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Burke, Alex NortonAn Integrated Toolbox to Assess the Viability of Solar PV at OHIO University
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2017, Environmental Studies (Voinovich)
Ohio University demands over 120,000 Megawatt Hours of electricity annually and plans to reduce the institutional greenhouse gas emissions to 0 by 2075. The demand for electricity includes a significant environmental footprint under the current electricity procurement contract. Addressing the best option for an energy user therefore requires careful examination of the environmental, social, and financial costs and benefits of each scenario. This research develops optimal scenarios for a solar PV installation in Athens, OH and assesses the sustainability of four solar PV installation scenarios and two status quo scenarios. Finally, Analytical hierarchy process is used to simulate decision making process with multiple criteria. The criteria are categorized as environmental, social, and financial and decisions are simulated with three sets of weighting on each criterion. A solar installation helps verify modeled results within the research which concludes that a solar PV farm with tracking or rooftop would serve as the most sustainable electricity procurement decision for OHIO University.

Committee:

Derek Kauneckis, Ph. D (Advisor); Daniel Karney, Ph. D (Committee Member); Greg Kremer, Ph. D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Environmental Management; Environmental Studies; Sustainability

Keywords:

Sustainable energy, solar PV, cost benefit analysis, life cycle assessment, sustainability assessment, sustainability, energy, decision making modeling, solar PV modeling, analytical hierarchy process, environmental studies

Wallin, Micah R.China’s Wind Energy Development and Prediction
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2010, East Asian Languages and Literatures
This thesis focuses on China’s wind energy development, focusing on data pertaining to effects of wind energy development on economic, environmental, and social issues. It also reviews the Chinese government’s Wind Energy development policy, laws that encourage the development of wind energy, as well as wind energy development problems and future development plans. I will also address current trends in China’s wind energy development, as well as present the results of my field research.

Committee:

Galal Walker, Dr. (Advisor); Jianqi Wang (Advisor)

Subjects:

Energy

Keywords:

5-year plan; Wind Energy; Wind Turbine; Green Energy; Alternative Energy; Sustainable Energy; on-grid

Grabowski, Karen S.Magazine Coverage of Corn Ethanol between Two Energy Crises: Sourcing and Framing in Corn Ethanol Coverage in Time, Newsweek and The Economist from 1979 to 2007
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2008, Journalism (Communication)
With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the increased knowledge of the detrimental effects burning fossil fuels has on the environment, renewable and alternative energies are solutions to which the United States is turning for its energy issues. Corn ethanol has become one of the most produced and used alternative energies in the United States, but research has found that corn ethanol is not the cleanest or most efficient alternative to fossil fuels and may perpetuate food shortages and high food prices. A content analysis of 172 articles about corn ethanol from the magazines Time, Newsweek and, The Economist was conducted to determine whether the coverage of corn ethanol changed from 1979, the year of the second energy crisis in the 1970s, and 2007. Sourcing and framing were the two main aspects examined in this study. The study found that the frame biofuel and sources affiliated with business/financial dominated the coverage of corn ethanol.

Committee:

Cary R. Frith (Committee Chair); Ellen Gerl (Committee Member); Joe Bernt (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Journalism

Keywords:

corn ethanol; renewable energy; sustainable energy; magazine coverage; Time; Newsweek; The Economist

Lim, TaekyoungMULTILEVEL GOVERNMENTAL EFFORTS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY: POLICY ADOPTION, IMPLEMENATION, AND EVALUATION UNDER THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT (ARRA)
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2017, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
This dissertation consists of three essays studying the impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the energy policy field. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of ARRA funds, spent as temporary funding, on the change of energy efficiency policies, jobs, and technologies. The first essay examined variation in local level energy-efficiency grants and corresponding initiatives from American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) in the United States. The analysis was based upon a hurdle model of counts of energy-efficiency grants received by 348 local governments that received these grants from 2009 to 2013, as well as 348 matched local governments that did not receive such funds. City-level characteristics including amount of federal financial support, per capita income, signaling of preferences for sustainability policies, manufacturing and political influences were shown to be empirically important determinants of variation in local energy-efficiency initiatives. The evidence suggested that all else held equal, the $21.8 billion in ARRA funds expended with the intent of promoting the diffusion of local energy-efficiency programs and policies successfully led to this end. The second essay examined the impact of the ARRA funds allocated through an intergovernmental grant provision under the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) of the Department of Energy. The purpose of the second essay was to evaluate the effectiveness of the large-scale federal ARRA grant provision implemented under the EERE on job creation related to energy efficiency and renewable energy at the sub-national level. In doing so, it focuses on whether federal ARRA investments, designed to spur the U.S. economy through establishing an innovative energy technologies in intergovernmental grant programs for state and local government, effectively achieved their stated objectives of increasing job. Using the first difference regression model with instrumental variables, the second essay examined the effects of federal ARRA expenditures on job creation in the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors from 2005 to 2015. The evidence suggests that all else held equal, the ARRA funds, implemented through the intergovernmental grant programs, successfully led to job creation in the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors . The evidence suggested that ARRA funds led to a productive cumulative return on job creation in energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors during the period of ARRA. The third essay analyzed whether federal ARRA investments, designed to spur new energy technologies in grant programs for state and local government, effectively achieved their stated objectives. The analysis was based upon a first difference regression model with instrumental variables. This essay examined the effects of federal ARRA expenditures on innovation activities in energy technologies from 2005 to 2015. The evidence suggests that all else held equal, the ARRA funds, implemented under the decentralized networks, successfully stimulated innovative activities in energy technologies. Results also showed that ARRA funds led to productive cumulative return on innovation activities toward alternative energy technologies and energy conservation technologies during the ARRA period.

Committee:

William Bowen, Ph.D. (Advisor); Sanda Kaufman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Tatyana Guzman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Cho Sung-Han, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act; ARRA; Energy Efficiency Programs and Policies; Sustainable Energy

SRINIVASAN, MINNUSustainable Skyscraper - Energy from Immediate Surrounding and Within
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
The early dwelling was a direct response to natural elements. As time elapsed, with technological advances and emergence of global culture, the gap between the relationships of nature with the human race widened. Can a large-scale building be designed that is evolved out of the relationship with the immediate environment and the environment within? Can it increase the awareness of the user about the relationship of the building and our actions on the environment to enable a paradigm shift in reacting in a more responsible manner? The exploration and pursuit for a sustainable skyscraper was a response to technology and social aspects in macro and micro scale. Since almost all of the evolution in nature takes place in the molecular level, an in depth analysis of incorporating nanotechnology need to be done. This thesis looks at how these three levels can be interrelated to work as a unified whole, can this incorporation help the building evolve and adapt to the changing requirement of users and the environment.

Committee:

Tom Bible (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Riorden (Committee Co-Chair); Gerald Larson (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Sustainable; Energy; Renewable; Skyscraper