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Jones, Gregory RThey Fought the War Together: Southeastern Ohio's Soldiers and Their Families During the Civil War
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History
Soldiers from southeastern Ohio and their families fought the Civil War (1861-1865) in a reciprocal relationship, sustaining one another throughout the course of the conflict. The soldiers needed support from their families at home. The families, likewise, relied upon the constant contact via letters for assurance that the soldiers were surviving and doing well in the ranks. This dissertation qualitatively examines the correspondence between soldiers and their families in southeastern Ohio, developing six major themes of analysis including early war patriotism, war at the front, war at home, political unrest at home, common religion, and the shared cost of the war. The source base for the project included over one thousand letters and over two hundred and fifty newspaper articles, all of which contribute to a sense of the mood of southeastern Ohioans as they struggled to fight the war together. The conclusions of the dissertation show that soldiers and their families developed a cooperative relationship throughout the war. This dissertation helps to provide a corrective to the overly romantic perspective on the Civil War that it was fought between divided families. Rather, Civil War soldiers and their families fought the war in shared suffering and in support of one another.

Committee:

Leonne Hudson (Advisor); Bradley Keefer (Committee Member); John Jameson (Committee Member); David Purcell (Committee Member); Willie Harrell (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; History; Military History

Keywords:

Civil War; Ohio; Southeastern Ohio; soldiers; Civil War soldiers; Union soldiers; civilians; northern civilians; northern home front; John Hunt Morgan; Morgans Raid; Athens Ohio; Marietta Ohio; Chillicothe, Ohio; Ohio Volunteer Infantry;

Moore, Kevin LLighting Up the Darkness: Electrification in Ohio, 1879-1945
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2013, History
This thesis argues that electrification in Ohio, which spread from cities to the countryside, required a strong impetus from the Federal Government to reach its ultimate fulfillment. The author attempts to address a lacuna in the scholarship of electrification by providing an original work on the history of electrification in Ohio. This thesis makes use of a “case study” approach to examine the topic in a three-stage analytical framework: urban electrification in Cleveland to address the changes in public perception regarding power and the resulting municipal reform; the transition of Toledo's interurban railways from primarily traction companies to electrical power companies to illustrate the expansion of electrical access beyond the municipality making the issue a state concern; and restriction of Ohio’s utility holding companies and the electrification of Miami and Shelby Counties by the Rural Electrification Administration to examine how firm federal policies succeeded where state and local intervention could not. The case is made here using a synthesis of existing literature on electrification and archival research. The present work concludes that the earliest attempts to expand electrification were made by private enterprise, but private efforts were most successful in cities where higher population densities guaranteed higher profits. Government actions on the part of municipal and state institutions tried to further electrification beyond the areas serviced by private utilities, but they lacked the resources and authority of the federal government.

Committee:

Walter E. Grunden, PhD (Advisor); Rebecca Mancuso, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Energy; History; Modern History; Science History; Technology

Keywords:

Ohio electrification; U.S. electrification; rural electrification in Ohio; Rural Electrification Administration; Ohio interurbans; Tom L. Johnson; US power policy; Ohio Progressive Era; interurbans; Ohio utilities; rural electric cooperatives; modern Ohio

Ampomah, ShadrackThe Influence of Land Use on Sediment Quality in the Mill Creek Watershed
Master of Science in Environmental Science, Youngstown State University, 2018, Department of Geological & Environmental Sciences
The aquatic ecosystem of Mill Creek Watershed (MCW) is currently susceptible to pollution from nutrients and heavy metals due to the various human activities within the watershed. Sediment quality parameters such as trace metals, organic matter (OM%), pH, total phosphorus (TP) and particle sizes were measured at 13 sampling points along Mill Creek. The overall objective of the research was to determine the immediate land use around each of the 13 sampling sites and how that impacts the sediment quality. Each of these sampling points were used as watershed outlets to delineate 13 distinctive drainage areas, with their individual land uses. The results showed most of the parameters measured were within acceptable values. TP values within the southern watershed were higher than all other sites (MacDonalds et.al, 2005). These observations were explained by the land use of the delineated drainage areas around each of these sites. Site 9 had about 30% of its drainage area covered by agricultural land row crops, site 10 had 20% and site 8 had 14%. Agricultural runoffs may have played a role in the TP concentration. A more direct impact may be the location of the Boardman Waste Water Treatment Plant at site 8, the semi buffered cattle ranch located by the creek at site 9 and the crop farm located at site 10. Geospatial statistical maps created showed the northern portions especially site 2A and 4 as well as some middle areas of the watershed which include mostly site 8, 9 and 10, to have higher levels of most of the trace metals compared to the sediment reference values. The calculated correlations among percentages of land use, trace metals, TP, pH & OM%, showed Ba to be statistically significant to agricultural land use. TP was also positively correlated with agricultural land use but not statistically significant. pH was significantly correlated residential areas. The other trace metals were not statistically significant with any land use which may be because of the dominant sandy particle sizes and flow dynamics of the river. The predominant residential land use and CSOs locations were perhaps the contributing sources. Ongoing studies would benefit from analyzing samples in both dry and wet seasons, and after precipitation events. Researchers may have to Incorporate sediment texture properties when sampling. Researchers may also combine Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) with sediment geochemistry to model trace metals and TP loadings if Mill Creek watershed establishes a gauge station on its main-stem.These will augment the understanding of the relationship between human activities, sediment and water quality and the importance to ecological health.

