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Shuster, GabrielaThe Management Of Feral Pig Socio-Ecological Systems In Far North Queensland, Australia
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies

The development of management programs for socio-ecological systems that include multiple stakeholders is a complex process and requires careful evaluation and planning. This is particularly a challenge in the presence of intractable conflict. The feral pig (Sus scrofa) in Australia is part of one such socio-ecological system. There is a large and heterogeneous group of stakeholders interested in pig management. Pigs have diverse effects on wildlife and plant ecology, economic, health, and social sectors.

This study used the feral pig management system as a vehicle to examine intractable conflict in socio-ecological systems. The purpose of the study was to evaluate: (a) stakeholder beliefs and values about pig management, (b) stakeholder socio-political relationships, and (c) how stakeholder relationships impact management practices. I used an action research approach that included the collection of oral histories, individual interviews, sociograms, participant observation, and a survey to investigate the socio-political relevance of pigs to hunters, growers, managers, government representatives, and traditional land owners in the Cassowary Coast Council of Far North Queensland. Data was collected between 2007-2009.

Despite differences in values and beliefs, I found that stakeholder groups all consider management outcomes resulting in pig control acceptable. There are multiple socio-political barriers that impede successful application of management strategies. These barriers include poor communication, competing stakeholder social structures, limited resources, and property access. Additionally, illusory barriers compound conflict and are tied to the influence of negative stereotypes on stakeholder behavior. The use by managers, of traditional management practices focusing on equilibrium resilience, conflicts with the more ecological resilience oriented practices of other stakeholders. The result is a division of the landscape that leads to poor management outcomes.

This study describes useful tools for the engagement of stakeholders. Frame analysis can clarify the values and positions of stakeholders and suggests strategies for reframing intractable conflicts. The evaluation of stakeholder social structures provides information about the social context of management issues. It is important to operationalize participation and determine the amount of participation desired by stakeholders throughout the research process. The electronic version of this dissertation is freely available in the open access OhioLINK ETD Center http://etd.ohiolink.edu.

Committee:

Beth A. Kaplin, PhD (Committee Chair); Tania Schusler, PhD (Committee Member); Diane Russell, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Animals; Communication; Conservation; Ecology; Environmental Management; Environmental Studies; Management; Natural Resource Management; Social Structure; Sociology; Wildlife Conservation; Wildlife Management

Keywords:

socio-ecological systems; conflict; participation; resilience; frame analysis; adaptive management; stereotypes; action research; multiple stakeholders; community engagement; natural resources; management; social context; socio-politics; hunter; landscape

Glass, Lindsey HeatherA Case Study of an International Baccalaureate School within an Urban School District-University Partnership
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
This research examines the relationship between the International Baccalaureate (IB) program and individual and institutional development as well as the potential of the IB program to increase students’ social capital. Drawing on a case study approach, research methods included semi-structured interviews with 21 educators; a focus group with students and a focus group with parents; and a review of archival material. Study findings suggest that educators found the learning curve challenging in opening and sustaining a school with the IB curriculum. Teachers reported tension between teaching the transdisciplinary IB content while also needing to attend to state standards on which their students would be tested. Educators and parents underscored the experience of uncertainty in terms of issues of staffing, space, and enrollment, often sources of anxiety and sometimes a source of engagement. The goals of the IB curriculum, combined with the opportunity and resources to shape the direction of a new urban school, appear to have sustained a high level of teacher motivation. Educator experience suggests the IB curriculum provides teachers with a platform to make significant, lasting change in the lives of their students due teachers’ feelings of professionalism, autonomy and willingness to challenge themselves for the betterment of the student body and the school itself. In an era of school accountability and national efforts to implement a common core of content standards, it is useful to study the growth and struggle encountered by key stakeholders as they participate in building a rich curriculum focused on the whole child and attentive to social, academic, physical, and civic development at its core. The study is significant in terms of its ability to offer insights in the development of future IB schools, particularly in urban settings.

