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Barszap, MichaelRussian literature in Polish literary criticism, 1918-1932 : a documentary study /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1977, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

Russian literature;Russian literature

Renner-Fahey, OnaMythologies of poetic creation in twentieth-century Russian verse
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
In my dissertation, I address how four twentieth-century Russian poets grapple(d) with the mysteries of poetic inspiration and I propose what I consider to be their personal mythologies of the creative process. As none of these poets offers a comprehensive description of his/her personal mythology of poetic creation, my task has been to sift through the poets' poems and prose in order to uncover pertinent textual references to themes of inspiration. The four poet-subjects are Osip Mandelstam, Anna Akhmatova, Joseph Brodsky, and Olga Sedakova. Together they represent many of the factors contributing to the remarkable genius of twentieth-century Russian poetry. By looking at these four particular mythologies of poetic creation, we are able to view notions developed by both genders, within two faiths, in both capitals, and throughout the entirety of the century. It is significant that each of these poets has turned to prose to work out his/her ideas concerning the creative process. In reconstructing these mythologies of poetic creation, I have looked to the poets' entire oeuvres and the "single semantic system" working within each of them. My work aims to bring together poets' prose and poetry and to offer readings of texts that are guided by the poets' own concerns and beliefs.

Committee:

Angela Brintlinger (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, Slavic and East European

Keywords:

Russian literature; Poetry; Twentieth century Russian literature; Russian poets; Osip Mandelstam; Anna Akhmatova; Joseph Brodsky; Olga Sedakova

Myers, Elena KA Semiotic Analysis of Russian Literature in Modern Russian Film Adaptations (Case Studies of Boris Godunov and The Captain’s Daughter)
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
Abstract The current study analyzes signs and signifiers that constitute the structural composition of Pushkin’s historical works Boris Godunov and The Captain’s Daughter and compare them with their Soviet and post-Soviet screen adaptations. I argue that the popularity of these literary works with filmmakers is based on their inexhaustible topicality for Russian society of the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, and therefore reassessment of their film adaptations guides us towards developing a better understanding of the sociopolitical complexities in modern Russia. The analysis employs methods of semiotics of film, which is a relatively young science, but has already become one of the most promising fields in the theory of cinema. The research is based on the scholarship of such eminent theorists and semioticians as Metz, Bluestone, Barthes, Lotman, Bakhtin, and others. By performing semiotic analysis of Russian intermedial transpositions and Pushkin’s source texts, the study demonstrates the parallels between the historical periods and contemporary Russia.

Committee:

Brian Joseph (Advisor); Alexander Burry (Advisor)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Foreign Language; History; Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Russian literature; Russian cinema; Russian film; Russian classics; Russian film adaptations; Russian literature of the nineteenth century; semiotics of film; semiotics of cinema; semiotics of literature; historical film; semiotics of film adaptations

Souder, Eric MatthewThe Circassian Thistle: Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoy's 'Khadzhi Murat' and the Evolving Russian Empire"
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2014, History
The following thesis examines the creation, publication, and reception of Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoy’s posthumous novel, Khadzhi Murat in both the Imperial and Soviet Russian Empire. The anti-imperial content of the novel made Khadzhi Murat an incredibly vulnerable novel, subjecting it to substantial early censorship. Tolstoy’s status as a literary and cultural figure in Russia – both preceding and following his death – allowed for the novel to become virtually forgotten despite its controversial content. This thesis investigates the absorption of Khadzhi Murat into the broader canon of Tolstoy’s writings within the Russian Empire as well as its prevailing significance as a piece of anti-imperial literature in a Russian context.

