Search Results (1 - 25 of 148 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Hayes, William FellowsRetention of 8th Grade Band Students During the Transition to High School
Master of Education, University of Toledo, 2004, Music Education
For band directors, the retention of students during the transition from junior high school to high school is a very important issue. At a time when high school graduation requirements are rising and elective credits are decreasing, directors must be focused on the reasons students decide to remain in band. For these reasons, a survey of band directors has been completed that attempts to gauge what they perceive as the most important factors in student retention. While all of the questions in the survey were important with regards to retention, the most important aspects dealt with the parental, musical and social aspects of band. The survey also seems to indicate, from the directors' point of view, that students have a wide variety of needs. Directors who can adapt their teaching philosophy to meet student needs will be the most likely to retain students during the transition to high school.

Committee:

Timothy Brakel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

music; music education; education; band; retention; band retention; music retention; band attrition; music attrition; attrition

Beck, Whitney MarieDescribing time spent using various teaching techniques and student immediate, short-term, and long-term cognitive retention
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2009, Agricultural and Extension Education

The purpose of the study was to describe teacher time spent using various teaching techniques and student cognitive retention of content during a secondary animal science unit of instruction. This observational case study was descriptive in nature.

One high school teacher was video-taped while teaching an Agricultural Science I class of 12 freshman students. The teacher taught 18 one-hour lessons that compiled an animal science unit of instruction. Eight instruments were used to describe the time that the teacher spent using teaching techniques and the immediate, short-term, and long-term cognitive retention of the students.

Results of the study showed that student notebooks and information sheets were the most widely used individualized teaching techniques. Lecture and discussion were the most often used group teaching techniques. Other teaching techniques were used occasionally.

Student immediate, short-term, and long-term cognitive retention of the animal science subject matter taught during the unit of instruction was measured. Student immediate cognitive retention was measured by multiplying the score of the final unit exam taken immediately after the unit of instruction was taught by the cognitive weighted score of the final unit exam. The mean student immediate cognitive retention score was 75%.

Student short-term cognitive retention was measured by multiplying the score of the final unit exam taken 42 days after the unit of instruction was taught by the cognitive weighted score of the final unit exam. The mean student short-term cognitive retention score was 78%. The mean difference between the test taken immediately after the unit and the test taken 42 days after the unit was 3%.

Student long-term cognitive retention was measured by multiplying the score of the final unit exam taken 182 days after the unit of instruction was taught by the cognitive weighted score of the final unit exam. The mean student long-term cognitive retention score was 74%. The mean difference between the test taken 42 days after the unit and the test taken 182 days after the unit was -4%. The mean difference between the test taken immediately after the unit and the test taken 182 days after the unit was -0.8%.

Committee:

M. Susie Whittington (Advisor); Scott Scheer (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agricultural Education; Agriculture; Education; Secondary Education

Keywords:

cognitive retention; student cognitive retention; cognition; student retention; teaching techniques; high school teaching

Lindstrom, Mathias E.V.Generation Of A Novel TiO 2 - Composite – A Feasibility Study
Master of Science, Miami University, 2002, Paper Science and Engineering
The objective of this work was to explore the feasibility of generating a fiber-latex-TiO 2 -composite material that could be used as an additive in the papermachine wet end. By initially binding a cationic latex and subsequently anionic TiO 2 to the fiber surface and then curing the latex, it was envisioned that the pigment would be strongly retained in a latex film on the fiber surface. This novel additive could be utilized in papermaking operations achieving high TiO 2 retention and substantial cost-savings. Dispersion turbidity and microscopy were used to monitor experiments. Data were generated on the interaction between fiber and cationic latex, and a fiber-latex intermediate and TiO 2 . Retention levels of TiO 2 in the range of the target value were achieved, and stability tests proved the material resistant to normal pH and shear stresses. However, the cured composite proved difficult to redisperse and a different approach for curing must be explored.

Committee:

William Scott (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Materials Science

Keywords:

paper making; titanium dioxide; TiO 2 ; latex; cationic latex; composite; retention; retention aid; additive; opacity; turbidity; Britt Jar; fiber surface

Meador, Douglas P.Modeling Training Effects on Task Performance Using a Human Performance Taxonomy
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Wright State University, 2008, Engineering PhD
There is little argument that modern military systems are very complex, both in terms of the resources in time and money to develop them and the infrastructure that is required to produce trained operators. To properly execute human systems integration during the acquisition process, systems built to train operators must be developed that optimize training. Consequently, the training system community would benefit from simulation models that provide the ability to make accurate predictions of training processes, and allow the decision maker to specify an optimum combination of operator performance after training and the cost of that training. The goal of this research is the construction of a model of human learning using time to complete a task as a performance measure. While past research has explored the nature of functions to characterize human learning, this study will examine processes used to build a model that considers task performance as a function of training methods used to instruct a task, the nature of the task being taught, and the ability of the human to retain skill over a specified period of nonuse. An empirical study was performed to collect data from individuals completing tasks typically performed by sensor operators assigned to military unmanned aircraft systems. The tasks performed covered a range of activities that require varying combinations of human perceptual, cognitive and motor skills. The data were fitted to a set of models that were used to predict the performance outcome of a task similar in type to those used to build the model. Results are reported and recommendations for future research are offered.