Committee:

Colleen McLean, PhD (Advisor); Felicia Armstrong, PhD (Committee Member); Peter Kimosop, PhD (Committee Member); Richard Ciatola, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Environmental Science; Geographic Information Science; Land Use Planning; Soil Sciences; Water Resource Management

Keywords:

Mill Creek Watershed, Youngstown, Ohio; Sediment quality in Mill Creek Watershed; Youngstown, Ohio, Land use impact on Mill Creek Watershed, Youngstown, Ohio; Water quality of Mill Creek Watershed, Youngstown, Ohio

Arbour, Thomas PaulINTERNSHIP WITH THE OHIO NATURAL HERITAGE PROGRAM
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2005, Environmental Sciences
My internship with the Ohio Natural Heritage Program assisted with the transition of the Ohio Natural Heritage Database from a paper to electronic geographic information system. I was hired to convert all data in Ohio’s coastal region to digital information. In addition, I created GIS layers of wetlands and conservation lands. I also developed an ecological monitoring project at Irwin Prairie State Nature Preserve, located in northwestern Ohio.

Committee:

Avram Primack (Advisor)

Keywords:

GIS; Endangered Species; Ohio; Lake Erie; Ohio Natural Heritage Program; Ohio Department of Natural Resources; Ohio Division of Natural Areas and Preserves

Daugherty, R. LouisThe role of the principal in professional negotiations as perceived by selected Ohio public school elementary and secondary principals.
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Collective bargaining--Teachers--OHIO;Elementary school principals--OHIO;High school principals--Ohio

Almothaffar, MohammadEvaluation of Safety Effectiveness of Median Cable Barriers Installed on Freeways in Ohio
Master of Science (M.S.), University of Dayton, 2018, Civil Engineering
The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) began installing median cable barriers in 2003 along highway medians for all roadways that were narrower than 59 ft. The central goal of this work was to prevent cross-median crashes (CMCs) that raised a concern due to their frequencies and severe injuries they caused when they occurred. Cross-median crashes occur when a vehicle leaves its travel way, enters or crosses the dividing median, and collides with vehicles moving in the opposite direction. This study received data from 41 locations totaling about 201 miles of installed median cable barriers in the years 2009-2014. These locations experienced 2,498 median related crashes before and after installation. The study involved a review of police reports to identify target crashes and the manner in which the vehicles hit or crossed the cable barriers, either by penetrating the cables, over-riding, under-riding, stopped, or redirected. A detailed analysis of cable hits was also conducted. The study found that median cable barriers were effective in stopping vehicles from breaching the barrier; 95.4 percent of all cable median barrier crashes had no penetration of the cable barrier, i.e., the vehicles where stopped or bounced by the cables. This thesis study summarizes some key findings of safety effectiveness evaluation of the median cable barriers in Ohio. The findings of overall statewide crash reduction after the median cable barriers compared to before period are based on the safety effectiveness percentages computed by Empirical Bayes (EB) before-after study method using the Highway Safety Manual’s (HSM) procedures. Safety effectiveness of Ohio’s statewide cable barriers was found to be 73.9 percent for total crashes, 80.4 percent for fatal and injury (FI) crashes combined and 80.1 percent for fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury (KAB) crashes combined. Therefore, the estimated crash modification factors (CMFs) for median cable barriers installed in Ohio’s Interstate system for total, FI, and KAB crashes are 0.261, 0.196, and 0.199, respectively. Overall, the evaluation results show that the median cable barriers installed in Ohio’s Interstate system are effective in reducing cross-median severe injury crashes, which was the main objective of ODOT’s installing median barriers in their Interstate highway system.

