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Shoop, Jessica ASENIOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) LEADER CREDIBILITY: KNOWLEDGE SCALE, MEDIATING KNOWLEDGE MECHANISMS, AND EFFECTIVENESS
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2017, Management
This dissertation explains leader effectiveness in the context of the senior information technology (IT) leader who plays a pivotal role in the execution and delivery of corporate IT services. Considered leaders of leaders, senior IT leaders typically report to the Chief Information Officer (CIO). Using a sequential three-phase mixed methods study the thesis makes four contributions; (1) through qualitative inquiry shows that effective senior IT leaders maintain a balance of domain knowledge and emotional and social aptitudes; (2) develops and validates a four-dimensional scale to measure the level of IT leader domain knowledge; (3) demonstrates nomological and predictive validity of the scale and evaluates the impact of IT leader domain knowledge in solving managerial problems and brokering knowledge to others; (4) the studies combine to a build cohesive argument that leadership credibility wherein technical domain knowledge forms the other component is a critical antecedent for leadership effectiveness. The validation is founded on a sample of 104 senior IT leaders and 490 IT leader subordinates within a global IT service firm. Overall, our findings suggest that the so far neglected effect of IT domain knowledge forms not only an important but vital component influencing overall senior IT leader effectiveness. This has consequences for both established theories of leader credibility and leader effectiveness in highly specialized technical domains. Practically the study underscores the importance of hiring and maintaining senior IT leaders with strong technical credentials.

Committee:

Kalle Lyytinen, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jagip Singh, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Genevieve Bassellier, Ph.D. (Committee Member); John King, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Information Systems; Information Technology; Management

Keywords:

Senior IT Leaders; Leadership Effectiveness; Credibility; Domain Knowledge; Leader Knowledge; Knowledge Mechanisms; Scale Development; Multi-dimensional Scale Validity; Mixed Methods

Kaloga, Marissa Elaine PrinzThe Role of Social Capital in Cooperative Groups: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women’s Collective Savings Groups in Conakry, Guinea
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Social Work
Financial inclusion programs have seen remarkable growth throughout the last two decades, with continued annual growth of up to 15% predicted for micro-credit along in the Sub-Saharan African region over the next three years. However, as private investment funds begin to dominate microfinance funding streams, there is debate about the benefits of microcredit for the population most targeted with these funds: women in the Global South. One aspect of this debate concerns the need for social capital, resources embedded in social networks, for the success of microcredit lending. While its necessity is acknowledged, the way that social capital is created, structured, and employed in women’s groups is not adequately understood. By better understanding these aspects of social capital, microcredit programs can be better designed, and the ethical implications of expanding microfinance services can be better understood. Employing a mixed methodology of qualitative interviewing and social network analysis, this study explores the phenomenon of social capital across a diverse sample of 12 women’s collective financial groups, including both informal savings clubs and micro-credit groups located in the West African urban capital of Conakry, Guinea. A multi-dimensional model of social capital developed by the World Bank was modified for use with this research population and included six domains: Access to Resources, Trust, Communication, Cooperation, Social Cohesion, and Empowerment. In depth qualitative interviews with 84 members of collective finance groups were analyzed to answer the question: What are Guinean women’s experiences as members of collective financial groups? Upon developing an understanding of the groups, this study then asked: How is social capital structured in the groups, and how do the social capital networks of collective financial groups function? Sociometric network analysis examined a global measure of social capital as well as analysis of each of six domains in the multidimensional model. A third phase of analysis combined characteristic features of the social capital networks with the qualitative transcripts to answer the question: How do the experiences of participants at characteristic structural locations within a social capital network differ? Qualitative analysis yielded a typology of collaborative financial groups as well as a set of principles in groups that supported solidarity. Djamakourou, a Guinean concept related to the promotion of social relationships, emerged as foundational to participants’ ability to create and sustain the groups. Results of social network analyses show that social capital in Guinean women’s groups is built from the inside out, relying on strong relationships between a core set of group members. Characteristic positions and accompanying perspectives within social capital networks were produced from combined qualitative and social network analysis. These results provide a contextualized perspective of individual members, illustrating the heterogeneity of experiences within the groups. This study provides new insights into the way social capital is created and used in women’s collaborative financial groups, and can inform future microfinance interventions as well as address the ethical implications of expanding these services across Sub-Saharan Africa.

Committee:

Mo Yee Lee, PhD (Committee Chair); Sharvari Karandikar, PhD (Committee Member); Keith Warren, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Studies; Social Work; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Financial Inclusion; Africa; Guinea; ROSCA; Social Capital; Djamakourou; Social Network Analysis; Qualitative Interviewing; Mixed Methods; Microcredit; Microfinance; Women; Gender; Feminism; Social Development; Social Work

McPherson, Gary RynellFactors Affecting Student Retention At a Midsized Private University
Doctor of Education, Ashland University, 2016, College of Education
In this study, I identified institutional actions that reduce student attrition using a mixed-methods research design. The research question asked, “What multitheoretical retention levers can be identified to reduce student attrition at CVU?” A theoretical framework influenced by Braxton’s (2000) research on the complex problem of student departure guided the study. Quantitative data from a student satisfaction survey were used to develop and implement a qualitative protocol. A thematic analysis of phone interviews resulted in the generation of a number of institutional actions that are known to improve student retention. These included providing students with clear lines of communication about campus goals, values, policies, and procedures; communicating expectations related to academic policies and course requirements; and optimizing the advisor–student dynamic. The research findings demonstrated that multitheoretical retention levers can be identified using a mixed-methods design.