Committee:

Raymond Hill, PhD (Committee Chair); Misty Blue, PhD (Committee Member); Gerald Chubb, PhD (Committee Member); Frank Ciarallo, PhD (Committee Member); Christopher Hale, PhD (Committee Member); Yan Liu, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Engineering

Keywords:

Human performance modeling; learning curve; performance prediction; human performance channels; modeling and simulation; skill acquisition; skill retention; skill reacquisition; training strategy; retention interval; military training; IMPRINT Pro

Kosiba, JudithWhen does retention have the greatest positive impact on a student's academic success?
Master of Arts, Wittenberg University, 2008, Education
The goal of this study is to understand and develop information for retention and social promotion which will provide insight for administrators, teachers, and parents in determining how and when students can achieve academic success, and if they are to be retained or socially promoted. Information was collected on achievement in academic areas while looking at other areas such as: discipline, attendance, intervention, age, and transient moves. The study examines these areas to determine whether they factors success or failure of a retained or placed student. Examining school records, it was determined that a student retained in early elementary school was the main predictor of significant academic success.

Committee:

Stefan Broidy, PhD (Committee Chair); Josephine Wilson, PhD (Committee Member); Barbara S. Arnold (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Evaluation; Elementary Education; Secondary Education

Keywords:

grade repetition; grade retention; retention (school); academic achievement; academic success

Cortner, Laquetta K.THE PERCEPTIONS OF INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MULTICULTURAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM ADVOCATES OF DIFFERENCES IN RETENTION INITIATIVES AND SUPPORT BY GRADUATION RATE
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2007, Higher Education (Education)

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of institutional members of the National Association of Multicultural Engineering Program Advocates of differences in retention initiatives and support by graduation rate. Specifically, this study examined the perceived effectiveness of retention initiatives, the impact of attrition issues and the effectiveness of retention resources to support the retention of multicultural engineering students. Completed in the winter 2007, this study was distributed electronically to institutional NAMEPA members and resulted in a 28% response rate. The survey instrument was developed by the researcher and consisted of five-point Likert scale items that examined the effectiveness of retention initiatives and attrition issues. Open response questions examined retention rates, unit goals, successful retention practices, practices not occurring at respondent institutions and factors impacting graduation rates. Information was also collected on time spent on retention initiatives, financial resources to support multicultural engineering student retention and personnel resources to support multicultural engineering student retention. Data was analyzed using Independent Samples T Test to test for statistical significance of retention initiatives and attrition issues by graduation rate group. Chi Square analysis was used to test for relational significance of time spent on retention initiatives, financial resources and personnel support by graduation rate group. This examination of institutional perspectives on retention initiatives did not find significant differences of these variables by the graduation rate groups established for this study. Data collected on successful practices, practices not occurring at the institutions, unit goals for retaining multicultural engineering students and graduation rate factors did support the retention initiatives and attrition issues evaluated in this study. Further studies can be done to collect student perspectives on these issues and to further examine each of the retention initiatives and attrition issues evaluated in this study.

Committee:

Valerie Conley (Advisor)

Keywords:

Multicultural Engineering Students; Retention of Multicultural Students; Retention of Engineering Students

Rygg, Matthew JThe Experiences of High-Achieving, Undergraduate Students Who Departed from Bowling Green State University in the First Year: A Case Study
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this case study was to understand the organizational, psychological, sociological, and financial experiences of high-achieving students who departed within their first year of study from Bowling Green State University. Although the literature suggests high-achieving students have special educational needs that must be recognized, supported, and nurtured in primary and secondary education, little is known about the experiences of high-achieving students in college. The goal of this qualitative research study was to gain a deeper understanding and explanation of student behavior within this student-institution context. Participants in this study were selected from the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 cohorts, based upon the following criterion: the student intended to graduate from BGSU, departed with the dean's list designation, was enrolled in at least 12 credits, lived on campus at least one semester, and was 18 years or older. Ten participants were interviewed at their new college or university or via Skype, and represented a variety of experiences personally and academically. Four broad themes emerged from the data: (1) High-achieving students did not establish a sense of belonging psychosocially in the residence halls, which negatively affected social integration; (2) participants, almost unanimously, felt "underchallenged" or "bored" by the curriculum in the general education courses; (3) participants needed more guidance to navigate course of study and career ambiguity; (4) participants demonstrated a deeper desire for intellectually stimulating conversations and meaningful engagement in the classroom and in campus life experiences. A number of implications for student and academic affairs are presented as a result of the findings. First, campus administrators must work with student and academic affairs to create a campus culture that nurtures a sense of belonging for high-achieving students. Second, an emphasis on faculty development to promote more active learning environments, more challenging curriculum, and the continual emphasis on learning communities and student-faculty relationships is recommended. Third, an emphasis on the first-year experience that creates clearer pathways for undecided students in terms of course of study and career is also recommended.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson (Advisor); Earley Mark (Other); Coomes Michael (Committee Member); Lunceford Christina (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

college student retention; student retention; high-achieving students; student success; first-year students; departure; attrition; completion; persistence