Committee:

Deogratias Eustace (Advisor); Peter Hovey (Committee Member); Gary Shoup (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Civil Engineering

Keywords:

Median Cable Barriers; Cable Barriers; Median Cable Barriers in Ohio; Safety Effectiveness of Median Cable Barriers in Ohio; Median Barriers in Ohio; Median Barriers

Wells, Dominic DavidCoalitions are People: Policy Narratives and the Defeat of Ohio Senate Bill 5
Master of Public Administration (MPA), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Public Administration
Historically, states in the Midwest have enacted policies favorable to organized labor. This has changed in recent years with several Midwest states passing severe restrictions on the collective bargaining rights of workers. This research focuses on one case where collective bargaining restrictions were overturned in the state of Ohio through direct democracy. Coalitions and policy narratives were identified through the scope of the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) and Narrative Policy Framework (NPF) in an attempt to fully understand the repeal of Ohio Senate Bill 5, a law that restricted collective bargaining for public employees. Analysis shows that the coalition in favor of repeal, We Are Ohio, formed a broader coalition and a more general, more effective, narrative than the coalition in favor of the collective bargaining restrictions, Building a Better Ohio. We Are Ohio argued that Senate Bill 5 was an overreach by greedy politicians that would hurt the middle class. Building a Better Ohio argued that Senate Bill 5 was a necessary measure that would help balance state and local budgets. This research demonstrates a useful application of the ACF and NPF to direct democracy in hopes that future research will be done using these frameworks on direct democracy. Furthermore, this research demonstrates how successfully expanding the conflict in direct democracy results in a larger coalition that is needed to win the policy narrative.

Committee:

Andrew Kear (Advisor); David Jackson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Political Science; Public Policy

Keywords:

Advocacy Coalition Framework; Narrative Policy Analysis; Ohio Senate Bill 5; SB5; We Are Ohio; Building a Better Ohio; Policy Narratives; Coalitions

Rockenbach, Stephen I.“War Upon Our Border”: War and Society in Two Ohio River Valley Communities, 1861-1865
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Arts and Sciences : History
During the American Civil War, guerrilla raids, military operations, economic hardships, political turmoil, and racial tensions upset the status quo of communities situated along the Ohio River border. This dissertation compares the wartime experiences of two border towns – Frankfort, Kentucky and Corydon, Indiana. These communities shared a legacy of white settlement and a distinct western identity, which fostered unity and emphasized cooperation during the first year of the war. However, the exigencies of war and the eventual demise of slavery in Kentucky divided citizens living on either side of the river border, including the people of Corydon and Frankfort. The Ohio River border was a cohesive economic and social unit at the beginning of the war, even though the river served as the legal boundary for slavery. Prominent Unionist citizens in both Corydon and Frankfort galvanized political support by strengthening connections with like-minded citizens throughout the river valley. The majority of white Unionists in the two towns believed that they could maintain peace by negating the radical notions of abolition and secession. Although white citizens in both places agreed on the importance of white supremacy to maintaining the stability of their respective communities, the Union government’s evolving policy on slavery, which culminated in the Emancipation Proclamation, ultimately strained the relationship between Unionists in southern Indiana and Kentucky. By the end of the war, Corydon’s residents had suffered devastation from raids and guerrilla violence, all emanating from Kentucky. Frankfort was engulfed in anti-government sentiment, guerrilla violence, and local resistance to the inevitable end of slavery in the state. The demise of slavery in Kentucky challenged white supremacy, while in southern Indiana most citizens welcomed the end of slavery if it meant an end to the war. Emancipation, violence, and material loss forged separate wartime experiences for the people of Corydon and Frankfort, causing them to, over the course of the war, come to view the Ohio River as a boundary between two societies, one northern and one southern.

Committee:

Dr. Christopher Phillips (Advisor)

Subjects:

History, United States

Keywords:

history; war; civil war; American Civil War; border; Ohio River Valley; Ohio Valley; Ohio River; Indiana; Kentucky; Corydon; Frankfort; community; slavery; White supremacy

Coil, William Russell“New Deal Republican”: James Allen Rhodes and the transformation of the Republican Party, 1933-1983
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, History
Ohio governor James Allen Rhodes (1909-2001) lived both an authentic American success story and an embellished populist myth. The son of a coal miner, Rhodes survived the insecurity that characterized the lives of early twentieth-century working-class Americans, matured after an extended adolescent aimlessness, and became Ohio's most powerful governor. He also exaggerated key parts of his biography and omitted other events in order to authenticate his credentials as a champion of the common man. From this odd mix of fact and fiction emerges a story of an important but overlooked politician. This dissertation is the first full length investigation into Rhodes’ life and political career, placing him in a larger context of regional political change, the rise of the consumer culture, and the working-class origins of populist economic security. Before Rhodes, Midwestern Republicans opposed the New Deal and saw nothing more than slavery in Democratic President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s promise to deliver economic security to American voters. As Ohio’s longest serving governor (1963-1971 and 1975-1983), as a child of the insecure working class, and as a young politician maturing in the 1930s, Rhodes made security the central part of his Republican philosophy. That concern led him to challenge Midwestern Republican orthodoxy, pioneer Republican Party efforts to capture the working-class vote, and attempt to radically alter the Rustbelt economy of the Midwest.

