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Robinson, Gary J.Delight, Satisfaction, and Behavioral Intentions in a Hospital Setting: The Role of Environmental and Interpersonal Services
Doctor of Business Administration, Cleveland State University, 2012, Nance College of Business Administration
This study is one of few on customer satisfaction, delight, and behavioral intentions and the first in a hospital setting. Data, collected through phone interviews with 250 patients discharged from a hospital, support that: (1) patient delight and satisfaction have positive influences on behavioral intentions; (2) environmental and interpersonal service quality have positive influences on patient satisfaction and patient delight; however, (3) patient satisfaction mediates the relationship between environmental and interpersonal service quality and patient delight.

Committee:

William Lundstrom (Committee Chair); Raj Javalgi (Committee Member); Rama Jayanti (Committee Member); J.B. Silvers (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Marketing

Keywords:

Delight; Satisfaction; Service Quality; Behavioral Intentions; Loyalty; Emotions; Patient Satisfaction; Interpersonal Satisfaction; Environmental Satisfaction

Garber, Jordan SlabaughWork Centrality as a Moderator of the Job Satisfaction-Life Satisfaction Relationship
Master of Arts (M.A.), Xavier University, 2017, Psychology
Work centrality was examined as a possible moderator of the job satisfaction and life satisfaction relationship. Participants included in the study were MTurk workers who were employed in at least one full-time job and lived in the United States of America. Data were collected using self-report items in an online survey and 93 participants were included in the study. In support of earlier research, life satisfaction and job satisfaction did have a significant positive correlation, r(91) = .426, p < .001. Work centrality also had significant, positive correlations with both job satisfaction, r(91) = .315, p = .002, and life satisfaction, r(91) = .252, p = .015. The results of the moderated regression analysis indicated that work centrality did not significantly moderate the relationship between job satisfaction and life satisfaction, ¿R2 = .002, F(1,89) = .232, p = .631. These results indicate that work centrality may have important implications for both job and life satisfaction, and may be helpful to career counselors when advising individuals about career and work choices. Also included are recommendations for future researchers wanting to examine work centrality as a moderator of the life satisfaction-job satisfaction relationship.

Committee:

Mark Nagy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Occupational Psychology; Psychology

Keywords:

Work Centrality; Life Satisfaction; Job Satisfaction; Industrial; Organizational; Psychology; Work Attitudes; Work-Life balance; job satisfaction and life satisfaction relationship;

Williams, Anthony R.The nursing home five star rating: How does it compare to resident and family views of care?
Master of Gerontological Studies, Miami University, 2012, Gerontology
In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a five-star rating system of nursing homes in the United States. These star ratings have been widely publicized both by CMS and in the national and state media. Although the components of the star rating system take into account various dimensions of quality, the satisfaction of nursing home residents and their families are not taken into consideration. The current study compares the CMS star rating system to the satisfaction ratings of nursing homes provided by residents and their families throughout the state of Ohio. Findings indicate that the star rating system does not adequately reflect consumer satisfaction and recommend that the star rating system be refined to include a consumer component.

Committee:

Robert Applebaum, PhD (Committee Chair); Jane Straker, PhD (Committee Member); Douglas Noe, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Health Care; Public Policy

Keywords:

Long-Term Care; LTC; Nursing Home; Quality Domains; Quality Ratings; Quality; Nursing Home Compare; NHC; Star Ratings; Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; CMS; Resident Satisfaction; Family Satisfaction; Consumer Satisfaction; Consumer Guide; Ohio

Williams, Michele L.Romantic Love Communication: Examination of Equity and Effects on Relational, Sexual, and Communication Satisfaction
PHD, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Communication Studies
Many couples are not satisfied in their relationships and are looking for ways to communicate better in order to avoid the devastating effects of divorce. One way for couples to improve their satisfaction is to learn how to communicate their love for one another effectively and equitably. This dissertation identifies the means by which individuals communicate romantic love and explores the effect these behaviors have on relational, sexual, and communication satisfaction using equity theory as the framework. Through an extensive study of relevant literature, a clear conceptualization and preliminary measurement of romantic love was created. Three hundred heterosexual married individuals will be surveyed through an online questionnaire. Survey instruments will measure both the individual’s use of romantic love communication behaviors as well as his/her perception of their partner’s use. In addition, measures of relational equity, romantic love communication behavior equity, marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, and communication satisfaction will be included. The dissertation offers a valuable contribution to the literature on romantic love by providing a typology of romantic love communication behaviors rooted in theory. In addition it will provide a clearer understanding of the relationships between romantic love communication behaviors, equity theory, and relational outcomes (relational, sexual, and communication satisfaction). If results support the idea that romantic love communication behaviors have the potential to increase relational, sexual, and communication satisfaction, the findings have potential to improve the quality of marriages.