Committee:

Harold Wilson, PhD (Committee Chair); James Olive, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Linda Billman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

mixed methods; student attrition; student departure; student retention

Hayes, Susan M.A Mixed Methods Perspective: How Integral Leaders Can Contribute to the Growth of Emerging Leaders
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Given that organizational complexity continues to increase, leaders are looking for credible information, and a process that helps them become a better leader. Emerging leaders are faced with trying to be the best leader they can be while leading teams of people who think and act differently from them. To assist emerging leaders with their leadership, this study explores the literature and looks to highly respected and admired leaders for how they became the leader they are today. The purpose of this study was fourfold: first, to identify and describe first and second tier integral theory leaders from a sample of leader respondents from a U.S. Midwestern city; second, to describe how first and second tier integral theory leaders define leadership; third, to determine what second tier integral leaders see as leading to their becoming the leader they are today; and fourth, to identify the integral leader’s perspectives and advice that can be shared with emerging leaders. This study focused on the convergent space of three theories. The first theory is the field of adult development theory with transformational leadership, the constructive-developmental theories, and meaning making; the second is the field of integral theory with Wilber’s all quadrants, all levels (AQAL) theory, and first and second tier consciousness; and the last is the hero’s journey as described by Joseph Campbell, and the quest for truth. The (AQAL) framework was used in a mixed methods perspective to explore how people assessed as integral leaders defined leadership, developed into integral leaders, and how they can contribute to the growth of emerging leaders. This study was dual-phased: Phase 1 was a quantitative and qualitative survey completed by 624 leaders, and Phase 2 was a telephone interview with eight integral leaders. From the thematic analysis of all the data, four themes emerged: looking inward, looking outward, being a good leader and paying it forward by mentoring others. Implications for emerging leaders, leadership and change, and future research are discussed. This ETD is available in open access in OhioLink ETD, http://ohiolink.edu/Center and AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ron Cacioppe, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rica Viljoen, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

mixed methods; integral theory; hero journey; spiral dynamics; tier one development; tier two development; leader; leadership; adult development; emerging leaders

Knapke, Jacqueline M.Improving Physician Research Training at the University of Cincinnati: A Mixed Methods Phenomenological Evaluation
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Educational Studies
This study was a mixed methods interpretive phenomenology with qualitative emphasis that evaluated the Master of Science program in Clinical and Translational Research (MSCTR) at the University of Cincinnati. The purpose of the study was to allow students to articulate their expectations, needs, and experiences in the MSCTR and to develop novel training methods and/or curriculum modifications to improve physician-scholar training. The sequential study design included document review and a group level assessment in phase I, followed by interviews, participant journal entries, and a survey in phase II. Group level assessment data were analyzed using group level assessment analysis, document review, interview, and journal entry data were analyzed using a modified seven stage hermeneutic analysis, and survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings suggest five major areas for improvement: curriculum, mentorship/relationships, program structure and organization, instructional methods, and ancillary student perspectives on MSCTR experiences. Concluding recommendations from these five patterns include: update the overall curriculum, improve statistical training, invest in online courses to make them better and continue to develop new coursework for online learning, consider more creative ways of integrating both online and in-person work into the curriculum, and create a more structured mentorship program within the MSCTR program.

Committee:

Lisa Vaughn, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Melinda Butsch-Kovacic, Ph.D. M.P.H. (Committee Member); Farrah Jacquez, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

program evaluation;CTSA;mixed methods;qualitative methods;curriculum development;graduate medical education

Clark, Rachael S.Grit Within the Context of Career Success: A Mixed Methods Study
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Educational Studies
Grit has been shown to predict success in several domains such as West Point summer program completion, National Spelling Bee placement, and educational attainment (Duckworth, Peterson, Matthews, & Kelly, 2007), but had not yet been studied within the career context. Having a successful career can provide meaning, identity, and life satisfaction (Erdogan, Bauer, Truxillo, & Mansfield, 2012; Forest, Mageau, Sarrazin, & Morin, 2011; Kram, Wasserman, & Yip, 2012). This sequential explanatory mixed methods study examined whether grit predicted career success, and explored the role of grit in career success for gritty, successful working adults. Positive psychology (Seligman & Csiksentmihalyi, 2000) was used as a theoretical framework to guide the topic of study, selection of participants for the qualitative phase, and to create start-up codes in the qualitative analysis. Self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000) was used to frame the study of grit and social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) was used to frame the study of career success. Participants in the quantitative phase included 423 working adults. Quantitative data sources included scores on the Short Grit Scale (Grit-S) (Duckworth & Quinn, 2009), the Career Satisfaction Scale (CSS) (Greenhaus, Parasuraman, & Wormley, 1990), a researcher-created Career Status measure, and Salary information. Data were analyzed using correlational analysis, independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, and multiple regression. The correlational analysis showed that in this study, grit did not significantly predict career success. Level of grit did not differ based on gender or occupational type (traditional, non-standard, or mix). Multiple regressions demonstrated that grit did not significantly add to any of the models using age and gender as covariates. Participants in the qualitative phase included 5 individuals from the quantitative phase who scored in the top quartile in grit and career success. The qualitative data sources were individual interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed by the author. Data were analyzed inductively using pattern codes and deductively using the theoretical frameworks. Case summaries were written for each participant in the qualitative phase, and major themes were illustrated visually in several models. Findings suggest that although gritty, successful participants perceived grit as necessary for their own career success, they did not think it was sufficient. Largely perceived as “strong work ethic” or “working hard,” grit manifested differently in individual workplaces. Perseverance seemed more relevant to the career success experience than passion, and the aspect of working toward long-term goals did not resonate with these participants in the career context. Implications for this study include considering the importance of networking and taking advantage of opportunities in career development, on top of a strong work ethic. Schools interested in adding grit to their character strengths curriculum may find these results of interest, as the findings from this study indicate a non-significant relationship between grit and career success, salary, and career status.