Oliver, Winona L.The Influence of Principals on Teacher Retention: An Examination of the Relationship Between Principal Behavior and Teacher Retention
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Education : Urban Educational Leadership
This qualitative study investigated the connection between the behaviors of principals and teacher job satisfaction and motivation, and how this connection results in increased teacher retention. Particularly, the researcher looked at what strategies principals use to motivate and encourage teachers to remain at a school. The researcher also examined teachers’ primary reasons for staying at a particular school. Two urban high schools were the sites for this study. The researcher conducted both focus groups and interviews. Individual interviews were held with two principals; one principal had two years of experience and the other had seven years of experience. In addition, the researcher conducted individual interviews with three teachers from each school. One focus group at each school, each composed of three to four participants, also yielded data. The research showed that college education programs do not adequately prepare teachers to work with students and face the various challenges that often accompany them. Teachers need support in order to succeed as educators. The data revealed that the principal sets the tone and is the driving force of a school, thereby having a huge impact on the school environment. Though teachers were more likely to stay at schools where they felt a connection to their students, this study found that the principal is instrumental in teacher retention. The researcher found that though teachers believe they directly have control of many aspects of the school reality, the principal continues to orchestrate and facilitate school operations in an indirect, inclusive manner. The effective, invisible principal creates an environment where teachers are empowered and moved to the forefront, while the principal navigates from the background. The ability of the teacher to focus on teaching and learning is directly correlated with the principal’s ability to maintain a safe and orderly environment, complete with the supports and recognition teacher need. These supports satisfy teachers’ intrinsic needs, in turn resulting in increased job satisfaction and then increased teacher retention. The behaviors of the principal as they relate to teacher support, interest in the staff, and the principal’s ability to motivate the staff all affect teachers’ desire to stay.

Committee:

Lanthan Camblin, PhD (Committee Chair); Roger Collins, PhD (Committee Member); Terry Joyner, EdD (Committee Member); Steve Sunderland, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; School Administration

Keywords:

principal behavior; principal; teacher retention; teacher behavior; teacher motivation; school administration; effective principal; urban teachers; urban principals; successful urban principals; teacher retention in urban schools; urban schools

Chenot, DavidORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND RETENTION IN PUBLIC CHILD WELFARE SERVICES ORGANIZATIONS
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2007, Social Welfare
Organizational Culture and Retention in Public Child Welfare Services Organizations Abstract By DAVID CHENOT Workforce turnover is a significant problem in Public Child Welfare Services Agencies (PCWS) with estimated rates higher than 20% nationally and retention directly addresses this problem. The research represented in this dissertation focused on the organizational dynamics that affect retention in PCWS organizations following previous research on organizational dynamics and retention. A cross-sectional survey research design was employed with a convenience sample of 767-PCWS employees recruited from 11-agencies in Central California. Multilevel modeling was utilized to investigate relationships between organizational or group level constructs and retention in PCWS agencies and in the field of Child Welfare Services (CWS) as individual level outcome variables. Organizational culture was the primary focus of the study but service quality and organizational climate were included as group level constructs as well. Four individual level variables collectively termed “work attitudes” were also included in several analyses. Findings from the study revealed that hypotheses concerning the effects of organizational culture and service quality on retention were not supported. However, three of the work attitudes variables did have significant relationships with the outcome variables on the individual level. Job satisfaction, organizational commitment and commitment to the field of CWS all predicted organizational retention. Job satisfaction and commitment to the field predicted retention in the field of CWS. The relationships between job satisfaction and both retention outcome variables were moderated by organizational climate. Two specific types of organizational climate, stress and engagement, moderated relationships between job satisfaction and both criterion variables. When stress was high the relationships between job satisfaction and both types of retention were weaker. When stress was relatively low the relationships between job satisfaction and both types of retention were stronger. The relationships between commitment to the field and retention in the field of CWS were moderated in a similar manner by both the stress and engagement types of organizational climate. The implications of the study findings for policy and practice, such as the need to streamline roles and provide role clarity in Public Child Welfare Services organizations are offered.

