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Conte, Carolina SiqueiraBonds: A Theory Of Appropriation For Shakespeare’s The Merchant Of Venice Realized In Film
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2005, Comparative Arts (Fine Arts)

This dissertation re-names and re-defines the process of film adaptation by presenting a theory of appropriation realized in film. The theoretical formulation proposed is further developed and illustrated in its application to William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice.

The theory of appropriation realized in film is elaborated through interdisciplinary and intertextual approaches. Aiming for the achievement of a contemporary film, for a specific contemporary audience, the theory focuses on the particularities of the film medium and the historical and cultural conditions determining the realization. It is important for this theoretical proposal to emphasize that the reality informing the contemporary process is inherently distinct from the reality informing the material appropriated.

Committee:

Keith Harris (Advisor)

Subjects:

Cinema; Theater

Keywords:

Film Adaptations; Shakespeare Film Adaptations; Film; Shakespeare on Film; Film and Literature; "The Merchant of Venice"

Myers, Elena KA Semiotic Analysis of Russian Literature in Modern Russian Film Adaptations (Case Studies of Boris Godunov and The Captain’s Daughter)
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
Abstract The current study analyzes signs and signifiers that constitute the structural composition of Pushkin’s historical works Boris Godunov and The Captain’s Daughter and compare them with their Soviet and post-Soviet screen adaptations. I argue that the popularity of these literary works with filmmakers is based on their inexhaustible topicality for Russian society of the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, and therefore reassessment of their film adaptations guides us towards developing a better understanding of the sociopolitical complexities in modern Russia. The analysis employs methods of semiotics of film, which is a relatively young science, but has already become one of the most promising fields in the theory of cinema. The research is based on the scholarship of such eminent theorists and semioticians as Metz, Bluestone, Barthes, Lotman, Bakhtin, and others. By performing semiotic analysis of Russian intermedial transpositions and Pushkin’s source texts, the study demonstrates the parallels between the historical periods and contemporary Russia.

Committee:

Brian Joseph (Advisor); Alexander Burry (Advisor)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Foreign Language; History; Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Russian literature; Russian cinema; Russian film; Russian classics; Russian film adaptations; Russian literature of the nineteenth century; semiotics of film; semiotics of cinema; semiotics of literature; historical film; semiotics of film adaptations

Strader, Laura KAn Exploration in Funding Independent Film
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2014, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
Film making is expensive. It can be done cheaply, but to raise a film to the level of art it requires an amount of increased integrity. This can be achieved through better cameras, crew, actors, props, locations, editing, and special effects (SFX) – all things that cost money. Film making is possibly more expensive than any other art form, especially when considering that a film must not only be created, but also edited, printed, and distributed in order to reach its target audience. Without backing from a major studio, the task of fundraising for a film can be daunting, unless considering alternatives. This thesis explores and concisely presents ways in which film makers can borrow and adapt strategies from other art forms, as well as non-profit and for-profit business models, to create a diverse funding mix to finance independent films.

Committee:

Kara Stewart, Mrs. (Advisor); Durand Pope, Mr. (Committee Member); Craig Joseph, Mr. (Committee Member); Neil Sapienza, Mr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Film Studies; Fine Arts; Theater Studies

Keywords:

art; cinema; film; independent film; film making; movies; fundraising for independent film; nonprofit fundraising; fundraising plan; social media for fundraising; crowdfunding; grant writing; solicitations

Shankar, Vikram A Symphonies of Horror: Musical Experimentation in Howard Shore's Work with David Cronenberg
BA, Oberlin College, 2017, Music
With a career spanning almost forty years, Canadian composer Howard Shore has become one of the most respected and sought after film composers working in the industry today. Much of his work, in particular his scores for the Lord of the Rings films, have received much academic attention; his longstanding working relationship with Canadian horror filmmaker David Cronenberg, however, has not yet benefited from such academic inquiry. Using the films The Brood, Videodrome, The Fly, and Naked Lunch as case studies, this thesis examines the way that Shore uses the arena of Cronenberg’s films as a laboratory for personal musical experimentation. Examples include Shore’s use of electronic synthesizer sounds alongside a string orchestra for Videodrome, implementations of against-the-grain writing for The Fly, and the incorporation of free-jazz aesthetics in Naked Lunch. Using as sources Howard Shore’s words and what academic inquiry exists in this field, but more often utilizing my own analysis and observations of the music and films, I argue that Shore’s scores incorporate such musical experimentation to work in tandem with Cronenberg’s own experimental art. As such, Shore’s scores for Cronenberg’s films are a prime illustration of the practical value of experimental composition, showing that there is room for experimental composition in music outside of the realm of academia and indeed that such music can have commercial potential.

