored grief counseling training and competencies with master’s level counseling students in the field experience part of their training. The Grief Counseling Experience and Training Survey (GCETS) was used to assess professional training and experience with grief and the Death Counseling Survey (DCS) and its five subscales (Personal Competencies, Conceptual Skills/Knowledge, Assessment Skills, Treatment Skills, and Professional Skills) were used to assess perceived grief counseling competencies. Descriptive information revealed participants lacked grief counseling training, despite nearly three-fourths of them having already worked with grieving clients. Further, respondents rated themselves as competent on general counseling skills related to grief (e.g., practicing self-care, exhibiting genuineness, providing a supportive setting in counseling, etc.), but scored much lower on grief-specific knowledge and skills (e.g., having knowledge of grief theories, being able to articulate developmentally appropriate grief reactions, and recognizing complicated grief symptoms, etc.). Regression analyses were used to explore the relationship between perceived grief counseling competencies and the variables of age, gender, professional training and experience with grief, and type of grief counseling training received. Age was found to be a significant predictor of Personal Competencies and gender a significant predictor of Overall Grief Counseling Competency, Conceptual Skills/Knowledge, Treatment Skills, and Professional Skills; though, these variables accounted for little unique contribution. Professional training and experience with grief was a significant predictor of all the competency subscales and accounted for much more unique contribution (ß = .22 - .70). The data analyzed in this study suggest a lack of grief counseling training opportunities despite professional training and experience being a strong predictor of perceived competencies. Further, students rate themselves as competent on general counseling abilities, but their scores decline drastically on grief specific skills and knowledge.

Committee:

Thomas Davis (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Counseling Education

Keywords:

grief counseling; grief counseling competencies; counseling students; grief theories

Lin, Yi-chunThe perceptions of human resource development professionals in Taiwan regarding their working relationships with subject matter experts (SMEs)during the training design process
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, Educational Studies: Hums, Science, Tech and Voc

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of human resource development professionals in Taiwan regarding their working relationships with subject-matter experts (SMEs) during the training design process. A descriptive correlation survey was used in this study. The target population in the study was 314 HRD professionals who worked in high-tech companies located in a science park in Taiwan. One hundred forty-six of 173 respondents completed the online survey (response rate: 84.39%).

The questionnaire was used to assess the independent variables, the current and desired ability of HRD professionals in the training design process, classified across the four stages (analysis, design and development, implementation, and evaluation) and the dependent variable, the ability of HRD professionals in working with SMEs. Paired t-tests, one-way ANOVA, Chi-square, Pearson product-moment correlation, and simple linear regression analysis were used to address the research questions.

The results showed there was no perceived difference between the HRD professionals’ current and desired ability regardless of whether they had worked with SMEs or not. Among HRD professionals who had not worked with SMEs, education level, years of work experience in HR related jobs, and experience in designing training programs were significantly related to current ability in the training design process; among HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs, education level was significantly related to ability to work with SMEs. In particular, a higher percentage of HRD professionals who had not worked with SMEs had obtained bachelor’s degrees while a higher percentage of HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs had obtained master’s degrees. A higher percentage of HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs had experience in designing training programs compared to HRD professionals who had not worked with SMEs. Finally, there was a significant positive relationship between the ability to work with SMEs and current ability in the training design process among HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs.

This study provides implications for the professional development of HRD practitioners and the practice of HRD in Taiwan companies. Cross-cultural issues are discussed to explain inconsistencies between the results and US-based perspectives on the training design process.

Committee:

Ronald L. Jacobs (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Vocational

Keywords:

Training design process; human competence; competencies; Human resource development; Taiwan; Subject Matter Experts (SMEs); Training design

Higotani Bies, AzusaEffectiveness of Music Therapy Education in Addressing Multicultural Competencies: Survey of Music Therapy Program Directors
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2011, Music Therapy (Fine Arts)
With the rapidly growing diversity in the United States, understanding cultural influence on human behaviors and becoming competent to work with culturally diverse populations have become important among human service professionals. The present study examined effectiveness and challenges of music therapy undergraduate programs in addressing multicultural competencies listed under AMTA Professional Competencies. A questionnaire was developed and sent to directors of undergraduate music therapy programs to assess their perception of effectiveness and challenges in teaching those multicultural competencies. Results indicated that a majority of directors perceived their programs effective; however, acknowledged the existence of multiple challenges. Although the results of the survey should not be generalized due to a low response rate, it provides insights into how to further develop multicultural education in the field of music therapy. Future research may utilize more objective tools and investigate correlations among different variables to pinpoint influential factors to effective multicultural education.