Committee:

Nichole Egbert, PhD (Committee Chair); Mei-Chen Lin, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Kristen Mickelson, PhD (Committee Member); Jeff Child, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

Romantic Love Communication; Relational Satisfaction; Sexual Satisfaction; Communication Satisfaction; Equity Theory

Rodriguez-Castro, MonicaELEMENTS OF TASK, JOB, AND PROFESSIONAL SATISFACTION IN THE LANGUAGE INDUSTRY: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL
PHD, Kent State University, 2011, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies

This dissertation presents a model of translator satisfaction along with an instrument and empirical data that can be used for the assessment of translator satisfaction in the language industry (LI). The model has been adapted to address specific trends widely prevalent in the industry. These trends have emerged over the last two decades due to the widespread adoption of internet technologies and other technological advancements. The subcontracting model has become a very common mode of operation among large corporations and language service providers, leading to the replacement of the traditional translation processes by mass-production methods. Division of labor, higher specialization of skills and higher process standardization are some of the inevitable consequences of mass-production. Subcontracting has radically reshaped the work environment, with increasing virtual teamwork, outsourcing and telecommuting becoming widespread. Subject matter and technical expertise, terminology management and project management skills have become essential in the new professional profile that has emerged due to the trends in the current LI.

The model proposed in this dissertation implements Herzberg’s framework of job satisfaction in order to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic predictors that influence three facets of satisfaction among active professionals in the LI—task, job and professional. A survey has been designed to collect data from active translation professionals, and the survey results are comprehensively post-processed and statistically analyzed in order to comprehend the factors and variables for each facet of satisfaction.

Study of the work behavior of a highly skilled labor force is important because translators remain a crucial component of the LI despite all the technological advancements. The findings suggest that most predictors come from the intrinsic sources of satisfaction found in individuals, tasks or the profession. Thus, new retention strategies that reinforce intrinsic satisfiers are recommended. The findings could be used to establish best practices, and further used by human resources management, employers and recruiters to review their approaches for retention as well as training and mentoring. The findings of this study may also be used to improve the academic curriculum in Translation Studies by incorporating modules that are deemed as important by the industry professionals.

Committee:

Gregory M. Shreve, Prof. (Advisor); Keiran J. Dunne (Committee Member); Sue Ellen Wright (Committee Member); Marcia Zeng (Committee Member); Susan Roxburgh (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Linguistics; Modern Language

Keywords:

job satisfaction; translators; task satisfaction; professional satisfaction; regression model; outsourcing; empirical research

Austin, Jacob BrendanA Phenomenological Investigation of Physician Job Satisfaction in Rural Integrated Primary Care
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
The job satisfaction of rural primary care physicians is of import given the crucial role these physicians play in rural health care systems and their consistent decline in numbers nationwide. The professional isolation of practicing in rural areas, particularly in accessing specialty care, creates greater burdens for rural physicians than their more urban counterparts, which likely contributes to their low level of job satisfaction. The shortage of mental health providers in rural areas in particular is thought to create a burden for rural primary care physicians, who generally neither have the time, training, nor expertise to adequately deal with complex mental health difficulties. Thus, integrated primary care—the provision of mental health services in the clinical flow of primary care medicine through the employment of behavioral health consultants—might reasonably improve rural physician satisfaction. Due perhaps to the novelty of this practice in rural primary care clinics, little research has examined this idea. This study uses a qualitative methodology—interpretive phenomenological analysis—to explore how rural physicians in integrated primary care settings experienced this innovative practice. Connections of this practice to physician job satisfaction are discussed, as are the implications toward facilitating this service in rural primary care practices. Limitations of this study are considered and directions for future research suggested. This research concludes with a personal reflection on my experience as a trainee in a rural integrated primary care clinic.

Committee:

James Fauth, PhD (Committee Chair); Thomas Stearns, PhD (Committee Member); Amanda Houle, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

Primary Care Behavioral Health; Rural Integrated Primary Care; Integrated Primary Care; Primary Care Physician Job Satisfaction; Rural Physician Job Satisfaction

Tseng, Hsing YuCommunication Factors Which Promote Employee’s Job Satisfaction in Taiwan High-Tech Industry: A Personality Traits Study
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2006, Communication
Effective communication in the work place contributes significantly towards the performance of employees and gives rise to enhanced job satisfaction. This paper investigates the communication factors that have a significant influence on job satisfaction as well as the variation in job satisfaction explained by differences in workers’ characteristics in terms of the big five personality traits among Taiwan high-tech industry employees. Three translated version of instruments including the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), the Job Descriptive Index (JDI) and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) were used in a web-based survey to collect the self-report data. The findings showed that employees’ communication satisfaction and job satisfaction can be successfully predicted by the Big Five personality traits of Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness, except Neuroticism in a Taiwanese sample. Future study in this area should also focus on determining other variations in communication satisfaction and job satisfaction, such as organizational culture differences.

