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Bensiger, JoyPerceptions of Pre-service Teachers of Using Video Games as Teaching Tools
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Curriculum and Instruction
Teachers’ beliefs and perceptions are very critical to the integration of video games in the classrooms. This study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of pre-service teachers in using video games as one of their teaching tools. Along with this initial purpose, the intent was to understand the anticipated barriers involved in integrating video games into the learning environment. A web-based online survey with 50 items was prepared and sent via email using a listserv along with a detailed cover letter and information sheet that explained the research protocol. The results were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics to answer the research questions. This study specifically investigated the following questions: (1) What experience do pre-service teachers have with video games? (2) Do pre-service teachers believe that the use of video games will enhance learning? (3) What barriers, if any, do pre-service teachers foresee in the integration of video games? (4) If provided opportunities, would teachers be willing to integrate video games in their learning environment? Findings from this study indicated that pre-service teachers believe that they have positive experiences playing video games, although they did not play video games on a daily basis. Further, most of the pre-service teachers believed that integration of video games in their classrooms would help their students develop social and academic skills. However, they responded that finding the appropriate educational video games, technical assistance in installation, and the cost of purchasing video games are barriers in the integration of video games. If provided opportunities, however, pre-service teachers expressed that they would be comfortable in integrating video games in their curriculum with the help of school administrators. To implement such technology, it is recommended that pre-service teachers be provided with adequate training in choosing the appropriate video games and how such technology would enhance learning.

Committee:

Rhonda Douglas Brown, PhD (Committee Chair); James Basham, PhD (Committee Member); Piyush Swami, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Software

Keywords:

Perception of Pre-service teachers;Video games in Education;implementing Video games in Schools;using video games as educational Tools;perceptions using video games in education;Video games as a teaching tool;

Stark, JessicaA Day in the Life of a Sim: Making Meaning of Video Game Avatars and Behaviors
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2018, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
With video game usage--and criticism on its activity--on the rise, it may be helpful for the psychological community to understand what it actually means to play video games, and what the lived experience entails. This qualitative, phenomenological study specifically explores user behaviors and decisions in the simulated life video game, The Sims. Ten participants completed one- to two-hour long semi-structured interviews, and the data was transcribed, organized into 1,988 codes, which were clustered into 30 categories, and from which six themes ultimately emerged. These resulting themes are: self-representation; past, present, and future; purpose for play; self-reflection; co-creation; and familiarity. The essence of playing The Sims includes a degree of self-representation through gameplay choices, projecting one’s own past, present or future into the game, and play that is motivated by distinct reasons or benefits. Gameplay in The Sims also involves a sense of familiarity, the interaction of inspirations coming from both the user and the game, and the users’ reflections on the connection between themselves and the game. Relationships between the six resulting themes and the current literature on video game psychology are reviewed, and future research and clinical implications are discussed.

Committee:

Jude Bergkamp, Psy.D. (Committee Chair); Kirk Honda, Psy.D. (Committee Member); Elizabeth Fanning, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Artificial Intelligence; Psychology

Keywords:

video games; The Sims; phenomenology; gamers; video game players; video game users; simulated life; qualitative; Sim; video game psychology; user behavior; lived experience; gameplay; self-representation; avatar; self-reflection; identity

LI, WEIHIERARCHICAL SUMMARIZATION OF VIDEO DATA
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Engineering : Computer Science
Digital video content is appearing in many new applications. There is a need for efficient video indexing, quick browsing, and easy retrieval of video content of interest in video clips. In this thesis, we analyze video structure and use a hierarchical summarization strategy to get a multilevel video summary. Keyframes from video are extracted from each video shot by comparing the similarity between frames. Using an affinity matrix which lists the similarities of every pairs of keyframes, similar keyframes are clustered and adjacent shots within a specified distance are merged into groups. These groups are organized into scenes that are independent story units. From scenes representative frames are selected to construct a hierarchy summary.

