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Flaherty, Stephen MatthewDeveloping an interactive technical writing curriculum through action research /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1984, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Technical writing

Porcellino, Michelle EileenHEALTH COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP AT THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2008, English
In fulfillment of the Master of Technical and Scientific Communication degree at Miami University (Ohio), I completed an internship in health communications at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, from January 2007 to December 2007. This report describes my experience as an intern in the office of the President's Cancer Panel (PCP), an advisory group of NCI that oversees the National Cancer Program. Chapter 1 provides background on the NCI and the PCP, as well as an introduction to my role as an intern in the Panel office. Details of my primary tasks throughout the year are described in Chapter 2 and a thorough account of my work on one major project is discussed in Chapter 3. The fourth and final chapter offers an analysis of the teamwork behind producing technical communications based on my experience as an intern with the Panel.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Chair); Richard Momeyer, PhD (Committee Member); Katherine Durack, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

health communications; National Cancer Institute; President's Cancer Panel; technical writing; science writing

Burke, Sarah ElizabethWorking as an Agent of Change: Writing Rapidly and Establishing Standards in Web Software Documentation
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2003, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report discusses my internship experiences at Fig Leaf Software in Washington, DC, where I worked as a technical writer during the summer of 2001. In the report, I describe the young, rapid-development environment in which I worked, my major tasks and projects, and a significant project that I completed during my internship. During this project, I faced many challenges in developing the company’s first client installation guide, including staying within the allotted hours and budget, gaining access to technical information, and establishing standards for a new document type. After discussing these challenges, I examine my role and value as an agent of change at Fig Leaf Software and present an expanded organizational role for technical communication practitioners.

Committee:

Katherine Durack (Advisor)

Subjects:

Information Science

Keywords:

writing; internship; technical writing; technical communication; technical and scientific communication; Web; Web software; Web software documentation; documentation; documentation process; computer; agent of change; organizational change

Canzonetta, Jordan N.Common Obstacles in the DL Teaching of Business Writing and Technical Writing: A Practical Guide
BA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
Ever-increasing demand for online university courses is prompting institutions of higher learning to commit resources to determine the best ways to deliver content asynchronously. Like any emerging educational-technological innovation, distance-learning (DL) teaching is attracting scrutiny from professors, students, and administrators. Although there are many ways to teach DL, many professors are encountering similar sets of difficulties in their DL courses. These problems include: dispelling misconceptions about online classes, accreditation discrepancies, translating one's teaching style into an effective online persona, communicating online (teacher-student and student-student), and collaborating effectively in online groups.Through careful observation, research, and study, this thesis aims to identify the cause of these problems, as well as it seeks to offer solutions to the pedagogical strain of an asynchronous environment. This research offers insight into the ways the online classroom affects students and professors in Business Writing and Technical Writing because those courses, already regarded as cold and demanding in the classroom, seem especially challenging in the DL environment. Collaborative writing, often problematic in traditional classes, becomes a significant challenge in DL classes because students usually (and incorrectly) assume work in DL courses consists of individual papers without any expectation of communicating with others. This misconception inhibits students¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ ability to successfully cooperate with peers in a group setting. Student-professor communication is also challenged when students fail to properly asses and follow the directions of a syllabus. Students misread detailed syllabi, which ultimately leads to confusion and inaccuracy on assignments. Often, these communication barriers frustrate students and professors, which consequently hinder academic progress. Other areas of concern include quandaries that involve the distribution of course material, specific difficulties involving Business Writing and Technical Writing, and the future of shell courses in asynchronous pedagogy.

Committee:

Don-John Dugas, PhD (Advisor); Sarah Newman, PhD (Committee Member); Mahli Xuan Mechenbier, J.D (Committee Member); Sarah Harvey, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition

Keywords:

Distance learning; distance education; asynchronous; online; business writing; technical writing