Committee:

Louise Steele, MMEd (Advisor); Richard Wetzel, PhD (Committee Member); Milton Butler, PhD (Committee Member); Kamile Geist, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Multicultural Education; Music; Therapy

Keywords:

music therapy; music therapists; music therapy curriculum; music therapy program; music therapy professors; culture; multicultural education; cultural competencies

Leeamornsiri, NantawutThe perceptions of human resource professionals in five Thai banks about the human resource development competencies and programs used during the merger and acquisition process
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Educational Studies: Hums, Science, Tech and Voc
The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of human resource professionals in five Thai banks about the human resource development competencies and programs used during the merger and acquisition process. The results showed that two components were found in the factor analysis – the change management process and competence building – and these components are critical across all four stages of the merger and acquisition process. Other contributions of HRD programs that contribute to the success of the mergers and acquisitions include redesign of organization structure, develop of new management practices, and increased learning about the cultural values and management practices of the new entity. A significant relationship was also found between the relative importance of HRD competencies used and HR professionals'ability to perform HRD competencies during the integration and post merger and acquisition stages. Implications for HRD theory and practice are discussed.

Committee:

Ronald Jacobs (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Business

Keywords:

Human resource development competencies and programs in the merger and acquisition process.

Dunn, Rochelle LThe knowledge and competencies of effective school counselor supervision
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Physical Activity and Educational Services

The purpose of this study was to answer the following research questions: What are the knowledge and competencies of effective school counselor supervision? Can the knowledge and competencies of school counselor supervision be measured in a valid and reliable manner? Three stages were utilized to address these two questions.

Phase One involved both a thorough review of the literature surrounding school counselor supervision and a focus group with practicing school counselors. Both the review and the focus group generated content areas for items to be included in the instrument. Phase Two involved establishing content and face validity by a panel of experts (N=6), including four counselor educators and two practicing school counselor supervisors. A Likert scale was utilized for construction of the instrument. Items were separated into following dimensions of school counselor supervision: counseling supervision, 23 items; program management and professional development supervision, 11 items; administrative supervision, 9 items. Phase Three involved a pilot study (N=70) with practicing school counselors.

Analysis of the demographic information revealed that a majority were not receiving supervision. When asked, the sample indicated a preference for counseling supervision. However a comparison of means indicated that respondents had the most favorable attitude toward program management and professional development supervision.

Cronbach’s alpha was utilized to establish internal consistency reliability of the instrument. Reliability was high for the overall instrument (alpha=0.94) and was high for the three dimensions as well: counseling supervision alpha=0.91, program management and professional development supervision alpha=0.85, and administrative supervision alpha=0.87.

An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to determine if the three dimensions emerged as latent variables. Principal components analysis revealed eight components. This suggests that perhaps these areas may not be as clearly defined as previously reported in the literature.

Committee:

Susan Sears (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Guidance and Counseling

Keywords:

school counselor; supervision; school counselor supervision; factor analysis; supervision competencies; Dunn Supervision Scale

Dixon, Jason M.Attitudes toward Acculturative Behavior Scale: Development, Reliability and Validity
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2008, Counselor Education (Education)

Numerous measures of acculturation have been developed for use in minority cultures. In this study the Attitudes toward Acculturative Behavior Scale (AABS) has been developed to measure the attitudes of host culture members toward the acculturative behavior of minority cultures. Items from the East Asian Acculturation Measure (EAAM) were modified as well as new items written in line with the theoretical underpinnings of John Berry's bidimensional model of acculturation.

One-hundred and twenty six (n=126) host culture members who were counselor trainees in master's-level CACREP accredited programs or in programs closely aligned with CACREP standards participated in this study. Confirmatory Factor Analysis was the principal method for establishing validity of the AABS. The AABS demonstrated acceptable reliability. Some evidence was found for construct validity. The AABS is an appropriate tool for approaching the development of multicultural counseling competencies based on acculturation psychology and is useful in producing evidence of learning in an outcome based education framework. Recommendations for further development of the AABS are presented.