Committee:

Stephen Hartke (Advisor); Charles Edward McGuire (Committee Chair); Rebecca Fülöp (Committee Member); Jesse Jones (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Music

Keywords:

david cronenberg; howard shore; the brood; naked lunch; the fly; videodrome; film composition; film scoring; experimentation; experimental composition; film studies; film music studies; musicology

Bernard, MarkSelling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2010, American Culture Studies/Popular Culture

In 2006, journalists began writing about the emergence of a group of young filmmakers who specialized in horror films featuring torture and graphic violence. Because of their gory and bloody movies, these directors came to be known as “the Splat Pack,” and they were depicted by the press as subversive outsiders rebelling against the Hollywood machine. However, what many discussions of the Splat Pack ignore is how the success of this group of directors was brought about and enabled by the industrial structure of Hollywood at the middle of the first decade of the twenty-first century. Drawing from political economy methodology, this study seeks to understand and illuminate the industrial changes and realignments that gave rise to the Splat Pack, first by looking at how industrial changes have affected the content of horror films of the past, and secondly by examining how the advent of DVD technology made way for the gory, “Unrated” films of the Splat Pack.

DVD played a major role in the rise of the Splat Pack by changing the way horror films were presented to their potential audiences and by leading to an industry acceptance of “Unrated” films. With this in mind, this study then turns to an analysis of several key films directed by the Splat Pack and uses the commodity form of the DVD as a lens through which to interpret these films. By foregrounding the commodity status of these films, this study resists reading these films as subversive manifestos. Instead, it seeks to use these films as a means of better understanding how commodity form affects content. The ultimate argument is that the films of the Splat Pack are commercial products made particularly salable by the DVD era and must be confronted and understood as such.

Committee:

Dr. Cynthia Baron (Committee Chair); Dr. Scott Magelssen (Committee Member); Dr. Paul McDonald (Committee Member); Dr. Maisha Wester (Committee Member)

Keywords:

film; film industry studies; horror film genre; film and technology

Fischer, SylviaDass Hämmer und Herzen synchron erschallen. Erkundungen zu Heimat in Literatur und Film der DDR der 50er und 60er Jahre. May hammers and hearts ring out in unison. Exploring Heimat in GDR literature and film of the 1950s and 1960s.
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Germanic Languages and Literatures
This dissertation explores manifestations of the topos Heimat in East German novels and films of the 1950s and 1960s. In particular, it identifies Heimat as a cultural-anthropological concept taking shape as an individual and social human endeavor, and explores the tensions, that arise between this endeavor and a socialist Heimat as defined by the GDR state. I propose that these tensions were never fully resolved, although it was a core ideal of the socialist society to harmonize them. Analyses of novels by Hans Marchwitza, Anna Seghers, Karl Heinz Jakobs, and Werner Bräunig, and feature films and documentary films by Kurt Maetzig, Konrad Wolf, and Winfried Junge reveal different approaches to the understanding of Heimat, as well as conceptions of how to resolve the tensions described above. Their conclusions range from equating Heimat with a societal form, to acknowledging and wrestling with an increasing gap between the individual’s grasp of Heimat and that of the state, and to mourning this gap. By employing Heimat as a discursive medium, this dissertation adds a new dimension to the ongoing discussion about the development of real socialism and its discontents in the GDR. It ultimately proposes that their reconciliation remained an utopian promise.

Committee:

Helen Fehervary (Advisor)

Subjects:

Germanic Literature; Literature

Keywords:

GDR; DDR; Heimat; Literatur und Film der DDR; GDR literature and film; Literatur und Film der DDR der 50er und 60er Jahre; GDR literature and film of the 1950s and 1960s

Chang, Hsin-NingUnfolding Time to Configure a Collective Entity: Alternative Digital Movies as Malaysian National Cinema
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Interdisciplinary Arts (Fine Arts)
This dissertation argues that the alternative digital movies that emerged in the early 21st century Malaysia have become a part of the Malaysian national cinema. This group of movies includes independent feature-length films, documentaries, short and experimental films and videos. They closely engage with the unique conditions of Malaysia’s economic development, ethnic relationships, and cultural practices, which together comprise significant parts of the nationhood of Malaysia. The analyses and discussions of the content and practices of these films allow us not only to recognize the economic, social, and historical circumstances of Malaysia, but we also find how these movies reread and rework the existed imagination of the nation, and then actively contribute in configuring the collective entity of Malaysia.