Committee:

Dr. Chia-Yung Han (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Video data processing; Video summarization; Video content structure; video indexing

Warden, JamesSenses, Perception, and Video Gaming: Design of a College for Video Game Design and Production
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
This thesis explores the psychological and architectural relationships between video gaming and architecture as they both relate to the senses in order to design an educational facility for video game development. Gestalt psychology has many theories of sensual perception, such as visual organization theories that can directly enhance or influence architectural content. Alternately, a “rejection” of Gestalt is explored to engage users in a conflicting experience. A design metaphor of space generation using the senses as a structural space-defining material is investigated along with exploring video game spatial structures in architecture. Sensual perception, spatial formation using the senses, and other design investigations of the interaction between architecture and video gaming are explored for design. Furthermore, this thesis also explores some of the other aspects of the overlap of architecture and video gaming, such as formal elements of the video game medium like spatial structures, imagery, and interactivity.

Committee:

Michael McInturf (Advisor)

Keywords:

architecture; senses; sensual; video game; video games; sensual experience; video gaming; video games and architecture; light; sound; touch; visual; aural; haptic; design; space; spatial formation; Gestalt; psychology; visual organization; interactivity

Uti, Ngozi V.Real-Time Mobile Video Compression and Streaming: Live Video from Mobile Devices over Cell Phone Networks
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science and Engineering

The limited computing resources on mobile phones, the demands of real-time requirements, and the variable and error-prone nature of the bandwidth of cell phone networks make the task of streaming live video from cell phones very challenging. As such, computational simplicity and efficiency are a requirement for video encoders on mobile devices. This research presents core components of a mobile video compression algorithm that has been developed in this project to compress real-time video from cell phones. This work shows how the careful selection of video compression components can be used to strike a delicate balance between the computationally complex nature of video compression and the efficient utilization of the limited computing resources available on cell phones. Although optimality is never claimed, a method for compressing and streaming real-time video of 15 frames per second has been developed. The video encoder uses 5-3 wavelet transformation and a new subband aligned integer run-length encoding technique to compress video in real-time on mobile devices. The wavelet video encoder is adaptive, highly scalable, and can gracefully adjust video compression levels to match changing cell phone network bandwidth conditions.

Further, because of the variability of the bandwidth of cell phone networks, the efficient streaming of real-time video over cell phone networks requires the ability to adapt the quality and amount of video being streamed to the available bandwidth. This research shows that without such adaptability, video frames will be dropped. Experiments presented herein show that without an adaptive framework over 50% of the video frames can be dropped. In response to this challenge, this research implements an application layer framework for the control of real-time streaming video originating from mobile devices to better utilize available bandwidth. The approach taken here aims to align the quality and transmission rate of live streaming video with the capabilities of cell phone networks.

Using decision making and feedback from the receiving video decoder, this real-time mobile streaming video framework is able to sense network conditions and effectively predict the available bandwidth. This adaptive framework utilizes the scalable wavelet video encoder for video compression. In conjunction with the wavelet video encoder on the mobile device, the framework adapts in real-time the video quality and video frames transmitted per second to achieve a near 100% delivery rate. This work provides a thorough description of this framework along with numerous experimental results. Presented is a detailed examination of the features of the adaptive framework and how they relate to cell phone network conditions, the video being streamed, and the mobile computing resources available on the mobile device.