Committee:

Anne Galletta, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Justin Perry, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ronald Abate, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David Adams, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Megan Hatch, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Tests and Measurements; Elementary Education; Higher Education; Multicultural Education; Teaching

Keywords:

International Baccalaureate; case study; university-district partnership; teacher narratives; teacher autonomy; social capital; whole child education; standardized testing; urban education; community engagement

Goldstein, Amanda L.Community Engagement in Sustainable Design: A Case Study of the Oberlin Project
BA, Oberlin College, 2011, Environmental Studies

The Oberlin Project is an unprecedented opportunity for the city of Oberlin, Oberlin College, and other participating institutions to work together to achieve sustainable development and carbon neutrality. How might these institutions engage Oberlin citizens in some of the planning decisions that will shape Oberlin's future? Collaborating with citizens is important because in theory, encouraging participatory, collaborative planning contributes to just, equitable, and diverse cities. Study of sustainability initiatives in Chattanooga, Tennessee, for instance, reveal that it is possible for cities to make great leaps at sustainable urbanism while simultaneously building up a strong base of social capital aimed at meeting sustainability goals. This social capital includes both public and private sector organizations, as well as a large percentage of active citizenry.

Based on a survey response involving interviews with twenty Oberlin citizens in the government, business, and community development sectors, the two greatest strains on citizen engagement in the Oberlin Project as of spring 2011 may be 1) existing social tensions between the town and College, and 2) a lack of widespread knowledge about the objectives of the Oberlin Project. Drawing from the theory and demonstration of collaborative planning, two means to overcome these difficulties are 1) establishing a culture and environment of listening and dialogue, and 2) creating outlets that allow citizens ownership in different projects. These are two policy goals that may prove useful to the Oberlin Project as it continues to evolve.

Committee:

Rumi Shammin (Advisor); Cindy Frantz (Advisor)

Subjects:

Area Planning and Development; Environmental Justice; Environmental Studies; Social Research; Sustainability; Urban Planning

Keywords:

The Oberlin Project; sustainable design; community engagement; collaborative planning

Conley, Matthew D.Exposed pedagogy: investigating LGBTQ issues in collaboration with preservice teachers
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Educational Theory and Practice
Preparing teachers to serve the needs of children who have been historically marginalized is difficult work. Although a growing body of scholars and researchers has attempted to describe the complexities, challenges, and promises of such work, we are far from understanding how to do it well. While much of this discussion has addressed issues of race and ethnicity, LGBTQ concerns have been glaringly omitted. By continuing to overlook LGBTQ issues in education, we perpetuate heterosexism and maintain LGBTQ youth's marginalization. Considering previous research that suggests teachers lack knowledge about LGBTQ issues and are ill-equipped to construct pedagogies that are supportive of LGBTQ youth and families, this research aimed to create a joint learning project to foster greater LGBTQ competencies in the context of teacher preparation. This action-oriented, qualitative research project emerged from a critical, feminist paradigm, utilizing narrative methods. During the 2002-2003 academic year, the activities of nine student-participants were recorded. Data was primarily in the form of written responses to experiences at the university and reflections related to the larger community-based experiences our collaboration provided. Participants' responses to inquiry experiences related to LGBTQ issues were collected in the form of written papers and taped transcription of classroom conversations. Analysis and interpretation was conducted to develop understandings of the ways student-participants made sense of the experiences our LGBTQ-focused collaboration had provided. This report offers a description of our year of inquiry. Community development was essential to our collaborative work. In community, we were able to seek out experiences that assisted us in moving beyond the university in order to reflect on our own unexplored biases related LGBTQ issues. Following an emergent curriculum, striving for greater teacher/student parity, and collectively scaffolding experiences for one another were the kinds of practices that allowed us to expose these biases and take small steps toward activism. These practices resulted in what we came to call an exposed pedagogy. This research, then, offers pedagogical implications for engaging pre-service teachers with LGBTQ issues. It describes, in essence, how a group of unlikely collaborators came to implement an exposed pedagogy to explore lives beyond their own.

