Search Results (1 - 25 of 154 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Brennan, John MichaelShow Design and Wind Arranging for Marching Ensembles
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2014, Music
The purpose this study is to illustrate current trends in show design and wind arranging within the marching band and drum corps activity. Through a comprehensive review of literature a need for further study on this subject was discovered. Specifically, texts from the 1950s, 60s, and 70s focused primarily on marching band arranging practices with minimal influence of show design. Since the 1980s, several documents have been written that discuss show design with some degree of detail, but have neglected to thoroughly address changes in marching band arranging. It is the aim of this thesis to discuss current trends and techniques in marching band wind arranging, and the higher level of detail placed into show conceptualization used by drum corps, competitive, and show band.

Committee:

Daryl Kinney, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Marching Band; Marching Band Arranging; Marching Band Halftime Show; Marching Band Show Design; Drum and Bugle Corps; Competition Marching Band; The Ohio State University Marching Band

Coy, Christopher JamesThe Use of Comprehensive Musicianship Instruction by a Middle School Band Director: A Case Study
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Music Education

The purpose of this study was to conduct a case study of a band director who uses comprehensive musicianship instruction in middle school bands. To determine the subject of this study, I selected ten directors based upon their reputation of success and my knowledge of middle school band directors in District 1 of the Ohio Music Education Association. I then e-mailed them a request to complete a survey that ascertained their understanding and use of comprehensive musicianship. Mr. Richard Brimmer, Director of Bands at Lake Local Schools, was chosen as the subject of this case study because his survey answers demonstrated clear knowledge and implementation of comprehensive musicianship. I visited Brimmer's school for a total of 16 full school days in March, April, and May of 2012, and collected data in the following ways: (a) entrance and exit interviews consisting of semi-structured questions conducted during my first and last full weeks of observation; (b) observations of the four middle school bands that I documented in a journal notebook; (c) observation notes that served as prompts for end-of-week reflective discussions with Brimmer to gain his reactions to class events; (d) a survey distributed to assenting band students during my final visit to determine their reactions to Brimmer's instructional methods; and (e) artifacts, including method books used, quizzes and tests, major projects, performance assessment rubrics and any additional resources used in class.

Analysis of the data collected revealed the following four instructional themes in Brimmer's teaching: (a) music theory, (b) performance skills, (c) musical independence, and (d) music's relationship to other aspects of life. Although the research literature has shown that the primary reason teachers do not use comprehensive musicianship is performance demands, Brimmer's use of it keeps performance at the center of his instruction. While he does not follow one specific comprehensive musicianship model, he uses comprehensive methods to achieve his performance goals because he believes it is essential to developing musical understanding in his students. His teaching, interview responses, and discussion comments demonstrated his belief that using comprehensive musicianship in the middle school band provides students with the conceptual understanding that is required to effectively perform advanced literature in the high school band and to be knowledgeable consumers of music.

Committee:

Vincent Kantorski, PhD (Advisor); Bruce Moss, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Fine Arts; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Comprehensive musicianship; middle school band; band; instrumental music; band director; case study; junior high band

Hayward, Carol M.A course in band literature based on a standard repertoire developed from the opinions of selected collegiate and secondary school band directors
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2004, Music
The issue of literature selection for performing ensembles is of criticalimportance for band directors in the schools with many authorities agreeing that the repertoire chosen for study is the curriculum for these classes. Preservice professionals and less experienced directors of wind bands may lack skills for determining the quality of materials chosen for study, as well as knowledge of standard literature for these ensembles. For this study, a survey group of collegiate directors of bands was selected on the basis of their expertise in wind literature. Most other studies on repertoire for wind bands have employed random selection methods to choose survey respondents. These selected participants were asked to respond to a survey concerning standard literature for band and the criteria for identifying quality in band literature. They were also asked to nominate high school band directors whose opinions they respect on the topic of repertoire selection. These recommended directors were asked to complete a similar survey. The survey respondents included 83 directors from both the collegiate and high school levels who teach in all six regions of the College Band Directors National Association. The respondents exhibited a wealth of experience in the field with most indicating that they had twelve or more years of teaching experience. The ultimate goal of the project was to construct a syllabus for a course in wind literature that would include the results of this research. The course builds upon the concerns expressed and recommendations derived from the review of literature, as well as the recommendations of the survey respondents. The survey identified 24 grade III-VI works from the standard literature of the wind band that through study and analysis would provide insight for determining criteria of quality in wind literature. In addition, a list of criteria for determining quality in music was substantiated for use as a catalyst for discussion in the class and to serve as a basis for students to develop their own criteria for determining quality in music, especially the quality of less familiar works that have not yet entered the body of standard literature.