Committee:

Warren Van Tine (Advisor)

Subjects:

History, United States

Keywords:

James Allen Rhodes (1909-2001); Ohio; governors of Ohio; Ohio politics; working-class Republicans; Midwest; Rustbelt; technology policy; Ray C. Bliss (1907-1981)

Papke, Mark KennethDeveloping Consolidation Characteristics of Ohio Soils Using GIS
Master of Science (M.S.), University of Dayton, 2011, Civil Engineering
Geographical information systems (GIS) can be useful in gathering information for soil properties especially at the preliminary design phases of projects. However, the usefulness and accuracy of the GIS analysis depend on the database that it relies on. The database becomes usually more populated around metropolitan areas or major cities, simply because of the increased need for infrastructure to serve larger population in and around these cities. A total of 255 consolidation test data collected from numerous transportation projects in the State of Ohio were analyzed, corrected for sample disturbance using Schmertmann’s correction, and entered into a GIS database for analysis. The analyses indicate that reasonably accurate compression index (Cc) values can be obtained both in metropolitan areas and statewide. This thesis presents the database, the uses of GIS with spreadsheets to analyze the data, and several compression index correlations developed for Ohio soils.

Committee:

Omer Bilgin, PhD, PE (Advisor)

Subjects:

Civil Engineering; Engineering; Geographic Information Science; Geological; Geology; Geotechnology; Information Technology; Sedimentary Geology; Soil Sciences; Transportation; Transportation Planning

Keywords:

Cc; Cr; Ohio Compression Index Correlations; Consolidation; Oedometer; Compression Index of Ohio Soils; GIS; Schmertmann; Pacheco Silva; Ohio Clays; Compression Index; Settlement;

Daberkow, Kevin S.Financing Ohio’s Public Schools through the Ohio Lottery: Quantitative and Qualitative Dimensions of the Lottery’s Tax Incidence
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2012, (Education)
For nearly four decades the Ohio lottery has offered its products with the promise of providing a financial benefit to Ohio’s public schools. The purpose of this study was to examine the tax incidence of the Ohio lottery in addition to qualitative aspects of lottery play. Data were collected from Ohio lottery sales and U.S. Census data both aggregated by zip code. Analysis of tax incidence was conducted through Suits Index analysis with confidence intervals in addition to double-log regression analysis creating elasticity coefficients. Qualitative data were collected through interviews. Five qualitative interviews provided data that were analyzed from an adapted grounded theory perspective. Suits Index analysis suggested that the Ohio lottery has been a regressive form of school finance for all of the years covered in this study (1992-2010). The least regressive games were lottery products that offered larger payouts with lower odds of winning. The most regressive games offered significantly smaller jackpots with higher odds of winning. Double-log regression revealed that lottery sales were supported disproportionately by less affluent consumers. Zip codes with higher median ages were found to drive increased lottery sales for all three types of lottery games. Non-African American minorities in Ohio (zip code analysis) were also shown to drive increased Lotto game sales. Increased percentages of males in a zip code resulted in increased Instant game sales. A higher level of education in a zip code reflected increases in lottery product’s sales. Findings of regressivity were confirmed in lottery scholarship; however, demographic representation of lottery play offered mixed results. Qualitative findings of this study revealed avoidance by lottery players to outside interference in their lottery play. Respondents also suggested a strong ability to control the lottery process when they were able to select numbers or tickets based on socially constructed or situationally applicable rules and values. Finally, respondents shared that they have some sense that lottery profits are directed to schools, despite voicing a strong anti-lottery and anti-large school district sentiment. When viewed in the context of sociological theory of stratification, the findings suggested that the lottery acts as a regressive tax on Ohio’s lottery consumers while education fails to receive a financial benefit due to fungibility described in existing literature. The primary research suggestion was to extend benefit incidence research. Policy recommendations that connect lottery regressivity to Ohio’s schools included a commitment to finance Pre-K and Kindergarten initiatives, class size reduction strategies for Ohio’s poorest schools, and a higher education lottery scholarship funded through lottery profits for graduates from Ohio’s poorest high schools.

