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Ribera, Deborah(Re)Presentation: An Affective Exploration of Ethnographic Documentary Film Production
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, American Culture Studies
This dissertation uses various theories of affect to re-interpret and re-present the idea of ethnographic documentary film production through the lens of cultural studies. I put forth a more experimental understanding of production that examines the ways in which self-other relations inform the producer of the film, the process of filmmaking, and the product that is the film. Using my own experience filming an ethnographic documentary in Haiti as a case study, I examine the construction of my perspective as a producer, significant moments and encounters that informed the process of making a documentary, and the feedback from a viewing of the documentary. I employ a combination of methods to narrate the conjuncture of documentary film production, using a retrospective analysis of personal narrative as well as elements of autoethnography to construct a critically reflexive analysis of this case. Through this analysis, I connect significant moments that make up the conjuncture of documentary film production and put them in conversation with my own subjectivity through the language of affect theory. This study incorporates my identities as a therapist, an educator, a nonprofit executive, a documentary filmmaker, and a scholar. In thinking deeply about my production process through this dissertation, I was able to identify ways in which I could make a better, more ethical documentary in the future. Ultimately, I conclude that an affective understanding of ethnographic documentary filmmaking can help producers--especially amateur ones--become more ethically accountable for the material consequences of encounters with the other that filmmaking facilitates for both those filming and those being filmed.

Committee:

Radhika Gajjala (Advisor); Ellen Berry (Committee Member); Thomas Mascaro (Committee Member); Marcus Sherrell (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Education; Mass Media; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; School Counseling; Therapy

Keywords:

affect; affect theory; cultural studies; documentary film production; ethnographic documentary; documentary; ethics; Beyond the Block; nonprofits; counseling; education; case study; autoethnography

Poland, Jennifer LeeLIGHTS, CAMERA, EMOTION! AN EXAMINATION ON FILM LIGHTING AND ITS IMPACT ON AUDIENCES’ EMOTIONAL RESPONSE
Master of Applied Communication Theory and Methodology, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
The current study examined the impact of three film lighting styles on participants’ emotional responses. The light styles - High Key, Low Key, and Available Light – were selected based on Film theory. Thus, this study combines Media Effects and Film literature to empirically study the impact of structural elements of film on media audiences. An experiment was conducted manipulating three levels of lighting. The According to film theory, a film presented in high key will cause audiences to feel higher levels of uplifting emotions such as happiness, joy, or humor, a film in low key will cause more feelings of suspense, mystery, and intrigue, and a film presented in available light will illicit feelings of realness or grittiness. A total of 162 participants viewed the film, 54 people watched each stimulus piece. Significant relationship between different lighting styles and the emotional response of viewers was found. Participants who viewed the film in Low-Key lighting reported significantly more feelings of mystery, suspense, malice, intrigue, and other uneasy feelings associated with Low Key lighting. Surprisingly, Low Key lighting also elicited higher levels of emotional response in more happy and positive emotions. . Though this is just the first empirical study of emotional responses in relation to film lighting style, significant results were found. Further studies must be conducted to develop a database and to provide more support to the findings in this study as the results indicate a relationship between film lighting and emotional response that has been indicated in film literature. This relationship can be empirically tested with significant results.

Committee:

Cheryl Bracken, PhD (Advisor); George Ray, PhD (Committee Member); Anup Kumar, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Experiments; Film Studies

Keywords:

Film, Film Production, Communication, Film Lighting Theory, Experiment,

El Rimawi, NidalDevelopment of an Audio Visual Tool for Medical Training at Kennedy Space Center
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2006, Aerospace Medicine
El Rimawi, Nidal. M.D. M.S., Department of Aerospace Medicine, Wright State University, 2006. Development of an Audio-Visual Tool for Medical Training at Kennedy Space Center As part of an effort to improve efficiency of space-flight medical support at Kennedy Space Center, a training video was created to replace a series of lectures given before a launch or landing of the Space Shuttle. The video was designed to familiarize volunteer physicians from around the country with the specific emergency response protocols for a Space Shuttle launch or landing emergency at Kennedy Space Center. The methods used were consistent with standard film making techniques as outlined in several film making texts. The Production was divided into three phases; A pre-production phase wherein the research, screenwriting and production planning took place, a Production phase consisting of the actual filming of the various scenes in the script and finally, a post-production phase during which the video was edited, music was added and the finished video screened and copied. The result was that the video was completed in seven months with the participation of over a hundred people. The final video won several awards for educational and government film and met all expectations of the author and the medical department. It was ultimately given to the Aerospace Medicine Residency program at Wright State University and to the medical staff at Kennedy Space Center.

Committee:

Robin Dodge (Advisor)

Keywords:

Aerospace Medicine; Space Medicine; Medical Education; Audio-Visual Tool; Kennedy Space Center; Space Medical Support; Emergency Medicine; Spaceflight Support; Spaceflight Emergencies; Film Production