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Paris, MelanieRepatriated Africans from Cuba and Brazil in nineteenth century Lagos
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1998, African-American and African Studies

During the late nineteenth century, primarily between the 1840s and 1860s, a significant repatriation movement to Africa took place among ex-slaves from the Latin American countries of Cuba and Brazil. Since most of these repatriates were of Yoruba descent, they chose to resettle in Yoruba-populated areas along the West African coast. Some of these Cuban and Brazilian repatriates resettled in Ouidah and Porto Novo in the present-day country of Republic of Benin. However, many of the returnees established themselves in West Africa’s largest port city of Lagos in what is now known as Nigeria.

It was also during the nineteenth century that British colonialists began to aggressively launch their quest for total domination and annexation of Yorubaland and the hinterland areas of “Nigeria”. In order to facilitate this agenda, the British used the Cuban and Brazilian repatriates as mediators between themselves and the local Yoruba population. Consequently, in order to secure the repatriates’ cooperation, the British elevated the Cuban and Brazilian returnees to an elite status in colonial Lagos.

This thesis examines the economic and social status of repatriated Africans from Cuba and Brazil in Lagos, and the social and economic conditions that served as an impetus for their drastic transition from slavery. More specifically, this study focuses on the relationship between the repatriates and British colonialists during the nineteenth century, and the elite position that the returnees assumed in the Lagos community as a result of this association.

Committee:

Abiola Irele (Advisor)

Keywords:

Agudas; Lagos; Yoruba; slaves; returnees; CUBA; CUBA AND BRAZIL

Ossai, Peter OgochukukaAwareness, Accessibility And Use Of Malaria Control Interventions Among At-Risk Groups In Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College of Public Health
Abstract With just a year remaining to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) deadline, there is limited evidence for and adequate level of awareness/use of malaria intervention strategies and by extension, decreases in malaria-related mortality and morbidity. This is a cross-sectional study on awareness and use of malaria control interventions based on data collected from a household survey from two of the 20 local government areas (LGAs) of Lagos State, Nigeria – Alimosho and Kosofe where a malaria control program of Roll Back Malaria (RBM) is being implemented. The sample included pregnant women (n = 250) and mothers of children under five years old (n = 233) that were interviewed using interviewer-administered, semi-structured questionnaires in a household survey. Questionnaires developed by the research staff of the Nigerian Institute for Medical Research probed respondents’ demographic characteristics; knowledge and compliance of policy guidelines on the awareness and use of malaria intervention strategies. The study was implemented over a 6-month period from February to August 2014. This study used both linear and logistic regression analysis. Linear regression was used to predict the Compliance Index as a function of the independent variables of Age, Marital Status, Maternal Status, Religion, Education and Local Government Area of residence, while logistic regression was used to predict alignment into high/moderate or low knowledge of malaria categories also as a function of Age, Marital Status, Maternal Status, Religion, Education and Local Government Area of residence. Results of the linear regression showed that the overall model of the six independent variables was able to significantly predict the compliance index, R2 = .163, F(6,409) = 13.28, p <.001. Age, Education and LGA were significant predictors. Results of the logistic regression showed the Exp(B) of two predictors, LGA and Maternal Status, as statistically reliable in distinguishing between low and moderate/high level of knowledge R2 = .163, F(6,409) = 13.28, p <.001The study finds that overall, improvements have been made, however, the level of awareness and use of malaria intervention tools was still low.

Committee:

Sonia Alemagno, Ph.D (Advisor); Jonathan VanGeest, Ph.D (Committee Chair); James Mark, Ph.D (Committee Member); Bhatta Madhav, Ph.D (Committee Member); John Graham, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Health

Keywords:

Awareness; Malaria intervention in Lagos State; Anopheles mosquito; Roll Back Malaria; Pregnant women and mothers of children under 5 years old; Amimosho Local Government; Kosofe Local Government; IPTp; Home Management of Malaria; ACT; LLINs

Ogboo, Adanma NeloTHE GEOGRAPHY OF AUTOMOBILE SPARE PARTS TRADE: ASPMDA AND LADIPO AUTOMOBILE SPARE PARTS MARKETS, LAGOS, NIGERIA
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2011, Geography
This thesis investigates the Geography of Automobile Spare Parts Trade in Lagos, Nigeria. It primarily uses qualitative method of data collection. Information was gathered from public officials, market managers and traders in two automobile spare parts market in Lagos- Automobile Spare Parts and Machinery Dealers Association (ASPMDA) and Ladipo Automobile Spare Parts Market. It examines economic geography of automobile spare parts trade in Lagos in terms of location, interaction and distribution. It also investigates the nature of changes and reasons for the occurred changes in this geography. The findings suggest that automobile spare parts petty traders demonstrate interconnectedness between places through international and interregional trade. There is an embedded distribution in Africa of manufactured goods produced in the semi-periphery with automobile spare parts petty traders serving as a link between China (the global semi-peripheral manufacturing) and Sub-Saharan African’s retailers. This thesis provides implications, and concludes based on the research findings that the automobile spare parts traders in Lagos contribute to both economic and spatial development of Lagos and demonstrates Nigerian's participation in the globalization processes.

Committee:

Ian Yeboah, PhD (Advisor); Stanley Toops, PhD (Committee Member); Abdoulaye Saine, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Geography

Keywords:

Geography; the global core; semi-periphery and periphery; globalization; SAP and trade liberalization; automobile spare parts trade; Lagos; Nigeria.