Troy, Matthew A.Producing Online Software Documentation at Ontario Systems, LLC
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2005, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report explains the technical and scientific communication internship I performed after completing my MTSC classes at Miami University. In the report, I orient the reader to the context in which I performed the internship by introducing Ontario Systems, its products, organization, corporate culture, and the work I performed there. I proceed to describe the activities and projects in which I spent time during the internship. I then extensively detail my largest project, the letter management online help, outlining the process I used to complete the project. In the final chapter, I analyze the process I used on the letter management project by using the Anderson Problem-Solving Method for Technical and Scientific Communication. I show how the process I used at Ontario Systems represents an example of the problem-solving method.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Technical Writing; Technical Communication; Documentation; Problem-solving model

Webb, TashaA technical communication internship with the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) – The Ellipse Optimization Project
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2015, English
This internship report discusses my 14-week internship as the technical writing intern with the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) in Columbus, OH, completed August 2009 through December 2009. My main responsibility during the internship was to create documentation for the Ellipse Optimization Project (EOP). The report has four chapters that discuss the organizational structure and culture at COTA, the documentation I created for the EOP, and my reflections on employment both during and after the internship period. The first chapter provides an overview of COTA, its organizational structure and culture, and my role as an intern. The second chapter discusses the various deliverables I worked on during my internship. The third chapter discusses a document on which I spent the majority of my time. Finally, the fourth chapter is a reflection on organizational changes at COTA that influenced my documentation process.

Committee:

Jean Lutz (Advisor); Michele Simmons (Committee Member); Gabriele Bechtel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

MTSC; COTA; technical communication; technical writing; organizational culture; documentation; Ellipse

Thomas, Christopher WilliamDeveloping an Online Course in Geology at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI): An Internship
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2005, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes and analyzes an internship in technical and scientific communication during my full-time employment at IUPUI as a Lecturer in Geology. My key project was to develop an online course G107 Environmental Geology. In 2004, development of high quality online courses that equaled learning in on-campus courses was an emerging field. The project entailed the planning, researching, designing, writing, editing, evaluating, and revising an online course. The course consisted of learning modules that contained a compilation of written text, images, animations, and integrated media. Development required analyzing best practices in online learning and web design, designing the documentation using technical communication theory, and evaluating the success of the project. Specifically, the successful development required a foundation in problem solving, rhetoric and linguistics, technical and scientific writing, and information design. This internship revealed that a strong foundation in scientific communication is a prerequisite for developing online learning media.

Committee:

Michele Simmons (Advisor)

Keywords:

Science Communication; Online Learning; Online Course; Geology; Earth Science; Internet; Technical Writing; Technical Communication; Indiana University; Indianapolis; Environmental Science; Adult Education; Higher Education

Weflen, Mark R.Technical Writing Internship at a Medical Device Company
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2011, Communication Studies
From January to July 2010, I worked as a technical writing intern at a medical device company where I gained experience developing a wide variety of departmental and product documentation. The most comprehensive project I worked on involved developing instructional inserts for two new surgical devices. Through my participation in this project—and other projects during my internship—I learned to leverage the knowledge of subject matter experts more effectively by closely collaborating with them throughout the document development process rather than treating them as isolated technical resources. Consequently, I gained a deeper understanding of the role of subject matter experts in the document development process and, as a result, will be better at determining how and when to leverage their skills and knowledge in my future endeavors.

Committee:

Dr. Jean Lutz (Committee Chair); Dr. Michele Simmons (Committee Member); Dr. Jason Palmeri (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

technical communication; technical writing; medical writing; medical device company; internship; medical device documentation; medical device instructions