Committee:

Vicki Plano Clark, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Christopher Swoboda, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mei Tang, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Cheri Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

grit;career success;mixed methods;positive psychology;sequential explanatory

Marschner, Daniel PImproving Interactions between International Students and Domestic Students, Faculty and Staff: A Mixed Methods Action Research Study
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Educational Studies
This mixed methods research study used an action research framework to consider the interactions between international and domestic students at a medium sized, liberal arts, Catholic university. This institution has a small but growing number of international students, and the university community is grappling with the benefits and challenges of increasing the population of international students. Postcolonial theory was the theoretical lens for this investigation because it emphasized the power dynamics present in intercultural activities and therefore provided insight into the campus environment. The action research framework incorporated a group of international students who participated in the study throughout its duration, acting as co-researchers and enhancing the validity and trustworthiness of the findings. This study explored the attitudes and perceptions of domestic students, faculty and staff towards international students. The investigation also explored the most common interactions between international students and domestic faculty, staff and students, and sought to identify ways to improve the acculturation process for international students. This exploratory sequential mixed methods study had two strands: the quantitative phase consisted of a campus climate survey, and the qualitative strand consisted of Photovoice with international students. The campus climate survey sought to document experiences with and perspectives towards international students on campus. The results of the quantitative strand informed the development of the subsequent qualitative strand. The qualitative portion of the study used Photovoice to encourage international students to express their perspective through visual imagery to the wider campus community. The combined quantitative and qualitative results were presented in a central location in the student center with the goal of demonstrating similarities and differences amongst the various campus constituencies and fostering an enhanced dialogue about campus internationalization. The results of this study supported enhanced resources for international students to acclimate to the university environment and stressed the importance of international students’ perspectives to augment global connections within higher education.

Committee:

Mary Brydon-Miller, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Sarah Stitzlein, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Lisa Vaughn, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jonathan Weller, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

School Administration

Keywords:

International Students;Mixed Methods Research;Action Research;Photovoice;Campus Climate Survey

Slavik, Peggy MStudents’ Attitudes toward Mathematics in a Spreadsheet-Based Learning Environment
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
This mixed methods study sought to determine the effect of a spreadsheet-based learning environment on college students’ attitudes toward mathematics. How students might use this technology to develop their conceptual understandings of specific mathematical concepts was also explored. Participants were comprised of students enrolled in an undergraduate Mathematics with Applications course at a small, private, liberal arts university in Northeast Ohio. Three frameworks were used to collect and analyze data: (1) the Attitudes Toward Mathematics Inventory (ATMI) was utilized at the beginning and end of the study to measure an initial 36 participants’ attitudes toward mathematics; (2) the Master, Student, Partner, Extension-of-Self Framework (MSPE) was employed to assess a smaller sample of six students’ ways of interacting with technology; and (3) the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcomes Taxonomy (SOLO) was used to measure the understandings and sense makings of mathematical concepts for the same six students. Although there were no significant changes in students’ attitudes based on the quantitative findings, qualitative results suggest that students’ value of mathematics increased. In addition, for most students, the use of spreadsheet technology to interact with mathematics increased over the duration of the study. Limitations of the ATMI are discussed with suggestions for the development of a new instrument that incorporates the use of technology. Implications for the use of spreadsheets in post-secondary mathematics courses are proposed and recommendations for future research based on unanticipated findings regarding the dynamics of student pairs are suggested.

Committee:

Scott Courtney (Committee Co-Chair); Michael Mikusa (Committee Co-Chair); Lisa Borgerding (Committee Member); Mark Kretovics (Other)

Subjects:

Education; Mathematics Education; Technology

Keywords:

attitudes toward mathematics; technology; spreadsheets; mixed methods; undergraduate; college; ATMI; self-confidence, value, enjoyment, motivation, Master, Student, Extension-of-Self; MSPE; Structure of the Observed Learning Outcomes; SOLO;

Korn, AnnTo Bend but Not Break: Adult Views on Resilience
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
A universal definition of resilience does not exist amongst researchers in the social sciences, making comparisons between studies nearly impossible. Added to this dilemma is that researchers hold divergent theories regarding the origin of resilience, whether it is a static trait across the span of a lifetime or more fluid phenomenon in response to life experience. Furthermore, the importance of resilience and the question of its commonality among individuals continue to be debated. A common thread, however, weaves through research: participants in the studies have not been asked for their views. A gap of understanding about the meaning and importance of resilience between the participant and the researcher may exist. In an attempt to understand the possibility of a gap in definition between participants and researchers, approximately 1,000 adult employees, from four different departments of a Northwest area hospital were sent an online, anonymous survey asking for personal views on resilience. The survey contained broad demographic questions. The survey had six additional questions; three were Likert-style and three were narrative in style. The responses were analyzed for the entire sample, by age, by gender and by two broad categories of ethnicity. A total of 348 survey responses were completed and analyzed. A wide range of ages were represented. Women far out-numbered male participants, though males did have representation. White participants out-numbered other ethnicities. Comparisons of views between genders and ethnicities were limited due to the disparity in group sizes. The most frequent definition of resilience was having the ability to bounce back from adverse events. As the majority of participants rated themselves with having high resilience, age did not directly relate to increased resilience in this study. In a more nuanced representation of age, the majority of participants reported that resilience had increased over time in response to adverse events. Death of a loved one was the most cited event that changed resilience for the participants. These views are fairly consistent with the developmental models of resilience. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Angie Hoffpauir, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Heather Hawk, DNP (Committee Member); Alejandra Suarez, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Psychology

Keywords:

Resilience; Developmental Theory; Trait Theory; History; Adult Views; Mixed Methods; Likert- Style questions; Text questions; Bounce Back; Recovery; Age and Experience

Stack, Wendy M.The Relationship of Parent Involvement and Student Success in GEAR UP Communities in Chicago
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2010, Leadership and Change
Nationally, the education pipeline is not preparing enough students for success and high school dropout rates in the nation’s urban areas are alarming. This mixed methods (QUAN→qual) empirical study examines the influence of parent involvement on the academic success of 1,774 GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) students matched to their parents in 21 high schools in Chicago. The results of the regression analyses were presented to focus groups composed of GEAR UP parents and staff to assist in making meaning of the data and to gain deeper insight and understanding of the results. The study results were viewed through the lens of social capital and implications for leadership were drawn for marginalized stakeholders. Parental involvement was measured by the amount of time parents engaged in GEAR UP program activities and the degree to which this involvement is related to their child’s achievement and aspirations for college was studied. The study focused on students and their parents who have been involved in GEAR UP in 8th grade and 9th grade. Student success was measured by 9th grade GPA and 10th grade PLAN Composite Score and Aspirations for College measured by the postsecondary intent question on the PLAN. Regression analysis showed a significant relationship between parent involvement and 9th grade GPA (p <.001) and a significant relationship between parent involvement and the PLAN Composite Score (p < .05). The video clips included in this document require Adobe Reader 9.0 and are directly accessible while reading.