Committee:

Frans Doppen, PhD (Committee Chair); Edward Morris, PhD (Committee Member); Gordon Brooks, PhD (Committee Member); Yegan Pillay, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Economics; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Sociology; School Finance; Sociology

Keywords:

Ohio lottery; Suits Index; double-log regression; Ohio school finance; tax incidence; lottery scholarship; class-size reduction; Ohio school funding; pre-k funding; full-day kindergarten; lottery tax; sociology of education; stratification

Kahn, Miriam B.Werner and His Empire: The Rise and Fall of a Gilded Age Printer
PHD, Kent State University, 2011, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History

Paul E. Werner, newspaper publisher, printer, industrialist, was as ruthless as other businessmen of Gilded Age Akron. His story and that of his company exemplifies the “Rags to Riches” American Dream. Lured by steady income from printing, Werner built his family business from a tiny concern in 1873 into a thriving multi-national company by 1894 by acquiring competitors and establishing offices in 20 cities across North America and Europe. Werner printed everything from newspapers and commercial stationary to books, magazines, art, and reference works, including the Encyclopedia Britannica (ninth edition). His once vast, multifaceted business collapsed in 1909 after Encyclopedia Britannica sued the company for copyright infringement, and disappeared by 1914.

This dissertation examines the printers of Akron in the nineteenth century, particularly Paul E. Werner, and their place in the history of Akron and demonstrates how Werner is typical of printers of the Gilded Age. Second, it compares Werner to contemporary printers of Cleveland, building upon Russell Duino’s 1981 dissertation and Walter Sutton’s work on Cincinnati Printers. Finally, it explores intellectual property rights and international copyright infringement as it pertains to Werner’s ultimate financial downfall.

In an era of micro-histories, this study contributes to Akron’s business history by demonstrating the economic significance of printing, and providing another perspective for understanding how industry fosters urban growth and prosperity. Werner’s business incorporated, in direct competition with contemporary printers, new merchandising techniques that enticed readers to acquire his books. Secondly, a careful study of Werner’s business practices will provide insight into the financial realities of late nineteenth century printers and book publishers, and will contribute to our understanding of the book in Gilded Age America. Lastly, this dissertation will set today’s battles over intellectual property and copyright into an historical context by demonstrating how international copyright laws continue to affect printers and publishers in the twenty-first century as they did in the late nineteenth century.

Committee:

John Jameson (Committee Chair); Kevin Adams (Committee Member); Kevin Kern (Committee Member); Diane Scillia (Committee Member); Robert Trogdon (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Intellectual Property; Regional Studies

Keywords:

Werner Company, Akron, Ohio; Encyclopaedia Britannica; Printing, Akron, Ohio; Copyright; Labor Unions, Akron, Ohio

Poritsky, Marc ICleveland and Northeast Ohio's Overlooked Historical Contributions to Underground, Punk, and Alternative Music
Master of Music, University of Akron, 2014, Music-History and Literature
ABSTRACT Further elucidation of Northeast Ohios musical endeavors are necessary to expand upon the fact that its equally as vital as other metropolitan centers with fertile underground music scenes such as New York City and London from the mid-1960s through the mid-1970s. Although both of those cities contained many prototypical punks and artists, Cleveland and Northeast Ohio shared rare, sheltered yet sophisticated, artistically supported and substantially influential musical underpinnings. And although there really wasnt what one might call a scene as in a substantial supportive alternative music community, there were many notable and important personalities that emerged and continue to this day to be important countercultural figures. When speaking of the lack of proper elucidation of the Northeast Ohio scene, it is necessary to look to the fact that there are only a handful of well-written books on the Punk and counterculture movements that ever really gave Cleveland and Northeast Ohio its cultural due. Notably these books have come to light in the past 25 years or so: Please Kill Me by Legs McNeil, and From The Velvets To The Voidoids and Babylons Burning, both by Clinton Heylin. Only these three books and a handful of others can stand as a testament to what has been written about the early Cleveland and Northeast Ohio musical environment. Cleveland and Northeast Ohio have had written exposure in a variety of books, magazines and fanzines homemade printed copy booklets Xeroxed in limited runs by fans; however, an investigation of the facts and people who participated in the early scene is in need of being further illuminated. Fully researching the subject, examining many countless books, articles, websites, magazines and other ephemera, it is apparent that Cleveland and Northeast Ohio has been neglected when academically speaking about its historical music.

Committee:

Brooks Toliver, Dr. (Advisor); Michele Mills, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

History; Modern History; Music; Music Education; Performing Arts; Regional Studies

Keywords:

Cleveland,Ohio, Northeast Ohio, Punk, Alternative, Underground, Music, Akron, Kent, Ohio Kent State, d a levy, Albert Ayler, Velvet Underground,

Moore, CyrusThe Ohio National Guard before the Militia Act of 1903
MA, Kent State University, 2015, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History
In the period between the War of the Rebellion and the Militia Act of 1903 the Ohio National Guard struggled to become a capable, professional military force serving both the state of Ohio and federal government. The origins of the Ohio National Guard lay in the Ohio Volunteer Militia of the Civil War. During the war Ohio needed a defense force of its own, separate from but compatible with the army of the United States. After sending its militia into volunteer service, Ohio recreated an organized militia in 1863. When the war ended in 1865 the militia, renamed the Ohio National Guard, numbered nearly 40,000 men. After a period of virtual-inactivity, the Ohio militia reemerged as the Ohio National Guard in the 1870s. It grew and evolved before entering Federal service in 1898 as part of the mobilization in the Spanish-American War. This mobilization lead directly to reform not only for the ONG but the country’s entire militia institution. Historians have viewed the 1861-1898 era as one marked by growth of government authority. The relationship of the National Guard to the federal government changed in this era, with the former ceding control gradually to the latter. This thesis examines why that change took place and what implications it had on the ONG.