Committee:

Heather Walter (Advisor)

Subjects:

Speech Communication

Keywords:

communication; organizational communication; communication satisfaction; job satisfaction

Wymer, Chelsea KayEffects of OCB on Job Satisfaction Perceptions
Master of Arts (M.A.), Xavier University, 2014, Psychology
Extensive research has established a strong, reciprocal relationship between job satisfaction and OCB in the workplace. The aim of this study was to examine perceptions of OCB and the effect those have on perceptions of job satisfaction. It was hypothesized that perceptions of OCB would positively predict perceived job satisfaction. It was also hypothesized that attribution would moderate the relationship between perceived OCB and perceived job satisfaction. Finally, it was hypothesized that ratings of perceived OCB engagement would be positively related to perceived working relationship with the individual’s supervisor. Data were collected from a sample of 85 participants. Simple linear regression was used to test the first hypothesis and it was found to be supported. Ratings of perceived OCB engagement did significantly predict perceived job satisfaction. A hierarchical regression was used to test attribution as a moderator but the results were not significant. A correlation was used to test the relationship between perceived OCB engagement and perceived working relationship with the supervisor and the results were significant, supporting the third hypothesis. The results have both theoretical and practical implications, which are discussed along with limitations and future research directions.

Committee:

Morell Mullins, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Dalia Diab, Ph.D (Committee Member); Mark Nagy, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Organizational Behavior; Psychology; Social Psychology

Keywords:

OCB; organizational citizenship behavior; job satisfaction; perceptions; OCB engagement; OCB in the workplace; job satisfaction in the workplace; attribution

Piggrem, Gary W.Life satisfaction and assertive behavior in the elderly
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1980, Psychology

Committee:

Lyle Schmidt (Advisor)

Keywords:

LIFE SATISFACTION; Assertiveness; SATISFACTION; ELDERLY; Older Persons; ASSERTIVE; Klemmack

Ehlers, Lindsay NicoleThe relationship of communication satisfaction, job satisfaction and self-reported absenteeism
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2003, Speech Communication
The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between communication satisfaction of employees with co-workers, supervisors, and upper management, job satisfaction and self-reported absenteeism. It is hypothesized that communication satisfaction has a positive influence on job satisfaction. Job satisfaction and self-reported absenteeism were explored as well as the relationship of job satisfaction playing a mediating role between communication satisfaction and absenteeism. Results were analyzed with correlations, multiple regressions and t-tests. It was that found communication satisfaction with co-workers, supervisors and upper management have significant positive relationships with job satisfaction. The study found job satisfaction had no significant relationship to performing the mediating role between communication satisfaction and absenteeism. This paper also presents limitations and directions for further research.

Committee:

Ann Bainbridge Frymier (Advisor)

Subjects:

Speech Communication

Keywords:

communication satisfaction; job satisfaction; absenteeism; organizational communication

Kaplar, Mary ElizabethLying Happily Ever After: Altruistic White Lies, Positive Illusions, and Relationship Satisfaction
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Psychology
Although some lies can damage relationships, we hypothesized that altruistic white lies (i.e., lies of minimal importance told to protect another) may benefit romantic relationships by buffering individuals against the potentially damaging effects of hurtful, albeit relatively minor, information. Positive relationship illusions (e.g., believing your relationship is more immune than others’ relationships to conflict and divorce) have been shown to be positively associated with relationship satisfaction. We hypothesized that altruistic white lies may help create positive illusions within relationships. In order to evaluate the potential links between altruistic white lies, positive relationship illusions, and relationship satisfaction, we created and validated a new scale called the Lying In Amorous Relationships Scale (LIARS). This scale assesses individual differences in attitudes toward telling altruistically motivated white lies to a romantic relationship partner. In a series of three studies we assessed the factor structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the LIARS, as well as whether favorable attitudes toward altruistic white lies are positively correlated with positive illusions and relationship satisfaction. The results of Study 1 indicated that the LIARS is a reliable, unidimensional scale that is best conceptualized as a single factor. In Study 2 the LIARS demonstrated good discriminant validity with measures of academic achievement and locus of control, as well as good predictive validity with behavioral intentions to tell one’s partner an altruistic white lie in response to a variety of scenarios. As predicted, LIARS scores also differed as a function of participants’ marital status and affiliation with the university. Contrary to predictions, the LIARS scores of men and women did not differ. Additionally, the LIARS did not demonstrate convergent validity with measures of empathic concern and perspective taking. Study 3 indicated that, contrary to our predictions, LIARS scores were negatively, rather than positively, correlated with positive relationship illusions (r = -.22) and relationship satisfaction (r = -.36). Thus, more positive attitudes toward telling altruistic white lies to a relationship partner were associated with fewer positive illusions and less relationship satisfaction. Stated another way, a preference for truth-telling (versus telling white lies) was associated with more positive illusions and greater relationship satisfaction. Overall, we conclude that the LIARS is a reliable measure of individual differences in attitudes toward telling one’s partner altruistically motivated white lies that demonstrates good discriminant and predictive validity. We also conclude that a preference for telling one’s partner the harsh truth (as opposed to telling altruistic white lies) is associated with greater positive illusions and relationship satisfaction, particularly for younger individuals, presumably with less relationship experience.

