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Pollock, Asher WPhase Shift
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Ohio University, 2017, Studio Art
Phase Shift is the thesis of Asher Pollock, submitted for graduation from the Honors Tutorial College of Ohio University. It contains writing and paintings that collectively question concepts, genres, and methods of story-telling known well to many audiences.

Committee:

Laura Larson (Committee Chair); Jennie Klein (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Art Criticism; Art Education; Art History; Arts Management; Performing Arts; Personal Relationships; Personality; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Religious History; Rhetoric; Social Research; Spirituality; World History

Keywords:

queer, poseidon, neptune, phase, shift, water, story, stories, painting, paintings, art, artist, man, they, them, gay, men, myth, mythology, mythic, myths, gods, god, family, love, loneliness, despair, ice, independence, conceptual, contemporary, modern

Selan, Nicholas H.Survivability of Planetary Satellites During Uranus-Neptune Ejection
Master of Science, Miami University, 2008, Physics
Recent work has proposed that the ice giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, did not form where they are located today in the Solar System. Instead, they originated in the present region of the gas giants, Jupiter and Saturn, and then were later gravitationally scattered into highly eccentric orbits that took them out into the Kuiper belt. Interactions with the Kuiper belt objects would slowly circularize their orbits to their present semi-major axes and eccentricities. It is unclear if the ejection process has any effect on systems of planetary satellites that may have existed at this time. We investigate this possibility through a series of simulations that include satellite systems around both the gas giants and the ice giants. For initial conditions, we chose to duplicate those of Tsiganis et al. (2005) where the ejection is caused by a Jupiter/Saturn resonance crossing.

Committee:

Stephen Alexander, PhD (Advisor); S. Douglas Marcum, PhD (Committee Member); Paul DeVries, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Astrophysics

Keywords:

Uranus; Neptune; Moons; Satellites; Late stage formation

Hesselbrock, Andrew J.A PERTURBED MOON: SOLVING NEREID'S MOTION TO MATCH OBSERVED BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS
Master of Science, Miami University, 2012, Physics
Since its discovery in 1949, Nereid's photometric variations, orbit, and mass have been well established, however knowledge of its spin, orientation, and shape is lacking. We simulate Nereid's orbital and rotational motion, dependent on these unknown characteristics, in an attempt to match observations. We show how a time-dependent gravitational torque can cause the body to precess on a timespan as small as ~ 17 years, following a complicated coning nutation. Modeled as a uniformly reflecting body, we find that if the photometric variations are to be solely explained by geometry, Nereid cannot be either prolate or oblate. We have produced large amplitude, intra-night variations similar to those presented in Schaefer et al. (2008), but are unable to fully match their observations. Our study shows our strongest candidate to have an initial obliquity of 60 degrees, a spin rate of 144 hours, and semi-axial ratios of c/a ~ 0.5, b/a ~ 0.6.

Committee:

Stephen Alexander, PhD (Advisor); Michael Pechan, PhD (Committee Member); Paul Urayama, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Applied Mathematics; Astronomy; Astrophysics; Physics; Theoretical Physics

Keywords:

Nereid; Neptune; dynamical evolution; prolate moons; rotational stability; forced precession

Wu, TiandanAn Application of N-Body Simulation to the Rotational Motion of Solar System Bodies
Master of Science, Miami University, 2008, Physics
We made computational simulations of N-body rotational dynamics system to investigate either long term or short term behavior of specific objects in the solar system. The HITS method is used to do both the simultaneous orbital and rotational integrations. Simulated results showed that the large asteroids Ceres and Vesta are experiencing a stable long term periodic change of their obliquity. The obliquity of Ceres fluctuates between 0° ~22°, with an average period of ~23 Kyr. The obliquity of Vesta fluctuates by about 25°, with an average period of ~50 Kyr. The high eccentricity of Neptune's moon Nereid has an important effect on its rotational motion. Nereid's obliquity is clearly perturbed when Nereid is at peri-Neptune position.

Committee:

Stephen G. Alexander, PhD (Advisor); T. William Houk, PhD (Committee Member); James P. Clemens, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Astrophysics

Keywords:

Nereid; obliquity; Ceres; Neptune; Vesta; orbit