Committee:

Russel Mikkelson (Advisor)

Keywords:

concert band literature; concert band repertoire; wind band literature; course in band literature

Stewart, Michael JohnA study of first-year students within The Ohio State University and the factors influencing nonparticipation in band programs at the collegiate level
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Music
The purpose of this study was to identify factors among first-year students influencing nonparticipation in collegiate band programs at The Ohio State University. This study arose from four primary concerns: 1) a need for a study focusing on the retention of non-music major band members from high school to college; 2) a need for a review and update of previous studies focusing on retention of band students from high school to college; 3) a need for a study of this nature to focus specifically on an individual large university; and 4) a need to provide data intended to improve recruiting techniques for large college band programs. Distribution and collection of a survey questionnaire was accomplished through two methods: 1) direct distribution of the questionnaire in selected classes and 2) electronic mail distribution with information provided from the SAT/ACT Interest Inventory. The total sample population for the study was 280 (n = 280) first-year students. Descriptive statistics were developed in the examination and presentation of the data. Results from the survey indicated the variable most influential to nonparticipation in bands at The Ohio State University was the perceived time commitment thought to be inherent from participation in a college band program. Of equal importance was the fact that 83.6% of respondents had made the decision not to participate in bands at The Ohio State University prior to enrollment into the university. Data suggest a first-year student’s decision not to participate in bands was influenced by factors such as: a) time conflict with other courses; b) an overall declining interest in band; c) concerns about academic course load; d) musical proficiency; e) fear of auditioning; f) lack of information about the college band program; and g) negative high school band experiences. Data provided did not find a relationship between nonparticipation and: a) reputation of the college band conductor, and b) advice from college academic advisors, high school counselors, parents, and high school band director(s). College band directors should continue to increase communication with high school band directors and potential students, focusing specifically on benefits to non-music majors, audition requirements and time commitments.

Committee:

Jon Woods (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music

Keywords:

nonparticipation; participation; band; college band; instrumental music; recruiting; retention; The Ohio State University; first-year; freshmen; college band

Backes, Aaron J.A Multiple Case Study of Six Exemplary Band Directors’ Repertoire Selection Processes
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Music Education
The purpose of the study was to conduct a multiple case study of six exemplary band directors' repertoire selection processes. Two collegiate, two high school, and two middle school band directors were nominated based on their outstanding reputations as instrumental music educators and their knowledge in repertoire selection. Each band director was interviewed in person and asked ten semi-structured interview questions on the repertoire selection process they use for the ensembles that they teach. Each interview lasted approximately 45 minutes and was video-recorded and transcribed. The band directors identified a number of factors that are important in the repertoire selection process with the most important being that the music is high quality. The band directors use different criteria in determining quality of music, which include form, harmony, scoring, variety, and unpredictability. The directors select music that is appropriate for their ensemble's ability level by selecting works that will challenge the students but also allow them to be successful in making music. The band directors indicated that an effective concert program has a variety of composers and styles as well as works that appeal to the audience, students, and conductor. The band directors also offer suggestions on how young band directors can become more effective in the repertoire selection process.

Committee:

Carol Hayward, D.M.A. (Advisor); Vincent Kantorski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Multiple Case Study; Band Repertoire; Repertoire Selection; Band Directors; Band; Repertoire Selection Processes

Maze, Rex AllanSWAT
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Music Composition

SWAT is a seven-minute work for symphonic band. The instrumentation follows the standard symphonic band arrangement, featuring multiple performers per wind part, as well as piano, timpani, and four percussion parts.

As the title suggests, SWAT is influenced by my own experience with a SWAT (special weapons and tactics) team raid in the Fall of 2009. The composition follows the general chronological order of events of the raid, featuring the progression from sleep, waking, the raid itself, and finally to the period of reflection and post-event trauma. Furthermore, the music motivically, texturally, rhythmically, and instrumentally reflects the intense physical, mental, and emotional stress of the actual event.

As mentioned above, the formal structure of SWAT is loosely influenced by the progression of events that transpired the night of the SWAT team raid. In this respect, the piece unfolds as a three-part form based on the following distinct events from the raid: the period of sleep prior to the raid (Section A), the time in which the SWAT team searched the residence (Section B), and finally the traumatic reflection after the event (Section C). While the inspiration for this structure is narrative in nature the composition itself is not strictly programmatic, but instead features loose musical portraits of each of these events. With this in mind, the intent of SWAT is not to retell the story of the raid, but rather to musically portray the extreme psychological impact of the experience.

The harmonic language of SWAT is based on a nine-note set (9-4 [012345789]) derived from an extended tertian sonority that forms the foundation of the pitch-material for the piece. Different subsets of this original set are explored throughout the work, forming an ever-changing yet structurally cohesive harmonic surface. In terms of macro-structure, the original set (T0) is used throughout Section A, the tritone transposition (T6) is used throughout Section B, and their combination (forming the complete chromatic collection), is used in Section C.

Committee:

Elainie Lillios, DMA (Advisor); Mikel Kuehn, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Music; Contemporary Music; Band; Symphonic Band; Concert Band; Wind Ensemble

Eng, Hank WThe crystal and electronic structures of oxides containing d0 transition metals in octahedral coordination
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Chemistry
Photocatalytic properties of a material are highly dependent upon the energy levels of the conduction and valence bands relative to the reactantfs HOMO and LUMO. Band edge positions control the wavelength of light that can be absorbed and the permissible surface redox reactions. These band edges are affected by (a) the charge transfer energy from the oxygen to metal, (b) local symmetry about the metal, (c) the connectivity of the MOn polyhedra, and (d) inductive effects from highly electropositive spectator cations. Ternary perovskite, ordered double perovskite and perovskite-related oxides with d0 transition metals (Ti4+, Nb5+, Ta5+, Mo6+, and W6+) in octahedral coordination have been systematically investigated to quantitatively understand the effects of cation substitution and structural features, such as symmetry about the transition metal. Measurements of the materialfs energetic band gap were made using UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and linear muffin tin orbital calculations were utilized to help discern trends in the measured band gaps. The cubic perovskite oxides give the minimal band gap energies for the transition metal of interest in octahedral coordination. Band gaps of elpasolite compounds are shown to be a measure of the oxygen-to-metal charge transfer, and thus, is a measure of that transition metalfs effective electronegativity. Distortions from the ideal, cubic structure lead to increases in the band gap. Other than going from ternary to quarternary perovskites, out-of-center distortions of the octahedra have the greatest affect on the band gap. Changes in the M-O-M bond angle have the next most significant affect on the band gap. Changes in dimensionality have almost no affect on the band gap; however, structural distortions arising from those changes may increase the band gap. Finally, inductive effects of spectator ions were negligible in the double perovskite compounds, although slight variations in band gap energies occurred with the less electronegative transition metals. Synthesis and structural refinement of seventeen Mo and W ordered double perovskite oxides (A2MŒMO6; A = Ca, Sr, Ba; MŒ = Mg, Ca, Zn, Sr, Ba; M = Mo, W) are reported. Comparisons to the crystal structures predicted by the structural prediction software SPuDS are also made.

