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Wonderly, MeghanA Son's Dream: Colonel Webb Cook Hayes and the Founding of the Nation's First Presidential Library
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, History
Today presidential libraries are expected from every former president. Presidents begin to plan their libraries before exiting office. It was not always so. Over time, the American public and their government altered their views of presidential documents. For years, presidential documents had been considered personal property, so former presidents did as they wished with them. During his presidency Franklin D. Roosevelt created the National Archives to preserve presidential papers. His presidential library was the first in the federal presidential library system and therefore receives much recognition for being the first presidential library. However, twenty years before Roosevelt’s library existed there was the Hayes Memorial Library and Museum. Now known as the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library & Museums, Roosevelt used it as a model for his presidential library. Therefore, it influenced the federal system of presidential libraries. This project argues the Hayes Memorial Library and Museum exists due to the determination and resourcefulness of its founder Colonel Webb Cook Hayes. It further states that by creating the first presidential library, Webb influenced the federal presidential library system. This project analyzes the creation of the Hayes Memorial Library and Museum, following its journey from conception to fruition. This thesis first outlines the life of founder Colonel Webb Cook Hayes, revealing what led him to create the memorial: influences that shaped his interests, sources of his power, and passions that drove him. Then the text examines the difficulties surrounding the creation of the Hayes Memorial. It was managed and owned by the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society. Because no presidential library existed before it, the Hayes Memorial had to become the model for others to follow. This project follows the complications that arose due to the innovative concept of a presidential library and how Webb assisted in managing them. The sources for this project include Hayes family papers, local collections and historical newspapers. It also includes various texts on the history of presidential libraries, place, local history, and memory. Gathering these sources and examining them together sheds new light on the creation of the presidential library concept.

Committee:

Rebecca Mancuso (Advisor); Nicole Jackson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

president; Hayes; library; presidential library; presidential museum; museum; history; military; Ohio; Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society; Webb; Colonel Webb Cook Hayes; Rutherford Birchard Hayes; Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Nugent, Beatrice LouiseWoody Hayes : a case study in public communication, 1973 /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1974, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Hayes

Pad, Dennis NelsonThe educational contributions and activities of Rutherford B. Hayes /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1970, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Hayes

McHugh, Kelly CAPPLICATIONS OF TRACE ELEMENT AND ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY TO IGNEOUS PETROLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL FORENSICS
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2017, Geology & Environmental Earth Science
The first project investigates diverse magmas erupted over the 35 ky known history of Hayes Volcano in south-central Alaska. Three distinct magma types are delineated. Two of these have adakite-like compositions (elevated Sr/Y and depleted heavy rare earth elements) while the other is non-adakitic. These magmas are modeled to be products of fractional crystallization accompanied by assimilation of diverse materials best explained by varying ascent pathways and polybaric differentiation from the same mantle source. Their generation is directly controlled by the geometry of the Pacific Plate beneath Hayes. Additionally, shared isotopic and trace element compositions of Hayes and Mount Spurr define a common mantle source. This study provides new insights into the production of varied magmas along the Aleutian-Alaskan arc. The second project tests the feasibility of tracing past uranium (U) contamination in the growth rings of trees. Like other metals, U mobility in annual growth rings is dependent on the tree species. Uranium abundances and isotopic compositions were measured in sugar maple, black walnut, slippery elm, and white ash tree rings near the former Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (FFMPC), a U purification facility in Ohio. U concentrations, 235U/238U, and 234U/238U in sugar maple are generally consistent with known events in FFMPC history suggesting that this species is reliable for monitoring past U contamination. However, U isotopic compositions (including 236U/238U) do not correspond to known events in black walnut, slippery elm, and white ash tree rings; therefore, U must be mobile across annual growth rings in these species. Nevertheless, the youngest growth rings in sugar maple and slippery elm are isotopically similar to contemporary soil compositions suggesting that these species may be used to monitor current, bioavailable U contamination. The final project uses lichen to trace the spatial extent of past, cryptic airborne industrial and nuclear contamination. Mound Laboratories (Ohio) operated from 1946 to 1996 performing weapons, energy, and space exploration research and development. Lichen samples from within 5 km of the site contain high concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu but low concentrations of U and Th. While the major U isotopes are within error of natural U, positive correlations between U concentrations, 236U/238U, and 230Th/232Th provide robust evidence that enriched U and non-natural Th were released into the surrounding area. These results further illustrate that lichen are powerful archives of contamination and that the determination of isotopic compositions is essential to constrain the presence of anthropogenic inputs.