Committee:

Erin Shevaugn Schlumpf (Advisor); Marina Peterson (Committee Member); Vladimir Marchenkov (Committee Member); Gene Ammarell (Committee Member); Louis-Georges Schwartz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian Studies; Film Studies; Fine Arts; Social Research

Keywords:

Contemporary Malaysia, Independent Film, National Cinema, Experimental Film, Postcolonialism, Postmodernity, Ethnic Chinese, Southeast Asia, Film Festival, Time in Film, New Malaysian Cinema

Gaswint, Kiera MA Comparative Study of Women's Aggression
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2018, English/Literature
This project explores womens aggression in superhero, science fiction, and crime film through a close reading of Wonder Woman, Ghost in the Shell, and Atomic Blonde. All based in genres that are traditionally considered for boys, these films are different from other superhero, science fiction, and crime films because they feature female leads with aggressive tendencies. Using Dana Crowley Jacks theory of womens aggression and Yvonne Tasker and Diane Negras definition of postfeminism, I argue that Diana, Major, and Lorraine revolutionize the image of the lead postfeminist character by offering examples of womens aggression that resist acceptable, palatable representations of womens aggression. Whereas in the past there have been many representations of aggressive women, those past representations have been affected by postfeminism in a way that commodifies and limits their ability to be authentically aggressive. I examine how these new films, Wonder Woman, Ghost in the Shell, and Atomic Blonde, play into and ultimately resist postfeminist representations because of their aggression and how that aggression is played out on the female body. In the following chapters I analyze how the heroines in Wonder Woman, Ghost in the Shell, and Atomic Blonde disrupt postfeminist notions and prior images of womens aggression by explicitly examining aggressive women who are not domesticated or justified by rape.

Committee:

Kimberly Coates (Committee Chair); Jeffrey Brown (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative; Comparative Literature; Film Studies; Gender Studies; Language Arts; Literature

Keywords:

gender; womens aggression; sexuality; Atomic Blonde; Ghost in the Shell; Wonder Woman; female body; postfeminism; aggression; literary; film; superhero; crime film; action film; superhero film; superheroine; heroine

Meinke, Ashley ErinKent State University at Stark's First Student Film Festival: Organizing a Campus/Community Event
BA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Communication Studies
The aim of organizing Kent State University at Stark's First Student Film Festival was to create an educational and community-based event that supports student creativity, all while utilizing/honing the various communication skills I have acquired through my degree in Applied Communication. These skills include event planning, advertising, networking, visual design, public speaking, and other similar skills. The thesis captures the journey of organizing and executing the film festival, from start to finish, through a detailed journal, reflection paper and other related documents. It also displays the various materials--such as posters and event photos--that were created to promote the festival. Finally, the project features the two short films I wrote, directed, filmed, acted in, edited and premiered in the festival. These films are in addition to the student films that were submitted by Kent State students. In sum, the thesis serves as a record and representation of the various steps that are needed to organize a campus/community event.

Committee:

Leslie Heaphy, Dr. (Advisor); Erin Hollenbaugh (Committee Member); Matthew Pallotta (Committee Member); Sara Newman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cinematography; Communication; Design; Film Studies; Mass Communications

Keywords:

Kent State University at Stark's First Student Film Festival; Ashley Meinke; Event Planning; Communication; Kent Stark Film Festival; Student Films; Advertising; Design; Event; Film; Executive Director Ashley Meinke

Doran, Melissa K(De)Humanizing Narratives of Terrorism in Spain and Peru
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Spanish and Portuguese
Both Spain and Peru experienced protracted violent conflicts between insurgent groups and State forces during the second half of the twentieth century. In Spain, this involved Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (ETA), a radical Basque nationalist organization which sought Basque autonomy via armed struggle in a conflict which lasted from 1959 until 2011. In Peru, the insurgent threat was represented by Sendero Luminoso, a Maoist guerrilla insurgency based in the Peruvian highlands that sought drastic sociopolitical change within Peru. Sendero Luminoso launched what they deemed a people’s war in 1980, and the bloody conflict that ensued continued until 1992. The damage caused by each of these conflicts was monumental, both in terms of the loss of human life and damage to infrastructure in both countries. In this dissertation I examine the depiction of these conflicts in a selection of Peruvian and Spanish novels and films. I argue that each work promotes a certain version of the conflict it describes, and that this can be revealed through an analysis of the humanizing and dehumanizing discourses at play in the representation of the actors in both of these conflicts. From Peru, I will examine Santiago Roncagliolo’s novel Abril rojo (2006) and Fabrizio Aguilar’s film Paloma de papel (2003). From Spain, I will analyze the novel Ojos que no ven (2010) by J.A. Gonzalez Sainz and the film Yoyes (2000) by Helena Taberna. In this work, I argue that these discourses of humanization and dehumanization affirm or deny, respectively, the humanity of subjects involved in these violent political conflicts. I assert that dehumanization is employed to legitimate systemic violence during a state of exception, while humanization serves to refute that legitimation by providing a more comprehensive image of the actors and their motivations. Furthermore, I signal the significance of the use of these discourses, as I consider these works to be part of a larger corpus from a number of disciplines that help to develop the collective memory surrounding these conflicts. In that way, I posit that the representations of the actors seen in these works, including the State, the insurgent organizations, and the general public, can contribute to the way in which audience members remember these conflicts and, therefore, highlight the potential implications of the representations presented in these novels and films.