Committee:

Yizong Cheng, PhD (Committee Chair); Richard Fox, PhD (Committee Member); Fred Annexstein, PhD (Committee Member); Raj Bhatnagar, PhD (Committee Member); Dieter Schmidt, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Real-Time Mobile Video;Mobile Video Compression;Video Streaming Challenges;Mobile Computational Resources;Real-Time Video Compression;Cell Phone Bandwidth

Weissman, Dustin RImpacts of Playing Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) on Individuals’ Subjective Sense of Feeling Connected with Others
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are a substantial part of the multibillion dollar gaming industry. Millions of people of all ages across the globe engage in game play. With the average gamer logging 26.6 hours a week online instead of engaging in real world activities and responsibilities, this genre has created an international epidemic. In the last ten years the literature on this topic has gained interest and momentum. Researchers continue to explore the innumerable reaches of MMORPGs and how the gamer and their community are affected. The aim of this study was to gain a more comprehensive understanding of how the gamer relates to their world, both virtual and real, on a social level. The participants were gathered online mostly from within one particular MMORPG, Perfect World International. This study surveyed 103 participants with an online questionnaire. They were and given compensation in the form of virtual money. The electronic version of this dissertation is available free at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Brett Kia-Keating, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Karen Lehman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Nickolas Jordan, Ph.D., LMFT (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Psychology; Mental Health; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research

Keywords:

MMORPG; Online Gaming; Video Game; Internet Addiction; Digital Addiction; CIUS; Compulsive Internet Use; Compulsive Internet Use Scale; Problematic Internet Use; UCLA Loneliness Scale; Video Game Addiction Test; Video Game Addiction; VGAT; MMO

Suarez, Juan MEmotional Intelligence and its Link to Aggressive Cognition and Aggressive Affect Generated by Violent Video Game Use of Male Undergraduates
Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.), Xavier University, 2015, Psychology
Abstract This study investigated the relationship between violent video game use and aggressive affect and cognitions. Emotional Intelligence (EI) as a possible protective factor against the Aggressive Affect (AA) and Aggressive Cognitions (AC) that occur after violent video game use was also explored. Participants included 172 male undergraduate students, ages 18-22, from a Midwestern Catholic university. Positive correlations were found between baseline total Emotional Intelligence and post-game aggressive affect within the overall sample, violent video game group (VVG), and non-violent video game (NVVG) group. Notably, for the VVG group, the Use of Emotions (UOE) and Regulation of Emotion (ROE) EI subscales were negatively related to AA. For violent video game playing, the components of EI that regulate aggressive emotions and facilitate constructive activities both negatively correlated with aggressive affect; although the limitations of correlational design call for future research to better understand the role of EI in regards to AA. The results also showed that for the NVVG group, both the ROE and the Self Emotions Appraisal (SEA) EI subscales were negatively related to AA. Results were different for aggressive cognitions. The UOE EI subscale was found to be negatively related to AC in the NVVG group and positively related to AC in the VVG group. This study contributes to the literature on violent video game use and emotional intelligence.

Committee:

Anna Ghee, Dr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

Emotional Intelligence; Aggressive Cognitions; Aggressive Affect; Video Games; Affect; Cognition; Tetris; Mortal Kombat; Violent Video Games; Video Game

Tweissi, AdiyThe Effects of Embedded Questions Strategy in Video among Graduate Students at a Middle Eastern University
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Instructional Technology (Education)
This study investigated the strategy of embedded questions in educational interactive videos. The educational videos were created and used in two versions: Video with Embedded Questions (VEQ), and Linear Video – a video without Embedded Questions (LV). Video was used as a medium to test the effectiveness of embedded questions strategy. The LV version provided the ability to control the timeline of instructions, whereas VEQ provided the ability to control the timeline of instruction and to interact with embedded questions. Both versions have covered two main topics: battery life reservation, and presentation skills. The VEQ had an embedded multiple-choice questioning system that shows a question up on an over-layered screen, with each of the three answers providing a specific scene as a confirmation feedback whether it is a wrong or correct answer. The dependent variables were comprehension and self-efficacy. Comprehension was measured by assessment scores, and self-efficacy was measured by average percentage from each item in the assessment. The independent variable was having embedded questions system. The methodology was a sequential explanatory approach; a quantitative experiment supported by a qualitative focus group interview. The experimental approach involved dividing the participants (60 graduate students) into a control group exposed to LV version, and an experimental group exposed to VEQ version, and testing them all via assessment designed to measure their comprehension. The findings and discussion are based on theoretical framework of learner control, self-efficacy, and instructional design of VEQ. The results showed a significant difference in terms of assessment average scores and self-efficacy for the favor of embedded questions. Effect sizes were found to be relevant to the usage of embedded questions and levels of self-efficacy; they were irrelevant to the topic of video or participant’s gender. The effect size of embedded questions over assessment scores was 0.916 and over self-efficacy was 1.24. Participant’s gender, however, showed no significant difference in ANOVA test. The embedded questions system had an effect size of 0.13 for presentation skills topic, and 0.12 for battery life topic. Explanation of the results along with technical and instructional recommendations for future research are included in the last chapter, summarizing that embedded questions helped participants to raise self-efficacy and gain more confidence, enhance existing knowledge with new information, rehearse memory, and achieve better learning outcome.