Committee:

Stephen Norris, Ph.D. (Advisor); Daniel Prior, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Margaret Ziolkowski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Leo Tolstoy; Tolstoy; Khadzhi Murat; Hadji Murat; North Caucasus; Chechnya; Daghestan; Russian Empire; Russian Literature; Censorship; Literary Criticism; Empire; Nicholas I

Hoffman, Zachary AdamNeither This Ancient Earth Nor Ancient Rus' Has Passed On: A Microhistorical Biography of Ivan Bunin
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2010, History
The life and writings of Russian author Ivan Alexseevich Bunin (1870-1953) provide a number of important insights into the major cultural discourses of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Russian history. This thesis uses his experiences and literature as well as those of a number of his contemporaries as a guide for examining the larger dialogues of Russian cultural life in which Bunin participated. In particular, it focuses on the question of Russian national identity, responses to the February and October Revolutions, and the role of nostalgia in Russian émigré culture in Russia Abroad. The use of Bunin’s life to explore these themes also demonstrates the ways in which many of these issues carried over from the imperial era to the Soviet era in Russian émigré communities. A microhistorical study of his life thus provides a template for examining these themes within the larger scope of Russian history during this period.

Committee:

Stephen Norris (Advisor); Robert Thurston (Committee Member); Benjamin Sutcliffe (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biographies; History; Russian History

Keywords:

Ivan Alexseevich Bunin; Russian History; Russian Literature; Russian &201;migr&233;s

Barksdale, E. C.Gon?carov and the pastoral novel in nineteenth century Russian literature /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1971, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

Pastoral literature;Russian literature

Sundaram, SusmitaLand of thought: India as ideal and image in Konstantin Bal'mont's Oeuvre
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
Russian writers have grappled with the notion of Russian identity between East and West and have mostly looked to Europe for answers since Peter the Great’s reforms. The discussion of Russia’s identity and historically ordained mission in the world came into sharp focus with the Slavophile-Westernizer debate in the first half of the nineteenth century, the resonance from which have informed Russian cultural philosophy since. Dostoevsky’s “Pushkin speech” in 1881 introduced the notion of Pushkin as a “Universal Poet” who could transcend national boundaries as a result of his universal cultural receptivity and yet could at the same time remain quintessentially Russian. The Russian Silver Age (1890’s-1910) witnessed a revival of the debate over Russia’s mission in a crisis-ridden fin-de-siècle Europe and Russia. Russian Symbolist writers looked to other cultures – in particular classical antiquity, and renaissance Italy – for cultural models that would provide an insight into solving the crisis of positivism and naturalism. The symbolist poet Konstantin Bal’mont – who was a much feted poet in the first decade of his oeuvre and perhaps unjustly ignored later – differed from his contemporaries in his quest for solutions both in sheer breadth of cultures studied and in his unusual choice of an ideal. This dissertation revisits Bal’mont’s oeuvre in order to examine his cultural philosophy – hitherto largely unexamined by critics – and discussed the poet’s choice of India as a cultural partner in the synthesis of Russian elemental spirit and Indian wisdom that he envisioned for the future. While Bal’mont studied a wide variety of cultures – Mayas and Aztecs, ancient Egypt, Japan and Scandinavia among others, India remains the Land of Thought an ideal country that is universal and all-encompassing, where wise men possess the secret of Universal pantheism, a secret that resonates with Bal’mont’ innate poetic pantheism. In his role as cultural philosopher Bal’mont also locates in Kalidasa, the ancient Indian playwright, the ideal solution to the crisis in European theater brought on by the prevailing aesthetic of naturalism. Finally, Bal’mont sees himself as Pushkin’s heir: the Universal poet, who would expand the cultural horizons of Russia far beyond his illustrious predecessor did.