Committee:

Victor Groza (Advisor)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

PCWS; CULTURE AND RETENTION; PCWS Culture; Intent to Stay; PCWS Culture and Retention; ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

Miller, Karen CA National Study on Student Satisfaction with and Importance of College Environment Variables as Predictors of Spring-to-Spring Retention
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2014, Higher Education
As accountability for America’s community colleges is at the forefront of conversation nationwide, it is now more important than ever that leaders in higher education determine the right combination of interactions and practices that matter most in engaging, retaining, and graduating community college students. The purpose of this research was to utilize the results of the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory for Community and Technical Colleges from 22 community colleges across the country to determine if student satisfaction with and importance of college environment variables are predictors of spring-to-spring retention. As research indicates a connection between student satisfaction and retention, this study seeks to fill the gap in the literature also connecting importance with satisfaction. Using Vincent Tinto’s Theory of Student Departure as the framework, and Alexander Astin’s I-E-O model as a data analysis framework, this study seeks to determine the connection between levels of satisfaction and importance on the variables and spring-to-spring retention. The results of this study will fuel discussion around future interventions and policy implications to promote retention and success for community college students across the country.

Committee:

Ronald Opp (Committee Chair); Debra Harmening (Committee Member); Sunday Griffith (Committee Member); Jennifer Spielvogel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Education; Higher Education

Keywords:

community college retention; student satisfaction; retention; student engagement

Pringle, Eboni JThe Unintended and Unexpected Outcomes of a Major Selection Policy
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a major selection policy, demographic background, and previous academic performance are related to retention and academic performance of degree-seeking students enrolled in non-degree programs. A comparative study design was used to explore whether implementation of a major selection policy impacts academic outcomes as measured by earned credit hours, college cumulative GPA, and retention. The study examined the differences in academic outcomes and retention of students who enrolled pre-policy and those who enrolled post-policy. The study included 3,468 students enrolled in non-degree programs. Based on the results of this study, major selection policies alone are not sufficient in assisting students in obtaining a college degree. A major selection policy may help students identify what is expected and the parameters associated with the community does not itself provide the support necessary to move students from non-degree programs to graduation. Based on the results of this study, the policy alone has unintended and unexpected outcomes that in the long-term may have negative consequences for the students and the institution. Requiring students to select a major by way of a policy may be analogous to a doctor treating the symptom rather than the medical cause. The cause of students not selecting a major may be indicative of larger developmental issues and/or inability to see the connection between completing a degree and reaping any desired benefits.

Committee:

Stephen Thomas (Committee Chair); Mark Kretovics (Committee Member); Melody Tankersley (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

retention; academic performance; undecided students; policy

Morton, DeborahThe Relationship Between Authentic Leadership and Employee Retention: Measuring the Perceived Level of Authentic Leadership and the Effect on Employee Retention
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2012, Educational Leadership
Authentic Leadership is an emerging leadership approach that is still in the formative stages of development. There has been noteworthy research on strategies to develop or enhance authentic leadership behaviors (Northhouse 2010) that can lead to high employee retention, however there has been only a small amount of research examining the relationship between authentic leadership and employee retention. This descriptive study examined the perceived level of authentic leadership on the four scales of the Authentic Leadership Questionnaire by retained and non-retained employees in one organization to determine if there is a relationship between authentic leadership and employee retention.

Committee:

Scott Graham, PhD (Committee Chair); Mindy McNutt, PhD (Committee Member); Glenn Graham, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Management

Keywords:

Authentic Leadership; Authentic Leader; Employee Retention; Transparency; Moral Ethical; Balanced; Self-Awareness; Mind Garden; ALQ; Authentic Leadership Survey

Jing, YanThe Influence of Chemical and Mechanical Flocculation on Paper Formation as Assessed by the Grammage Probability Distribution
Master of Science, Miami University, 2009, Paper Science and Engineering
This investigation was designed to test the influence of the mechanical and chemical variables of papermaking to the resulting paper formation based on statistical and transmission radiography methods. Results were analyzed by using the formation number and grammage probability distribution. Increasing the degree of refining caused fiber fibrillation and shortened fiber length without changing diameter or coarseness. This made the distribution of fibers in the suspension and resulting handsheets more uniform as described by the crowding factor. The excessive concentration of C-PAM retention aids and the addition of A-PAM formation aids can all benefit the uniformity of the paper as determined by the STFI formation number which was attributed to the electrostatic repulsion of the fibers. On the other hand, an acidic environment or the C-PAM dosage below 0.5% deteriorate paper formation due to van de Waals forces and charge neutralization. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the grammage distribution was explained as the sum of different normal distributions with different mean values. The larger standard deviation of the original histogram and the shift of the mean between the original distribution and the first residual frequency histogram can intensify the extent of asymmetry which results in a larger skewness of the grammage probability distribution.