Committee:

David Moore (Advisor); Greg Kessler (Committee Member); Danielle Dani (Committee Member); Alan Wu (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Educational Evaluation; Educational Technology

Keywords:

embedded questions; video; educational video; interactive video; learner control; mathemagenic activities; multimedia learning; interactive learning; feedback

Li, HonglinHierarchical video semantic annotation – the vision and techniques
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Electrical Engineering
The omnipresent multimedia data calls for efficient and flexible methodologies to annotate, organize, store, and access video resources. Video annotation data, or video meta-data, plays an important role in the future annotation-driven video systems. Although the importance of the video annotation data is widely recognized and a considerable amount of research has been conducted on its various aspects, there is no consistent framework on which to structure video annotation data. In this dissertation, we propose a hierarchical structure for video semantic annotation. Not only do users think in terms of semantic concepts, they also think and operate video systems in a hierarchical fashion. Moreover, hierarchical structures are being used to store and transmit video production data. Consequently, a hierarchical structure for video annotation data is needed. The hierarchical structure is so important that it is likely to affect almost every aspect of multimedia computing. We anticipate that numerous research activities in various aspects of video will be tailored toward this hierarchical structure. Second, various techniques are investigated in terms of how to hierarchically extract video annotations, from low- to mid- to high-levels. The lower the level of the video annotation in the hierarchy, the more applicable automatic approaches are likely to be. Different semantic levels call for different techniques to extract video annotations. For example, high-level video annotations tend to describe high-level video events that are present in the video data. High-level video events are highly structural and the traditional statistical pattern analysis is insufficient. As a result, structural pattern analysis methods such as the syntactic approach are needed to extract high-level video annotations. In this dissertation, we have studied the techniques to hierarchically extract video annotations, from low-, to mid-, and to high-level. In particular, one of the key contributions of this research is to propose building predictive models to deduce midlevel annotations and apply the syntactic pattern analysis approach to analyze high-level video events. Finally, we have developed an XML-based video markup language, VideoML, which is built upon the video part of MPEG-7 with special consideration of the video annotation data’s hierarchical structure.

Committee:

Stanley Ahalt (Advisor)

Keywords:

Video Annotation; Hierarchical Structure; Video Query; Syntactic Pattern Analysis; Hidden Markov Model; Video Markup Language

Salva, Karol T.A Hybrid Approach to Aerial Video Image Registration
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2016, Computer Science
Many video processing applications, such as motion detection and tracking, rely on accurate and robust alignment between consecutive video frames. Traditional approaches to video image registration, such as pyramidal Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) feature detection and tracking are fast and subpixel accurate, but are not robust to large inter-frame displacements due to rotation, scale, or translation. This thesis presents an alternative hybrid approach using normalized gradient correlation (NGC) in the frequency domain and normalized cross-correlation (NCC) in the spatial domain that is fast, accurate, and robust to large displacements. A scale space search is incorporated into NGC to enable more consistent recovery of scale factors up to 6. Results show that the scale space enhanced NGC improves performance in both speed and maximum scale recovery. The proposed hybrid approach is compared to KLT and results demonstrate a significant improvement in robustness in exchange for a slight reduction in accuracy.