Silvestro, John JosephChanging the Conversation: A Case Study of Professional, Public Writers Composing Amidst Circulation
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2017, English
This project examines how writers compose research texts, such as reports, infographics, digital content—so that they might circulate. Specifically, I study a group of writers at The Women’s Fund of the Greater Cincinnati Foundation (TWF) and their writing processes for their research texts, texts they write both to inform audiences and to motivate those same audiences to share and discuss the texts with others. TWF researches and distributes information on the unique socio-economic challenges women in Cincinnati face. They strive to change the local conversation about socio-economic issues so that everyone from citizens to businesses leaders to local politicians understand the distinct challenges that women face. They want to inform Cincinnatians about these issues and equip them to engage in discussions with others about these issues. Studying TWF’s efforts to get their research texts discussed so as to change local conversations affords the opportunity to study how professional writers compose texts both to inform and to circulate. More specifically, it enables an examination of the ways writers compose amidst circulation, both its possibilities to expand conversations and its limitations. Additionally, it enables me to articulate specific strategies that other professional writers can draw upon in their efforts to compose texts for similar public engagements and circulation. To study TWF, I use a Circulation Studies methodology and corresponding methods to perform a multi-part case study of their strategies for a few representative research texts. I first outline the local conversation that TWF works to change, establishing the narrow constraints that influence what texts and information circulate. From there, I study TWF’s understanding of that local conversation, particularly its narrow perspective on local social and economic issues. I next present how TWF incorporate that understanding into their research texts—infographics, reports, presentations, digital content, keynote speakers, hashtag campaigns—to better enable their texts to circulate in local publics. Lastly, I examine how TWF combines strategies to motivate audiences to share their research into publics that otherwise block their research. In sum, my case study suggests several strategies for composing research for circulation. The strategies suggest that writers need to carefully study the ongoing circulation in their target publics and then compose and distribute their texts to work within and against that circulation. Furthermore, my research reveals that professional writers should integrate strategies into a protracted campaign that engages publics and their circulation constraints and possibilities.

Committee:

Michele Simmons, Dr (Committee Co-Chair); Jason Palmeri, Dr (Committee Co-Chair); Tim Lockridge, Dr (Committee Member); James Porter, Dr (Committee Member); Glenn Platt, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Gender; Mass Communications; Public Policy; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Web Studies

Keywords:

professional writing; non-profits; circulation; public advocacy; public rhetoric; digital rhetoric; writing strategies; public spheres; Cincinnati; data visualization; public reports; technical writing; content writing; community engagement; public policy

Hausen, Michelle JenniferConverting Instructor-Led Training to Web-Based Training at Atos Origin
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2008, English
This report describes the internship I completed as part of the requirements for my Master's in Technical and Scientific Communication at Miami University. During my internship period from November 2006 through February 2007 as an instructional designer for Atos Origin, Inc., I worked on several projects. My main project work involved converting instructor-led training to web-based training, but I also worked as a quality tester for a website and worked on a new project that developed from the web-based training conversion work.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Chair); Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Member); Gary Shulman, PhD (Committee Member)

Keywords:

technical writer; technical writing; technical communication; technical communicator; editor; editing; web-based learning; web-based training; training; content development; instructional design; simulation; course development

Denman, Christopher DavidDEFINING THE ROLE OF THE TECHNICAL COMMUNICATOR: AN INTERNSHIP WITH THE WEB-BASED LEARNING GROUP AT THE KROGER COMPANY
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report discusses my internship experiences at the Kroger Company in Cincinnati, Ohio, where I worked as a technical writer from May 2004 through August 2004. The report describes working in the expanding field of web-based learning for the largest grocery retailer in the United States. I discuss my role within the organization, the contributions I made to the Web-based Learning group, and the ways in which I demonstrated the value of technical communication when developing learning products. This report presents a sample training course project where I was responsible for helping with initial planning, editing and revising content, providing suggestions for visual presentation, and assisting in final development.

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical writer; technical writing; technical communication; technical communicator; editor; editing; web-based learning; web-based training; training; content development; instructional design; simulation; course development

Ambro, SharonTwo Technical Communication Projects Performed During an Internship with Analex Corporation
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2002, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes and analyzes my work as a technical writer for Analex Corporation during my 16-week Master of Technical and Scientific Communication internship period. Analexs Cleveland branch works in the aerospace industry and primarily contracts for NASAs Glenn Research Center. This report details my work on two projects during this time: Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) and Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). For the CM-2 project, I wrote procedures for astronauts to run combustion science experiments on board the space shuttle. For the FCF project, I edited requirements documents for experiment hardware that will be on board the International Space Station. This report discusses background information for each project and analyzes my writing and editing processes in terms of the Anderson Problem-Solving Model for technical communication. The final chapter describes my learning experiences and how these experiences contributed to my development as a technical communicator.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

Technical Communication; Technical Writing; Scientific Communication; Science Writing; Aerospace Industry; Problem-Solving Model