Committee:

Anne Gordon (Advisor)

Keywords:

romantic relationships; relationships; scale; scale creation; scale validation; scale reliability; validity; reliability; positive illusions; illusions; relationship satisfaction; satisfaction; dating; marriage; altruism; altruistic; lying; lies

Madlock, PaulSupervisors’ Communicative Behaviors as Predictors of their Subordinates’ Communication Satisfaction, Job Satisfaction, and Willingness to Collaborate
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2006, Communication
The study examined the relationship between supervisor and subordinate communication with respect to supervisors’ behaviors of nonverbal immediacy and communicator competence, and how these behaviors influence subordinates’ job and communication satisfaction, and their willingness to work collaboratively. Additionally, the study examined subordinates’ trait of willingness to collaborate for effects on job and communication satisfaction. Participants (N = 275 [men, 132; women, 143]) worked for female supervisors (N = 129)or worked for male supervisors (N = 146). The findings indicated a significant and positive relationship between supervisors’ communicative behaviors and their subordinates’ perceived job and communication satisfaction, and their willingness to collaborate. Additionally, the data revealed that significant differences existed between supervisors’ levels of communicative behaviors (high vs. low) and subordinates’ reported job and communication satisfaction.

Committee:

Carolyn Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

Nonverbal immediacy; job satisfaction; communication satisfaction; collaboration

Massey, Brooke Christina-MarieThe Happy Boomer: Baby Boomer Life Satisfaction Through Affect and Feeling of Belonging
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
The age cohort of 65 years and older is a growing population. It is part of the group referred to as Baby Boomers, the generation born between the years 1946–1964. It will be the largest population to reach late adulthood to date. In the United States alone, the Baby Boomer cohort is expected to reach 70 million by 2030. In response to this growing elderly population much research has been conducted on Baby Boomer quality of life issues. Such research uncovered the phenomenon known as the well-being paradox. The well-being paradox refers to the findings that older adult’s life satisfaction remains stable or can even increase with age despite age-related losses. Utilizing the theories of positive psychology and socioemotional selectivity, the Happy Boomer project offers an explanation for the well-being paradox. Using data from The Gross National Happiness Index Survey (Happiness Alliance, 2011), the Happy Boomer project analyzed associations between the dependent variable of life satisfaction and the independent variables of positive affect, negative affect, and feeling of belonging for 1,268 individuals ages 65 years and older. No previous research has been found that compares the predictive powers of these specific independent variables on the dependent variable, life satisfaction. Through an ordinal multiple regression, results showed that positive affect had the strongest association with levels of life satisfaction, followed by negative affect and feeling of belonging. Gender was not predictive of life satisfaction. The results also demonstrated the independence of positive affect and negative affect associations with life satisfaction. These findings suggest that affect, specifically positive affect, could mediate the effects of age-related loss as they pertain to life satisfaction for older adults. Furthermore, these findings suggest that Baby Boomers may be able to maintain or increase levels of life satisfaction by focusing on activities that increase positive affect as well as activities that decrease negative affect. The electronic version of this dissertation is at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Alejandra Suarez, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Laura Musikanski, J.D., M.B.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Gerontology; Psychology

Keywords:

Life Satisfaction; Older Adults; Affect; Ordinal Multiple Regression; Feeling of belonging; Happiness; Happiness Alliance; Odds ratio; Gross National Happiness; Satisfaction with Life; Elderly; Baby Boomers; OECD; Subjective well-being; Quality of Life