Committee:

Arthur Goshtasby, Ph.D. (Advisor); Thomas Wischgoll, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Juan Vasquez, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

registration; video registration; image registration; image alignment; homography estimation; remote sensing; aerial image; aerial video; full motion video; KLT; NGC; OC; NCC; normalized gradient correlation; orientation correlation; correlation; fourier

Everhart, CraigAN IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS OF THE USE OF FOOTBALL VIDEO TECHNOLOGY: A STUDY OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL VIDEO COORDINATORS
Master of Science, University of Akron, 2007, Physical Education-Sports Science/Coaching
Ever since the early 1900’s technology in some form has played a part in how coaches prepare their athletes for competition. It is the most recent years in which the world of college football has seen such technology come full circle. The present study examines specifically how technology has changed in college football since the mid-1990’s, as well as giving a historical background of football film that dates back to the early 1900’s. Along with examining how the technology has changed, this study evaluates how the role of the college football video-coordinator has changed as a result of the technological advances. The results of the study show that all college football programs studied incorporate video editing software into the game planning process. In regards to the job analysis aspects of this study the researcher found that the role of the video coordinator has changed.

Committee:

Alan Kornspan (Advisor)

Keywords:

Football; Videotaping; Sport Video; Football Video; Computer; Coaching; Audio-Visual Aid; Career; Interview; Video Coordinator

Garrett, Philip R.THE CREATION, DESIGN, AND STAGING OF THE INTERMEDIAL PLAY ALL THINGS SHINING The Creation, Design, and Staging of the Intermedial Play All Things Shining
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Theatre

All Things Shining is an experimental, intermedial, dramatic which I wrote, directed, and produced at The Ohio State University in spring quarter of 2012. The play’s experimental nature is derived from its incorporation a number of theatrical styles that interest me as a theatre artist. In bringing together these different approaches, I wanted to create a unique theatre experience. The intermedial nature of the play is defined by its use of media as storytelling elements. The term “intermedial” is used liberally to describe a convergence of media that creates a co-relationship between media, and the mutual influence between the media leads to a redefinition of the media that are affecting each other. Intermediality in the context of my work is a method for incorporating media in a way that makes them essential elements of telling the story of the play.

As the primary designer, I utilized video projections, lighting effects, and sound design elements to create an environment on stage, which fully engages the actors and the audience. I refer to this effect as the immersive atmosphere of the play. The production was staged in the Experimental Movement and Media Arts (EMMA) Lab located in the Motion Capture Suite at The Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design (ACCAD). This document records the creation and production process of the project.

The concept for this project focused on a lone spaceman, Matt Simon, facing his own mortality in the dramatic present of the play. The present narrative is intercut with pivotal and interrelated events from his past, illustrated through flashbacks that led him to the present. The present timeline is set aboard Matt’s disabled spacecraft, Proteus, in the orbit of the planet Mars. It is the not too distant future, the year 2051, and Matt is heading up the manned mission to Mars. This play is a tragic, spiritual portrayal of hope in the face of inevitability.

It was important that specific science fiction conventions and the ephemeral landscape of memory be represented on stage. My team and I accomplished this with projections, lighting effects, sound and live cameras. The different worlds of the play include the dramatic present, the past, the liminal and ephemeral arena of the mind, and the spiritual plain. The different worlds needed to be represented, and transitions between them needed to be as seamless as possible. Transitions were achieved through layering of video overlapping dissolves of projected video elements.

All Things Shining was staged in the style of intermedial theatre because I felt it was necessary in order to tell this specific science fiction, which transcends time and space. Integration, the incorporation of any and all elements necessary to the play, is important to my work, and anything that does not serve to tell the story or tell the audience anything new about the character must be cut. My philosophy of writing and directing is that “everything”, every line of dialogue, every action, and every design element must be in the work for a reason.