Committee:

Patrick Woodward (Advisor)

Keywords:

electronic structures; band gaps; band structures; perovskites; LMTO band structure calculations; d0 transition metal oxides

Blair, Jennifer MarieThe History and Development of The Ohio State University Concert Wind Band Program from 1929-1995
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2010, Music

From humble beginnings, the concert wind bands at The Ohio State University developed from a utilitarian campus group to a nationally recognized program, serving the artistic, educational, and aesthetic needs of the students for whom it exists. From an educational standpoint, the Ohio State band program is not alone in this development. Across the country, similar wind groups began as makeshift military bands, fashioned loosely in the style of traveling professional groups from the early twentieth century. As these bands became established campus ensembles, eventually serving the academic needs of music departments and schools, directors began to selectively model their programs on the philosophical and educational trends of the day. Reflective of the national progression of the wind band movement, the Ohio State band directors demonstrated a desire to perform original and often contemporary literature, to replicate the instrumentation of other leading university band programs, and to seek performance opportunities that would bring recognition to the ensemble and attract talented prospective students.

As opportunities and resources grew for band directors at Ohio State, value-based decisions were made, which resulted from the directors' own philosophical views on performance and education, limited only by the support and funding provided by campus administrators. By the 1960s, wind band advocates could no longer claim a professional disadvantage based on the limitations of repertoire or the curricular acceptance of bands at the post-secondary level. Rather, directors had to choose the path that their programs would take, determining the best balance for their institution, drawing from campus traditions and contemporary methodologies endorsed by leading professionals in their field. During this time at Ohio State, as well as at other institutions, long-established directors would build reputations of excellence and expectations of tradition with their band that would be transferred to future directors for years to come.

As the years passed, a new generation of directors entered the field with firm foundations in the contemporary philosophies of the wind band movement, as encouraged by leading directors and educators in the band world. Faced with the task of evolving their programs from a strong but often outdated philosophical identity, they made changes when possible, updated what they could, and tried not to lose sight of the ultimate goal for their programs – to maintain an outlet for the artistic expression and educational involvement of the students whom they served.

Committee:

Daryl Kinney, PhD (Advisor); Patricia Flowers, PhD (Committee Member); Russel Mikkelson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education History; Music; Music Education; Performing Arts

Keywords:

concert band; ohio state; wind band; wind ensemble; symphonic band; Donald McGinnis; Manley Whitcomb; Eugene Weigel; Craig Kirchhoff; School of Music

Macura, Nebojsa S.Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2011, College-Conservatory of Music: Composition
In many ways, the Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble reflects my experiences at the University of Cincinnati. Composed mainly during the first four months of 2011, and originally intended as a summary of the various compositional techniques honed during my doctoral studies, the work also gained a programmatic element, seemingly without any conscious effort on my part. Although the concerto is in one continuous movement, it is divided into three main sections, each alluding to my state of mind during my three years as a full-time student at UC. Approximately 27 minutes in duration, this is my largest composition so far.

Committee:

Joel Hoffman, DMA (Committee Chair); Douglas Knehans, DMA (Committee Member); Mike Fiday, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

concerto;piano;wind ensemble;wind band;concert band;band

Terban, Jessica L.Strategies Used by Women High School Band Directors to Meet the Challenge of Balancing Career and Family
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education

The lack of women band directors, especially at the high school and collegiate levels, is an area of concern for music educators. Previous research has identified balancing career and family responsibilities as a challenge for professional women, and a possible factor in the inequality of men and women in the band directing profession.

The purpose of the study was to investigate strategies used by women high school band directors to meet the challenge of balancing career and family. College band directors in Michigan and Ohio nominated women high school band directors based on the following criteria, (a) female, (b) current or former high school band director in Michigan or Ohio, (c) married or divorced, and/or caregiver of a child during the period of employment as a high school band director. Semi-structured, open-ended live interviews were conducted with four women exhibiting a range of experiences with balancing a career as a high school band director and family responsibilities. Interviews were recorded and subsequently transcribed. The analysis initially focused on issues presented in previous research, such as spousal support, childcare methods, time management, and family and career planning and was further guided by the interview of each subject allowing the researcher to identify challenges and strategies related to balancing a career as a band director and family responsibilities.

Analysis and coding of data within and across cases revealed challenges and strategies commonly related to a theme of time. Participants reported challenges and strategies related to the time requirements of the high school band director position and parenting. Numerous afterschool and weekend commitments contributed to participants' emotional distress and guilt from being separated from their children, maintaining personal relationships, and difficulty staying healthy. Strategies used by participants to cope with their time commitments included: relying on their spouses for support; depending on family, friends, and daycare providers for quality childcare; setting priorities; scheduling meticulously; and living near their families and schools.