DeLuca, Todd A.A Technical Writing Internship with CTC Parker Automation
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2001, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report centers on a four-month internship I performed in the Documentation Department of CTC Parker Automation from February to May 1999. My major responsibility was revising previous documentation and writing new material for the company’s computer hardware and software products. My largest assignment was writing the online help for a new industrial computer interface, the Shell. The first chapter of this report describes CTC Parker Automation and its documentation department. The second chapter highlights my major internship activities. The third chapter discusses my work writing online help for the Shell computer interface. In the final chapter, I analyze my internship challenges and the lessons I learned facing those challenges. I also discuss how I adapted the Problem-Solving Method for Technical and Scientific Communication to my particular situation.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical writing MTSC documentation CTC Parker computer; Technical and Scientific Communication; Problem-Solving Method

Robisch, Katherine A.Search Engine Optimization: A New Literacy Practice
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2013, English
Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the technical practice of modifying a website to receive higher rankings on search engines such as Google. Computer programmers carefully place keywords within content of frequently updated websites such as blogs, social networks' discussion boards, and company profile sites so the site will appear at a higher ranking on search engines and capture potential consumers' attention. Search engines frequently change the algorithms that scan websites and display them on search results listings, meaning the writers and computer programmers who focus on this optimization must constantly adjust their tactics for new rhetorical situations. This technical writing focuses not only on content and keyword count but essentially the goal of constantly drawing attention to the information they produce and exchange. Following this conception of literacy, Search Engine Optimization writing as a literacy practice includes technical programming skills to create web content. This content is intended to reach a human audience but is mediated by the technical knowledge of search engine algorithms. New literacy practices describe not only new technical genres but reflect that the process of creating such genres and the social motives for creation are non-traditional or new. SEO writing involves new technical writing skills and styles of writing, as well as a new purpose, not just selling products or achieving recognition, but gaining the attention of search engines that often control web users access to information. Exploring the literacy practice of such writing will demonstrate how technical and professional communicators have adapted to new genres and rhetorical situations in a digital landscape.

Committee:

Patrick Thomas, Ph.D. (Advisor); Margaret Strain, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Xiaoli Li, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Language; Language Arts; Literacy; Multimedia Communications; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Technology; Web Studies

Keywords:

SEO; new literacies; literacy practice; technical writing; digital literacies; search engine optimization

Warren, Jessica L.Report on a MTSC Internship at Seapine Software
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2012, English
This four-chapter report describes the Master of Technical and Scientific Communication internship I completed as a member of the technical publications team at Seapine Software, Inc. during the fall of 2008. It provides an overview of the company, my role as a technical writing intern, and the projects I worked on; a description of a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) set I created as my major project; and an analysis of how my internship experience compared to my expectations generated from my coursework at Miami University. In Chapter 4, I also address my development from intern to full-time technical writer.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Michele Simmons, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Glenn Platt, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

MTSC; technical communication; technical writing; software documentation

Allen, Andre RamonA Technical Communication Internship at The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes my internship as a technical writer/editor at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Cincinnati, Ohio. NIOSH is the primary federal agency responsible for researching and making recommendations for workplace safety and health. As a technical writer, I wrote and designed a brochure about skin exposures to hazardous chemicals in the workplace. As a technical editor, I contributed final edits to the NIOSH Chartbook and completed several other editing projects for scientists in the Document Development Branch. In this report, I discuss how I performed my writing and editing tasks in accordance with the NIOSH document development process. I also describe the challenges I encountered as I analyzed and wrote for audiences with whom I had no direct contact. Finally, I reflect on how my internship experience at NIOSH affected my development as a technical and environmental communicator.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical communication; environmental science; technical writing; technical editing; federal government

Scobba, Tracy LAn Internship Preparing User Documentation at CTC Parker Automation
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, Technical and Scientific Communication
To fulfill one of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, I performed a 20-week internship at CTC Parker Automation (CTC) as a technical writer. During the internship, I wrote and edited product communications in the forms of user guides, online help, and installation sheets. I was responsible for all aspects of these communications, including preparing the graphics, coordinating reviews, and preparing the files for printing. I interviewed subject matter experts, such as software, hardware, quality-control, and customer-support engineers, to obtain product and user information. This internship was my first experience in the field of technical communication. I learned the importance of seeking information from experts throughout the company to produce effective user documentation.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