Committee:

Barbara Seidl (Advisor)

Keywords:

Teacher Preparation; LGBTQ Studies; Equity and Diversity Education; Collaborative Inquiry; Community Engagement

Bragg, Christina DawnIt’s All Connected: How Teachers and Students Co-Construct Spaces and Figured Worlds through Literacy and Language Events and Practices
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Teaching and Learning
This dissertation uses discourse analysis and ethnographically informed qualitative research methods in order to answer these research questions: What happens when teachers and students from different neighborhoods and communities in Central County participate in literacy and language events and practices in an alternative humanities class? When, where and under what conditions do spaces/places become engaging and/or community generative learning environments? The study examines a half-day humanities program for high school juniors and seniors, which is known as Connect. Applying trialectical spatial theories (Lefebvre, 1974/1992) and Holland et al’s (1998) theory of figured worlds, the researcher analyzed classroom data in the form of field notes of classroom observations, audio and/or video recordings of classroom observations, classroom artifacts, Facebook postings to the Connect group page, and interviews with both teachers and 5 focal students. Findings include greater understanding into the ways that teachers’ and/or students’ conceptions and perceptions interact with one another across spaces in ways that co-construct not only classroom spaces but also the collective figured world of Connect, the ways that fields of privilege, such as those involving race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and/or schooling, interact in classroom spaces, and the ways in which Connect spaces were (or not) community generative and/or engaging.

Committee:

Caroline Clark (Advisor); Mollie Blackburn (Committee Member); Valerie Kinloch (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literacy; Secondary Education

Keywords:

adolescent literacy; humanities classroom; community; engagement; space

Doughty, Jeremy R."The other side": A narrative study of south African community members' experiences with an international service-learning program
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of my narrative study was to hear stories about how community members are affected by international service-learning programs. At a time when universities and colleges in the United States emphasize internationalization efforts and the civic purpose of higher education, more institutions are designing and delivering international service-learning programs. More questions must be raised regarding how these programs affect communities. Despite the centrality of reciprocity in the service-learning paradigm, the extant literature primarily focuses on the effects of international service-learning programs on students. I spent two weeks collecting data at a primary school in Ithemba, a predominantly Black African, Xhosa-speaking township in South Africa characterized by one of my participants as “the other side.” Three participants at Korhaan School—Bhejile (the principal), Dunyiswa (the deputy principal), and Peline (a teacher)—engaged in two semi-structured interviews and one focus group. To mask the identity of my participants, I selected pseudonyms for the two universities, the primary school, and the community where the primary school is situated, and I use the names selected by my participants throughout the manuscript. Three key findings emerged from the data. First, my participants’ stories underscored the interconnectedness of the community and the community-based organization. Second, the students who participate in the international service-learning program bring a myriad of benefits to Korhaan School, and the students’ actions align with ubuntu, a cultural framework that shapes an individual’s engagement with others. Third, areas for improvement exist for the international service-learning program. A number of implications for higher education professionals are presented as a result of the findings. First, faculty members and practitioners must involve community members as co-educators in the long-term life cycle of an international service-learning program. Second, U.S. higher education professionals must learn from international models of service. Third, faculty members and practitioners who design international service-learning programs must restructure pre-departure programming to include domestic service opportunities, academic preparation beyond surface-level knowledge, and the postcolonial perspective. These strategies will help higher education professionals construct meaningful partnerships with community-based organizations that are characterized by thick reciprocity—partnerships that are more inclusive, just, and reciprocal.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Ksenija Glusac, Ph.D. (Other); Christina Lunceford, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

international service-learning; service-learning; study abroad; South Africa; international education; community; community engagement; reciprocity; higher education; student affairs; narrative inquiry

Nagy, BethAre Planning Students Becoming Transformational Leaders?
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Urban Educational Leadership
This research asks us to consider the intersection of three major themes in the pedagogy of teaching Planning students: sustainable community theories, transformational leadership and community engagement. The intersection, a critical Planning pedagogy, should be a part of any Planning program, embedded within the curriculum of higher education. This democratic, community-based pedagogy seeks to balance technical Planning skills with socially responsible, ethical, sustainable processes to build and sustain communities with high qualities of life for all of its citizens through empowerment of its assets. We must know more about how Planning students are being equipped with transformational, sustainable process-based skills. Planners are expected to be ethical professionals and citizens, advancing socially-responsible citizenship-based practices. Planners must understand the impact of decisions on communities. This requires mastery of techniques for involving a wide range of people in making decisions, ability to work with the public and articulate planning issues to a wide variety of audiences as well as the ability to function as a facilitator when community interests conflict. These skills require a foundation in transformational leadership, but students cannot model it unless the curriculum deliberately exposes students to it. Although this is a case study, and its findings limited to one program, the framework can be explored as a means to examining leadership and community engagement in higher education.