Identifying strategies used to meet the challenge of balancing a career as a band director and family responsibilities may benefit women who desire to achieve their professional goal of becoming a successful high school band director and personal goal of having a family.

Committee:

Elizabeth A. Menard, PhD (Advisor); Vincent J. Kantorski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Gender; Gender Studies; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

music education; women band directors; high school band directors; college band directors; career and family; challenges; strategies

Paschall, Shannon SuzanneA REVIEW OF BEGINNING BAND METHOD BOOKS FOR INCLUSION OF COMPREHENSIVE MUSICIANSHIP AND ADHERENCE TO THE NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR MUSIC EDUCATION
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education
The purpose of this study was to review five beginning band methods for inclusion of comprehensive musicianship and adherence to the National Standards for Music Education. Band Expressions (Smith & Smith, 2003), Essential Elements 2000 Plus DVD (Lautzenheiser et. al., 2004), Standard of Excellence: Enhanced Comprehensive Band Method (Pearson, 2004), The Yamaha Advantage: Musicianship from Day One (Clark & Feldstein, 2001), and Accent on Achievement (O’Reilly & Williams, 1997) were reviewed for inclusion of items, topics, and musical skills that each should address according to the National Standards for Music Education as well as books, articles, and studies on comprehensive musicianship. The number of times each band method addresses a topic cited as a standard in the National Standards and/or included in comprehensive musicianship was charted. While all five band methods assist directors in providing comprehensive instruction and adhering to the National Standards, only Band Expressions integrates all of the topics reviewed in this thesis into the band method.

Committee:

Kevin Schempf Kenneth Thompson (Advisor)

Keywords:

beginning band methods; band method; beginning band books; National Standards; Comprehensive musicianship

Hayes, William FellowsRetention of 8th Grade Band Students During the Transition to High School
Master of Education, University of Toledo, 2004, Music Education
For band directors, the retention of students during the transition from junior high school to high school is a very important issue. At a time when high school graduation requirements are rising and elective credits are decreasing, directors must be focused on the reasons students decide to remain in band. For these reasons, a survey of band directors has been completed that attempts to gauge what they perceive as the most important factors in student retention. While all of the questions in the survey were important with regards to retention, the most important aspects dealt with the parental, musical and social aspects of band. The survey also seems to indicate, from the directors' point of view, that students have a wide variety of needs. Directors who can adapt their teaching philosophy to meet student needs will be the most likely to retain students during the transition to high school.

Committee:

Timothy Brakel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

music; music education; education; band; retention; band retention; music retention; band attrition; music attrition; attrition

Williamson, Brad AlanA Study of Ohio High School Band Directors’ Perceived Preparation for Teaching High School Marching Band Through Participation in a Collegiate Marching Band, Marching Band Technique Classes, and Methods Courses
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, Music
The purpose of this study was to survey Ohio high school marching band directors to obtain their perceptions of need, and their undergraduate preparation, in the area of marching band techniques. It was determined that a questionnaire was the best method to solicit opinions. Responses were solicited from a sample of 400 Ohio high school marching band directors. A total of 226 questionnaires were returned, representing 56.5% of the target sample, of which 214 were usable. Results from the survey indicated that 67.8% of the respondents had taken a full course in marching band techniques as an undergraduate student. The results also revealed that 72.9% of the respondents had participated in a collegiate marching band. Data were collected regarding twenty-eight teaching factors related to teaching a high school marching band. For each factor participants were asked to define their perceived degree of need for preparation in the undergraduate curriculum. Participants were also asked to indicate their perceived degree of preparation for each factor through coursework in marching band techniques and through participation in a collegiate marching band. The factors indicated to have the highest degree of need were those from the category “skills for marching band rehearsals” and from the category “marching band music.” The factors perceived by the participants to have the highest degree of preparation through coursework were those from the “philosophical” category, and the factors the respondents felt best prepared for through participation in a collegiate marching band were from the category “show design techniques.” Respondents indicated a higher degree of need than degree of preparation for all twenty-eight of the teaching factors. Results indicate that respondents perceived twelve of the factors were best prepared through coursework, while sixteen of the factors were perceived to have been best prepared through participation in a collegiate marching band. For this reason, it would appear as if future instrumental music educators would be best served through coursework in marching band techniques as well as participation in a collegiate marching band.

Committee:

Dr. Jon R. Woods, PhD (Advisor); Jere Forsythe, PhD (Committee Member); Russel Mikkelson, DMA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Music; Music Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

music; teacher preparation; marching band; marching band techniques; methods courses; music education; band directors; instrumental music

Saunders, Matthew CharlesThe Symphony for Band of Donald E. McGinnis: A guide for conductors
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2007, Music
Dr. Donald E. McGinnis (born 1917) composed his Symphony for Band as his doctoral dissertation at the University of Iowa in 1953. A consideration of the harmonic language and structure of the piece reveals that it utilizes compositional techniques appropriate to the time and scope of the work. Its historical context in the development of the symphony for wind band/ensemble places it in a cohort of pieces by Morton Gould, Paul Hindemith and Vincent Persichetti. The 1977 published edition did not include a movement that appeared in McGinnis’ original conception of the piece, the "Solemn Tune." That movement and an errata list for the 1977 score and parts represent an important step toward assuring this piece the place it deserves in the repertoire.

