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Feliciano, WalberDesign and Implementation of a Radiometer and Rain Data Collection System for a Ka-band LEO Ground Station
Master of Science, University of Akron, 2009, Electrical Engineering
The design and performance of broadband Ka-band satellite communication systems depends mostly on the radio propagation characteristics of the earth-to-space path. The goal of this project was to develop and deploy a low earth orbit (LEO) ground station terminal capable of collecting radiometric and beacon data at Ka-band frequencies; which ranges approximately from 20 to 30 GHz. LEO satellites will employ high data rates to transfer very large amounts of data. High data rates require large channel bandwidth; a motivation to utilized Ka-band frequencies. Many radio frequency (RF) propagation effects are more severe at Ka-band frequencies than at lower frequencies. Collected data can be statistically analyzed and used to study the Earth’s atmosphere RF propagation effects at Ka-band, applicable to LEO links; thus improving the system availability models currently used. Collection of propagation data and its analysis is important for the development of satellite link analysis and communication component design, capability and requirements. Currently no LEO attenuation prediction models are available at Ka-band. This project provides a starting point to understand the dynamic effects of the Earth’s atmosphere on rapidly changing Ka-band transmission from a LEO spacecraft. A LEO propagation model will enable communication system designers to improve their systems availability.

Committee:

Nathan Ida, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

LEO;Ka-band;Propagation;Ground Station;Radiometer

Finkel, Jennifer HMichelangelo at San Lorenzo: The “Tragedy” of the Façade
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Art History
This dissertation considers Michelangelo’s intended sculptural program for the never-realized façade of the Medici parish church of San Lorenzo in Florence, and how its iconography related to the Medici, the Papacy, and the city of Florence. In 1516, Pope Leo X de’ Medici commissioned Michelangelo to complete both the sculpture and the architecture of the façade. This project, which Michelangelo claimed would be the “mirror of architecture and sculpture of all Italy,” was to be the most prestigious commission of the sixteenth century and Michelangelo’s most ambitious creation. But, for the Medici patrons, the sculptural program for the façade would have been the ultimate expression of Medici propaganda. Chapter one is a study of the history of San Lorenzo and generations of Medici patronage at their parish church. The sculptural program for the façade would have visually communicated the Medici dynasty and their destiny, and thus, the account of the San Lorenzo façade project starts here. Chapter two provides an overview of the façade commission and Michelangelo’s involvement on the project from 1516 to 1520. Chapter three is dedicated to Michelangelo’s architectural façade drawings for San Lorenzo, and his figural drawings for statuary that have been previously unassigned to a known project or connected to his other sculptural projects. These drawings are considered afresh in conjunction with the vast extant correspondence from this period, with the primary focus on Michelangelo’s concern for the sculptural decoration of the façade. Chapters four and five use the methodologies of iconography and iconology to reconstruct the intended plan for the sculptures on the façade. Michelangelo greatly enlarged the original sculptural program from ten over-life-sized marble statues, to eighteen freestanding over-life-sized marble and bronze statues, and nineteen relief panels. This expanded sculptural program relied on a calculated arrangement of the saints and their placement on the façade, which had specific meanings and connotations for the Medici, for Florence, and for the Medici in the papal court in Rome. Appendix A of the dissertation is a detailed chronological account of the façade project as extrapolated and compiled from more than three-hundred extant letters.

Committee:

Edward Olszewski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Michelangelo; Medici; San Lorenzo; facade; Pope Leo X de'Medici

Heron, Jason AndrewThe Analogia Communitatis: Leo XIII and the Modern Quest for Fraternity
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
This dissertation examines the social magisterium of Pope Leo XIII as it is developed in the aftermath of the French Revolution and during the nationalizing process of the liberal Italian state. The thesis of the dissertation is that Leo XIII provides Catholic social teaching with a proper vision of human relationship as a mode of analogical participation in the Lord’s goodness. In his own historical context, Leo’s analogical vision of social relations is developed in tension with the nation-state’s proposal of political citizenship as the social relation that relativizes every other relation – most especially one’s ecclesial relation. In our own context, Leo’s analogical vision of social relations stands in tension with the late-modern proposal of consumerism as the social reality that relativizes every other relation – including one’s matrimonial, familial, social, and ecclesial relations.