user documentation; technical writing; computer; CTC

Wickman, ChadDisplays of Knowledge: Text Production and Media Reproduction in Scientific Practice
PHD, Kent State University, 2009, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
A growing body of scholarship in writing and rhetoric studies has explored the relationship between everyday writing activity and the broader systems within which texts organize and reproduce local action. Broad in scope, studies have specifically shown that the concept of writing tends to be as diverse in form and function as the cultural settings within which it is enacted as a literacy practice: whether in urban communities, academic disciplines, or professional workplaces. This dissertation builds on and extends existing scholarship through a qualitative study of writing and multimodal text production in a scientific research setting. Three case studies form the core of my dissertation and were developed systematically over the course of approximately one year I spent studying scientists at work. The first examines the inscriptions and texts that a chemist brings to bear on the production of materials used in physics experimentation; the second examines the distributed processes through which experimental physicists characterize materials and display their work visually and textually; and the third examines the multiple media and written forms that theoretical physicists deploy to model and simulate material systems. Individually, each case provided unique points for data collection and analysis in my study. And together, these cases illustrate the ways in which writing shapes the production, circulation, and legitimization of knowledge in a modern scientific workplace.

Committee:

Christina Haas, Dr. (Committee Chair); Raymond Craig, Dr. (Committee Member); Pamela Takayoshi, Dr. (Committee Member); Peter Palffy-Muhoray, Dr. (Committee Member); John Stalvey, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literacy; Rhetoric; Social Research

Keywords:

Scientific writing; rhetoric of science; writing in the disciplines; multimodality; semiotics; visual rhetoric; technical writing; ethnography; workplace literacy.

van der Heijden, Anna M. H.Creating an Environmental Education Website at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2002, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes my 16-week internship at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Edgewater, MD, where I started on 29 January 2001 as an "Education Specialist/Web Developer" at SERC's education department. I was responsible for the website for the Education Department and for a website related to Watershed Radio, an environmental education project about the Chesapeake Bay watershed. In this report, I describe the five phases of the development of the website, namely the 1) Information Planning Phase; 2) Content-Specification Phase; 3) Implementation Phase; 4) Production Phase; and 5) Evaluation Phase. I also discuss the difference between education and advocacy and how the combination of a non-contextualized model and a website-specific tutorial provides a good basis for developing a website. The internship report ends with the conclusion that my internship was successful; although I could have done a better job of planning and managing my project, I delivered a well-received product, learned a lot, and worked with great colleagues at an interesting organization.

Committee:

W. Simmons (Advisor)

Keywords:

environmental education; web design; website; web site; online publication; publication's development life cycle; JoAnn T. Hackos' model; information architecture; IA; advocacy; education department; internship; technical writing; science communication

Burpo, MelissaReport on an Agile Technical Writing Internship at Dovetail Software
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2009, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes my sixteen-week internship with Dovetail Software in Austin, Texas for the Master of Technical and Scientific Communication program at Miami University. My internship lasted from October 23, 2006 to February 2, 2007. In the report, I examine my time at Dovetail and my role within the organization. It contains an overview of my major projects, which included revising user guides, documenting new product functionality, and developing marketing materials as needed. It goes on to describe in detail my first user guide revision and my experience as the first and only technical writer at a small company. Finally, I analyze my time as a technical writer working with an agile team whose development methods included working in short iterations, working in a team room, and continually delivering small slices of functionality.

Committee:

W. Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Chair); Janel Bloch (Committee Member); Douglas Havelka, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

MTSC; internship report; technical writing; agile; software development;

Damschroder, Carrie MarieA Technical Communication Internship with a Technical Communication Consulting Company: Write on the Edge, Inc
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2003, Technical and Scientific Communication
In this report, I discuss my internship with Write on the Edge, Inc., (WOTE). WOTE is a small technical communication consulting company in Vista, California. WOTE currently has about five clients; however, Hewlett-Packard (HP) generates most of WOTE’s business. While I interned at WOTE, I wrote print and online documentation for HP’s Photosmart division in Rancho Bernardo, California. My project work focused on writing documentation for five HP photo printers. My deliverables included printed Basics Guides, Reference Guides, one-page instruction and reminder sheets, and online Printer Help. The dates of my internship were January 6, 2003, to April 18, 2003. Chapter One of this report describes WOTE, its connection to HP, and the products for which I wrote documentation. Chapter Two discusses my major project work and deliverables. In Chapter Three, I describe my writing process and discuss my work on developing the HP Photosmart 7200 Series Reference Guide. Chapter Four offers an analysis of my writing process, explains how I used the WOTE project workflow process, and reflects on the lessons I learned during my technical communication internship.