Committee:

Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Chair); Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Member); George Olson, PhD (Committee Member); Chandra Taylor-Smith, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African Americans; Education; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Higher Education; Hispanic Americans; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Secondary Education; Social Research; Sociology

Keywords:

parent participation; GEAR UP; student achievement; social capital; mixed methods; quantitative; qualitative; urban; Chicago; transition; elementary; Latino; African-American; college access; GPA; college aspirations; K-12; leadership; family

Ruzow Holland, Ann HopeParticipatory Planning for a Promised Land: Citizen-Led, Comprehensive Land Use Planning in New York’s Adirondack Park
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2010, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies

New York’s Adirondack Park is internationally recognized for its biological diversity. Greater in size than Yellowstone, Everglades, Glacier, and Grand Canyon National Park combined, the Adirondacks are the largest protected area within the Northern Appalachian/Acadian Eco-Region and within the contiguous United States. Ecologists, residents of the Park, and others are concerned about rapid land use change occurring within the borders of the Park. Almost half of the six million acres encompassed by the Park boundary is privately-owned, where 80% of land use decisions fall within the jurisdiction of local governments. The comprehensive planning process of one such local government, the Town of Willsboro, New York, was the focus of a Participatory Action Research (PAR), single case study. Using a PAR, mixed methods approach, community-led comprehensive planning integrated natural science, technology and citizen participation. I evaluated the role of PAR in helping to transform conventional land use planning practice into a more democratic, environmentally conscious, and durable civic responsibility. Stakeholder viewpoints about the local environmental setting revealed deep connections to nature. Findings of the research indicate that comprehensive land use planning capacity increases when citizens increase their scientific and ecological literacy, especially when tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used for data collection and analysis. Applying ecologically-based comprehensive planning utilizing a PAR framework improved citizen’s confidence in land use decision-making and also expanded science literacy. PAR holds great promise as a methodological framework to bring together ecologically-focused natural science with citizen-led collaborative land use planning. Areas of further research identified during this study include assessing age-specific gaps in stakeholder participation, evaluating the relationship between plan recommendations and regulatory implementation, and investigating factors that contribute to a culture of community engagement. Local land use planning decisions have important cumulative impacts on protected area land development at the local and regional scale. A comprehensive plan can reflect an emergent process, where the primacy of community self-determination and consensus-building yields recognition of the link between, and sanctity of, nature, home, and homeland.

Committee:

James Jordan, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Steven Guerriero, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Robert Baldwin, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Area Planning and Development; Cartography; Climate Change; Communication; Conservation; Ecology; Environmental Law; Environmental Management; Environmental Science; Environmental Studies; Geographic Information Science; Geography; Land Use Planning; Natural Resource

Keywords:

Adirondack Park; Comprehensive Planning; Land Use; Participatory Action Research; Collaboration; Planning; Conservation; Science Literacy; Case Study; Mixed Methods; Protected Areas; Rapid Land Use Change; Amenity-Rich; Community decisionmaking

Ratliff, JasonPERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATORS ON INTERNATIONALIZATION PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION AT A MIDWESTERN UNIVERSITY: A MIXED METHODS STUDY
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of university administrators on stakeholder involvement in internationalization planning and implementation of internationalization at Mid-Western University (MWU) a public four-year university located in a Midwest state in the United States of America. It has been argued that there is a gap between the study of internationalization planning and implementation of those plans on college campuses (Childress, 2009). This study sought to fill this gap in the literature. A mixed methods study was utilized as a comprehensive way of studying the perceptions (Quantitative variable) and experiences (Qualitative variable) of participants at the subject university. The researcher surveyed 80 university administrators to examine their perceptions of internationalization planning and implementation at MWU. The researcher then utilized nested and extreme case sampling to interview six administrators (three with low perceptions and three with high perceptions) to explore their experiences at MWU with internationalization. A correlational study was performed to measure the relationship between internationalization planning and implementation practices at MWU. A strong positive correlation was found between internationalization planning and implementation practices (r =.69). Also, many administrators on campus did not have knowledge or experience with internationalization planning practices on campus. A view that human and financial resources for internationalization efforts were limited was prevalent among administrators. The researcher provided steps toward the development of comprehensive stakeholder involvement in planning and implementation processes to bring about the internationalization of MWU.

Committee:

Rachel Reinhart (Advisor); Patricia Kubow (Committee Member); Judith Zimmerman (Committee Member); Rosemary Max (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Higher Education

Keywords:

Internationalization; Higher Education; Change; Stakeholder Involvement; Kotter's Change Model; Internationalization Planning; Mixed Methods