Pereyra-Rojas, MilagrosA THEORETICAL, EMPIRICAL AND PRACTICAL APPROACH TO ACADEMIC KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION AND JOB SATISFACTION: THE ROLE OF ACADEMIC ALIGNMENT
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Management
Academic productivity has been an important concern for both, scholars and institutions. Although, several studies have explored the factors that may impact academic productivity, only a few have focused on intrinsic academic factors. In addition, specific studies of job satisfaction and overall well-being of scholars are rare, as shown by the results of our extensive literature review on these topics. This research proposes the study of factors that foster or inhibit knowledge production and well-being among scholars, taking into consideration their different scholarship interests and academic environments. Beginning with a qualitative study and the use of grounded theory approach, we found that scholars identify themselves with different scholarship dimensions (discovery, application, teaching, integration, and engagement (Boyer, 1990; Van de Ven, 2007) and that their productivity is influenced by these dimensions of scholarship in addition to the expectations of the scholars&#x2019; institutions. We created a research model using the inferences obtained in Phase 1 and developed scales to measure the extent of scholarship identity, work focus, and perceived institutional expectations along the five dimensions of scholarship mentioned above. In Phase 2, we discovered that scholarship Identity, work focus and perceived institutional expectations do influence academic productivity and well-being. Furthermore, when the model is mediated by academic alignment (the congruence of values, skills and resources between the scholar and the institution), productivity and well-being increase significantly. Continuing with our quest, we explored if the proposed mediated model in Phase 2 varies by discipline cluster and/or university type. Our results indicate that our model is moderated by discipline cluster only when the Hard/Pure (i.e. well-defined paradigm and pure research orientation) dimension is present and/or when the institution corresponds to a university type 1 (very high research oriented). This multi-method study also provides a practical guidance to scholars, university administrators, and policy makers. Our findings suggest that academic alignment is fundamental as a mediator of the key factors (scholarship identity and institutional expectations) fostering academic productivity and well-being. For this purpose, the instruments developed for this study allow the assessment of the degree of scholarship triple parallax among scholarship identity, academic work focus and institutional expectations. Higher education administrators can use this triple parallax profile approach as a way to diagnose and minimize academic misalignment to improve scholarship productivity and well-being.

Committee:

Tony Lingham (Committee Chair); Gary Hunter (Committee Member); Antoinette Somers (Committee Member); Simon Dolan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Scholarship types; scholarship dimensions; scholarship identity; knowledge production; academic productivity; well-being; job satisfaction; life satisfaction; Biglan classification; academic alignment

Jorina, MariaDeterminants of Satisfaction and Willingness to Recommend: Physician and Patient Perspectives
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Public Health
Today, when the U.S. health care system is undergoing significant transformations geared towards improving quality of, increasing access to and making more affordable health care services, hospitals are committed to attracting and retaining highly qualified physicians. At the same time, hospitals, in addition to providing excellent care, are interested in attracting new patients. Positive word-of-mouth is believed to be one of the most effective strategies for attracting both qualified physicians and loyal patients. While human resources management literature has demonstrated the link between satisfaction and willingness to recommend, very little research in this area has been conducted in the health care setting. This dissertation project was aimed at developing an in-depth understanding of factors affecting physician and patient willingness to recommend. The project consisted of three studies. The first study was qualitative in design and consisted of 14 interviews with physicians working at a Midwestern Academic Medical Center. The physicians’ views on the factors influencing their job satisfaction were explored. It was discovered that physicians held different beliefs about job satisfaction drivers and the factors associated with job dissatisfaction. Additionally, the respondents identified taking care of patients as being one of the most rewarding aspects of the job. Finally, it was possible to distinguish between factors common among academic medical centers and specific characteristics of the medical center under investigation that were associated with job satisfaction. The second study analyzed data obtained from 1,030 physician satisfaction surveys collected at the medical center during 2009-2011 to measure the impact of various aspects of the work environment and job satisfaction on physicians’ willingness to recommend the medical center as a place of work. A series of logistic regressions revealed that job satisfaction, communication with administration, collaborative efforts between physicians and the medical center to improve quality of care, and physician-nurses collaboration were significantly and positively associated with willingness to recommend. The third study analyzed data from 11,344 patients who were hospitalized at the medical center and completed post-discharge satisfaction surveys between 2009-2011. A series of logistic regressions tested the relationships between various characteristics of the hospitalization experience, satisfaction with care and patients’ willingness to recommend the medical center to others. The analyses demonstrated that overall satisfaction with care, as well as satisfaction with personal aspects of care, tests and treatments, and care delivered by physician were all significantly and positively associated with patients’ willingness to recommend. Additionally, the study tested the relationship between physicians’ job satisfaction and patients’ willingness to recommend. This relationship was not significant. This dissertation project not only provides important insight into physician and patient perspectives on satisfaction and willingness to recommend, but also offers practical guidelines to health care managers, leaders, and physicians on ways hospitals could serve as attractive employers and excellent providers of care.

Committee:

Ann McAlearney, ScD (Committee Chair); Sarah Anderson, PhD (Committee Member); Eric Seiber, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care Management

Keywords:

job satisfaction; patient satisfaction; willingness to recommend; positive word-of-mouth; academic medical center; patient-centered care; care quality; outcomes measurement; physician-patient relationship; communication

Dotson, Jeffrey P.Measuring the Effects of Satisfaction: Linking Customers, Employees, and Firm Financial Performance
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, Business Administration
Firms are most successful when they are able to efficiently satisfy the wants and needs of their clientele. As such, customer satisfaction has emerged as one of the more ubiquitous and oft studied constructs in marketing. Central to the study of satisfaction is the desire to understand its antecedents and outcomes. Managers would ultimately like to know how their actions will impact the satisfaction of their consumer base and, by extension, the company's financial performance. Through two essays, this dissertation develops quantitative models that allow for formal study of the relationship between customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and firm financial performance. The proposed models are designed to accommodate a variety of challenges often encountered in satisfaction studies including simultaneity, linkage of distributions, and the fusion of multiple data sets. The benefits of these models are demonstrated empirically using data from a national financial services firm.

