Search Results (1 - 5 of 5 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Gaskins, WhitneyChanging the Learning Environment in the College of Engineering and Applied Science: The impact of Educational Training on Future Faculty and Student-Centered Pedagogy on Undergraduate Students.
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Engineering and Applied Science: Biomedical Engineering
Over the past 20 years there have been many changes to the primary and secondary educational system that have impacted students, teachers, and post-secondary institutions across the United States of America. One of the most important is the large number of standardized tests students are required to take to show adequate performance in school. Students think differently because they are taught differently due to this focus on standardized testing, thus changing the skill sets students acquire in secondary school. This presents a critical problem for colleges and universities, as they now are using practices for and have expectations of these students that are unrealistic for the changing times. High dropout rates in the College of Engineering have been attributed to the cultural atmosphere of the institution. Students have reported a low sense of belonging and low relatability to course material. This study developed a “preparing the future” faculty program that gave graduate students at the University of Cincinnati a unique training experience that helped them understand the students they will educate. They received educational training, developed from a future educator’s curriculum that covered classroom management, standards, and pedagogy. Graduate students who participated in the training program reported increases in self-efficacy and student understanding. To reduce negative experiences and increase motivation, Challenge Based Learning (CBL) was introduced in an undergraduate Basic Electric Circuits (BEC) course. CBL is a structured model for course content with a foundation in problem-based learning. CBL offers general concepts from which students derive the challenges they will address. Results show an improved classroom experience for students who were taught with CBL.

Committee:

Anant Kukreti, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Beverly Davenport, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Catherine V. Maltbie, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Cheryll Dunn, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Jeffrey Johnson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Joy Moore, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Engineering

Keywords:

Challenge Based Learning;Learning Environments;Student Experience;Preparing Future Faculty;Teaching Self-Efficacy

Falkenstein, Robert NStudent Experiences of Participation in Tracked Classes Throughout High School: The Ethic of Justice, School Leadership, and Curriculum Design
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Leadership Studies
While school leaders negotiate changing governmental mandates, tracking continues as the most implemented curriculum delivery model in American schools (Lovelace, 1999). There is a growing disconnect between governmental pushes toward a similar educational bar for all students and tracking, which encourages student achievement at fluctuating levels. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to reveal the experience of tracking for graduating high school seniors. Tracking is defined as dividing students into class levels for low, medium, and high achievers in each grade (Oakes & Lipton, 1994). A philosophical background demonstrated how the ethic of justice spectrum—the balance between the good of society and individual rights (Starratt, 1991)—applied to curriculum design. The impact of tracking on students’ school experiences was addressed. The six participants engaged in this study ranged all track levels. The research questions were (1) How do 12th grade students describe their experience in tracked classes in high school?, (2) How does the essence of tracking impact 12th graders’ high school experiences?, and (3) How are students’ tracking experiences represented on the ethic of justice spectrum? An existing Method of Analysis of Phenomenological Data was used to analyze and code the data (Moustakas, 1994). The thinking processes behind data transformation were highlighted. The participants overwhelmingly supported tracking. Their experiences revealed five themes: (1) appropriateness of placement, (2) student effort and perceived teacher effort, (3) similarity of instructional methods, (4) social influence of peers and family, and (5) view of others: students in different track levels and school leaders. Tracking met the needs of participants according to individual ability levels. Tracking found its place on the ethic of justice spectrum toward the individual, nonconsequential end and away from utilitarian notions. The participants supported continued tracking practices but cited trusted, respected teachers as more influential than school principals or the tracking design itself. School leaders were reminded that, from students’ perspectives, tracking is the preferred curriculum design. The ethic of justice was proven a useful evaluation tool of school policy and programming. Administrators were reminded to promote ventures that seek student input in decision-making activities and to uphold justice in schools by respecting students’ individual rights.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor)

Keywords:

tracking; ability grouping; curriculum design; student voice; ethic of justice; school leadership; phenomenology; essence; qualitative; student experience; data transformation