Love, Carolyn D.Generations Apart: A Mixed Methods Study of Black Women's Attitudes About Race and Social Activism
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
Since the beginning of slavery in the United States, Black women have been actively involved in the creation and formation of Black civil society. The abolitionist, Black women's club, and civil rights movements challenged White supremacy and created institutions that fought for political, social, and economic justice. Historically, Black women have engaged in the struggle for group survival while at the same time fighting for institutional transformation to eliminate or change discriminatory policies, practices, and procedures. With each passing generation, Black women have led efforts of resistance against racial discrimination, gender bias, and class exploitation. However, with each passing generation, the concept and meaning of race has changed. Immigration, colorblind ideology, post-racial and post-civil rights attitudes influence the meaning and relevance of race. While some Black women have moved into the middle class and beyond, a majority of Black women remain poor and the objects of both racial and gender discrimination. The purpose of this study is to examine how race influences the activities of Black women in search of political, social, and economic justice. The research design was an exploratory sequential mixed-methods study that investigated the generation differences in racial attitudes and social justice involvement among Black women. The study consisted of a total of 183 participants and included six personal interviews, four focus groups, and a survey. Twenty African American women participated in the personal interviews and focus groups. In total, 163 African American women participated in the survey. An analysis of the qualitative data indicated that regardless of the generation cohort, the African American women participating in this study perceive race as a relevant issue and an issue that influences the life chances of African Americans in general. Additionally, there is a perception amongst the participants that there is a crisis of follow-ship rather than a crisis of leadership in the African American community. An analysis of the quantitative data indicated that gendered racial stereotyping of African American women remains a problem within the African American community and the broader society. While African American women continue to play a critical role in social justice initiatives, gendered racial stereotyping influences the perception of their leadership. This document is accompanied by one video file (MP4) that contains the author's introduction to the dissertation and 11 audio files (MP3s) that contain selected responses from personal interview and focus group participants. Follow this link, https://ys-media.antioch.edu/uploads/authorintroduction.flv , to connect to the author's introduction. The electronic version of the Dissertation is accessible in the open-access Ohiolink ETD Center http://etd.ohiolink.edu .

Committee:

Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Philomena Essed, PhD (Committee Member); Helen Neville, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African Americans; Black Studies; Gender; Womens Studies

Keywords:

race; racial studies; social activism; gender; generational differences; intersectionality; standpoint; social identity; mixed-methods, African Americans, women

Davis, BryanExploring the social construction of masculinity and its differential expression in culturally different populations using a mixed method approach
Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Wright State University, 2019, School of Professional Psychology
Previous research on gender conflict and strain quantitatively measured traditional masculinity ideology from western societal norms. The current study added to the previous research and qualitatively studied masculinity performance in men from different cultures: Black, Asian, Latino. Results from this study added to masculinity research due to the mixed method approach of both quantitative and qualitative research in males from diverse groups. Information gained from this study enabled masculinity to be operationally defined by different cultural focus groups and compared in order to explore distinct masculinity expression. Information was gained by measuring traditional masculinity ideology quantitatively on the Male Role Norms Inventory-Short Form (MRNI-SF). In addition, the males participated in separate focus groups to provide narratives of their masculinity performance beyond their traditional masculine ideology measured on the MRNI-SF. The current study showed that traditional masculine gender ideology was similar within all males, but how they expressed their masculine ideology appeared different in the Black, Asian, and Latino focus groups. Information from the current study will add to the masculinity research and increase understanding on the complexity of masculinity expression due to the integration of multiple cultural variables. Such knowledge will also enhance the cultural competence of providers and improve mental health resources for diverse men.

Committee:

Steven Kniffley Jr., sy.D., M.P.A., ABPP (Committee Chair); Scott Fraser, Ph.D., ABPP (Committee Member); Chris Modica, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; African Literature; Asian American Studies; Asian Studies; Black Studies; Clinical Psychology; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Gender; Gender Studies; Hispanic American Studies; Hispanic Americans; Latin American History; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Mental Health; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Quantitative Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research

Keywords:

Masculinity; Social Construction; Black Masculinity; Asian Masculinity; Latino Masculinity; Differential Expression; Mixed Methods; Quantitative; Qualitative; Diversity; Cultural Competence; Gender Role Strain; Gender; Male; Men; Mental Health

Edgar, PerezDeveloping a Resilient Network Ambidexterity Scale
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this study was to develop a resilient network ambidexterity scale. While numerous research efforts have considered the dimensions of social capital, resilience, and adaptive capacity to evaluate organizations and communities, few have explored social network indicators within organizations that can be used to mobilize ambidextrous strategies during times of disruption. The emphasis here was to understand the tendencies and behaviors that networks possess to sustain or achieve success along the parallel strategies of optimization and exploration. This study progressed in three specific phases toward filling this void in organizational development literature, using a mixed-methods approach. Phase 1 was the development of the item pool and analysis of the scale to establish face and content validity. Phase 2 included administering an online survey to 344 participants. Data collected were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis, followed by a partial confirmatory factor analysis These revealed a two-factor solution central to identifying resilient network ambidexterity: Optimizing Organizational Boundaries and Exploring Novelty. Phase 3 involved getting feedback on the revised scale from organizational leaders and practitioners working in innovative fields to refine the final RNA instrument. This research made connections between resilience and ambidexterity in organizations through ongoing inquiry on ways that fusing distinct paradigms impacts organizational outcomes. The development of this scale can serve as a useful tool for organizations to assess their level of resilience and mobilize the features of optimization and exploration. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Donna Chrobot-Mason, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Adaptive capacity, Ambidexterity, Mixed methods, Social networks, Social capital, Resilience, Scale development, Organizations

Raei, Mohammed Development and Validation of the Adaptive Leadership with Authority Scale
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
A reliable scale to measure adaptive leadership with authority—leadership from a position of power—does not exist. This was an embedded mixed-methods study–QUAN(qual) with data collected through an online survey instrument that included the proposed scale items and an open-ended question. The quantitative part of the study, using data from 436 respondents (92.7% from Mechanical Turk, 7.3% from snowball sampling), involved the development and validation of a unidimensional scale that measures adaptive leadership with authority using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The 11-item scale had a Cronbach’s alpha value of .891 and thus displayed high reliability. In the qualitative part of the study, thematic analysis was used to analyze data from 550 respondents to confirm the presence of adaptive leadership with authority sub-constructs and identify possible adaptive leadership behaviors not included in the adaptive leadership framework. The analysis provided support for the following adaptive leadership with authority sub-constructs: Distinguish Between Adaptive and Technical Challenges; Identify the Stakeholders and Their Losses; Create the Holding Environment; Regulate the Distress to maintain focus on adaptive work; Give the Work Back; and Use of Self as a diagnostic and intervention instrument. The narrative data did not support Protecting Voices of Leadership without Authority. The combination of the narrative data and scale pointed to Give the Work Back, Use of Self, and Create the Holding Environment as the most important elements in adaptive leadership with authority. This dissertation is accompanied by a de-identified data file [xls] and the author’s MP4 video introduction. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Harriette Thurber Rasmussen, Ed.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Developmental Psychology; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Adaptive Leadership; Adaptive Challenges; Adaptive Change; Change Theories; Second Order Change; Leading Change; Wicked Problems; Leadership Development; Complex Adaptive Systems; Transformational Leadership; Scale Development; Mixed Methods