Committee:

Ulises Juan Zevallos-Aguilar (Advisor); Ignacio Corona (Committee Member); Aurélie Vialette (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Literature

Keywords:

literature; film; terrorism; Spain; ETA; Peru; Sendero Luminoso; Latin American Literature; Spanish Literature; Latin American Film; Spanish Film

Bauer, Shad A.Film, Music, and the Narrational Extra Dimension
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2013, Philosophy (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis addresses the role of so called nondiegetic film music, also known as background or score music, as it pertains to the overall structure of processes involved in cinematic presentation. Some of the questions that are normally asked here are: Where is this music supposed to be coming from? Who is responsible for it? What is it really doing? In addressing this common filmic feature we will clear up several foundational concepts in film, provide a rough categorization of film music, critique Jerrold Levinson’s recent attempt to answer the above questions, and ultimately arrive at a consideration of nondiegetic film music as a kind of narrational extra dimension. We will ultimately reject the view that music is instrumental in building narrative facts, in favor of one that holds music to be significant to the very processes of film narration, affecting how a film is presented.

Committee:

John Bender, Dr (Advisor); Vladimir Marchenkov, Dr (Committee Member); Arthur Zucker, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Film Studies; Philosophy

Keywords:

Film Narration; Philosophy of Film; narrative significance; narrational significance; Film; music; narration; narrative; extra dimension; Levinson; narrative agency; indefinite narrator; narrator; ubiquitous narrators;

Ranade, Aditya PrakashStructure Property Relationships in Various Layered Polymeric Systems
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2007, Macromolecular Science

Layered polymeric structures made via forced assembly have shown unique optical, mechanical, electrical and barrier properties. The advantages include the flexibility of the process in scaling from macro to nano scale; and the ability to incorporate electrically/optically active small molecules.

Excellent control over the cell size is demonstrated in PP foam/film structures. Cell size can be reduced considerably by increasing the number of layers without adversely affecting the density. The cell structure and the compressive response of these structures is similar to Cork. The tensile and compressive moduli could be predicted using series and parallel composite models. The constituent materials can be chosen to alter the flexibility of the composite.

Narrowband 1D photonic crystals have been fabricated using microlayer coextrusion. Assemblies of 128 alternating polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate layers were successfully made that demonstrated the tuning of the photonic band gap. The structural perfection of the photonic crystals was evaluated via model simulations and atomic force microscopy.

Alternate layers of a 1D photonic crystal could be doped with an optical limiting dye and scaling of the layers could be adjusted so as to enhance the optical limiting effect with the layer reflectivity. A prerequisite for this is achieving dispersion of dye molecules in the monomer form. Aggregation studies of PbPc(β-CP)4 were carried out with blends in polycarbonate using the UV-VIS spectroscopy. An attractive feature of the polycarbonate blends is the high concentration of monomer. The concentration effect is satisfactorily described by the monomer/dimer equilibrium.

Solid state structure of these blends was probed. In the concentration range 0 to 0.1%, monomer fills up large free volume holes in polycarbonate, as indicated by the sharp increase in density and refractive index. Between 0.1 to~8%, PbPc(β-CP)4 is mostly in monomer form. Monomer “antiplasticizes” polycarbonate, resulting in reduced glass transition temperature, increased modulus and suppression of the sub-Tg γ relaxation for polycarbonate. The refractive index-density relationship can be described by the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. Above ~ 8 %, formation of aggregates is detected. The densification of the blends are attributed to the combined effect of reduction in free volume and the addition of PbPc(β-CP)4.

Committee:

Anne Hiltner (Advisor)

Subjects:

Plastics Technology

Keywords:

foam/film; ¿¿¿¿-CP; PbPc; PP foam/PP; film; layers on foam/film; cell size

Hogue, Kari LRepresentaciones de la Guerra Civil Espanola en la novela y el cine: Hacia una comprension del pasado y una reconciliacion con la realidad actual
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Spanish
The Spanish Civil War took place between 1936 and 1939 and exhibited the nations division in terms of class, religion, politics and ideology. Throughout the post-war years of repression and Francoist dictatorship, many people elected to forget about the war or were censured in their attempts to express their memories and stories. A half century later, in response to this forgetting, society has responded through various means: conversations, debates and cultural representations. This study examines a collection of six novels and five films from the post-Franco era that illustrate diverse experiences of the war and the post-war repression. They are analyzed based on the different perspectives taken to recount a specific history as well as the socio-historical moment in which they were produced, as a representation of the society. The novels and films portray the complexity of the war and the ensuing difficulty of investigating its victims. Long before any discussion of Spains 2007 Law of Historical Memory had begun, these authors and directors reveal the challenging but necessary process of recuperating historical memory.

