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Allen, Susan RothAn Ethnonursing Study of the Cultural Meanings and Practices of Clinical Nurse Council Leaders in Shared Governance
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Nursing: Nursing - Doctoral Program
Shared governance models have been implemented in health care organizations throughout the world over the past three decades. Moving from a vertical governance structure to a shared leadership organizational model requires significant changes in the culture of an organization, and in the behaviors, beliefs and values of its members. The purpose of this study was to discover, describe and systematically analyze the expressions, meanings, lifeways, beliefs, and values of selected clinical nurse shared governance council leaders in a pediatric health care organization. The aims of this study were to: 1) gain new knowledge from the participants through interviews, focus group sessions and field work that may prepare nurses as leaders; 2) discover barriers that may exist in the development of the caring lifeways that are needed to prepare nurses as leaders; and 3) analyze how caring relationships develop to promote nursing leadership. Ethnonursing research methods (Leininger, 1997) were used to discover previously unknown knowledge about the participants' experiences. The findings illustrated how caring relationships assisted clinical nurse council leaders to discover leadership within themselves, find their own voice, give voice to other nurses, accept personal and professional accountability for nursing practice, and advocate for patients and families. Caring leadership practices were all levels of nurses equally sharing their beliefs and values about nursing practice. However, the values and beliefs that nurses experienced in a hierarchical organizational culture could sometimes be in opposition to a nursing culture with the values and beliefs of shared governance. Mutuality in shared governance was clinical nurse council leaders engaged in equitable, reciprocal communication with managers to share leadership and decision making about nursing practice, and grow professionally to become nursing leaders.

Committee:

Edith Morris, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Marilyn Ray, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Denise Gormley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rebecca Lee, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Nursing

Keywords:

nursing leadership;shared governance;ethnonursing research;clinical nurse council leaders;mutuality;caring leadership

Tufts, Winfield F.High People-High Mission: The Power of Caring Leadership as Experienced in the Air Force
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
On the surface, caring and the military appear to be opposites. The stereotypical image of the military giving and obeying orders does not conjure up images of leaders caring for their subordinates. In reality, caring for subordinates and caring for the mission could help leaders form stronger relationships with subordinates, because subordinates may have confidence that their leaders will not recklessly send them into harm’s way. Subordinates may develop confidence in their leaders based on their leaders’ care during non-combat environments. Yet, empirical studies of caring in the military are sparse. This study investigates how Air Force retirees characterize “great bosses” care for them and care for the mission. A mixed method study of 12 qualitative interviews with Air Force retirees, followed by a quantitative survey study of 226 Air Force retirees revealed that caring actions cluster into four themes: Caring for Subordinates Personally, Caring for Subordinates Professionally, Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Mission Execution, and Caring for the Mission with a Focus on Empowering the Unit. This study also examined how these subordinates responded to those bosses that cared for them through Stronger Job Performance and Stronger Relationship with the Boss. The dissertation findings operationalize caring, demonstrate correlations between caring actions and self-reported increases in performance and boss-subordinate relationship quality, and detail actions that an authentic, caring leader can take to pursue the flourishing of subordinates and mission success simultaneously. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Laura Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Davis, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Military Studies

Keywords:

Air Force; bosses; mixed methods; leadership; care; caring; caring leadership; military culture; military leadership; servant leadership; virtuous leadership