Committee:

Jimmy Bohr (Advisor); Janet Parrott (Committee Member); Maureen Ryan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Theater

Keywords:

intermedial theatre; intemediality; projections; video; play; video design; performance; transmedia; devised theatre; science fiction; science fiction theatre; play directing; scenography; film; video

Jimenez, Eliseo DUsing Self-Directed Video Prompting for Skill Acquisition With Post-Secondary Students With Intellectual Developmental Disabilities
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
This dissertation contains three stand-alone papers on the topic of using video prompting and self-directed video prompting to teach individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The literature review examined the current body of literature to better understand if and how video prompting was being utilized with individuals with moderate to profound disabilities. Additionally, maintenance and generalization measures were examined to determine the extent to which each was being utilized and measured. Overall, there were positive results for the use of video prompting as a stand-alone procedure and as a packaged intervention. Additionally, there were positive results for the studies that included maintenance and/or generalization measures. Using the information from the literature review, the research paper presents a study that taught two individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities vocational and daily living skills using self-directed video prompting. Following task mastery, maintenance probes were conducted for 2 weeks starting 1-week post-mastery. Results showed that both students acquired novel skills across all three tiers, indicating that individuals can acquire novel tasks with minimal prompting with self-directed video prompting. The third paper is a practitioner paper that teachers and other practitioners can use to teach their students how to independently provide their own video prompts and how they can promote generalization after students have learned self-directed video prompting.

Committee:

Helen Malone (Advisor); Moira Konrad (Committee Member); Diane Sainato (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Software; Educational Technology; Special Education; Technology

Keywords:

Video Prompting; Self-Directed Video Prompting; Generalization; Maintenance; Developmental Disabilities; Intellectual Disabilities

De Genaro, Arthur Paul,Experimental use of the video tape recorder as an evaluative instrument and observational tool in supervision of student teachers of physical education /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1969, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Physical education teachers;Video recording;Video tape recorders

Ereditario, danielM3A5UR1NG (V1D30 P03TRY & 0TH3RW15E)
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2009, Creative Writing
This thesis is a collection of poems written for the page and the screen between Fall 2005 and Spring 2009. The thesis, which roughly follows a chronological order of production, with the most recent coming last, appears in two parts: the first consists of video poems made independent of each other; and the second is a sequence of forty-five sonnets relying on the recycled language of other texts. The latest version of Adobe Reader should be installed to play the videos.

Committee:

cris cheek (Committee Chair); Keith Tuma (Committee Member); Catherine Wagner (Committee Member)

Keywords:

Video; Poetry; Video Poetry; Electronic Poetry; Population Studies

Katko, JustinP03M5
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2007, Creative Writing
This thesis is a collection of fifteen Video Poems made between Fall 2005 and Spring 2007. They include collaborations with Camille PB (What Spam Means to Network Situationism), Jow Lindsay (Collected Vision), and Katharine Fronk (Scores). The latest version of the Quicktime player should be installed to play the videos. The supplementary text is in two parts: the first outlines Video Poetry as a genre, tracing its historical development (along with Film Poetry) to establish a foundation for contemporary discourse and practice; the second provides a statement for each of the Video Poems, and in the case of the collaboration with Jow Lindsay, presents a completely text-based Video Poem.

Committee:

Cris Cheek (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

Poetry; Video; Video Poetry; Film; Electronic Poetry

Young, David M.Adaptive Game Music: The Evolution and Future of Dynamic Music Systems in Video Games
Bachelor of Science of Media Arts and Studies (BSC), Ohio University, 2012, Media Arts and Studies
Examination of the history, development, and future of adaptive, dynamic, and interactive music in video games. Discussions include nonlinear music historical developments, compositional approaches for adaptive music, generative music, testing methods in the compositional and implementation stages, the evolving industry of adaptive music composition, future technological developments in music production and gaming, and adaptive music beyond games. Also included is an appendix of video game case studies, as well as an appendix of professional insight from game industry veterans.