Committee:

Donald Harris (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

McGinnis, Donald; Symphony for Band; symphony; band music; twelve-tone music; Hindemith, Paul; Schoenberg, Arnold; errata list

Messerli, Andrew P.High School Band Directors’ Sound Exposure Levels Relative to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Workplace Standards
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education
The purpose of this study was to determine high school band directors’ soundexposure levels relative to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) workplace standards. Subjects for this study were four band directors from northwest Ohio and east central Illinois. Two directors regularly rehearsed in non-acoustically treated facilities, and two regularly rehearsed in facilities that have received acoustic treatments. Data were collected in the fall and early spring semesters of the 2007-2008 school year using Larson Davis Spark 706RC Personal Noise Dosimeters, devices used to measure and calculate decibel exposure. Measurement times and ensemble samples varied depending on the subject’s schedule. Two dose parameters on the dosimeters were set to correlate to the OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) standards for permissible exposure limits (PEL) and hearing conservation (HC) limits, and a third to the ACGIH (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) threshold limit value (TLV) standard for noise exposure. Results showed that each director experienced decibel levels that would either make them eligible, or very close to eligible, for a hearing conservation program. Implications for music education included that directors should strongly consider wearing musicians’ earplugs during rehearsals. Directors should also try to determine their own decibel exposure levels through the use of noise dosimeters or decibel meters to determine their need or eligibility for a hearing conservation program. Suggestions for further research included comparing how well directors hear various aspects of musical ensembles both with and without musicians’ earplugs.

Committee:

Bruce Moss, Ph.D. (Advisor); Vincent Kantorski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Music; Music Education; Occupational Safety

Keywords:

Band; Band Directors; Noise; Noise Exposure; Sound; Sound Exposure; OSHA; NIOSH; ACGIH; NIHL; Hearing Loss

Emge, Jeffrey DavidTHIRD-STREAM MUSIC FOR BAND: AN EXAMINATION OF JAZZ INFLUENCES IN FIVE SELECTED COMPOSITIONS FOR WINDS AND PERCUSSION
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2000, College-Conservatory of Music : Conducting, Wind Emphasis
Elements of jazz are becoming increasingly common in artistic music for winds and percussion. In Praise of Winds (Symphony No. 3) by Gunther Schuller, No Sun, No Shadow by Timothy Broege, Piece of Mind by Dana Wilson, Three City Blocks by John Harbison, and J'ai été au bal by Donald Grantham are outstanding examples of works for band by respected composers who utilize compositional and scoring techniques from the jazz idiom. The development of jazz, the wind ensemble, and Third-Stream music are a uniquely American phenomenon. The history of jazz is relevant to the emergence of Bop and its compositional language at the middle of the twentieth century. By 1950, respected composers began to recognize the potential of the wind ensemble as a viable medium for serious composition. At roughly the same time, there was some blurring of compositional techniques and materials in both jazz and classical music. After six indicators of jazz style were examined, it was found that instrumentation played a large role in the portrayal of jazz style in all five compositions, due to the prominence of saxophone, trumpet, and trombone. The use of a trap set, whether actually specified or simulated, was both an important element of the scoring and an integral part of establishing a jazz "feel." Improvisation was present in most of the compositions, whether it be explicitly called for or simulated by notation. Swing notation was used in three compositions, while in the Schuller and Harbison works a conscious effort was made to imitate rhythms characteristic of Bop. All five of the compositions exploited the major-minor seventh chord as an important harmonic structure; most used extended tertian sonorities and blues-type scales as well. Specialized notation unique to the jazz idiom was present in most of the compositions. These five works are expected to become important additions to the rapidly expanding repertoire for the American wind band.

Committee:

Terence Milligan (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

Third-Stream; Band; Jazz and Wind Ensemble; Band composers

Hartz, Barry C.Cultivating Individual Musicianship and Ensemble Performance Through Notation-Free Learning in Three High School Band Programs
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2015, Music Education
Playing by ear is a time-honored and effective means of music learning in many musical genres. Learning without notation has been a principal means of acquiring musical skills for generations of jazz, popular, and folk musicians. The sound to sign approach to music learning has been incorporated into classroom music instruction through the methodologies of Jacques-Dalcroze, Kodaly, Orff, Suzuki, and Gordon. At the same time, instruction in American school bands has remained predominantly reliant on notation at every stage of learning and performing music. There is a distinct lack of research regarding learning without notation in high school concert bands. The purpose of this multiple case study was to examine the use of notation-free learning (NFL) in three high school concert band programs to develop the musical skills of individual students and promote excellence in ensemble performance. The research was guided by four questions: (a) What aspects of musical performance do participating conductors address through notation-free learning (NFL)?, (b) How do participating conductors communicate and develop musical vocabulary without standard notation?, (c) What challenges and benefits of learning without notation do participants identify?, and (d) What personal and contextual factors affect the implementation of notation-free approaches? I spent three days at each of three high schools located in Texas, New York, and Ohio, collecting data through observation, individual interviews with conductors, focus group interviews with students, and document collection. Data analysis involved transcribing recorded interviews, generating and applying codes, and identifying emergent themes. Reports on individual cases were completed prior to conducting cross-case analysis. Themes generated by the research questions included aspects of musical performance, communicating and developing musical vocabulary, challenges and benefits of NFL, and factors influencing implementation. I asserted that fundamentals of ensemble performance can be effectively developed without notation in concert bands and that students experienced notation-free learning as more mentally engaging than learning from notation. More research is needed to determine the role of notation-free learning in helping students develop mental models and to develop ways of supporting individual musical skill acquisition in the absence of notation.