Committee:

Kelly Johnson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Russell Hittinger, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jana Bennett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael Carter, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Philosophy; Religious History; Social Structure; Theology

Keywords:

Catholic Social Teaching; social theory; political theory; citizenship; nationalism; consumerism; 19th century Catholicism; social Catholicism; Leo XIII; modern papal teaching; Catholic social magisterium; theological anthropology; social anthropology

Barritt, Brian JamesThe Modeling, Simulation, and Operational Control of Aerospace Communication Networks
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2017, EECS - Computer Engineering
A paradigm shift is taking place in aerospace communications. Traditionally, aerospace systems have relied upon circuit switched communications; geostationary communications satellites act as bent-pipe transponders and are not burdened with packet processing and the complexity of mobility in the network topology. But factors such as growing mission complexity and NewSpace development practices are driving the rapid adoption of packet-based network protocols in aerospace networks. Meanwhile, several new aerospace networks are being designed to provide either low latency, high-resolution imaging or low-latency Internet access while operating in non-geostationary orbits -- or even lower, in the upper atmosphere. The need for high data-rate communications in these networks is simultaneously driving greater reliance on beamforming, directionality, and narrow beamwidths in RF communications and free-space optical communications. This dissertation explores the challenges and offers novel solutions in the modeling, simulation, and operational control of these new aerospace networks. In the concept, design, and development phases of such networks, the dissertation motivates the use of network simulators to model network protocols and network application traffic instead of relying solely on link budget calculations. It also contributes a new approach to network simulation that can integrate with spatial temporal information systems for high-fidelity modeling of time-dynamic geometry, antenna gain patterns, and wireless signal propagation in the physical layer. And towards the operational control of such networks, the dissertation introduces Temporospatial Software Defined Networking (TS-SDN), a new approach that leverages predictability in the propagated motion of platforms and high-fidelity wireless link modeling to build a holistic, predictive view of the accessible network topology and provides SDN applications with the ability to optimize the network topology and routing through the direct expression of network behavior and requirements. This is complemented by enhancements to the southbound interface to support synchronized future enactment of state changes in order to tolerate varying delay and disruption in the control plane. A high-level overview of an implementation of Temporospatial SDN at Alphabet is included. The dissertation also describes and demonstrates the benefits of the application of TS-SDN in Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellite constellations and High Altitude Platform Systems (HAPS).

Committee:

Frank Merat (Committee Chair); Rabinovich Michael (Committee Member); Daniel Saab (Committee Member); Mark Allman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering; Computer Engineering; Computer Science

Keywords:

temporospatial; SDN; TS-SDN; aerospace; networks; satellites; LEO; NGSO; constellations; HAPS; high-altitude platforms; STK; wireless; mesh; networking; modeling; simulation; ns-3

Souder, Eric MatthewThe Circassian Thistle: Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoy's 'Khadzhi Murat' and the Evolving Russian Empire"
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2014, History
The following thesis examines the creation, publication, and reception of Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoy’s posthumous novel, Khadzhi Murat in both the Imperial and Soviet Russian Empire. The anti-imperial content of the novel made Khadzhi Murat an incredibly vulnerable novel, subjecting it to substantial early censorship. Tolstoy’s status as a literary and cultural figure in Russia – both preceding and following his death – allowed for the novel to become virtually forgotten despite its controversial content. This thesis investigates the absorption of Khadzhi Murat into the broader canon of Tolstoy’s writings within the Russian Empire as well as its prevailing significance as a piece of anti-imperial literature in a Russian context.

Committee:

Stephen Norris, Ph.D. (Advisor); Daniel Prior, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Margaret Ziolkowski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Leo Tolstoy; Tolstoy; Khadzhi Murat; Hadji Murat; North Caucasus; Chechnya; Daghestan; Russian Empire; Russian Literature; Censorship; Literary Criticism; Empire; Nicholas I