Committee:

Eddie Ashworth (Advisor); Arthur Cromwell, Dr. (Other)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Mass Media; Music; Technology

Keywords:

adaptive music; video games; games; gaming; video game music; dynamic music; interactive music; nonlinear music; generative music; composition; composers; game soundtracks; game scores; interactive; game audio; game music; game sound; audio middleware

DeBacy, Diane LeeThe effect of viewing videotapes of a selected sport skill performed by self and others on self-assessment /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1969, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Video tape recorders;Video recording;Self-evaluation

Hedges, Lowell EugeneThe feasibility of using videotape techniques in pre-service teacher education in agriculture /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1970, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Agriculture;Agriculture teachers;Videocassette recorders;Video tape recorders;Video recording

Shearer, James D.Development of a Digital Game-Based Learning Best Practices Checklist
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Career and Technology Education/Technology

The problem of the study was to evaluate current distracted driving video games for teen drivers based on a best practice checklist of effective strategies. The best practice checklist was generated from game metrics, game models, and theorists that specialize in digital game-based learning (DGBL) games. The DGBL model was designed to help teach teen drivers all the distracted driving challenges teens presently face that the driver’s education program does not hit on. The DGBL game model was designed from all the evaluated distracted driving video games.

All the current distracted driving video games were evaluated with the best practice checklist. After all the current distracted driving video games had been evaluated, they were ranked and put into a list. If a driving game has a certain criteria from the checklist it would get a check mark for that game criteria. Whichever game got the most check marks would be first and thus down the line of games. Once the list was completed all the games were be reviewed to see if there was one game that fits all the criteria for a complete DGBL game model. If one game happens to fit the criteria it would be used for the DGBL model.

The results from objective two were analyzed and ranked. They were ranked based on how many of the criteria they met. At the end of the ranking process, there were two games that not only had the same amount of game metrics, but also had the same game metrics as well. Both of them had all of the game metrics, except rewards. Both of the top two ranked distracted driving games were especially well done and had in-depth story lines, many challenges, and immediate feedback, and were motivating, engaging, and interactive. The researcher’s game model was based off of the Distractology game model with rewards being added to make it a true well-rounded DGBL game model.

Committee:

Terry Herman, Dr. (Advisor); Larry Hatch, Dr. (Committee Member); Paul Cesarini, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Education; Educational Software; Educational Technology

Keywords:

digital game-based learning; best practices checklist; driver's education; distracted driving; video game; video game model

Poland, Kristofer P.A NATION OF GAMERS
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2007, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis probes the world of video games, focusing on their relationship to America’s contemporary sociopolitical scheme. Particular attention is paid to gaming’s place in popular culture, the role of leisure in the average American’s life, and the content and uses of video games. Video game culture, gaming communities, and individual gamers are examined as potential sources for a more pluralistic, participatory democracy.

Committee:

Julie White (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science, General

Keywords:

video game; videogame; video games; videogames; gaming; gamer; gamers; political science; political theory; popular culture; democracy; participatory democracy; pluralism; leisure

Alexander, Joseph RAn Interpretive Phenomenological Inquiry Into Fulfillment Of Choice Theory's Four Basic Psychological Needs Through Console Video Game Engagement
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
This study sought to understand how people satisfy needs by engaging in console-based video games and ultimately help counselors understand clients' need fulfillment by video games. Data has been collected on the players' experiences and thoughts on how console-based video games meet the four basic psychological needs of choice theory. After reviewing the participants' data, patterns and themes have been generated and reported from the dialog of the participants. These patterns and themes were used to inform professional counselor readers how to assist video game playing clients understand their basic psychological needs more efficiently.