Greer, Patricia AElements of Effective Interorganizational Collaboration: A Mixed Methods Study
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
Interorganizational collaboration is a process used by committed stakeholders within a problem domain to solve 'messy’ or complex issues. Joint identification and resolution of complex problems is achieved through an iterative process, using elements for success: committed members, resources, time, communication, trust, shared goal, defined process, and collective identity. This study utilized an exploratory sequential mixed methods process as a practical approach, resulting in richer data and increased understanding of the phenomenon of collaboration. The guiding research problem explored which elements influence successful collaborations and, specifically, how collective identity is developed, sustained, and related to the perception of success. The research population was comprised of collaboration experts and the participants in 46 collaborations that submitted applications to receive the Colorado Collaboration Award in 2013 and 2014. The research focused on the following questions: what elements of collaborations were evident from the Colorado Collaboration Award applications and the interviews with subject matter experts, how did subject matter experts and survey respondents describe successful collaborations, what collaboration elements influenced survey respondent perception of collective identity and success, and how did survey respondents and focus group participants describe their collaboration’s efforts to achieve collective identity and success? The results of the study identified dimensions of success: collective identity, the development of relationships that bring value to communities, and despite challenges and differences, the building of something wonderful together. A new model for developing collective identity was justified. This dissertation is accompanied by the author’s MP4 video introduction. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/, and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Lize Booysen, DBL. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Carl Larson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Matthew A. Koschmann, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Communication; Organizational Behavior; Social Research

Keywords:

Mixed methods; collective identity; collaboration; success; community value; committed members; time; resources; synergy; messy problems; iterative process; relationships; non-profits; interorganizational

Klossner, DavidFACTORS THAT INFLUENCE FIRMS’ ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE: AN EXAMINATION OF LARGE COMPANIES
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Management
This research illuminates the differences among US-based multinational corporations (MNCs) that operate in a pro-environmentally responsible manner and those that do not. I asked: What factors might explain differences between weak and strong performance among MNCs? I investigated different groups and explored the following lines of inquiry: Does industry matter? What can explain discrepancies in firms’ accounts of their performance when compared to actual performance? I applied an open mixed method approach that used five datasets: (a) firms’ environmental performance as reported by Newsweek statistics, (b) firms’ safety performance as reported to OSHA, (c) a survey conducted among top executives of the Fortune 500 companies, (d) 78 interviews with top US- and India-based executives of the MNCs, and (e) field observations of MNCs’ facilities in India. I discovered two distinct drivers that explain environmental performance: (a) organizational consciousness, and (b) elevated concern for employee safety. Organizational consciousness is a reflection of proactive management (characterized as heedful, alert, and caring about policies and operations). I observed that the Resource-Based View and institutional factors alone cannot explain significant differences between strong vs. weak environmental performers. I found the most significant difference is explained by industry type: (a) high-performing manufacturers have a greater ability to transfer knowledge across functional boundaries and source, and exploit new knowledge for environmental performance; (b) low-performing manufacturers are reluctant to allocate sufficient resources, and use “short-term fixes” to avoid risks associated with uncertain environmental outcomes, and (c) service companies do not see that they represent a risk to the environment and place a low priority on environmental concerns. Surprisingly, a number of firms underestimated their environmental performance (termed “Greenmodest”), and these share the following attributes: (a) primarily service companies, and (b) see a weak connection between their environmental performance, organizational capacities, and external pressure. In contrast, “Greenwashing” firms (a) are mainly manufacturers, (b) are older and more traditional, (c) have higher per-employee annual revenues, (d) are anxious about making decisions, and (e) try to “just get by.” “Greenhonests” - whose perception of the firm’s environmental performance aligned with actual performance - prioritize accurate measurement of environmental performance. Overall, the study provides new and surprising insights into factors that explain superior environmental performance among large companies.

Committee:

Kalle Lyytinen (Committee Chair); David Cooperrider (Committee Member); James Gaskin (Committee Member); Roger Saillant (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Environmental Management

Keywords:

Multinational corporations, emerging economies, Fortune 500, safety performance, environmental performance, organizational mindfulness, absorptive capacity, coercive pressure, risk aversion, CSR, cultural interactions, and mixed methods

Ganz, Johnanna JContested Titles: Gendered Violence Victim Advocacy and Negotiating Occupational Stigma in Social Interactions
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, American Culture Studies
This dissertation employs a mixed-method approach to explore the experiences and perceptions of domestic and sexual violence victim advocates. Advocates are trained professionals who provide support, information, and resources to victims who have experienced gendered violence. Little research examines domestic and sexual violence victim advocates despite the thousands who work across the United States. The existing literature research primarily uses quantitative methods to examine the negative emotional impact of employment. Few, if any, studies ask questions about how external factors and experiences of every day life affect advocates, on or off the job. As a result, this research investigates what it means to be an advocate in a socio-relational context by exploring advocates’ experiences of occupational identity when interacting with strangers or new acquaintances. Occupational identity is a primary point of interaction within the social world, and advocacy is a complex, politically, and culturally situated occupation within the United States. Advocates are subject to a host of reactions when they introduce their jobs to strangers or new acquaintances—many of these experiences communicate stigma based on occupational choice rather than personal identity. Thus, this dissertation examines the presence and effects of occupational stigma on advocates, which is most clearly seen through the deployment of positive and negative stereotype and the relational process of Othering. Using data gathered from 21 in-depth interviews with advocates as well as a survey with 221 respondents, this study uses cultural studies, feminist methodology, and sociological theory to demonstrate that occupational stigma experienced through short introductory interactions has an effect on advocates’ sense of self, sense of work, and willingness to share their occupational identity. Advocates and advocacy organizations have few resources to consider and prepare their employees for the experience of stigma. To assist organizations, this dissertation examines the relationship between experiences of Othering, stereotype, and stigma to feelings of burnout. Finally, this dissertation provides concrete suggestions on how to train advocates, provide support to organizations, and reduce the impact of occupational stigma on victim advocates. Such research offers new areas for consideration and exploration for those interested in victim advocacy, care-work, the micropolitics of occupational identity, and stigmatized occupations.