Committee:

Lisa Koops, Ph.D. (Advisor); Nathan Kruse, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Matthew Garrett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kathleen Horvath, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David Miller, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

band; music notation; band pedagogy; music literacy; aural skills; ensemble skills; listening skills; music improvisation; intonation; student engagement; mental representations; music education; music learning

Davis, LaPointe ManuelThe effects of structured singing activities and self-evaluation practice on elementary band students' instrumental music performance, melodic tonal imagery, self-evaluation, and attitude /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Musical instruments;Band music;Singing;Band musicians;Music

Yahl, Ryan MichaelAttitudes of High School Band Directors and Students Regarding Ohio Music Education Association Large Group Adjudicated Events
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Music Education
The purpose of this study was to determine attitudes of high school band directors and students regarding Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Large Group Adjudicated Events. Subjects were high school band directors (n = 11) and students (n = 214) from 12 bands in OMEA District I, which consists six counties in Northwest Ohio (Defiance, Fulton, Lucas, Napoleon, Williams, and Wood). Subjects represented each of the OMEA performance classifications (AA, A, B, C, and D) and three geographic regions (rural, suburban, and urban). Participants completed the OMEA Large Group Adjudicated Events Survey, which consisted of three sections: (a) background information, (b) personal opinion, and (c) free response. Based on data collected from survey responses, both directors and students agree that Large GroupAdjudicated Events are an important part of high school band programs. Subjects also agree that, although the rating earned at contest is important, making music and receiving comments from adjudicators are of higher importance.

Committee:

Kenneth Thompson, D.M.A. (Advisor); Vincent Kantorski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

band directors; band contest; adjudicated events; Ohio Music Education Association; student attitudes

CHINCHOLI, ASHWINPARALLEL FABRICATION OF PHOTONIC CRYSTALS USING INTERFERENCE LITHOGRAPHY
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Engineering : Electrical Engineering
Photonic band gap property of photonic crystal structures has opened up many possibilities in the field of optical communications. The ability of photonic crystals to guide light through waveguide bends with feature sizes comparable to the wavelength of light has possible applications in fields like photonic integrated circuits. E-beam lithography is predominantly used for the fabrication of photonic crystals in semiconductors but its serial method of writing patterns limits its use in large area fabrication. This work presents interference lithography as a parallel method of fabrication of photonic crystals. Lloyds mirror interference lithography system was set up and used for photonic crystal fabrication in this thesis. Two dimensional square photonic crystal structures were fabricated on silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by first recording a multiple exposure interference pattern of interference lithography on a photoresist and then transferring the pattern to the substrate underneath by Reactive ion etching (RIE). Period of the photonic crystal structures fabricated was measured using Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and diffraction based measurement method to get a realistic picture of actual fabricated period. The fabricated structure was simulated using specialized simulator tools like FDTD Solutions to obtain the photonic band gap data of the fabricated structure. Reflectance properties were also analyzed by coupling light from a lensed fiber into the photonic crystal patterned top silicon layer of a SOI wafer and measuring reflected power in the available 90nm laser emission window. Measured data was presented in units similar to simulation data and a reasonable agreement on spectral reflectance properties was observed between the two.

Committee:

David Klotzkin (Advisor)

Keywords:

Photonic crystals,; band gap,; lithography,; photonic band gap,; interference,; Lloyds mirror,; shipley 1805,; waveguides,; fabrication,; silicon,; SOI,; shipley 1805,; Lumerical,; Translight

Orra, MikeStudy on the Simulation and Analysis of an FH/FDMA OBP Satellite Based Mobile Communication System Under Critical Channel Impairment
Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering, University of Toledo, 2010, Electrical Engineering

Fully regenerative satellite On-Board Processing (OBP) systems are endorsed in literature as being the most effective architecture for maintaining signal quality under jamming circumstances. Dehop-Rehop Transponder (DRT) systems have been proposed as economical alternatives, bridging the gap between passive repeaters and full OBP architectures; however, no openly published literature quantifies the performances of either DRT or OBP payloads through simulation or closed form analysis. The objectives of this study are to provide modeling and simulation of a frequency hopped, frequency division multiple access (FH-FDMA) DRT and OBP satellite based tactical mobile communications system under critical channel impairment. Analyses of the resulting end-to-end BER performances are provided for both architecture types. Two variants of phase shift keying (PSK ) modulation are considered for the system waveforms: convolutional coded non-coherent Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying (GMSK) (1-bit differentially detected) and convolutional coded Symmetric Differential PSK (SDPSK). SDPSK and GMSK modulation schemes have been commonly cited in tactical satellite applications wherein bandwidth efficiency and immunity towards adjacent channel interference (ACI) and inter-symbol interference (ISI) are desirable. While some literature has been published quantifying the performance of SDPSK modems under critical impairment, no such study considering GMSK in this context has been published. Consequently, this study also seeks to determine the feasibility of using 1-bit differentially detected GMSK modems in satellite-based tactical mobile communications systems.

Channel impairment is modeled as partial band noise jamming (PBNJ), and band multi-tone jamming (BMTJ) with AWGN. Degrading factors pertaining to the system hardware including quantization and nonlinear travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) are also considered.