Committee:

Irene Masing-Delic (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, Slavic and East European

Keywords:

Russian Literature - India; Konstantin Bal'mont - India; Russian Silver Age - India

Osborne, David LyleRussian physiological sketches and the "natural school" : man and environment in the 1840's /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

Russian literature;Realism in literature;Naturalism in literature

Ormiston, GregoryThe Prison Worlds of Dostoevskii, Tolstoi, and Chekhov
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
It may be unsurprising that in nineteenth-century Russia, under a politically sensitive tsarist regime notorious for sending some of the country’s most famous writers into exile, prison became a conspicuous topic in literature. In the second half of the century, the works of three of Russia’s best realist authors - Fedor Dostoevskii, Lev Tolstoi, and Anton Chekhov – prominently featured prison, and even prisoners as heroes. Nevertheless, critical treatment of these prison-related works tends to isolate them to the context of each individual writer. This dissertation explores the carceral connections between these authors to see how prison, as a common theme, played a larger role in the development of nineteenth-century Russian literature than has previously been recognized. My study focuses especially on how prison influences the creation of the three authors’ literary worlds. Specifically, through close reading and analysis of selected texts, I show how the realists use the time and space of prison to produce the themes and forms of their fiction. Thus prison becomes foundational in the works of Dostoevskii and Chekhov, and revelatory in Tolstoi’s late period. Theoretical support for this analysis comes mainly from Mikhail Bakhtin, whose notion of the “chronotope” aids in the investigation of prison-like settings, and Michel Foucault, who tracks the changing nature of prison and its increasing effect on society leading into the era of the Russian realists. The works of Dostoevskii, Tolstoi, and Chekhov have common origins in the modern penal system Foucault describes, which shifts its focus from the crime to the criminal, and from the body to the soul. The Russian realists, I conclude, engaged with prison in a way that not only drove their own thematic and formal innovations, but also provided a framework for subsequent generations of Russian “prison writers.”

Committee:

Alexander Burry (Advisor); Angela Brintlinger (Committee Member); Helena Goscilo (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

Russian literature, Dostoevskii, Tolstoi, Chekhov, prison, Resurrection, Sakhalin, Brothers Karamazov

Shank, Ashley C.Composers as Storytellers: The Inextricable Link Between Literature and Music in 19th Century Russia
Master of Music, University of Akron, 2010, Music-History and Literature

As an avid listener of Russian music I often noticed the tendency of Russian composers to produce music that tells a story, often a specifically Russian story. This proclivity is evident not only in vocal works such as solo songs or opera, but in the story choice for ballets and programmatic instrumental works.

I sought to understand why Russians were so attracted to storytelling. As Richard Taruskin says in the introduction to his article, “Some Thoughts on the History and Historiography of Russian Music:” “We are simply curious to know and understand the music we love as well as we possibly can, and eager to stimulate interest in it.” Historically, Russia (and later the Soviet Union) has been dominated by totalitarian regimes and the flow of information into and out of the country has often been strictly controlled. The setting apart of Russian music (and the Russian arts as a whole) has helped create its mystique. But, in the opinion of musicologist Richard Taruskin, it has also marginalized the music. The music of Russian composers has become defined by how well it fulfills a stereotypical set of stylistic traits. As Taruskin says: “Verdi and Wagner are heroic individuals. Russians are a group.”

Russian music has thus been held apart and—to borrow Taruskin’s term—“consigned to the ghetto.” But in actuality the Russian intelligentsia, (of which authors and composers were members), were highly cosmopolitan and saw themselves as part of the European community. Many of the trends we associate with Russian music were not the result of some unique and original expression but rather were important trends across Europe during the nineteenth century. Nationalism, program music, and the interest in orientalism/exoticism, all had their origins in Western Europe. Russians then took these models and made them personal and national forms of expression.

In this paper I argue that the inclination to produce music that tells a story can be attributed to the close development of the Russian literary and musical traditions during the nineteenth century as the small educated class (specifically in St. Petersburg and later Moscow) sought to create arts that were not only equivalent in quality to those produced in Western Europe but reflective of their personal aesthetics, expressive of their growing feelings of nationalism, and acceptable to their totalitarian state.

Committee:

Brooks Toliver, Dr. (Advisor); George Pope, Mr. (Committee Member); William Guegold, Dr. (Committee Member); Dudley Turner (Committee Member); George Newkome (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Performing Arts; Russian History

Keywords:

Russia; Russian Music; Russian Literature; Russian Poetry; 19th Century Russia; Music;