Committee:

Sandra Faulkner, Dr. (Advisor); Madeline Duntley, Dr. (Other); Jorge Chavez, Dr. (Committee Member); Lisa Hanasono, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Gender Studies; Sociology; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Victim Advocacy; Gendered Violence; Sexual Violence; Domestic Violence; Victim Advocates; Occupational Stigma; Occupational Identity; Mixed Methods; Stereotype; Othering

Berkey, Rebecca ElaineJust Farming: An Environmental Justice Perspective on the Capacity of Grassroots Organizations to Support the Rights of Organic Farmers and Laborers
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
This mixed methods study builds upon literature and research in environmental justice, public participation, and community development to examine how justice-related issues impact farmers and workers on organic farms in the Northeastern United States. It also examines how involvement in a grassroots organization helps farmers and workers address these issues. At the core of the study is an exploration of environmental justice and its applications at a broad, systemic level; an examination of the current context of laborers in organic agriculture in the Northeast; and finally an investigation of the effects of grassroots organizing within the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) as it intersects with notions of justice. It offers promising recommendations for addressing the systemic injustices that are encountered on organic farms. The first phase of this study comprised an online survey sent out to all NOFA member farmers to gather information about who the laborers on organic farms in the NOFA network are and about the unique justice issues they face. The results of the survey indicate that most of the farms within the network are small-scale and rely heavily on family members and volunteers for labor. Farmer participants identified challenges encountered in enacting their justice-related values. The second phase consisted of phenomenological interviews with farmers and workers from three different member farms known within NOFA for a commitment to justice to discover patterns of meaning around justice and the contributions of network membership to its realization. This study expands the scale of justice considerations beyond the local and considers theories of justice beyond utilitarianism that incorporate elements of participation, recognition, and capabilities. It also offers an understanding of the broader systemic context within which small-scale organic farmers make their commitments and decisions, and it illustrates how the justice-related experiences of both farmers and workers are affected by membership in a regional organization, providing insight into the impact of democratic participation, coalition-building, and community development in practice at that scale. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open-access Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd and on the Antioch University Repository & Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/.

Committee:

Tania M. Schusler, PhD (Committee Chair); Steve D. Chase, PhD (Committee Member); Joseph V. Siry, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Environmental Justice; Environmental Studies

Keywords:

Environmental justice; agriculture; organic agriculture; workers; farmers; farmworkers; values; coalitions; Northeast Organic Farming Association; northeast; United States; survey; mixed methods; phenomenology

Grohowski, MarianaAt War with Words: Understanding U.S. Service-Personnel's Literate Practices for a Universal Design for Learning Worldview
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
Learners—e.g., students and research participants—face unique and invisible barriers to making and sharing knowledge. In fact, some individuals prefer to express themselves in modes that do not comply with “school-sponsored” (Emig, 1971) composing practices. Given writing studies teacher-scholars’ established reputation advocating for students of varied abilities, needs, and experiences, this project contends that Universal Design for Learning (UDL) could sustain writing studies teacher-scholars’ continued efforts for student advocacy and diverse learning practices. Stemming from disability studies, UDL fosters practices that are inclusive and accessible from inception for learners, including but not limited to individuals with military experience. Using mixed methods procedures for conducting and representing findings, this project shares the “self-sponsored” (Emig, 1971) multimodal literate practices of 301 current and former, male and female U.S. Military service personnel—including but not limited to their use of digital technologies. Findings reveal that literate practices foster complex identity negotiations and a sense of personal agency. Indeed, co-interpreters testify to the ways in which composing practices affirm their differences (identities) and agency as survivors—not victims—of trauma through their use of multimodal practices like drawing and public speaking, which a UDL worldview best facilitates.

Committee:

Kristine Blair (Committee Chair); Lee Nickoson (Committee Member); Sue Carter Wood (Committee Member); Alexis Hart (Committee Member); Laura Lengel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Rhetoric

Keywords:

Universal design for learning; Military service personnel; Mixed methods research; Writing studies

Chohaney, Michael L.Secrets Beneath the Soil: A Mixed Methods Necrogeographic Investigation of Romany (“Gypsy”) Memorial Sites
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2012, Geography
While American Romanies live a notoriously secretive cultural existence, their grave locations and memorial stones offer accessible inferential lore and knowledge about their active on-going communities. Building upon earlier observations in the field reported by Dr. David J. Nemeth, this methodological piece outlines how to gather and analyze Romany cemetery data without necessitating the exhausting and intrusive task of first locating and building rapport with local Romany informants. My case study identifies Romanichal and Rom memorial sites located in Toledo, Ohio’s Historic Woodlawn Memorial Park and Calvary Cemetery, respectively. I gathered my data after devising a qualitative ranking system to accompany my efforts to quantitatively categorize the grave sites, which I also spatially cataloged using a GPS device. Additionally, I collected genealogical data on the families whenever available. This allowed me to build a social network to analyze via social network analysis (SNA) tools. The network was also spatialized using GIS software to visualize family relations across the earth’s surface. The results of the coupling of social network theory with the gathered spatial data reveal promising evidential connections between the nature and location of an individual’s grave site and local family and community structure. I also applied GIS-driven spatial statistics techniques to the dataset to highlight the potential for promoting spatial-quantitative Romany research. My case study and mixed methodology exemplify the value of Romany memorial site and monument data as an effective source for discovering heretofore deliberately obfuscated spatial/social relationships among local Romany populations. My discoveries have the potential to advance Romany studies as I have demonstrated—by applying modern analytic tools, including GPS, GIS and SNA hardware and software to reveal hidden knowledge.