Committee:

Nathan Richardson, PhD (Advisor); Amy Robinson, PhD (Committee Member); Pedro Porbén, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

European History; Foreign Language; History; Literature

Keywords:

Spanish Civil War; 1936-1939; Historical Memory; Law of Historical Memory; Victims of War; Spanish film; War novels; Spanish film; War film; Ley de Memoria Historica; Victimas de la Guerra; Guerra Civil; Representaciones en la novela y el cine

Kimball, Samuel H.Evaporation is the Primary Mechanism of Tear Film Thinning
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2009, Vision Science
The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of evaporation in the thinning of the pre-corneal tear film. The human tear film is essential to the optical and physiological function of the eye. A malfunctioning tear film can be visually disruptive as well as cause damage to the ocular surface. Dry eye disease is an ocular surface disorder that is essentially a manifestation of a faulty tear film. Dry eye disease represents a significant public health concern and a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the eradication of the tear film will be needed in order to better treat and manage this significant disease. There are three possible mechanisms of tear film thinning and they include absorption (inward flow), tangential flow, and evaporation (outward flow) of the tears. Previous research, designed to establish the contribution of each of the three proposed mechanisms of tear film thinning, has led to disagreement as to the significance of evaporation or outward flow in the thinning of the human tear film. This study was designed to discover the contribution of evaporation in the thinning of the pre-corneal tear film. Tear thickness values and tear film thinning rates were gathered using spectral interferometry from the right eye of 39 subjects with a mean age of 30.0 ± 9.5 years. Tear film data was gathered under two differing conditions for each subject: open-air and airtight goggles. Two separate recordings of the tear film were first made given the open-air condition then two recordings were made for subjects wearing the airtight goggles. Each subject also completed an Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire. Data analysis revealed that the mean initial thickness for subjects under open-air conditions was 3.46 ± 0.83 µm compared to 3.54 ± 0.83 µm for subjects wearing goggles (p = 0.53). The mean tear film thinning rate for subjects in open-air was 3.53 ± 4.12 µm/min and -0.16 ± 1.78 µm/min for the same subjects wearing airtight goggles. The mean OSDI score was 10.8 ± 7.1, with four subjects being classified as dry eye (OSDI > 22). A significant reduction in the tear film thinning rate is seen when evaporation is controlled with airtight swimming goggles. In fact on average the tear film thinning rate is reduced to nearly zero when simulating a non-evaporative environment. This suggests that evaporation is the primary means by which the tear film thins. The reason for the contradictory evidence put forth in the literature concerning the contributions of the three proposed mechanisms of tear film thinning may be explained by the difference in testing methodology. It appears conclusive from this current study data that evaporation is the primary mechanism of tear film thinning.

Committee:

Jason Nichols, PhD, OD, MPH (Advisor); Kelly Nichols, PhD, OD, MPH (Committee Member); Ewen King-Smith, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ophthalmology

Keywords:

tear film; dry eye; evaporation; tear film thinning; interferometry; mechanisms of tear film thinning

Schweitzer, Dennis ChristopherTon & Traum : A Critical Analysis Of The Use Of Sound Effects And Music In Contemporary Narrative Film
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2004, Film (Fine Arts)

We often talk about the mysterious Magic of the Movies , the unique ability of the filmic medium to take the audience into another world, another era, even another galaxy. We also talk about films unique ability to record life as it happens and to document what is going on in our world, be it right where we live or at the most remote place on Earth. But whenever we look at film as an art form, most of us tend to exclusively credit the visual component of the film, i.e. cinematography, topped off with the occasional thought on editing. The sonic component of film, however, is unjustly ignored most of the time. Sure, we know the name Hans Zimmer from Gladiator or Danny Elfman from Batman and most recently Spider-Man 2 , but how many of us know who recorded the location sound on Master and Commander ?

The goal of Ton & Traum is to give the film-soundtrack the credit it deserves. I will start out with an analysis on how music, dialogue, and sound effects work together and show what powerful a tool for storytelling and creation of drama and suspense the soundtrack is in the right hands. The second section will look at the soundtrack following different theoretical approaches such as semiotics and psychoanalysis. The third and final section will take it from there and look at the use of Sound Effects in the Sci-Fi TV series Stargate SG-1 .

I hope to demonstrate the importance of the film-soundtrack in order to create that certain Magic of the Movies . I hope to show that film (and Television) is a carefully balanced compound of certain elements that come together - one of them being the soundtrack - to bring the filmic work of art to life.