Committee:

William Hart (Advisor); Elisabeth Widom (Advisor); John Rakovan (Committee Member); Neil Danielson (Committee Member); Darin Snyder (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Environmental Geology; Environmental Science; Geochemistry; Geological; Geology

Keywords:

isotope; trace element; environmental contamination; nuclear forensics; igneous petrology; Hayes Volcano; Alaska; volcanic glass; uranium; thorium; adakite; industrial contamination; metal; tree rings; lichen

Gray, Edgar LaughlinThe career of William Henry Smith, politician-journalist
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1951, History

Committee:

Eugene Roseboom (Advisor)

Keywords:

Hayes; WILLIAM HENRY SMITH; Smith MSS

Gutowski, James ArthurPolitics and Parochial Schools in Archbishop John Purcell's Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2009, College of Education and Human Services
This study chronicles the contentious relationship between advocates of public schools and those promoting Catholic education in Ohio during the career of Archbishop John Purcell of Cincinnati. Using information culled from qualitative research into primary resources such as personal correspondence, published proceedings and newspaper articles of the time, this monograph reconstructs a history of philosophical and political conflict accompanying the parallel development of two burgeoning school systems. The years from 1833 to 1883 saw the development of an equilibrium between the two systems that helped to define Thomas Jefferson’s concept of the “wall of separation” between church and state. Public schools did not have to share tax-generated funding with parochial schools which, in turn, were irrefutably protected from taxation themselves. Furthermore, the history of competing school systems exhibits the paradox of religious liberty in America and uncovers an evolution in the nature of opposition to Catholicism in the United States.

Committee:

James Carl, PhD (Committee Chair); David Adams, PhD (Committee Member); Carl Rak, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Shelton, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Tebeau, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Education; Education History; History; Political Science; Religion; Religious Education; Religious History; School Administration; Teacher Education; Teaching; Theology

Keywords:

Catholic; Geghan; Cincinnati; Cleveland; Rutherford B. Hayes; school funding; church taxation; nativism; Gilmour

Duffy, RyanTrouble along the Border: The Transformation of the U.S.-Mexican Border during the Nineteenth Century
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2013, History
The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the transformation of U.S.-Mexican relations throughout the nineteenth century and its impact on the border during the administrations of James K. Polk and Rutherford B. Hayes. This transformation is exemplified by the movement away from hostile interactions during Polk's presidency to the cooperative nature that arose between Hayes and, then President of Mexico, Porfirio Diaz. In addition, another aim was to place the importance of the public sphere in framing the policy making of the United States and Mexican governments. The thesis focused upon the research surrounding Polk, Hayes, and their interactions with Mexico during their terms as president. The secondary materials were supplemented with corresponding primary source material from the presidents as well as their close advisors such as newspaper articles, correspondences, and speeches from both the United States and Mexico. The conclusion of the work demonstrates that the transformation in the border, first, the United States to become the dominant power on the continent, ending its rivalry with Mexico. Second, the ability of Porfirio Diaz to bring some stability to the Mexican political structure that permitted him to work in conjunction with the United States to control the border in exchange for recognition. Third, the increase in economic ties of the United States and Mexico that made war an unprofitable and dangerous outcome for both countries. Last, the difference in the president's personalities, Polk being ambitious, while Hayes following a cautious policy, as well as the fading of American expansionism and the concept of "manifest destiny."

Committee:

Amilcar Challu, Dr. (Advisor); Scott Martin, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca Mancuso, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Latin American History

Keywords:

Rutherford Birchard Hayes; James Knox Polk; Porfirio Diaz; railroads; United States-Mexican border; Texas; Mexican-American War; William Maxwell Evarts; California; United States Presidents