Committee:

David J. Nemeth, Dr. (Advisor); Mary Beth Schlemper, Dr. (Committee Member); Neusa Neusa Hidalgo-Monroy McWilliams, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ethnic Studies; Geographic Information Science; Geography

Keywords:

necrogeography; Romani People, GIS, social network analysis; mixed methods

Jackson, Ellen F.Parent Child Boundary Dissolution Across Cultures: A Comparison of College Student Perceptions in India and the United States
Bachelor of Arts, Miami University, 2011, College of Arts and Sciences - Psychology
In Western cultures, appropriate parent-child boundaries are considered crucial to healthy child development. Parent-child boundary dissolution, the loss of psychological distinctiveness between parents and their children or confusion of interpersonal roles (Kerig, 2005) has been implicated in negative child mental health outcomes in Western cultures (Barber 1996). However, it is reasonable to suspect that cultures vary in individuals’ subjective experience of parent-child boundary dissolution. The purpose of this study was to use mixed-methods to compare the subjective experience of parent beliefs and behaviors typically associated with parent-child boundary dissolution in college students in India (n=110) and those in the United States (n=250). Results indicate that parent beliefs and behaviors associated with enmeshment and role reversal were experienced more frequently and perceived more positively in Indian emerging adults as compared to those in the US. Results are discussed in the context of cultural differences in parenting goals and parent-child relationships.

Committee:

Vaishali Raval, PhD (Advisor); Aaron Luebbe, PhD (Committee Member); Emily Bendikas, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

parent-child relations; boundary dissolution; psychological control; cross-cultural differences; mixed methods

Fraga-Canadas, Cynthia P.Investigating Native And Non-Native High School Spanish Teachers’ Language Practices Inside And Outside Of The School Setting: A Mixed Methods Approach
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, ED Teaching and Learning (Columbus campus)

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) suggest that a high proficiency in the language is essential for all Spanish teachers. No matter what level of Spanish (SPN) a teacher teaches, the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines declare that the minimum level of proficiency for Spanish teachers should be advanced low, which sets the standards high. Most teacher preparation programs do not have a system in place to help non-native language instructors maintain and improve their language proficiency. With the growth of the Spanish speaking population in the U.S and the diversity of the Spanish Culture, teacher education programs need to ensure that teacher candidates are better equipped to face the increased demands of language proficiency.

This two-phase (survey + case studies) study investigated both native and non-native high school Spanish teachers language practices outside and inside of the school setting such as their level of involvement in target language activities. Results suggest that NSTs and NNSTs had different needs in the areas of teacher education and professional development. While native teachers preferred to focus on improving their pedagogical knowledge, most non-native teachers sought additional classes and professional development opportunities designed to enhance their language proficiency. Survey results suggested that NNSTs had considerably less experience teaching upper level classes than NSTs. Many NNSTs felt that teaching only lower level Spanish classes affected their confidence and proficiency in the language.

Several important implications for teacher educators and Spanish teachers emerged from this study, including the development of a fluent communication channel between foreign language and teacher education departments to ensure that Spanish teachers’ proficiency development does not stop when they enter a teacher preparation program, the establishment of safe and effective learning Communities of Practice (COP) for Spanish teachers in which the target language is the sole language of the community, and the implementation of a rotation system in which teachers alternate in the teaching of lower and upper level classes. Recommendations for future research are also offered.

Committee:

Samimy Keiko, PhD (Advisor); Robert Hite, PhD (Committee Member); Karen Newman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Language

Keywords:

high school; language proficiency; Spanish; teacher education; native teachers; non-native teachers; mixed-methods; in-service teachers; communities of practice

Litten, Joyce A. PuracchioA Quantitative and Qualitative Inquiry into the Call to Serve Among Non-Traditional Undergraduate Social Work Students
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Leadership Studies

The purposes of this study were to explore the narratives of nontraditional social work students who were identified as servant leaders, and to investigate the students' perception of his or her call to service and the meaning of leadership within their developmental and prior lived experiences. This exploration study examined the phenomena of baccalaureate social work education as a choice for nontraditional students. Three research questions guided this investigation: (a) What is the relevance of self-resiliency and self-efficacy to these individuals and to their self-identification as social work leaders? (b) What can these stories tell us about how we can better structure social work education and curricula for students who are nontraditional? (c) What instructional methods and advising strategies should social work education consider in order to better support and nurture leadership in this group?

Quantitative and qualitative methodologies supported the study of these questions. A survey was administered to 33 nontraditional social work students who were enrolled in an introductory social work class. Six key informants were identified through the survey and interviews were conducted with these informants that identified themes that emerged from the survey and through the conceptual framework of the research proposal. A semi-structured interview with standardized questions was completed with each key informant, and of the key informants also participated in a cognitive mapping exercise in order to elicit more detailed data.

The findings suggested that: (a) key informants validated the concepts of the research framework, (b) key informants identified the concept of resiliency as most significant and relevant in their call to serve through social work, and,(c) key informants provided additional concepts with meaningful connections to their decision to seek professional social work education. The research raised questions to be further explored with nontraditional students can provide additional guidance to baccalaureate social work program directors, support recruitment and retention strategies in social work higher education, and inform standards and policies of the accrediting body of professional social work education.

Committee:

Judith A. Zimmerman (Committee Co-Chair); Judy Jackson May (Committee Co-Chair); Mark A. Earley (Committee Member); Gerald Strom (Committee Member); Sr. Ann Francis Klimkowski, OFS (Committee Member); Ruben Viramontez Anguiano (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Higher Education; Social Work

Keywords:

social work; non-traditional students; servant leadership; mixed-methods

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