Committee:

Greg Allenby, PhD (Committee Chair); Robert Burnkrant, PhD (Committee Member); Rao Unnava, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Marketing; Statistics

Keywords:

Customer Satisfaction; Employee Satisfaction; Bayesian Statistics; Marketing; Linkage Analysis; Simulteneity; Service Profit Chain

Wheatley, Robert LeeThe relationship between work, nonwork, and life satisfaction of word processing operators /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Word processing;Satisfaction;Job satisfaction

Gordo, Myla D The Moderating Role of Attachment Style in the Relationships between Work-Home Interference, Relationship Satisfaction, and Job Satisfaction
BA, Kent State University, 2015, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Psychology
Work-home interference is increasing due to challenges in balancing the demands of home and work environments. Yet, certain individuals are more susceptible to interference than others. We predicted that individuals’ attachment styles would influence the effects of work-home interference on relationship and job satisfaction. Participants (N = 150) completed online questionnaires measuring relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction, perceived work-home interference, and attachment styles. We examined the associations between work-home interference and relationship/job satisfaction, and attachment styles as moderators of these associations using regression analysis. Results indicated significant negative main effects of attachment avoidance on relationship satisfaction, and work-to-home interference on job satisfaction. Contrary to our predictions, attachment styles did not moderate the effects of work-home interference on job and relationship satisfaction. Although results indicate associations between attachment styles and relationship satisfaction, as well as work-home interference and job satisfaction, it is unclear how individual differences influence the effects of work-home interference.

Committee:

Judith Gere (Advisor)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

attachment style, work-home interference, relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction

Laditka, Robyn MackenzieThe Influence of Argumentativeness, Verbal Aggressiveness, and Affective Orientation on Roommate Communication Satisfaction and Roommate Affinity
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2006, Communication
The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between three specific communication traits and roommate communication satisfaction. The three traits this study examined included: verbal aggressiveness, argumentativeness, and affective orientation. Two Hundred four participants were asked to complete a questionnaire measuring argumentativeness, verbal aggressiveness, affective orientation and roommate communication satisfaction. The findings indicated there was no significant relationship between roommate communication satisfaction and argumentativeness, nor was there was significant relationship between roommate communication satisfaction and affective orientation. However, the results did show a significant negative relationship between roommate communication satisfaction and verbal aggressiveness. Implications of these findings, and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Committee:

Andrew Rancer (Advisor)

Keywords:

Argumentativeness; Verbal Aggressiveness; Affective Orientation; Roommate Communication Satisfaction; Roommate Satisfaction; Roommate Affinity; Affinity

Heeman, Vanessa C.Interpersonal Communication Motives, Satisfaction, and Psychological Well-Being in Father-Young Adult Daughter Relationships
MA, Kent State University, 2008, College of Communication and Information / School of Communication Studies
This study examined interpersonal communication motives, communication satisfaction, relational satisfaction, and psychological well-being in the father-young adult daughter relationships. The main purpose of the study was to see whether communication and/or relational satisfaction mediated a connection between interpersonal communication motives and psychological well-being. Young adult daughters (n = 223) ranging in age from 18-24 provided self-reports of their interpersonal communication motives for talking with their fathers, their communication and relational satisfaction with their fathers, and their own level of psychological well-being. Results revealed that neither communication nor relational satisfaction mediated a relationship between interpersonal communication motives and psychological well-being. Nevertheless, a significant connection between young adult daughters’ interpersonal communication motives and their psychological well-being was revealed. There was also a significant relationship between young adult daughters’ communication satisfaction with their fathers and their psychological well-being. Overall, the findings suggested that communication exchanges between fathers and young adult daughters have a powerful influence on young adult daughters’ psychological well-being. Contributions and limitations of the investigation are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.

Committee:

Nichole Egbert, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

interpersonal communication motives; communication satisfaction; relational satisfaction; psychological well-being; father-daughter communication; father-daughter relationships

Eschleman, Kevin J.A Construct Validation of the Neutral Objects Satisfaction Questionnaire (NOSQ)
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2008, Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology MS
The current study is a construct validation of the Neutral Objects Satisfaction Questionnaire (NOSQ). The study includes tests of convergent and discriminant validity. Specifically, the NOSQ had more empirical overlap with affective-oriented dispositions (i.e., positive affectivity, negative affectivity, neuroticism, extraversion, trait anxiety, trait anger, trait depression, and cheerfulness) than with cognitive-oriented dispositions (i.e., need for cognition, general self-efficacy, and locus of control). In addition, the NOSQ had greater empirical overlap with the aforementioned affective-oriented dispositions than with a measure of temporal affect (i.e., mood). Correlations between the NOSQ and both job satisfaction and job cognitions were also compared, but no significant difference in correlation strength was found. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and the utility of the NOSQ in dispositional and job attitude research are discussed.