Committee:

Steven Keller, D. (Advisor); Douglas Coffin, W. (Committee Member); Shashi Lalvani (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Chemical Engineering

Keywords:

GRAMMAGE; FLOCCULATION; fiber; handsheets; PAPER FORMATION; C-PAM; retention aids

White, Jeffry L.Persistence of interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics: an analysis of persisting and non-persisting students
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Educational Policy and Leadership
While there has been an increase in enrollment, interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been declining on college campuses since 1967. Higher enrollment does not transfer to an increase in the number of minorities in the STEM fields. The majority-minority enrollment ratio is nearly 2:1 but the gap widens to 4:1 when it comes to graduation. In fact, underrepresented minorities (URM) earned only 12% of the STEM degrees awarded in 1998. When the higher attrition and lower graduation rates of URM are scrutinized, upwards of 60% changed majors or dropped out of STEM. Further investigation reveals the most frequently cited reasons for departure were loss of initial interest, developed a greater interest in another field, or were turned off by the STEM disciplines. A primarily exploratory study was conducted into the conditions necessary for academic interest in the STEM fields to persist. A model based on student engagement (Astin, 1977) and interest operations (Prenzel, 1988a) theories was used with a random sample of URM at universities participating in the Ohio Science and Engineering Alliance. Survey research was employed to investigate interest development and the effect of student retention programs and activities on such interest. The latter part of the study could not be fully examined when 95% reported not utilizing retention services. For the section on interest, an online survey using a 5-point Likert scale was validated using principal components analysis. A binominal logistic regression was used to predict membership in one of two possible groups: persisters and students at-risk for not persisting. The major conclusions are: 1.While 3 variables (feelings, learning and difficulty) were statistically significant only one, feelings was substantively significant. 2.Persistence increased 80.9% for each 1-unit increase in feelings and 9.9% for learning. 3.Persistence decreased 19.8% for each one-unit increase in difficulty. 4.The sample was not a very good fit with the parameter estimates. 5.The model fit the data at an acceptable level with an overall accuracy of 74.3%. 6.Using the model 72% fewer classification errors were made. 7.Multiple measures of association indicated a small-moderate effect size.

Committee:

James Altschuld (Advisor)

Keywords:

STEM; minority retention

Reynolds-Adkins, Martha E.Relationship Between Student Retention and Client Presenting Concern
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2008, Counselor Education (Education)
This study examined the relationship between seeking counseling and re-enrollment. In addition, the relationship between client presenting concern and re-enrollment was analyzed. The participants were 395 first-time, full-time undergraduate, primarily residential students, at a large, public research university in the mid-western United States. Chi-squared analysis were utilized to determine relationship. Results suggest there is a significant relationship between seeking counseling and retention as well as significance in the client presenting concerns of Legal Concerns, International Students, Anxiety and Thought Disturbance, and Body Image and Retention for those students who sought counseling.

Committee:

Thomas E. Davis, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

first-time full-time; retention; client presenting concerns; university counseling center

Hovart, Amy LoraREMEDIATION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND METAL RETENTION BY NATURALLY OCCURRING ACID WETLANDS IN PIERCE RUN WATERSHED, RACCOON CREEK, OHIO
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2006, Environmental Studies (Arts and Sciences)

Pierce Run, a sub-watershed of the Middle Basin of Raccoon Creek in Vinton County, Ohio, is one of the highest contributors of acid mine drainage (AMD) to the Raccoon Creek watershed. The 12.8-square-mile watershed contains several naturally-occurring acid wetlands. Monthly water samples and discharge measurements were taken for one year at ten sites and analyzed for AMD components. These wetlands remove 10-64% and 56-74% of acidity and metal loadings to Pierce Run respectively. Retention of metals in the wetlands amounts to 31 tons/year and 1.10 tons/year of iron and aluminum respectively. Based on the water quality, discharge, treatment area, and a literature search on active and passive treatments, passive treatment systems are recommended, namely a combination of steel-slag leach beds, aerobic wetlands, and open-limestone channels. The high metal retention has implications for long term management of these wetlands.

Committee:

Mary Stoertz (Advisor)

Keywords:

acid mine drainage; wetlands; metals retention; Raccoon Creek Watershed; remediation

Donnelly, PatrickExamining Pre-College Academic Variables: Investigating Future College Success
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Education : Curriculum and Instruction

This study looked at the success rate of first-year students in a new program for conditionally admitted students. Logistic regression was used to determine the impact of several pre-college variables, such as high school grade point average and ACT scores, and orientation generated variables, specifically placement test results, on the dependent variable of student success. Student success was achieved when a student was subsequently enrolled for the first term of his or her second year of college. As part of the findings, each independent variable is interpreted based on whether or not it was determined to be impactful.

The study concludes with a discussion of the broader implications of the research. First, the research is discussed in terms of how it fits within the existing research on student success and how it might add to that research base. Next, the research is used to inform future researchers of similar studies how to approach and design their research so that it provides them with even more meaningful results. Finally, the practical applications of the research are discussed in the form of recommendations to student affairs professionals and others concerned with student success. These recommendations are a list of specific actions practitioners can implement to improve the retention of their first-year students, especially those students who have been conditionally admitted and are taking developmental education courses.