Committee:

Lionel Brown, EdD (Committee Chair); David Edelman, PhD (Committee Member); Stephen Sunderland, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Urban Planning

Keywords:

critical Planning pedagogy;transformational leadership;community engagement;;;;

Silvestro, John JosephChanging the Conversation: A Case Study of Professional, Public Writers Composing Amidst Circulation
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2017, English
This project examines how writers compose research texts, such as reports, infographics, digital content—so that they might circulate. Specifically, I study a group of writers at The Women’s Fund of the Greater Cincinnati Foundation (TWF) and their writing processes for their research texts, texts they write both to inform audiences and to motivate those same audiences to share and discuss the texts with others. TWF researches and distributes information on the unique socio-economic challenges women in Cincinnati face. They strive to change the local conversation about socio-economic issues so that everyone from citizens to businesses leaders to local politicians understand the distinct challenges that women face. They want to inform Cincinnatians about these issues and equip them to engage in discussions with others about these issues. Studying TWF’s efforts to get their research texts discussed so as to change local conversations affords the opportunity to study how professional writers compose texts both to inform and to circulate. More specifically, it enables an examination of the ways writers compose amidst circulation, both its possibilities to expand conversations and its limitations. Additionally, it enables me to articulate specific strategies that other professional writers can draw upon in their efforts to compose texts for similar public engagements and circulation. To study TWF, I use a Circulation Studies methodology and corresponding methods to perform a multi-part case study of their strategies for a few representative research texts. I first outline the local conversation that TWF works to change, establishing the narrow constraints that influence what texts and information circulate. From there, I study TWF’s understanding of that local conversation, particularly its narrow perspective on local social and economic issues. I next present how TWF incorporate that understanding into their research texts—infographics, reports, presentations, digital content, keynote speakers, hashtag campaigns—to better enable their texts to circulate in local publics. Lastly, I examine how TWF combines strategies to motivate audiences to share their research into publics that otherwise block their research. In sum, my case study suggests several strategies for composing research for circulation. The strategies suggest that writers need to carefully study the ongoing circulation in their target publics and then compose and distribute their texts to work within and against that circulation. Furthermore, my research reveals that professional writers should integrate strategies into a protracted campaign that engages publics and their circulation constraints and possibilities.

Committee:

Michele Simmons, Dr (Committee Co-Chair); Jason Palmeri, Dr (Committee Co-Chair); Tim Lockridge, Dr (Committee Member); James Porter, Dr (Committee Member); Glenn Platt, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Gender; Mass Communications; Public Policy; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Web Studies

Keywords:

professional writing; non-profits; circulation; public advocacy; public rhetoric; digital rhetoric; writing strategies; public spheres; Cincinnati; data visualization; public reports; technical writing; content writing; community engagement; public policy

Gazda, Courtney M.Educational Outreach in the Arts: A Study of the Link Up Music Education Program
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2017, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
Research has long supported the benefits of the arts, specifically to students in grades K-12. Although arts programs have been decreasing over the last decade, nonprofit organizations have created strong programs that enrich students in the arts and create opportunities for collaborations with the community. The Weill Institute of Music at Carnegie Hall developed the Link Up music education outreach program to provide a beneficial means of music education in collaboration with partner host organizations and schools and has proven to be highly effective.