Committee:

Nathan Bowling, PhD (Advisor); Martyn Whittingham, PhD (Committee Member); Corey Miller, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

NOSQ; Neutral Objects Satisfaction Questionnaire; Gripe Index; Affective-Oriented Dispositions; Job Satisfaction; Personality; Construct Validation; Positive Affectivity; Negative Affectivity; Mood

Blundell, Gregory EdgarA DISRUPTION OF ONLINE LEARNING COURSE DESIGN: COMPARING SELF-REPORTED LEVELS OF FACULTY SATISFACTION WITH ONLINE COURSES CREATED APPLYING THE 2011-2013 EDITION OF THE QUALITY MATTERS™ RUBRIC STANDARDS TO THOSE ONLINE COURSES CREATED WITHOUT.
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
Faculty satisfaction with designing online courses matters a great deal, for a number of reasons. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether applying the Quality MattersTM Rubric [QMR] as a foundation for online course design increases faculty’s self-reported levels of satisfaction with online courses designed using the QMR, in comparison to faculty’s self-reported levels of satisfaction with online courses that were not designed using the QMR. The local and national importance of this study is fully underscored by an increased emphasis from government, employers, and other stakeholders, on the rigor and role faculty play in creating efficacy through the medium of instruction, particularly online instruction. This study explored and answered the question: Does the design mode make a difference to faculty’s self-reported levels of satisfaction in terms of online course design? The Online Faculty Satisfaction Survey [OFSS], originally developed by Bolliger & Wasilik (2009), was augmented as the Online Faculty Satisfaction Survey-Revised [OFSS-R], and was distributed throughout private higher education institutions in the state of Ohio. There is a clear link between an increased level of faculty satisfaction and an increased level of student satisfaction in their experiences throughout online course. Therefore, it was important for this researcher to establish whether the QMR provided different levels of satisfaction when compared to other instructional design models, and the hypotheses were established to test these differences. However, analysis found no significant difference in faculty self-reported satisfaction levels between the QMR and other instructional design methods in terms of designing online courses. For this researcher, this shall be a matter of future study.

Committee:

Mark, A Kretovics, PHD (Committee Chair); Susan, V. Iverson, PHD (Committee Member); Victor, L. Berardi, PHD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Technology; Instructional Design

Keywords:

Distance or online learning; faculty satisfaction; instructional design; traditional, web-facilitated, blended hybrid, flipped, and fully online modes; asynch and synch learning networks; Online Faculty Satisfaction Survey OFSS; learning effectiveness

Windon, Suzanna R.Examining Ohio State University Extension Program Assistants’ Turnover Intention through Job Satisfaction, Satisfaction with Supervisor, and Organizational Commitment
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Agricultural and Extension Education
Employee turnover and turnover intention are key indicators of human resource development practice and overall organizational leadership effectiveness. Employees’ perceptions about job satisfaction, satisfaction with supervisor, and organizational commitment are thought to be related to turnover intention. However, empirical studies that examine the relationship between job satisfaction, satisfaction with supervisor, organizational commitment and turnover intention are limited, specifically in the Extension system. Almost all Cooperative Extension employees’ turnover studies investigated Extension agents, called educators in some states, as a subject of study; however there is no research that examines turnover intention among the focus of this study, Extension program assistants. Ohio State University Extension (OSU Extension) program assistants, are responsible for recruiting individuals for educational programs, use standardized curriculum to provide informal teaching, and use standardized evaluation instruments to assess program impact. The Cooperative Extension System is experiencing significant changes, which may affect voluntary. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of demographics, job satisfaction, satisfaction with supervisor, and organizational commitment on turnover intention for Extension program assistants. The quantitative research methodology was based on the descriptive–exploratory study and correlational research design. The target population for this study was full time OSU Extension program assistants. An online survey was used to collect data from 149 OSU Extension program assistants. Respondents were asked to provide their perceptions and feelings related to their job satisfaction, satisfaction with supervisor, organizational commitment, and turnover intention. Data analysis involved the use of descriptive statistics, chi-squared test of independents, correlation analysis, binary linear regression, hierarchical multiple regression approach, and Hayes Sobel test to measure mediation effects. Findings from this study indicated that job satisfaction, satisfaction with supervisor, organizational commitment, employee’s age, and years of service relate to employee turnover intention. Younger employees and employees with less years of service tended to have higher turnover intention. Lower levels of organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and satisfaction with supervisor among OSU Extension program assistants tended to predict employee intention to leave. The results of this study are consistent with previous research suggesting that job satisfaction, satisfaction with supervisor, organizational commitment, age, and years of service are important predictors of employee turnover intention. Monitoring and diagnosing employees’ perception and attitude as related to job withdrawal behavior are important HR actions towards the retention of OSU Extension employees. The findings from this study could be used as guidelines for the OSU Extension personnel development and organizational policy. Future quasi-experimental and longitudinal research is need to predict actual turnover. Recommendations for leaders, managers and supervisors in OSU Extension include: renew HR procedures and policies for recruitment, offer professional development for program assistants and their immediate supervisors, and improve retention strategies. Investing in strategies to reduce turnover intention among Extension program assistants will help fulfill Extension’s long term mission.