Committee:

Kenneth Martin, PhD (Committee Chair); Suzanne Ehrlich-Martin, EdD (Committee Member); Nancy Hamant, EdD (Committee Member); Chester Laine, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

student success;retention;academic advising;developmental education;post-secondary education;college admissions

Kallmeyer, Robert J.How Social Interactions Impact the Effectiveness of Learning Communities
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Education : Educational Studies
The purpose of this study was to examine how social interactions influenced the effects of Learning Communities (LCs) on college students' academic success. Previous research has shown that LC students are more socially integrated and perform better academically than non-LC students (Stassen, 2003). An ANCOVA and logistic regression on 946 first-year students found no group differences in GPA and that LC enrollment was not predictive of retention. The analyses controlled for demographic and entering academic characteristics. Results of analyzing interview transcripts revealed that students from both groups report the influence of social interactions on academic success in remarkably similar ways. Most interestingly, non-LC students often create social and study groups similar to LCs. Implications of the results and direction for future research are discussed.

Committee:

Lanthan Camblin, PhD (Committee Chair); Wei Pan, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Collins Roger, PhD (Committee Member); Hall Wayne, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology

Keywords:

learning community;social interaction; social integration; academic success; GPA; retention

Whetsel-Ribeau, PaulaRetention of Faculty of Color as it Relates to Their Perceptions of the Academic Climate at Four-Year Predominantly White Public Universities in Ohio
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationships between demographic characteristics, academic climate perceptions, and retention plans of 103 tenured and tenure-track faculty of color at 11 four-year predominantly White public universities in Ohio. The 59-item Faculty Retention Questionnaire was administered online and assessed perceptions of the academic climate defined by six variables (job satisfaction, social climate, faculty-student relationships, role conflict, role clarity, and retention). Demographic characteristics were also measured (e.g., racial/ethnic background, gender, age, sexual orientation, country of origin, institution type, academic discipline, marital status, with/without children, and tenure status). Likert-type scales, multiple choice, and open-ended questions measured employment values and intent to stay in current position. Of the 725 surveys distributed, 103 were submitted, yielding an overall response rate of 14%. Critical Race Theory (CRT) framed this study. Correlational results indicated that job satisfaction was significantly related to and highly important to the retention variable. Analysis of variance revealed that U. S. born faculty of color are more likely to be retained than non-U. S. born. Forward multiple regression analysis identified job satisfaction as the sole predictor of retention with job satisfaction only accounting for 23% of variance in retention. Further regression analysis identified social climate, role clarity, and role conflict as factors that best predict job satisfaction. Conclusions from the study raised larger questions regarding job satisfaction: (1) Does job satisfaction mean something different to faculty of color than it does to mainstream faculty? (2) Do faculty of color perceive job satisfaction as part of their social/cultural experience? (3) Is job satisfaction a part of the dual reality that is inherent in people of color through the identification of being a member of an underrepresented group or by having minority status in America? Responses to these larger questions may be best understood through the recognition and understanding of Critical Race Theory. Findings suggest the importance of providing opportunities for the sharing of subjective cultural worldviews of faculty of color with mainstream faculty with the intent of creating greater understanding, cooperation, and positive relationships, thus serve as a retention strategy. This may provide the opportunity to build an academic climate that supports all faculty. The researcher offers other explanations and suggestions regarding the findings from this study that may be valuable in faculty of color retention.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta (Advisor)

Keywords:

Critical Race Theory; faculty of color; retention; correlational; multiple regression; diversity; academic climate; higher education; job satisfaction; role conflict; role clarity; role ambiguity; social climate; faculty-student relationships

Kitheka, Bernard M.INVENTORY OF STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN THE CITY OF OXFORD, OHIO
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2010, Environmental Sciences
This report is an inventory of types of stormwater management practices, both the poor and the best, in the City of Oxford. A structure or practice is regarded as a “poor stormwater management practice” if it increases peak flow, decreases base flow, increases or does not eliminate pollution, exacerbates erosion and degrades aquatic habitats. These practices include connected impervious surfaces, poorly designed or poorly managed stormwater infrastructure, uncollected trash and pet waste. A structures and practices is regarded as a stormwater “best management practice” if it reduces peak flow, increases baseflow, eliminates or does not contribute to stormwater pollution and does not degrade streams and aquatic habitats. Such practices include pervious pavers, filter strips, storm drains, rain gardens, disconnected impervious surfaces, street sweeping, vegetated depressions and retention gardens. This study does not attempt to uncover issues of policy regarding stormwater management in the city. Some recommendations on how the City of Oxford could encourage stormwater best management practices are given in the end. A glossary of key stormwater terms is also provided.

Committee:

Mark R. Boardman, PhD (Advisor); David L. Prytherch, PhD (Committee Member); Donna S. McCullom, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Hydrology

Keywords:

Impervious cover; baseflow; peakflow; GIS; NPDES; watershed; biofilter, retention pond, vegetated swale; pervious paver; infiltration; point-source pollution

Albright, Mary BethHere Today, Gone Tomorrow: An Investigation Into Why Older Youth Leave the 4-H Program
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, Agricultural and Extension Education

For years, 4-H has struggled with the complex problems of membership retention, especially among older youth. However, little research has been done concerning why 4-H members choose to leave the program. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the retention of older 4-H youth. Specifically, the study sought to investigate the reasons older youth choose not to re-enroll in the Erie County 4-H program. Specific objectives of the study were to: (a) explore the reasons why youth chose not to re-enroll in the Erie County 4-H Youth Development program, (b) identify the barriers to participation in the 4-H program for Erie County youth, and (c) determine what conditions would facilitate participation in the Erie County 4-H program.