Committee:

Steve Rainey, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Betsy Page Ed.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Alicia R. Crowe Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Mental Health

Keywords:

counseling; video games; Choice theory; Reality therapy; gamer; basic needs; console video games; mental health; Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis; Typological Analysis; Qualitative; games; leisure; William Glasser;

Clouse, Bethany KThe Impact of Video Modeling as Supplemental Home Practice Instruction on Voice Therapy Outcomes
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2016, Speech Pathology and Audiology
The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the efficacy of video modeling as a means of supplemental instruction for home practice of Vocal Function Exercises (VFEs). Four participants between the ages of 18 and 21 were enrolled in the study. The control group received verbal instruction during the first therapy session and an audio recording of VFE protocol instructions for home practice. The experimental group received verbal instruction during the first therapy session, an audio recording of VFE protocol instructions for home practice, and a video recording of their first therapy session to use in conjunction with home practice. Data analysis examined number and complexity of instructional cues, laryngeal health and function (phonation, frequency range, and power average), and patient self-efficacy. Overall, the areas of most notable benefit of video modeling may be increases in adduction exercise phonation times; decreases in instructional cues, verbal cues, and total explicit instruction; and the maintenance of relative importance of voice therapy to the patient across sessions. The findings of this study may be useful for speech-language pathologists in regard to increasing patient adherence to the VFE home practice regimen.

Committee:

Susan Baker Brehm (Advisor); Renee Gottliebson (Committee Member); Wendy LeBorgne (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Speech Therapy

Keywords:

voice therapy; vocal function exercises; VFE; video modeling; video self-modeling; home practice

Gopalan, RamyaExploiting Region Of Interest For Improved Video Coding
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2009, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Today massive video data transfers are successfully done over the Internet. But, achieving a good quality real time video Transfer is still a challenge. Video requires large bandwidth for error-free transmission over the network. Since bandwidth is an expensive resource, ensuring sufficient bandwidth for error free transmission of video is difficult. Hence, low bit rate transmission is preferred. But low bit rate transmission implies lower quality video. This is where Region of Interest Video Coding comes into play. It uses the fact that there are certain areas in the video which are of higher perceptual importance than other areas and assigns a higher quality to those areas. Hence a better perceptual video quality is achieved under the same bandwidth conditions.Region of Interest Coding can be broken into 2 parts: Region of Interest Tracking and Video Preprocessing. Region of Interest Tracking involves tracking the region of interest in all the frames of the video based on some criteria specified by the user. Video Preprocessing is the preprocessing performed, to ensure higher quality to the region of interest over the background. This thesis presents a methodology for both Region of Interest Tracking and Video preprocessing. In Region of Interest Tracking,a covariance tracking method is studied and is applied in the 2 different cases of rigid and non rigid body motion of the Region of Interest (ROI). In Video preprocessing, a spatio-temporal preprocessing technique is studied and is tested on different standard video sequences.

Committee:

Ashok Krishnamurthy, PhD (Advisor); Yuan Zheng, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

Region of Interest; Region of Interest Video Coding; Region of Interest Tracking; Video Preprocessing

Brooks, David G.The Effects of Self-Directed Video Prompting on Teaching Individuals With Moderate to Severe Disabilities Daily Living Skills
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
This study examined the effects of self-delivered video prompts via an iPod Touch on teaching six adolescents with moderate to severe intellectual and developmental disabilities two daily living skills. Students were taught the skill of washing a table with a spray bottle using video prompts presented by the instructor. Once a student reached 80% correct for three consecutive trials, they were taught to use the iPod Touch. In the next phase, the students used the iPod Touch to teach themselves the skill of vacuuming. Results of the study indicate that video prompting was an effective teaching tool for four of the six participants. Three of the participants also used the iPod Touch to teach themselves the skill of vacuuming.

Committee:

Helen Malone (Advisor); Sheila Morgan (Committee Member); Chris Tullis (Other)

Subjects:

Special Education

Keywords:

disabilities; video prompting; daily living; students; video modeling; teaching; self-directed; moderate; severe

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