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Subjects:

Language, General

Keywords:

technical writing; technical communication; writing; editing; problem solving; MTSC; internship report; MTSC internship report; consulting; language; English; writing process

Kramer, Elizabeth S.AN INTERNSHIP AS A GRADUATE ASSISTANT AT THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2010, English
This report describes my projects and major activities during my internship with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). As a graduate assistant in the Office of Research and Development (ORD), I worked directly with field researchers and subject matter experts to develop technical and non-technical publications for public distribution. This report provides a high level description of the organizational structure and culture at ORD, descriptions of several projects I worked on, including an informative brochure on arsenic contamination and a web site supporting Drinking Water Distribution Systems Research. This report also highlights my contributions to ORD as a graduate assistant, and my analysis of the application of Paul Anderson’s Problem Solving Model to my main project. A summary of my main project, developing a web site for the Drinking Water Distribution System Research program, and a detailed description of the development process are also included.

Committee:

Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Chair); Janel Bloch, PhD (Committee Member); Ann Hagerman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

MTSC;Internship report;EPA;USEPA;Environmental Protection Agency;water;contamination;techical communication;technical writing

Whitson, Donna MarieReport on a MTSC Internship at the Warren County Engineer's Office
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2013, English
This four-chapter report describes the work I performed as a technical writing intern for the Warren County Engineer's Office (WCEO) in Lebanon, Ohio, during the summer of 2010. The report provides an overview of the county organization; a description of my role in the Engineer's Office, and the documents I created for Warren County, including an instructional pamphlet on stormwater drainage maintenance for Home Owner Associations (HOA) and a booklet on stream setbacks for the Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District (WCSWCD). (I also include an analysis and comparison of project management to my internship experience and how that affected the development of my documents and the exploration of the internship and how my experience compared to my classroom training as a technical writer.)

Committee:

Jean Lutz, Ph.D (Advisor); Katherine Durack, Ph.D (Committee Member); Jerry Green, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

stormwater; stream setbacks; technical writing; project management

Woerner, Joanna LMixing bits and pieces: how technical writers meet the needs of larger writing communities through intertextuality
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2006, English
Because technical writers frequently work with larger writing communities (the multiple discourse communities that collaborate on a project), they must learn to blend the unique languages and conventions of multiple communities into one acceptable document. This blending can often prove challenging. However, by using intertextuality – defined as the practice of employing specific phrasing and visual elements that direct readers’ minds to accepted, pre-existing communications within a discourse community – technical writers can mix ‘bits and pieces’ (Porter 1986) of successful communications into new discourse. Though the definition and application of intertextuality has been much debated over the last forty years, I will demonstrate how it can be valuable to technical communication by describing how I used intertextuality during my internship at the Integration and Application Network, a branch of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science in Cambridge, MD, and by providing guidelines for establishing intertextuality in a document.

Committee:

Michele Simmons (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical writing; intertextuality; discourse communities; visual language; writing communities

Hawkins, SteveAn Internship in Technical and Scientific Communication with Dell Inc
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2003, Technical and Scientific Communication
In January of 2000, I accepted a full-time position with Dell Inc. (formerly known as Dell Computer Corporation) located in Austin, Texas. This report describes the first 18-months of my tenure at Dell and focuses on a major project I completed during this time. I began this project in January 2001 and completed it in March 2001. The other chapters in this report provide a description of Dell Inc., an overview of my internship and my major and minor writing projects, an analysis of the problem-solving model, and some examples of the technical writing assignments that I developed at Dell.

Committee:

Jean Lutz (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

server; storage system; Fibre Channel; high-availability cluster; Installation and Troubleshooting Guide; technical writing; NAS; network attached storage; changing careers

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