Committee:

Thomas E. Davis, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); George Johanson (Committee Member); Yagambaram Pillay (Committee Member); Diane Gut (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

acculturation psychology; psychometrics; counselor education; scale development; multicultural counseling competencies; host culture

Hemmeler, Megan ReneeSocial and Emotional Competency and Exclusionary Discipline
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
Current exclusionary disciplinary practices used in American schools are problematic for several reasons. Exclusionary discipline is ineffective in changing behavior, it perpetuates the problems which account for negative outcomes for students, and it uses valuable resources wastefully. Furthermore, multiple studies have been published suggesting that students with a disability, male students, and students of minority ethnicity are disproportionately represented in exclusionary discipline referrals, suggesting that a larger societal problem of discrimination may exist. Researchers have long written about the influence of social and emotional competencies on positive life outcomes as well as the influence of school problems on negative life outcomes. The following study examines the relationship among demographic variables, social and emotional competencies as perceived by teachers, and exclusionary discipline. The researcher chose a strength-based instrument to measure competencies. As a result, the benefits of using a strength-based measure are also discussed. Results of the study indicate that social and emotional learning plays a significant role in student outcome. Implications for teachers, administrators, teacher trainers, and other school personnel are discussed.

Committee:

Antoinette Miranda, PhD (Advisor); Joseph Gliem, PhD (Committee Member); Michael Klein, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Education; Education Policy; Educational Psychology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Neurobiology; Psychology

Keywords:

Suspension; Exclusionary Discipline; Schools; Social and Emotional Competencies; DESSA; Resilience; Strength-Based Measurement; Over-representation

Asempapa, BridgetExploring Counseling Students’ Perceived Competencies about Integrated Care
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Counselor Education (Education)
Integrated care has its foundation in the biopsychosocial model of care, and it is gaining importance in the health sector. The calls for practitioner training in integrated care have increased due to the siloed nature of training for health practitioners. This study explored graduate counseling students’ perceived competencies in integrated care using a survey instrument—integrated care competency survey (ICCS). The researcher generated the ICCS items based on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Health Resources and Services Administration (SAMHSA-HRSA) integrated care competency categories. The researcher pilot-tested the survey items to establish validity and reliability measures for this study. The ICCS consists of nine sub-categories and demographic information such as gender, specialty, graduate degree level, exposure to integrated care training, and field experience. Using a cross-sectional survey research design with random and purposeful sampling techniques, a sample size of 243 graduate counseling students in 15 CACREP accredited counselor education programs responded to this study. Data analyses employed in the study included descriptive statistics, a 5-way and a 3-way MANOVA, and a multiple regression. Additionally, supplemental analysis on the open-ended questions yielded themes that triangulated with the quantitative results. Based on the results from the study, it can be concluded that the participants had satisfactory perceived competency levels in integrated care (M = 3.95; SD = .83). However, there were no indications of considerably high or low perceived competencies in integrated care. Additional findings suggested that participants with exposure to training in integrated care and field experience were more likely to demonstrate competency in integrated care concepts. Supplemental responses showed that participants had attained useful skills such as communication, leadership and advocacy, and counseling techniques and micro-skills that are valuable in integrated care. Moreover, previous work experiences in medical fields or collaborative work environments were considered beneficial. However, participants expressed concerns in the areas of adjustment to medical culture, communication and collaborative interactions, and lack of specific training in integrated care. Despite the concerns raised by the participants, there was evidence that self-learning, supervision and consultation, and professional development support graduate counseling students in integrated care settings. The results for this study have implications for counselor education programs, counselor educators and supervisors, and existing curricula for counselors. The researcher anticipates that these findings will foster discussions in counselor education programs, mental health fields, and medical training fields on issues related to competencies and research in integrated care.

Committee:

Christine Bhat, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Gordon Brooks, Ph.D (Committee Member); Thomas Davis, Ph.D (Committee Member); Yegan Pillay, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Counseling Education; Health Care; Social Research

Keywords:

Integrated care; perceived competencies; ICCS; counseling students; counselor education; training; SAMHSA-HRSA; exploratory study; survey; reliability

Roy, MamtaTeacher Preparation and Professional Development: Competencies and Skill Sets for the Online Classroom.
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Education and Human Services
The purpose of this mixed-method study was to explore the competencies and skill sets of participating K-12 online teachers in Ohio through an online survey based on relevant standards issued by specialized organizations, such as the North American Council for online Learning (NACOL), National Education Association, and Southern Regional Educational Board. The survey items helped identify the self-reported competencies and skill sets of ninety-eight participating K-12 online teachers in Ohio. The findings of this study indicated that the subjects in this research project need technical support systems in place to work effectively in the online environment. Additionally, the participants required further training in using technology in terms of assistive technologies for special needs students. Moreover, these virtual environment instructors would benefit from having more hours of both face-to-face and hybrid professional development customized to their specific online teaching needs, designed to form collaborative communities of practice.