Simulations were conducted to illustrate the end-to-end BER for the described system and waveforms of interest. Results show that SFH/SDPSK exhibits excellent immunity towards PBNJ and BMTJ with AWGN channel impairments which can be further enhanced by low rate convolutional codes. OBP processing gains range from 2 - 6.5 dB at a BER of 10-3 over corresponding DRT systems, depending on jamming intensity and coding rate used. Results further show that using OBP architectures with SFH/GMSK (BT = 0.5) waveforms with code rate 1/3 under uplink PBNJ can realize power efficiency gains between 11.5 dB - 15.5 dB at a BER of 10-3 when compared to DRT systems. Increasing the BT product to 1 can provide gains of 3.5 dB - 7.5 dB for DRT system architectures (over BT = 0.5). While the increased BT product also results in improved performances for OBP architectures, it is not as pronounced.

SFH/GMSK with convolutional coding cannot realize sufficient performance to be considered for practical application under PBNJ and BMTJ with AWGN impairments, irrespective of the BT product values; in order to use SFH/GMSK modems in tactical communications systems (both DRT and OBP based architectures), powerful concatenated coding or iterative decoding schemes are required.

Consequently, a theoretical analysis of the performance of 1-bit differential detected GMSK under AWGN is developed herein, so that turbo coding can be applied. Modem level simulations of turbo-coded GMSK under AWGN exhibit an approximate 2 dB gain over convolutional coded GMSK for a BER of 10-3 with further gains realized for additional decoding iterations. Substantial improvements in power efficiencies were also realized when subjecting turbo coded GMSK to the effects of PBNJ interference, particularly for code rate 2/3. Both empirical investigations into differential GMSK BER performance under AWGN and PBNJ interferences effectively demonstrate that greater bandwidth efficiencies can be realized by using high code rates turbo codes with modest BER performance degradation. These results strongly support use of turbo coding with differential GMSK under AWGN and PBNJ interferences, and in turn application in satellite-based tactical mobile communications systems. The results also warrant further investigation into the feasibility of using differential GMSK under tone jamming conditions.

Committee:

Junghwan Kim (Committee Chair); Zeljko Cuckovic (Committee Member); Mohamed Elbialy (Committee Member); Roger King (Committee Member); Gursel Serpen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

on-board processing; OBP; differential GMSK; SDPSK; partial band noise jamming; PBNJ; band multitone jamming; BMTJ; turbo code

Gonzalez, Luis S.REHEARSAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF REHEARSAL PHILOSOPHIES AND PROCEDURES OF SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOL AND POSTSECONDARY WIND BAND CONDUCTORS
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2001, College-Conservatory of Music : Conducting, Wind Emphasis
The purpose of this analytical study was to identify the underlying rehearsal philosophies of selected wind band conductors and determine what procedures are employed to reinforce stated philosophical beliefs. Six case study conductors, three each representing public school and postsecondary school respectively, were selected on the basis of their outstanding record of achievement, historically strong programs, and excellent reputations within the profession. One major focus of this study was to determine what makes the rehearsal effective, both in terms of achieving its musical goals, and in its satisfaction for all involved as a meaningful musical experience. A second focus was to develop a thorough analysis of various rehearsal activities in order to create a framework for discussion while comparing the philosophical and procedural approaches used in conducting situations found at different player experience levels. Two key aspects of the rehearsal were examined: the conductor's philosophy, which governs the rehearsal, and the rehearsal procedures, which in a broader sense are the activities employed in support of the conductor's philosophy. Data gathered were initiated by a conductor identification survey which was distributed to three groups of wind band conductors. Upon selection, each conductor was presented with a formal invitation to participate in the project. Each case study solicited a continuous, non-edited videotape recording of a typical rehearsal followed by a conductor questionnaire, which was designed to address issues of rehearsal philosophy, procedural proaches and rehearsal effectiveness. The main vehicle for data collection was the development of a procedural catalogue which included descriptive information and a thorough listing of all rehearsal activity such as procedures, rehearsal segments, and each instructional comment given by the conductor. For the purpose of the study, the term "procedure" was used to describe any particular activity where the conductor stops the music, gives an instruction and/or makes a comment with the expectation of a student response, either verbally, physically or musically, The term "instructional comment" was identified as a verbal direction given by the conductor to address issues related to historical, or performance-based aspects of the music. The findings were based on the identification and comparison of similarities found among the case study conductors with regard to rehearsal philosophy and related procedures. The study found that consistent with the conductors were the utilization of an effective rate of pacing, a systematic rehearsal format, timely interjections of instructional comments and a philosophically-based plan for the use of rehearsal procedures. In addition, the study established related patterns among the conductor with regard to teaching, conducting, and personal skills that are contributing factors to the effectiveness of the wind band rehearsal.

Committee:

Rodney Winther (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

REHEARSAL EFFECTIVENESS; CONDUCTING; WIND BAND; CONCERT BAND

Weller, Travis JPerspectives on Emergent Wind Band Literature: Understanding the views of band directors in high school instrumental settings
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College of the Arts / School of Music
Directors of school concert bands continue to program new and emergent works alongside pieces considered to be part of the core and traditional repertoire. The purpose of this dissertation was to discover what criteria directors consider important in their review of new and emergent concert band works for use in rehearsal and performance. A secondary objective examined if director experience and educational background influenced the evaluation of this music used in high school instrumental settings. In order to evaluate this recent repertoire, the Concert Band Repertoire Evaluation Criteria (CBREC) was developed by the researcher, and reviewed by a panel of collegiate directors. The review of the CBREC revealed it to be a reliable tool for the purposes of the study. An independent panel of experts in concert band repertoire selected three works to be reviewed by participants. Invited participants comprised band directors who hold membership in an international band fraternity. The teaching responsibilities of these directors included conducting concert bands at American senior high schools. Participant directors rated each work using the CBREC after viewing an image of the music score and listening to an audio recording of the piece. The participant directors had the option of rating their familiarity with each piece used and answering three open-ended questions regarding repertoire selection. Data collected from the participants indicated favorable mean ratings for the works used in the study. When the participant data were analyzed in sub-groups, several statistically significant findings were reported. Sub-groups including older directors, directors teaching only one ensemble, and directors who answered open-ended questions in the study demonstrated more stability in their ratings of the repertoire used in the study than did younger directors, directors teaching multiple ensembles, and directors who did not respond to open-ended questions. Results suggested participant directors reached a consensus regarding several aspects of the pieces used in the study, indicated by the CBREC Ratings and open-ended comments. The correlational analysis of CBREC Items demonstrated that directors are considering multiple aspects of a work during the evaluation process. Data supported that melodic material, pedagogical use, as well as timbre and orchestration influence how this group of directors estimate the longevity of new concert band works.

Committee:

Craig Resta, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Concert Band Repertoire, Music Education, Instrumental Music, High School Band, High School Wind Ensemble

Ramadugu, Jaya ChandraDesign of Microwave Band Stop and Band Pass Filters Based on BST Thin Film Varactor Technology
Master of Science (M.S.), University of Dayton, 2013, Electrical Engineering
This thesis presents a design of band stop and band pass filters for microwave applications. These filters are based on coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission lines on a 500 µm thick sapphire substrate. 0.25 µm thin film barium strontium titanate (BST) thin film is used as the tunable dielectric layer. The design of the band stop filter is based on the traditional varactor shunt switch (designed by Dr. Subramanyam and his team) coupled to the ground using an inductive path. Thus, the design symbolizes a single pole standard band stop filter with the potential for frequency tunability. The capacitive overlap makes the device tunable. Several designs of the band stop filter based on the same concept, but different capacitive overlaps, inductive configurations and overall device dimensions were designed and studied. The center frequency for these designs varied from 1 to 5GHz. The band pass filter is mostly single layered and represents a microstrip based structure although it is CPW fed. It is shunted to the ground with varactors on either side of the device. The idea of having varactors were to achieve tunability. It has 4 resonant iv traps representing a 4-pole filter. The design, simulation results, experimental results and analyses are presented.

Committee:

Guru Subramanyam (Committee Chair); Monish Chatterjee (Committee Member); Weisong Wang (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

Band stop filter, band pass filter, BST varactor technology, ferroelectrics, dielectrics, quad ring filter

Ferguson, KatherineHIGH SCHOOL BAND SIGHT READING IN THE UNITED STATES: PROCEDURES, PREPARATION, ATTITUDES, AND EXPERIENCES
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College of the Arts / School of Music
Sight reading is the ability to read and perform music at first sight without preparatory study of the pieces. Each year, high school large group instrumental and choral adjudicated events occur throughout the United States. Evaluation in sight reading is a part of these events in some states, however, the results of the nationwide sight-reading overview by Paul (2010) show fewer than half of the state-sponsored music contests require assessment in sight reading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the state of sight reading in band performance evaluations and classrooms across the nation. This study in sight reading sought to identify baseline knowledge, which explored the traditions and procedures, attitudes of directors, and event experiences in high school large group band performance evaluations. This research specifically focused on large ensemble, band sight reading in both the rehearsal and adjudicated performance room. A mixed methods approach was used, which allowed the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative paradigms to emerge. Utilizing portions of both models aided in the discovery of answers to the research questions in this study. Initially, data regarding sight-reading procedures at large group sight-reading evaluations was gathered from each state. Next, responses to a survey were collected from band directors across the United States. Feedback in the areas of sight-reading participation, director training, student preparation, and director attitude toward adjudication in sight reading was given. Finally, participants were selected for a more in-depth interview. The line of questioning involved a more focused look at their attitudes and experiences surrounding sight-reading adjudication. Results from this study have yielded information that can potentially impact teacher training, professional development, and the organization of the sight-reading adjudication system. The Sight Reading Instruction Training Attitude Survey (SRITAS) was developed with the guidance of several surveys used as source material. Results of the survey provided a broad portrait of sight-reading instruction and adjudication throughout the United States. Participants revealed that they have a varied structure in which they teach sight reading within their schools, and a mixture of attitudes when it comes to sight reading adjudication. All participants believe that sight reading is an important aspect of the music education of a child, but the manner in which that skill is taught varies greatly. It is evident that many of the states share characteristics in sight reading education, such as placement in the adjudicated process, and desire for the students to be actively engaged in the study time. Some of the procedural aspects differ from one state to the next. Preparatory study time and directors’ communication during the performance are a few of these aspects. Discussions among band directors and state leaders, based on the importance of including sight-reading evaluation in their festival, need to serve as a platform from which to continue development of classroom learning standards that align with the national music standards, and the inclusion of sight reading in that process. Teachers are continuously searching for resources to better their instructional techniques in this area, and are passionate about cultivating meaningful, musical, and educational experiences for their students in sight reading. With so much supporting evidence on the importance of sight reading, teaching sight reading is an accepted and recommended piece of instrumental music instruction.

Committee:

Craig Resta (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

music education; teaching; music; sight reading; sight-reading; concert band; wind ensemble; adjudication; band festival; performance assessment

Next Page