Committee:

Ruth Bradley (Advisor)

Subjects:

Cinema; Music

Keywords:

Sound Effects; Sound Design; Film Studies (contemporary); Film Music; Sci-Fi Film and Television

Poland, Jennifer LeeLIGHTS, CAMERA, EMOTION! AN EXAMINATION ON FILM LIGHTING AND ITS IMPACT ON AUDIENCES’ EMOTIONAL RESPONSE
Master of Applied Communication Theory and Methodology, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
The current study examined the impact of three film lighting styles on participants’ emotional responses. The light styles - High Key, Low Key, and Available Light – were selected based on Film theory. Thus, this study combines Media Effects and Film literature to empirically study the impact of structural elements of film on media audiences. An experiment was conducted manipulating three levels of lighting. The According to film theory, a film presented in high key will cause audiences to feel higher levels of uplifting emotions such as happiness, joy, or humor, a film in low key will cause more feelings of suspense, mystery, and intrigue, and a film presented in available light will illicit feelings of realness or grittiness. A total of 162 participants viewed the film, 54 people watched each stimulus piece. Significant relationship between different lighting styles and the emotional response of viewers was found. Participants who viewed the film in Low-Key lighting reported significantly more feelings of mystery, suspense, malice, intrigue, and other uneasy feelings associated with Low Key lighting. Surprisingly, Low Key lighting also elicited higher levels of emotional response in more happy and positive emotions. . Though this is just the first empirical study of emotional responses in relation to film lighting style, significant results were found. Further studies must be conducted to develop a database and to provide more support to the findings in this study as the results indicate a relationship between film lighting and emotional response that has been indicated in film literature. This relationship can be empirically tested with significant results.

Committee:

Cheryl Bracken, PhD (Advisor); George Ray, PhD (Committee Member); Anup Kumar, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Experiments; Film Studies

Keywords:

Film, Film Production, Communication, Film Lighting Theory, Experiment,

Ferrari, Matthew P.Mysterious Objects of Knowledge: An Interpretation of Three Feature Films by Apichatpong Weerasethakul in Terms of the Ethnographic Paradigm
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2006, Film (Fine Arts)
Three feature films from acclaimed Thai art film director Apichatpong Weerasethakul–Mysterious Object at Noon, Blissfully Yours, and Tropical Malady are interpreted here within the context of ethnographic discourse. In particular, this thesis argues for an appreciation of the films as experimental ethnographic “writings” closely bound to the generic blurring of non-fiction and fiction film modes. Furthermore, recurring anthropological thematics are situated within the discursive web of writer-text-reader relations. One especially prominent and overarching thematic addressed throughout is the evocation of local or traditional knowledge in an increasingly globalized Thai cultural setting, and how this is enacted formally by a society/nature dialectic. Finally, these films are situated within a broader art world shift towards quasi-anthropological art in which a primitivist paradigm is still very much in operation, implicating the artist’s cultural identity in relation to the cultural content of the works and the cultural location of their dominant interpretive community.

Committee:

Adam Knee (Advisor)

Keywords:

Thai Film; ethnographic film; documentary; experimental film

Shook, Steffi A.Campy Conclusions: Examining the Subversion of Heteronormative Relationship Sanctions in American Film Musicals
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2013, Film (Fine Arts)
The heteronormative endings that conclude American film musicals can be read as camp or ironic in light of the subversion of hegemonic relationship sanctions that proves consistent throughout the genre. In order to understand the reading of camp into these endings one must examine the ways in which American film musicals subvert hegemonic relationship sanctions. This subversion takes place through the allowance of female agency via musical performance, the abundance of gender play, the presentation of alternative family structures specifically through the glorification of communal living, and the possibility for alternative masculinities. While these endings make the films available to camp readings, this thesis focuses on their ironic function in that they constitute a marked reversal of the films' subversive tropes.

Committee:

Louis-Georges Schwartz (Committee Chair); Michael Gillespie (Committee Member); Ofer Eliaz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Film Studies

Keywords:

film; film musicals; camp; subversion; gender; film endings

O'Hara, Mark WilliamFoucault and Film: Critical Theories and Representations of Mental Illness
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2014, Educational Leadership
This study investigates the representation of mental illness in Hollywood film. Using an approach grounded in Foucauldian theory and media literacy, this study will examine six Hollywood films covering a span of six decades, roughly from the end of World War II through the first decade of the twenty-first century. When writers, directors and producers of films portray characters with psychological disorders/disabilities, these representations may result in negative attitudes and skewed impressions among viewers/consumers. Further, inaccurate and demonizing portrayals in filmic texts serve only to create blueprints of stigmatization that could affect real-world persons with psychological disorders. With the agenda of exploring the hegemonic infrastructures of stigma and othering, this study will employ a theoretical framework of Foucauldian theory, along with critical media literacy perspectives to unpack the discursive power carried by popular visual media, as well as to analyze dominant cultural attitudes toward the normal/abnormal binary. In an attempt to emphasize the need for increased awareness of and sensitivity toward the lived experiences of persons with psychological disorders, this study will also highlight the value of curricularizing films featuring mental health/illness issues, and of recommending ways of striving for social justice for persons with these invisible disabilities.