Abokor, Abdillahi H.Somali Students' Experiences in a Major University: A Qualitative Case Study
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
Research on Somali students’ experiences is very limited and has been focused mainly on school-age children rather than college students despite their increasing presence in U.S. higher education. So far little is known about the circumstances of those in postsecondary education. The purpose of this study was to explore Somali students’ experiences in a major U.S. university. It particularly investigated the challenges undergraduate Somali students face in college and the support they receive in order to cope with those challenges. A qualitative case study methodology was employed to examine the lived experiences of ten students who participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews, which were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Findings of the study indicate that Somali students encounter many obstacles in college. The study also found that students cope with their challenges in various ways by drawing support from their institution, family, peers, faith and community, who provide them remarkable social capital and resilience. Findings will have implications for both practice and policy by providing an understanding of the obstacles Somali students encounter in U.S. colleges, as well as directions for future research. They will also be significant for research in that they will contribute to the literature by addressing the existing knowledge gap. Recommendations were made in light of the outcomes of the study in terms of ways that could be helpful for students to overcome their challenges.

Committee:

Emmanuel Jean Francois (Committee Chair); Mona Robinson (Committee Member); Bill Larson (Committee Member); Edna Wangui (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Somali Students; Minority Students; Student Experience in College; Challenges in Higher Education; Barriers in College; Educational Studies; Educational Leadership

Duncan, Robin AStudents' Perceived Value of the Community College Experience: A Mixed Methods Study
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this study was to explore students’ perceived value of their community college experience and its relationship to other factors often related to student persistence in college, namely satisfaction, academic quality, service quality, and engagement. The research was guided by three focused questions: How do students describe and define perceived value of community college; what components emerge from exploratory factor analysis of items designed to measure perceived value; and how, if at all, is a student’s perception of the value of a community college experience different from related measures such as satisfaction, engagement, or quality? Data were collected from students enrolled at, primarily, three Massachusetts community colleges, employing a three-phased, mixed methods exploratory sequential approach. Phase 1 consisted of focus group interviews with students from one of the participating colleges to identify the themes and language for developing the perceived value construct. Phase 2 consisted of an online survey targeting currently enrolled community college students. Factor analysis identified key components of the perceived value scale and multiple regression analysis determined the relationship between perceived value and other control variables. Phase 3 consisted of a virtual post survey focus group with voluntary survey participants from Massachusetts community colleges to discuss and clarify the quantitative results and narrative survey responses. The dominant theme emerging from the findings was that students described perceived value as “I am valued” by the college. Results also indicated that the perceived value construct was different from other measures and suggested promising ways for further exploring and measuring student persistence. As a result of the study’s findings, a conceptual framework in the form of a Perceived Value Wheel was proposed with recommendations to community college leaders and practical contribution to higher education leadership and change. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ruth Slotnick, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Business Administration; Business Education; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Continuing Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Management; Marketing; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Perceived Value; Service Quality; Academic Quality; Satisfaction; Student Engagement; Involvement; Student Experience; Higher Education; Two Year Colleges; Community College; Students; Mixed Methods; Regression; Factor Analysis; Persistence; Retention

Corder, Megan JuliaStudent Perspectives of College and University Presidents
BS, Kent State University, 2015, College of Communication and Information / School of Journalism and Mass Communication
This thesis analyzes the relationship between students and university and college presidents.The thesis identifies key areas that determine and influence student perspectives of institutional leaders. Participants in a research study shared perspectives, opinions, and experiences that shaped their awareness of their institutional leader. Student experiences, interactions, networks, and interests are just a few of the factors that may influence student perceptions of university and college presidents. By beginning to determine these factors and how they related to each specific student, such as what organizations a student may be involved in, one can better understand the factors that influence and motivate student awareness of university leaders.

Committee:

Timothy Roberts (Advisor); Eric Mansfield (Committee Member); Candace Bowen (Committee Member); Brenda McKenzie (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Higher Education

Keywords:

Student Engagment, University and College Presidents, Student Perspectives, Student Experience, Higher Education