To address the research questions, a qualitative study was designed to explore factors related to youth discontinuing their involvement with the Erie County 4-H program. Sixteen youth participated in one of three focus groups held to gather data to answer the research questions. Focus group participants consisted of Erie County youth who were ages 11 to 17 during the 2007 4-H program year who were enrolled in 4-H in an Erie County community 4-H club in 2007, but who did not re-enroll in a community 4-H club in 2008.

Significant findings from the study concerning the retention of older 4-H youth related to: (a) experiences with advisors, (b) experiences with competition, and (c) conflicts with other activities. The findings of the study clearly revealed that the relationship between a club advisor and a member had an influence on a youth’s satisfaction with their club, and their satisfaction with the 4-H program as a whole, and hence their decision not to re-enroll. Negative judging experiences was also established as a theme across research questions. While some participants described positive experiences with competition, many youth described perceived favoritism during judging, unclear expectations for judgings, problems with organization during judging, and poor sportsmanship exhibited during competition. Finally, several participants said that 4-H was time consuming and interfered with other activities in which they were involved, which influenced their decision not to re-enroll.

Committee:

Jamie Cano, PhD (Committee Chair); Theresa Ferrari, PhD (Committee Member); Scott Scheer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

4-H; retention; youth development

Lambdin, Matthew W.The Relationship of Sophomore Student Debt on Retention in a Private University
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this study is to better understand what impacts a student continuing their degree at a four-year, private university beyond the second year. Furthermore, understanding if certain student characteristics are reliable in predicting which students are more likely to persist beyond the second year of education. For this study there were 878 students from Ohio public schools who as first-time freshmen enrolled at a four-year, private university in Ohio during the 2009-2011 academic years. The data were gathered from Midwest Private University’s (a pseudonym) financial aid and institutional research offices and included 15 variables relating to the demographic, enrollment, and academic characteristics of the included students. Two research questions were utilized in this study. Binomial logistic regression was used to determine if the variables were more likely to predict student persistence. The results indicate that five variables have a positive correlation with those persisting beyond the sophomore year of college: higher high school and college GPA’s, completing more college credits during the first two years of college, being a varsity athlete, and being a university “legacy”. The results also indicated that student loan debt, race, gender, geographic location of the high school, or the high school ranking did not impact the persistence of the student. Understanding how to better retain students is important for everyone involved in the education process. Helping student’s complete their degrees is an educationally, professionally, and financially imperative topic for University’s, communities, industry, government, and most of all-the student. The results of the study indicate that more research is needed nationally, but also at individual universities to better understand the specific variables that are unique to each institution.

Committee:

Paul Johnson, Dr. (Committee Chair); William Ingle, Dr. (Committee Member); Lawrence Lesick, Dr. (Committee Member); Richard Anderson, Dr. (Other)

Subjects:

Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Retention; Enrollment; Admissions; Persistence; Second Year; Third Year; Student Debt; Private University

Breuler, Lindsay MildredDeveloping Ohio 4-H Horse Project Quality Indicators through the Analysis of Enrollment Data and Volunteer Leader Discourse: A Mixed Model Approach
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2015, Agricultural and Extension Education
The purpose of this study was to develop 4-H horse project quality indicators that would act as a tool for advising 4-H youth and guide 4-H professionals as well as volunteers. Leaders worldwide realize that planning, implementation, and evaluation are essential steps for a solid value-based foundation within any organization. Currently, the Ohio 4-H horse program lacks a clear set of implementation and evaluation guidelines for 4-H horse projects. 4-H horse projects are structured according to a standard format for all 4-H projects but not uniquely for their content. Therefore, youth implement and complete 4-H horse projects in the manner that they or their advisor best see fit. This lack of clear structure and guidelines creates a wide range of possible experiences and learning across the scope of these projects. As such, the development of quality indicators for Ohio 4-H horse projects will ensure the maintenance of youth satisfaction and an advisor ability to serve. Information obtained through the in-depth evaluation of 2003-2013 Ohio 4-H horse projects and youth enrollment data will yield a better understanding of current trends and future expectations. The analysis of enrollment data will inform both the Ohio 4-H horse program as well as the Ohio 4-H program of the current issues and strengths within the organization. Based on the identified issues within the enrollment data and an extensive literature review, quality indicators for 4-H horse projects were developed. Internal stakeholders, identified as volunteer 4-H horse advisors, were used to validate the relevancy of the individual quality indicators. The quality indicators were validated through a web-based survey of Ohio 4-H horse advisors utilizing the Qualtrics survey software suite. Advisors were asked to review the quality indicators and establish the relevancy of each indicator via a 4-point Likert-type scale. Advisors were also asked to rank the order of importance for each indicator within the six separate categories. To further validate the results, a focus group of the Ohio 4-H Horse Committee was used to validate quantitative data and dive deeper into the phenomenon of quality indicator development and application. From an evaluation of the survey results and qualitative input, the quality indicators were revised and put into rank order. The 4-H horse project quality indicators provide a concrete method for evaluating the overall experience of a youth’s participation in any 4-H horse project and provide a framework to guide their experience. These indicators will ensure the continuous improvement and preservation of youth satisfaction and the 5 C's of youth development within the Ohio 4-H horse program. By improving the overall quality of the youth experience within 4-H horse projects, it will help to increase retention of youth for multiple years. Also, the continuous maintenance and improvement of the 4-H horse experience will lead to improved outcomes. Based upon results and findings, programmatic recommendations to advance the Ohio 4-H program, the Ohio 4-H horse program and 4-H horse projects were also suggested.