Committee:

Dennis Carlson, PhD (Committee Chair); Richard Quantz, PhD (Committee Member); Thomas Poetter, PhD (Committee Member); Frank Fitch, PhD (Committee Member); Sheri Leafgren, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Gender Studies; Literature

Keywords:

Foucault; film; Hollywood film; representations; mental illness; disability; disability studies; Shutter Island; The Soloist; One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest; Patch Adams; The Snake Pit; Girl, Interrupted; education; film literature

Muhlberger, Patrick J.Redefining the Independent Filmmaker's American Dream from 1990 to 2010
Bachelor of Science of Media Arts and Studies (BSC), Ohio University, 2010, Media Arts and Studies
This thesis covers the effects technology and distribution have had on the independent filmmaker's ability to achieve mainstream success from 1990 to 2010.

Committee:

Eric Williams (Advisor); Arthur Cromwell, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Motion Pictures

Keywords:

film distribution; lee toland krieger; sundance; independent film; film festivals; american dream; miramax;

Drake, Susan WiebeMaria Felix: the last great Mexican film diva: the representation of women in Mexican film, 1940-1970
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Spanish and Portuguese
In my project, I analyze the star text of María Félix (1914-2002). In spite of her prolific film career of 47 films and her memorable image in the media, the scholarly treatment of her films and larger star text has been limited. As vintage film magazines and Mexican melodramatic comics attest, Félix was very visible and her personal life was scrutinized as her “real-life” self played out characteristics from her mala mujer film persona—her multiple husbands and lovers, her relationship with her son, and even her wardrobe choices. I analyze many of her films and her image in other forms of media such as fotonovelas, trade magazines, and her biographical sources in the following chapters. Her star image is powerful and far-reaching and presents an alternative model of Mexican womanhood from the beginning of her film career in the 1940s through (and even beyond) her last film in 1970. The star text of María Félix is a site that registered tensions between modernity and the traditional at a particular moment in Mexican history. The Mexican Revolution of 1910 brought many changes to society as warfare destabilized the family and disrupted the region. After the war, the Revolution became institutionalized as the government attempted to put into practice the goals of the Revolution. From the 1940s and throughout 1950s and 1960s it was a time of increased industrialization and urbanization as people migrated to the cities to find employment, as it became increasingly difficult to support a family through farming. These social tensions registered in her films and star text are in relation to women’s changing roles as Mexican women gained more political freedoms, including national suffrage in 1953,and began working outside the home as the nation became more industrialized and urbanized throughout the 1940s and subsequent decades.

Committee:

Laura Podalsky (Advisor)

Keywords:

Maria Felix; Mexico; Mexican film; women in film; mujer; Taming of the Shrew; Prostitution; prostitute; soldadera; film star; Revolution

Rosenblatt, Jacob A.Cinematic Style: The Effects of Technology
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Ohio University, 2010, Film
This thesis chronicles the history and evolution of American mainstream cinema technology as it pertains to camera, lenses, lighting, camera support, and film stocks.

Committee:

Steven Ross (Advisor); Jeanette Buck (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

cinematography;film technology;cinema technology;movie history;camera;lenses;film lighting;camera support;film stock;

Ki, Jun-WanTitanium Sponge on Titanium Substrate for Titanium Electrolytic Capacitor Anodes
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Materials Science and Engineering
Capacitors are energy storage devices capable of supplying electric energy. Volumetric and gravimetric energy storage efficiencies are some of the important criteria for evaluating electrolytic capacitors as energy storage devices. High energy density capacitors can be achieved by anodic growth of a dielectric film on surface enhanced valve-metal. Electrodes with high surface area accessible along with wide and short conduction paths (electrolyte) have advantages as power devices. Surface-enhanced metal substrates can be made by various methods. One method is by oxidation followed by reduction. Oxidation of a metal and reduction of oxide are generally associated with volume changes. During growth of an oxide scale on a metal substrate, the volume expansion of an attached oxide scale can only occur in the thickness direction. During subsequent reduction of the oxide volume shrinkage occurs. It can take place along all directions, in particular in the plane of the oxide scale. This shrinkage leads to pores in the metal layer that is formed by the reduction of the oxide scale. Therefore, a layer of titanium sponge can be obtained by the oxidation plus reduction method. The titanium sponge layer can be anodized in order to grow a thin dielectric film on the surface of the sponge metal. In this way it is made into a capacitor anode. Reduction of titanium oxide scale with magnesium or calcium produces titanium sponge with different morphologies. Magnesium-reduced sponge has a higher degree of porosity than calcium-reduced sponge. The different morphologies of the reduced oxide scale result from different reduction behaviors in the presence of magnesium or calcium. Possible mechanisms are suggested to explain how magnesium and calcium affect the reduction behavior of titanium oxide. Because titanium anodic films tend to have high leakage current, titanium is not used for commercial electrolytic capacitor anodes. Nitrogen and oxygen doping of titanium surface layer enables the growth of a doped anodic titanium film and can decrease leakage current of titanium anodic film. Leakage current of titanium anodic film decreases with higher [N + O] doping level. TEM micrograph shows that such doped titanium anodic film has an improved micro-structure.