Committee:

Kevin Adams, Ph.D. (Advisor); Clarence Wunderlin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Richard Steigmann-Gall, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Ohio; Ohio National Guard; Ohio Militia; Militia Act of 1903

Kask, Kristen M.Training and development needs of school board members as perceived by school board members and superintendents in Ohio /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1990, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

School board members--Education--Ohio;School superintendents--Ohio--Attitudes;School board members--Training of--Ohio

McMahan, Kevin JosephColerain Township Zoning Amendment Case: ZA2006-04
MCP, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Community Planning
In late 2005, owners of Rumpke, Inc. decided to “expand” their Colerain Township landfill. This report analyzes the zone amendment process for Ohio townships. Case: ZA2006-04 is studied to determine how closely this process is followed. The “expansion” or siting of a landfill is a scenario which will continue to play-out in municipalities across America. For planners, understanding as much as possible about the zone change process necessary for development of a landfill, or other LULUs, enables us to approach these situations strategically. For everyday citizens, educating themselves on statutes which shape their world empowers them to live a more meaningful life, and helps them feel included in decisions their elected officials are making. Findings show there is not much room for deviation from O.R.C. requirements. An analysis of interviewees' opinions revealed a consensus that the NIMBY factor is to blame for why zone amendment decisions are challenged in court.

Committee:

Christopher Auffrey (Advisor)

Keywords:

Landfill; Zoning; Township; Ohio; Colerain Township; Hamilton County; NIMBY; LULU; Rumpke; Landfill Expansion; Landfill Siting; Ohio Township Zoning Amendment; Colerain Case: ZA2006-04; Ohio Revised Code; Garbage Disposal; Waste Disposal

Garnes, William ThomasSubsurface Facies Analysis of the Devonian Berea Sandstone in Southeastern Ohio
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Geology
James Evans, Advisor The Devonian Berea Sandstone is an internally complex, heterogeneous unit that appears prominently both in outcrop and subsurface in Ohio. While the unit is clearly deltaic in outcrops in northeastern Ohio, its depositional setting is more problematic in southeastern Ohio where it is only found in the subsurface. The goal of this project was to search for evidence of a barrier island/inlet channel depositional environment for the Berea Sandstone to assess whether the Berea Sandstone was deposited under conditions in southeastern Ohio unique from northeastern Ohio. This project involved looking at cores from 5 wells: 3426 (Athens Co.), 3425 (Meigs Co.), 3253 (Athens Co.), 3252 (Athens Co.), and 3251 (Athens Co.) In cores, the Berea Sandstone ranges from 2 to 10 m (8-32 ft) thick, with an average thickness of 6.3 m (20.7 ft). Core descriptions involved hand specimens, thin section descriptions, and core photography. In addition to these 5 wells, the gamma ray logs from 13 wells were used to interpret the architecture and lithologies of the Berea Sandstone in Athens Co. and Meigs Co. as well as surrounding Vinton, Washington, and Morgan counties. Analysis from this study shows evidence of deltaic lobe progradation, abandonment, and re-working. Evidence of interdistributary bays with shallow sub-tidal environments, as well as large sand bodies, is also present. A prominent sequence of climbing ripples = 6 cm give evidence for distributary mouth bars. Frequently appearing massive bedding, sparse bioturbation, and a sequence of massive bedding to planar lamination overlying convoluted bedding provides evidence that high sedimentation rates were common during the deposition of the Berea Sandstone. Turbulent debris flows are interpreted based on the presence of a 10 cm incomplete turbidite lithofacies assemblage. Tidal processes can be inferred from tidal rhythmite sequences approximately 5 m thick, and clear storm activity is apparent from the presence of a 16 cm tempestite lithofacies assemblage. Geophysical log analysis allowed for the interpretation of the subsurface architecture of the formation. Combined, these features provide strong evidence for the interpretation that, in southeastern Ohio, the Berea Sandstone was deposited in a tidally-influenced, deltaic environment.