Committee:

Gary Straquadine (Advisor); Graham Cochran (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

4-H; horse projects; youth enrollment; youth retention; quality indicators; quality; mixed methods; program quality

Stewart, Michael JohnA study of first-year students within The Ohio State University and the factors influencing nonparticipation in band programs at the collegiate level
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Music
The purpose of this study was to identify factors among first-year students influencing nonparticipation in collegiate band programs at The Ohio State University. This study arose from four primary concerns: 1) a need for a study focusing on the retention of non-music major band members from high school to college; 2) a need for a review and update of previous studies focusing on retention of band students from high school to college; 3) a need for a study of this nature to focus specifically on an individual large university; and 4) a need to provide data intended to improve recruiting techniques for large college band programs. Distribution and collection of a survey questionnaire was accomplished through two methods: 1) direct distribution of the questionnaire in selected classes and 2) electronic mail distribution with information provided from the SAT/ACT Interest Inventory. The total sample population for the study was 280 (n = 280) first-year students. Descriptive statistics were developed in the examination and presentation of the data. Results from the survey indicated the variable most influential to nonparticipation in bands at The Ohio State University was the perceived time commitment thought to be inherent from participation in a college band program. Of equal importance was the fact that 83.6% of respondents had made the decision not to participate in bands at The Ohio State University prior to enrollment into the university. Data suggest a first-year student’s decision not to participate in bands was influenced by factors such as: a) time conflict with other courses; b) an overall declining interest in band; c) concerns about academic course load; d) musical proficiency; e) fear of auditioning; f) lack of information about the college band program; and g) negative high school band experiences. Data provided did not find a relationship between nonparticipation and: a) reputation of the college band conductor, and b) advice from college academic advisors, high school counselors, parents, and high school band director(s). College band directors should continue to increase communication with high school band directors and potential students, focusing specifically on benefits to non-music majors, audition requirements and time commitments.

Committee:

Jon Woods (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music

Keywords:

nonparticipation; participation; band; college band; instrumental music; recruiting; retention; The Ohio State University; first-year; freshmen; college band

Lake, William A. (Tony)MEMBERSHIP AND THE FIRST YEAR OF COLLEGE: A COMPARISON OF THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS OF SOCIAL SORORITY AND FRATERNITY MEMBERS WHO JOINED DURING THEIR FIRST YEAR OF COLLEGE AND STUDENTS WHO NEVER JOINED
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2005, Higher Education Administration
The possible effects of involvement in social fraternities and sororities on college students have been debated for nearly as long as these organizations have existed. Both anecdote and conjecture have been common in the printed debate, but little has been done in recent years to study the academic outcomes of the students who have chosen to become involved. After controlling for pre-college academic achievement, this study investigated whether or not there were differences in the career academic outcomes of students who joined a social Greek organization during their first year and students who chose not to affiliate during their entire college career. Data related to nine years worth of incoming cohorts were gathered from institutional records at Bowling Green State University. These records included institutionally predicted grade-point averages, term and cumulative grade-point averages, yearly retention information, term credit hours earned, graduation rates, and time to degree were analyzed. Stratified random samples of non-Greeks were compared to the sample of Greeks described above from each of these nine cohorts yielding several significant and important findings. The results of this study are important for two reasons. The analysis of findings demonstrates that becoming a member of a Greek social organization does not have a deleterious impact on first-year grade point averages, cumulative grade point averages and term credit hours earned. Furthermore, there is a significant benefit in terms of retention and graduation rates for both men and women members compared to non-members. The implications of these findings are synthesized in the final chapter for the improvement of both policies and practices of Greek life at institutions similar to BGSU.

Committee:

Robert DeBard (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Higher

Keywords:

Fraternities; Sororities; Academic Acheivement; Grade-Point Averages; Retention; Graduation

Next Page