Committee:

Gerhard Welsch (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Materials Science

Keywords:

Capacitor; Electrolytic capacitor; Dielectric film; Anodic film; Anodic titanium oxide film; Metal Sponge; Surface Enhancement; Titanium Oxide

Polley, Kerry A.Ceci n’est pas un film: Visual Perception in Michael Haneke’s Caché
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2009, French
The purpose of this thesis is to examine the ethical implications of voyeurism as a diegetic construct within cinema within the specific context of Michael Haneke’s 2005 film Caché. The first chapter uses works by René Descartes and Diego Velázquez to frame the question of the deceitful nature of the senses, which contextualize the way we look at film as an entity distinct from lived experience. The second chapter examines theories of montage in order to elaborate upon the difference between narrative and lived experience. The third chapter looks at films by and interviews with Alfred Hitchcock to elaborate upon the previous chapter’s discussion of montage and explain the ethics and the legal code of voyeurism as presented in Caché.

Committee:

Elisabeth Hodges, PhD (Advisor); Jonathan Strauss, PhD (Committee Member); Claire Goldstein, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Literature; Romance Literature

Keywords:

Michael Haneke; Cach&233;; Descartes; Hitchcock; Velazquez; montage; cinema; film; Eisenstein; Metz; surveillance; spectatorship; voyeurism in film

McVey, David CharlesMan Enough: Multiple Masculinities in the Films of Pavel Lungin
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
Pavel Lungin has been a dynamic, award-winning figure on the Russian film scene for nearly forty years, approximately twenty-five of which he has spent in the director’s chair. Lungin’s success in courting a range of international and domestic financiers has permitted him to work not only through rough economic patches in crisis-ridden post-Soviet Russia, but has also afforded him relative liberty to craft films in accordance with his own designs, and not necessarily in response to public appetites. This artistic freedom has redounded to a diverse oeuvre, which incorporates comedies and tragedies, blockbusters and art-house films, original screenplays and literary adaptations, as well as genre and genre-bending films. Lungin’s storied career has most certainly warranted a monograph-length scholarly examination. My study provides the first analytical survey in any language of Lungin’s directorial corpus. A common thread running through Lungin’s diverse films is their showcasing of a wide range of topical and historical male typologies that critique traditional notions of culturally viable heteromasculinity in the Russian context. Having developed such a cinematic modus operandi, Lungin appears to have distinguished his films from most post-Soviet mainstream fare. Seemingly in response to fervent pleas by cinema luminaries Daniil Dondurei and Nikita Mikhalkov, successful Russian directors have by and large featured idealized, palliative masculine heroes as a discursive antidote to the Russian public’s pessimistic perception of men as perpetually inebriated, short-lived deadbeats. My dissertation argues that, contrary to this trend, Lungin’s films consistently foreground alternative, unconventional, and even marginalized models of Russian masculinity to reform or overthrow previously valorized types. Lungin champions such traits as the creative ingenuity, proactive passivity, and physical longsuffering of artists, holy fools, and religious leaders in contrast to the brute force, competitive drive, and blind compliance stereotypically attributed to the soldiers, businessmen, and romantic leads of recent record-breaking Russian blockbusters. In other words, while mainstream Russian filmmakers have been toiling to reinvigorate their industry on the backs of sympathetic, redemptive masculine heroes—and provide a boost to public morale—Lungin has been offering up critical take after critical take not only on traditionally ideal, socially sanctioned masculinity, but also on topically jeopardized, discursively ostracized masculine figures. I demonstrate that Lungin accomplishes this feat through a system of juxtaposition and triangulation of the various positive and negative, yet always culturally resonant male characters in his films. Most significantly, my study directs specific attention to the reality of multiple masculinities in Russian film, utilizing Lungin’s work as possibly the most dependable purveyor of a rich array of manly and less-than-manly typologies, not only heroes such as Danila Bagrov in both Brother films. In adopting a concept of the cinematic gaze as dialogical and textually embedded, my dissertation examines the possibility of manifold representations of masculinity, as well as multiple points of spectatorial identification. Thus, my study treads fresh ground by expanding the boundaries of what may be presented and viewed as socially and aesthetically productive masculinity in Russian film.

Committee:

Helena Goscilo (Advisor); Yana Hashamova (Committee Member); Alexander Burry (Committee Member); Linda Mizejewski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Gender; Gender Studies; Russian History; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Masculinity; film; Russian film; Pavel Lungin; cinema; gender

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