Committee:

Elisa Gargarella (Advisor); Ramona Ortega-Liston (Committee Member); Jonathan Willis (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Arts Administration; Music; Music Education; Education; STEAM; Link Up; Akron Symphony Orchestra; Arts; Arts education; Arts Management; Nonprofit; Education Outreach; Community Engagement; Audience Development

Filon, Michele R.To Tweet or not to Tweet
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
The main purpose of this research was to explore and determine how the use of multiple social media tools, such as microblogs (e.g., Twitter) and social networking sites (e.g., Facebook) can build a positive sense of community for rural educators, considering the declines in population, jobs, resources, and schools. In addition, the research provided valuable feedback for educational leaders on the importance of developing a comprehensive communication plan that includes the utilization of multiple social media platforms. The Social Media and Community Engagement Instrument, sixty-three items which included yes/no answers, Likert-type scale value statements, extended response items, and demographic questions, was developed and administered online via Qualtrics to 233 parents or grandparents of rural (as defined by Ohio Department of Education) public school children (K-12). Once respondents with incomplete data were removed, the final response count was 170. Upon examining the data, the researcher determined that there were three strong factors - “Community Pride”, “Classroom/Building Level Involvement in Social Media”, and “Sharing/Marketing”. The researcher notes four conclusions based upon the data in regards to use of social media by rural public school districts: 1) school districts develop a comprehensive communication plan that utilizes multiple social media sites; 2) school districts provide venues for constructive 2-way communication; 3) school districts utilize social media to market their district and provide accurate, transparent communication; and 4) and school districts incorporate use of social media in their crisis plans. In regards to future studies, the researcher makes two recommendations: 1) build upon this research to determine whether positive sense of community results in increased physical community engagement; and 2) utilize the Social Media Hyperdrive Communication Theory (Filon, 2015) to create a positive sense of community in an urban district or community.

Committee:

Krisana Machtmes, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Dwan Robinson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Charles Lowery, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Educational Leadership; Multimedia Communications; School Administration

Keywords:

social media; communication; rural leadership; Social Media Hyperdrive Communication Theory; multiple channels communication; leadership; community engagement; positive sense of community; 21st century leadership;

gauntner, josephBoundary Spanner Role Conflict in Public Urban Universities
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2013, College of Education and Human Services
Universities are increasingly seeking partnerships with external organizations for student learning and inter-organizational access to resources (Austin, 2010; Sandmann, 2006). The focus of such partnerships includes employee training, business development, affordable housing, community schools, community health centers, and other projects of reciprocal value to both the universities and community partners. Such work is frequently labeled university-community engagement (Carnegie Foundation, 2007). University staff members who build and sustain partnerships between their institutions and the broader community are referred to as boundary spanners (AASCU, 2004). Working as agents of the institution, a boundary spanner must be capable of working both sides of the university-community organizational boundary to bring together people and resources and to move toward outcomes sought by both parties. Institutions frequently employ formally sanctioned, full-time university staff to serve as boundary spanners. It is common, though not exclusive, that such staff is administrative or allied staff versus tenure track faculty or academic unit administrators. Even in those institutions fully committed to the principles of community engagement, it seems inevitable that boundary spanners attempting to design mutually beneficial relationships between separate entities will experience role conflict as they seek to align diverse community and institutional agendas. The challenges of creating such partnerships are even greater for urban universities that operate in complex environments. A constructivist grounded theory study was carried out to explore role conflict experienced by non-academic university staff members who work across organizational boundaries in urban universities to address the needs of both their host institutions and their communities. Key findings of the study included that (1) the experience of role conflict is an integral part of the boundary spanner role, (2) individual boundary spanners’ responses may be identified and characterized either as formative responses directed toward continuing to seek alignment of interests between the university and the community or as adaptive responses, which indicate that the role conflict is unlikely to be resolved by reaching agreement, and (3) a theoretical framework for boundary spanner role conflict was identified, inclusive of factors which appear to increase role conflict and other factors which support formative responses to role conflict.