Committee:

James Evans, Dr. (Advisor); Jeffrey Snyder, Dr. (Committee Member); Charles Onasch, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Geology; Sedimentary Geology

Keywords:

Berea Sandstone; Geology; Sedimentary Geology; Ohio; Southeastern Ohio; Facies; Subsurface Facies Analysis; Devonian Ohio; Sandstone

Hill, Robert FrederickAn historical analysis of policy decisions and the fiscal equity of school funding in Ohio: 1980—2003
Doctor of Education, Ashland University, 2008, College of Education
An ex-post facto approach was used to construct a history of Ohio school finance from 1980-2003 to show links between policy decisions and changes in the equity of the system. Through economic analysis, litigation analysis and review of literature, the effect of education funding policy changes in the state of Ohio between 1980 and 2003 were examined. The research began with determination of years of major policy changes and was followed by assembly of the database, including the Adjusted Current Expenditures (ACE) for school districts in the state of Ohio. Adjusted Current Expenditures (ACE) for each school district in each year was calculated using a formula similar to the formula used by Arbogast (2005). The measures of equity chosen were the Gini coefficient and the McLoone index. The Gini coefficient and the McLoone index values were analyzed to determine if the trends in those values changed between successive time periods of the four periods marked by FYs 1980-83, 1984-91, 1992-97, and 1998-2003. The analysis was conducted using multiple linear regression models. The findings suggest that the passage of the state income tax in 1983 increased equity levels, as measured by the McLoone index. In addition, in Period 3, the equity fund increased the equity trend, as measured by the Gini coefficient and, as measured by the McLoone index of per pupil spending for Ohio school districts.

Committee:

Carla Edlefson, PhD (Committee Chair); Larry Cook, PhD (Committee Member); John Fraas, PhD (Committee Member); David Lifer, PhD (Committee Member); Jim Van Keuren, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education History; School Finance

Keywords:

policy decisions; fiscal equity; Ohio; Ohio school funding; Ohio funding equity; school funding

Durgin, Rodney W.A model for managing career guidance programs in secondary schools of Ohio /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1974, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Vocational education--Ohio;Vocational guidance--Ohio

Wright, Christopher EricPALEOECOLOGICAL AND PALEOENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF THE MIDDLE DEVONIAN DUNDEE FORMATION AT WHITEHOUSE, LUCAS COUNTY, OHIO
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Geology
Middle Devonian faunas from the eastern United States have been well studied for over a century. Many analyses have been done on stratigraphic units of the Appalachian Basin (e.g., Columbus Limestone in Ohio and Onondaga Limestone in New York) and Michigan Basin (e.g., Silica Formation in Ohio). However, the early Middle Devonian Dundee Formation of the Michigan Basin has not been studied in detail. This thesis provides paleontological and lithological data in order to interpret the paleoecology and paleoenvironment for the Dundee Formation. In particular, a comparison of marine invertebrate community composition between the Dundee Formation carbonates and the slightly younger siliciclastic Silica Formation was performed, and the faunas in the different layers in the Dundee were compared to each other to see if ecological changes occurred through time. The Dundee Formation is well exposed at the Whitehouse Quarry in Lucas County, Ohio. Hand samples and thin sections tied to five measured sections from the quarry provide a context for interpreting both lithological and paleontological data. The Dundee Formation consists of two members, the (lower) Reed City Member, and the (upper) Rogers City Member. The Reed City Member shows a shallowing-upward trend through typical shallow subtidal carbonate wackestones and packstones, with storm deposits becoming more frequent towards the top of the exposed section. Much of the Dundee Formation appears to have been bioturbated, with Thalassinoides-type burrows most common, indicating firmground but not hardground substrates. The top of the section shows a pronounced change from wavy-bedded tempestites to fine-grained nodular deep-water limestones. These nodular limestones represent the first documented occurrence of the Rogers City Member of the Dundee Formation in Ohio. The Rogers City Member is overlain by harder, more massive, bluer beds with large colonial rugose and tabulate corals and stromatoporoids. This colonial coral assemblage resembles that from the Columbus Limestone exposed at Marblehead Quarry, Ottawa County, Ohio. Nineteen 40-cm x 40-cm rock slab samples were taken from eight stratigraphic horizons at the Whitehouse, Ohio, quarry. Fossil taxa found within a randomly placed 20-cm x 20-cm grid on the slab were identified and counted. Dominant taxa include brachiopods, tentaculitids, and rugose corals; fish bones, bivalves, and rostroconchs are common in some horizons. Five distinct faunal assemblages succeed each other upsection, three within the Reed City Member, one within the Rogers City Member, and one within the Blue Limestone. These communities have similar taxonomic compositions, but with varying abundances. For instance, Strophodonta demissa, Mucrospirifer mucronatus, and Pseudoatrypa cf. P. devoniana are least abundant in the deep-water environment of the Rogers City Member, while Rhipidomella vanuxemi drops in abundance through time. Tentaculites scalariformis and Tropidoleptus carinatus (both fairly small) seem to increase in abundance when there is less dolomite content. Overall, these trends show that when sea level was at its highest, during the deposition of the Rogers City Member, many of the common Dundee species were either not present or had lower than normal abundances. Dolomitization may have hindered the preservation of the smaller fossil organisms. The Silica Formation fauna was found to be much more diverse than that of the Dundee Formation (70 versus 129 genera). Of 70 genera known from the Dundee Formation, only 21 (30%) persist into the Silica Formation, and only 16 of 112 species (14%) are present in both units.