Committee:

Graham Cochran (Advisor); Scott Scheer (Committee Member); Mary Rodriguez (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agricultural Education

Keywords:

Extension Organization, Extension Program Assistants, Turnover Intention, Job Satisfaction,Satisfaction with Supervisor, Organizational Commitment

DABKE, SHILPA SHRIKRISHNAJOB SATISFACTION OF WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION TRADES
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Engineering : Civil Engineering
Women face unique challenges to work and establish themselves in non traditional occupations such as construction trades. Existing research on women in construction focuses on engineers and entrepreneurs, yet little to no attention has been given to women in trades. Thus, the aim of this research is to review literature on tradeswomen, and to conduct a localized study to determine if demographic variables affect satisfaction with work, pay, opportunities, supervision, and people on the job for tradeswomen. These variables include age, education, number of dependents, number of trade years, duration of work, and frequency of work outside of the local area. Thirty-nine tradeswomen from the Cincinnati area were surveyed to assess their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with construction work. Currently, literature review indicates that research on tradeswomen is limited and largely restricted to identifying measures that can attract and retain women in construction trades. Studies on motivation and job satisfaction of construction workers neither identify nor compare perceptions of tradeswomen about their work. Results of this exploratory study showed that pay, benefits, and job security are most important to women in their occupation. Although tradeswomen appear to be satisfied with the nature of work in construction trades, this is not the case in terms of pay, benefits, and job security. Demographic variables did not affect the level of job satisfaction for women in construction trades. Research on tradeswomen is essential and important as the industry tries to change its image, encourage diversity in order to mitigate labor shortage.

Committee:

Ossama Salem (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Civil

Keywords:

Tradeswomen; job satisfaction; women in trades; work satisfaction

Whetsel-Ribeau, PaulaRetention of Faculty of Color as it Relates to Their Perceptions of the Academic Climate at Four-Year Predominantly White Public Universities in Ohio
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationships between demographic characteristics, academic climate perceptions, and retention plans of 103 tenured and tenure-track faculty of color at 11 four-year predominantly White public universities in Ohio. The 59-item Faculty Retention Questionnaire was administered online and assessed perceptions of the academic climate defined by six variables (job satisfaction, social climate, faculty-student relationships, role conflict, role clarity, and retention). Demographic characteristics were also measured (e.g., racial/ethnic background, gender, age, sexual orientation, country of origin, institution type, academic discipline, marital status, with/without children, and tenure status). Likert-type scales, multiple choice, and open-ended questions measured employment values and intent to stay in current position. Of the 725 surveys distributed, 103 were submitted, yielding an overall response rate of 14%. Critical Race Theory (CRT) framed this study. Correlational results indicated that job satisfaction was significantly related to and highly important to the retention variable. Analysis of variance revealed that U. S. born faculty of color are more likely to be retained than non-U. S. born. Forward multiple regression analysis identified job satisfaction as the sole predictor of retention with job satisfaction only accounting for 23% of variance in retention. Further regression analysis identified social climate, role clarity, and role conflict as factors that best predict job satisfaction. Conclusions from the study raised larger questions regarding job satisfaction: (1) Does job satisfaction mean something different to faculty of color than it does to mainstream faculty? (2) Do faculty of color perceive job satisfaction as part of their social/cultural experience? (3) Is job satisfaction a part of the dual reality that is inherent in people of color through the identification of being a member of an underrepresented group or by having minority status in America? Responses to these larger questions may be best understood through the recognition and understanding of Critical Race Theory. Findings suggest the importance of providing opportunities for the sharing of subjective cultural worldviews of faculty of color with mainstream faculty with the intent of creating greater understanding, cooperation, and positive relationships, thus serve as a retention strategy. This may provide the opportunity to build an academic climate that supports all faculty. The researcher offers other explanations and suggestions regarding the findings from this study that may be valuable in faculty of color retention.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta (Advisor)

Keywords:

Critical Race Theory; faculty of color; retention; correlational; multiple regression; diversity; academic climate; higher education; job satisfaction; role conflict; role clarity; role ambiguity; social climate; faculty-student relationships

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