Committee:

Catherine Hansman, EdD (Committee Chair); James Carl, PhD (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, PhD (Committee Member); Catherine Monaghan, PhD (Committee Member); Rosemary Sutton, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership

Keywords:

university community engagement; boundary spanner; role conflict

Werry, Tasha K.Increasing Shared Understandings between Educators and Community Members through Intentional Collaborative Interactions
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
This study examines the experiences of the teachers and community business representatives that have partnered in a community engagement initiative to address career exploration for students. The goal of this collaboration is to bridge the gap between education and employment. This qualitative study uses a phenomenological approach and gathers data through a series of three interviews with five participants from the community engagement process. Data collected are coded and analyzed through a phenomenological lens in order to extract the textural and structural essence of the process. Data revealed that boundary crossing by the educators and business representatives increased shared understandings due to shared participation in community engagement activities. The research provides an intimate look at the approaches used to directly connect teachers and community members. These findings are beneficial to educational leaders and community leaders.

Committee:

Dwan Robinson, Ph.D (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

community engagement; K-12 education; education and business partnerships; social networks; student engagement; educational leadership; sociocultural learning

HORNYAK, MEGAN LACYEDUCATION QUALITY AND THE COMMUNITY: A GEOGRAPHIC AND POLICY ANALYSIS OF A RUST BELT CITY'S SCHOOLS
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Geography
Education remains an important component of urban policy with regards to urban development and the physical and economic outcomes of urban environments and neighborhoods. This study seeks to understand the relationships between blight and crime and student outcomes in their schools, and in particular, if minorities and their neighborhoods are still left disadvantaged. This study also seeks to understand how education policy impacts these students as well as their communities. Results show that domestic violence was one of the highest crimes spatially dispersed throughout the city and that there were more African American neighborhoods located near blighted areas, but schools with high population percentages of African American students were still successful. Four out of 11 failing schools were located inside blight hot spots along with one C graded school. Student outcomes and whether a school is performing poorly is also based on several other factors including absence rates of students per school, the number of students with disabilities, and the number of the student population with a limited English proficiency. This study also finds that a lack of community in the decision making of educational policy can have detrimental effects, creating conflict between the community and the school district.

Committee:

DAVID KAPLAN (Advisor); XINYUE YE (Committee Member); TODD HAWLEY (Committee Member); ERIC SHOOK (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Geographic Information Science; Geography

Keywords:

education policy, urban schools, urban blight, community development, community engagement, minority education

Van Ausdall, AndreaEXAMINING PROCESS AND PROGRESS IN PLANNING AND DEVELOPING CINCINNATI COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTERS
MCP, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Community Planning
Recently educators and planners have focused on the benefits of community participation in the creation of a new or renovated school facilities that include components available for use by the wider community. These community schools can act as a hub for neighborhood activity, offering amenities such as family support centers, after-school programs, and health and mental health services. This study examines the role of community engagement in planning educational facilities, specifically the case studies of two Cincinnati Public Schools, Riverview East Academy in Columbia Tusculum and Washington Park Elementary in Over-the-Rhine. The schools utilized similar approaches but reveal very different results. Conclusions include that one process does not fit all schools, that planners must be aware of and work with the dynamics of the community culture and politics, and that although the process is viable as a planning tool it may not always lead to the desired outcomes.

Committee:

Thomas Wagner (Advisor)

Keywords:

community learning centers; community schools; Cincinnati Public Schools; community engagement; Riverview East Academy; Washington Park Elementary; educational planning

Bonner, Brooke AlexisAMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CORE STANDARDS AND EVIDENCE BASED INSTRUCTION
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2014, Speech Pathology and Audiology
This paper examines the arguments for American Sign Language (ASL) as a foreign language and the development of a complete ASL curriculum to fulfill a foreign language requirement at Miami University. The development of a curriculum grounded in evidence of second language learning pedagogy is essential for the fulfillment of Miami University foreign language requirements. This paper used primary sources from peer-reviewed literature, books, and current organizational websites to examine the importance of ASL instruction at institutions of higher learning and establish a complete curriculum based on language learning pedagogy and foreign language proficiency standards.