Committee:

Margaret Yacobucci (Advisor)

Keywords:

Dundee Formation; Paleoecology; Silica Formation; Rogers City Member; Reed City Member; Paleoenvironment; Middle Devonian; Northwest Ohio; Whitehouse Ohio

Brown, Jason K.Spatial Distribution of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) in Ohio Brush Creek Watershed, Southern Ohio
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2010, Geography (Arts and Sciences)
Between July and October 2005, 42 sites across Ohio Brush Creek watershed were surveyed to assess the spatial distribution of native freshwater mussels (Unionidae). Freshwater mussel shells were recorded at 28 out of 42 sites representing 14 native species. A total of thirteen species were recorded at 19 sites as living or fresh dead. Associations between the presence, diversity, and abundance of freshwater mussels and coarse-scale variables (drainage area, stream gradient, and percent land cover) and fine-scale variables (200 meter stream-reach habitat features based on Ohio EPA’s Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index (QHEI)) were explored using correlation and chi-square analysis. The presence, diversity, and abundance of mussel shells were associated with both coarse- and fine-scale variables. Drainage area and stream reaches with excellent channel development, high amounts of habitat cover, maximum water depths > 1 meter, and riffle depths > 5 cm were all associated with the presence, diversity, and abundance of mussels. Stream gradient was also associated with mussel shell presence and diversity, however was not associated with shell abundance due to the high abundance of fat mucket shells in upper reaches of the watershed. Sites with the highest diversity and abundance occurred along the mainstems of Ohio Brush Creek and the West Fork. Thirty-seven native mussel species have been recorded in the watershed. Unfortunately over 40% of these species are listed as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Sedimentation due to agricultural runoff and deforestation of riparian corridors has been identified as the primary threat to freshwater mussels in Ohio Brush Creek watershed. It is imperative to collect data that can be explored to find spatial and temporal patterns that exist amongst the mussel community in Ohio Brush Creek watershed. This data can also be used to help guide stream habitat restoration and native mussel re-establishment projects in the watershed.

Committee:

James Dyer, PhD (Committee Chair); Timothy Anderson, PhD (Committee Member); Gaurauv Sinha, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ecology; Geography

Keywords:

spatial distribution; freshwater mussels; ohio brush creek watershed; southern ohio; coarse-scale variables; fine-scale variables; Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index (QHEI); GIS land cover analysis

Defenbaugh, Angela LynnEvaluating Ohio River Basin Waters: A Water Quality and Water Resources Internship with the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2014, Environmental Sciences
The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) was organized in 1948 to direct the coordination and action of water quality improvement within the Ohio River Basin (ORB). Numerous monitoring programs were developed to implement this intent, with focus on conducting biological assessments, assessing chemical and physical attributes of waterways, setting wastewater discharge standards, and promoting volunteer monitoring programs. During a 2013 field season internship, environmental specialists monitored ORB water sources through biological, water quality, and water resource programs. Results from these programs indicate the entire Ohio River "partially supports" fish consumption use, two-thirds of the Ohio River is "impaired" for contact recreation use support, rivers and streams should be evaluated on a national scale, and ORB water resources may be at risk from climate change effects. Observed trends will supply policy makers with information to make wise decisions that effectively manage, restore, and protect waters within the ORB.

Committee:

Jonathan Levy, Ph.D. (Advisor); Thomas Crist, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Donna McCollum, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology; Chemistry; Environmental Science; Water Resource Management

Keywords:

ORSANCO; Ohio River; Ohio River Basin; biological monitoring; fish tissue; macroinvertebrates; water quality; bacteria sampling; water resources; climate change; Clean Water Act; National Aquatic Resource Survey; National Rivers and Streams Assessment

Shoemaker, Paul AlexanderCurrent issues in adult distributive education in Ohio /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Adult education--Ohio;Vocational education--Ohio

Kadunc, Donald AlbertComputer model of combustion and radiation processes in refuse derived fuel fired stoker boilers /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Engineering

Keywords:

Electric power-plants--Ohio--Columbus;Refuse as fuel--Ohio--Columbus

Antwi, Ebenezer YawA comparative study of perceptions of presidents of Evangelical church-related colleges and mainline Protestant church-related colleges about their work /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

College presidents--Ohio;Church colleges--Ohio

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