Committee:

Marius Boboc, PhD (Committee Chair); Joanne Goodell, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Jeremy Genovese, PhD (Committee Member); Brian Harper, PhD (Committee Member); Adam Sonstegard, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Education; Educational Technology

Keywords:

Teacher Preparation; Professional Development; Competencies; Skill sets; Communities of practice; student engagement; motivation

Cochran, Graham R.Ohio State University Extension Competency Study: Developing a Competency Model for a 21st Century Extension Organization
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, Human and Community Resource Development

The literature on competency-based human resource (HR) management provides a strong case for moving from a jobs-based to a competency-based approach to human resources. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a competency model for a state Extension organization. Specific research objectives were to: (a) identify and describe competencies required for Extension professionals in Ohio to be successful now and in the future; (b) construct a competency model that includes core competencies, describes what they look like in practice, and reflects organizational preferences; and (c) ensure that the competency model created is a valid one. This study was designed as action research and took place in Ohio State University Extension (OSUE). Methods were highly participatory and relied on a criterion group of exemplary performers and key internal stakeholders for idea generation, model refinement, and validation. Mixed methods were used with an emphasis on qualitative approaches, including reviews of existing research and gathering data from employees through interviews and group processes. Peer debriefing and survey research were used to validate and further refine the results. The research design included multiple cycles of data gathering, analysis, integration, and peer debriefing.

The findings from this study are represented by two key pieces of information, a list of trends and their implications for Extension work and the OSUE Competency Model. Five trends (changing and complex conditions, increased competition and limited resources, changing complex organizational structures, changing demographics, and technology and life in the e-world) and seven implications are identified and described. The OSUE Competency Model identifies and describes a set of core competencies (including definitions and key actions that further illustrate each), relevant across job groups, that are important now and in the future for OSUE employees. The 14 core competencies identified were: communication, continuous learning, customer service, diversity, flexibility and change, interpersonal relationships, knowledge of Extension, professionalism, resource management, self-direction, teamwork and leadership, technology adoption and application, thinking and problem solving, and understanding stakeholders and communities. Each competency is further described using 3 to 8 key actions. Research results are presented documenting that the competency model reflects organizational preferences, has high face and content validity, and has catalytic validity.

As action research, this study provided a competency model that will be used and further developed by the participants who constructed it. Recommendations are provided for OSUE related to using the model and applying the research results to HR practices. This study also extends the body of knowledge in two ways: by providing a competency model with core competencies designed to cut across the entire organization, of which few exist, in the Cooperative Extension System and by using a criterion group of exemplary performers to construct and validate the model. Implications for practice are shared that focus on the research process, methods used, and potential replication by other organizations. This research documented a process from initial information gathering through validation that could serve as a model for other organizations.

Committee:

Theresa M. Ferrari, PhD (Advisor); Garee W. Earnest, PhD (Committee Member); Keith L. Smith, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agricultural Education; Higher Education; Management

Keywords:

competency; competencies; competency model; competency-based; trends; Extension; Ohio State University Extension; Cooperative Extension System

Short, Christine M.Comparison of Employability Skill Subjects Taught Statewide to Junior and Senior Programs in a Vocational School
Master of Arts in Education, Defiance College, 2005, Education
Vocational school employability instructors across the state of Ohio participated in the study. Sixty-eight surveys were sent out to 58 vocational schools and skill centers across the state of Ohio. Thirty-eight surveys were returned. The purpose of the study was to determine the level of compatibility between ITAC competencies and what Ohio vocational teachers said they were teaching and what the researcher was teaching in her classes. The results of the survey indicated that subjects most frequently being taught matched those expected by employers in the Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies (ITAC) and suggested by the state of Ohio.

Committee:

Suzanne McFarland (Advisor)

Subjects:

Vocational Education

Keywords:

vocational education; Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC); surveys; employability

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