Committee:

Kathleen Hutchinson- Marron, Ph.D. (Advisor); Shelly Bromberg, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Amber Franklin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Megan Gross (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Foreign Language; Speech Therapy

Keywords:

American Sign Language; Best Practice; foreign language standards; institution of higher learning; community engagement; evidence based instruction; intermediate ASL curriculum

Reading, JessicaInitiating and sustaining social projects in a college environment
Bachelor of Science in Business, Miami University, 2009, School of Business Administration - Human Resource Management
Students interested in engaging with communities beyond the University may perceive four years as a lengthy time, but it is relatively short in the growth of a community. I personally faced the challenge of leaving a community of which I have become a part through the partnerships I have developed in Hamilton, Ohio, with a coalition of Latino business owners and how to sustain the partnership post-graduation. The question in this thesis is how do students, in a generation that is driven to create and make lasting social change to our society, attempt to impact the community of which they are part for a short amount of time? When it comes to civic responsibility, community engagement, social entrepreneurship, mutual learning, and community-based learning, students face the challenge of establishing and growing a University-community partnership that may lead to future projects or may help to sustain a current one. This thesis discusses the concept of university-community partnerships through my research: experiential learning of two specific partnerships in which I have been included: La Voz and Partners for Change. These partnerships are discussed through a comparative analysis of their successes and limitations. Because the projects cannot be evaluated solely on quantitative data, personal narratives illustrate the impact the partnerships have had on both university students as well as the Butler County community. Through these experiences, this paper argues a new framework of sustainability metaphorically represented as living entities that are nurtured, yet self-sustaining, much like the lifecycle of a tree. Just like trees, University-community partnerships too have roots that provide a foundation; elements that help care for the tree and the nutrients to sustain them. This study investigates University-community partnerships and explores a model that provides a way of understanding how to successfully create, build, and sustain a partnership and initiative that outlasts the existence of the members that created it.

Committee:

Shelly Jarrett Bromberg, Dr. (Advisor); Marguerite Shaffer, Associate Professor (Committee Member); Rebecca Luzadis, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Business Education; Education; Higher Education; Management; Social Work

Keywords:

social change; college; sustainability; community engagement; civic leadership; citizenship; partnerships; university; community

Kim, InSulArt as a Catalyst for Social Capital: A Community Action Research Study for Survivors of Domestic Violence and its Implications for Cultural Policy
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, Art Education

The purpose of this dissertation study is to conduct an art-based, community action research study as a means (1) to support the recovery process of domestic violence survivors; (2) to produce social capital among members of the community to initiate civic discussions on the consequences of domestic violence; and (3) to investigate its implications for cultural policy as the outcomes of this study highlight the unique role of the arts in making a difference in people’s lives and communities.

The art works produced by the workshop participants of this study (i.e., domestic violence survivors) were exhibited in a professional gallery as a form of visual narrative that speaks for their wounded past and difficult journeys. The collected data strongly indicates that art can be an exceptionally powerful tool for communication and healing, when words and discussions fall short. Overall, this research investigates the instrumental functions of the arts as a means to produce social capital for personal well-being, social support, and social justice.

The study was framed within action research methodology and the triangulation model in data sources, research methods, and theoretical lenses, while both quantitative and qualitative techniques were employed. The collected data were analyzed at three different levels: (1) Personal level (i.e., the art workshop participants: n=16), (2) Organizational level (i.e., the staff of the transitional housing facility and the gallery: n=6), and (3) Community level (i.e., the general audience who came to the exhibit: n=74).

Committee:

Margaret Wyszomirski (Advisor); Karen Hutzel (Committee Co-Chair); Patricia Stuhr (Committee Member); Mo-Yee Lee (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education

Keywords:

Cultural Policy; Arts Policy; Social Capital; Action Research; Art Education; Community Art; Art Therapy; Art-based Research; Therapeutic Art; Domestic Violence; Artmaking; Social Justice; Community Engagement; Qualitative Research; Mixed Methods

Potts, Martha AnnChanging Poison into Medicine Through Social Processes of “Finding Pathways Out”: The Rwandan Construction of a New Destiny in the Aftermath of the 1994 Genocide
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2011, Organizational Behavior
Between April 6th and mid-July of 1994, more than a million Tutsi, moderate Hutu and Batwa were killed in the Hutu government orchestrated genocide in Rwanda, Africa. The initial purpose of the research was to explore micro-financed small business partnerships between Tutsi and Hutu women in the aftermath of the genocide. Based on the dictates of classic grounded theory the research was redirected to the more salient issues for the research participants. The topic evolved to one of looking at reconciliation, the creation of a progressive civil society and coping with tremendous loss. A grounded theory of “finding pathways out” of the horrors of genocide emerged as being the more salient concern of the research participants. The phrase, “finding pathways out,” refers to a group of social processes present in post-genocide Rwanda. They emerged from the data on three levels of the society; individual, national and community. On the individual level is a concept termed managing the void, the properties of which are: numbing down, masking, mimicking, episodic recall, confronting the void and catapulting the gap. On the national level, the concept is reconstituting national identity and the properties are: invoking the ancestors, embodying change, operationalizing change and sharing the dream. On the community level the concept is improvising civility with properties termed encouraging oneness, reaching deep and engaged healing. The theory highlights how Rwandans are redefining the past, shaping the ideals of the present, and envisioning the future as a means of influencing the reconciliation process.

Committee:

Eric Neilsen, PhD (Committee Chair); Ronald Fry, PhD (Committee Member); David Kolb, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Chupp, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Studies; Holocaust Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Organizational Behavior; Peace Studies

Keywords:

classic grounded theory; genocide; post-genocide recovery; coping behaviors; community engagement; peacebuilding

McNamara, Kim H.Fostering Sustainability in Higher Education: A Mixed-Methods Study of Transformative Leadership and Change Strategies
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2008, Leadership and Change
As evidence of the earth’s limited capacity to sustain human life mounts, institutions of higher education are being looked to for leadership in the effort to educate students about environmental concerns and support the development of sustainable innovations. Colleges and universities are responding to this call for leadership by starting and/or expanding environmental research programs, integrating sustainability issues throughout the curriculum, adopting sustainable operations, and building green facilities. Reflecting upon the sustainability efforts of these institutions, this research study explores the following questions:What factors are essential for initiating and leading a successful change effort to foster sustainability in higher education? What processes guide higher education institutions in efforts to deeply and comprehensively implement sustainable changes? A sequential mixed-methods research design was used to gather data from questionnaires administered to 86 colleges and universities in the United States implementing sustainability programs, from interviews with 20 individuals who are guiding the change processes at ten different institutions, and from archival records documenting the initiatives and outcomes at these colleges and universities. After the data had been analyzed to identify common themes, factors and change process strategies, the results of the analyses were examined in relationship to existing models of change in higher education. Significant correlations were found between the change strategies used and the support systems provided by these institutions and the level of progress achieved on the sustainability initiatives.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Richard Couto, PhD (Committee Member); Jean MacGregor, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Environmental Science; Higher Education; Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

sustainability; higher education; colleges; universities; leadership; transformative change; environmental; green; mixed method; strategic planning; community engagement; collaboration

Tullier, Sophie M“It Was More About the Functional Area”: Pursuing and Persisting in Student Affairs Community Engagement Positions
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Policy and Leadership
The purpose of this constructivist narrative study was to explore the prior experiences that have influenced new student affairs professionals to pursue positions focused on promoting community engagement as well as factors that contribute to their desire to leave or persist in this functional area. The research questions guiding this study were: 1) What are the prior life experiences of new student affairs professionals that have influenced their decision to hold a position focused on engaging students with the local community through co-curricular volunteerism, community service, or service-learning? 2) What factors influence individuals’ desire to leave or persist in these positions? Data collection occurred through three separate interviews with four participants, each focusing on a separate timeframe of the new professionals life experiences. Additional data was collected through document analysis, including participants’ position descriptions, resumes, and cover letters. Data was analyzed using the content-categorical method of narrative analysis to identify commons themes and experiences. Findings from this study indicate the influence of service involvement and related leadership experiences during students’ undergraduate education, when decisions were made regarding specialization within the field, as well as socialization to the functional area.

Committee:

Susan R. Jones (Advisor); Tatiana Suspitsyna (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

student affairs; career decision-making; community engagement; service-learning; community service; higher education