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Lusk, David MichaelAn Evaluative Study of User Satisfaction and Documentation Compliance: Using an Electronic Medical Record in an Emergency Department
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2010, Allied Medical Professions

With a general lack of knowledge regarding electronic medical records in the ED, the objectives of this study were to solicit user satisfaction and measure documentation compliance of an ED EMR six years post implementation. User satisfaction was measured using a survey instrument, while documentation compliance was measured by conducting a retrospective patient chart audit analysis across two EDs in the same health system. One ED utilized the EMR, while the other was still using paper charting.

ANOVAs were calculated to determine significant difference of socio-demographic variables across survey responses. A total of 106 (35%) users completed the survey and means indicated that respondents were generally satisfied with the ED EMR. Both age range and user role in the ED showed significant difference across survey categories. T-tests and Fisher Exact Tests were calculated to determine significant difference of chart compliance between EDs. Patient chart audits showed an overall significant difference between the EMR (98 percent compliant) as compared to paper charting (86 percent compliant), along with several chart components (14 out of 23) that were significantly different and favored the EMR over the paper process. Both studies conducted should continue to be a permanent, ongoing effort by health systems to continue to measure and improve ED EMR usability and long term sustainability.

Committee:

Melanie Brodnik, PhD (Advisor); Laurie Rinehart-Thompson, JD, RHIA,CHP (Committee Member); Nina Kowalczyk, PhD,RT(R)(CT)(QM),FASRT (Committee Member); Susan White, PhD,CHDA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care; Information Systems; Technology

Keywords:

electronic medical records; EMR; emergency department; health information technology; user satisfaction; compliance; documentation compliance; ED EMR; ED

Basmaz, Özgün“The Rebellious Daughter of the Republic” or “The Mother of the Turks”: Reconsidering the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early Turkish Republic Through the Politics of Halide Edip Adivar
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2008, History

In this study, I will analyze Halide Edip whose life spanned one of the most important transformations of Turkey from an empire to a nation state. Halide Edip has been and continued to be lauded as a patriot, and the ideal “Turkish woman”; on the other hand, Halide Edip is simultaneously depicted as a traitor on the basis of Atatürk’s portrayal of her in his Nutuk. Nevertheless, Halide Edip, through her works and deeds, as a nationalist, a women’s rights activist, modernist, educator, and popular novelist, managed to problematize Ataturk’s representation of her as a traitor and resisted against being denied agency in one most important events in Turkey’s histoy. I have tried to show how, through her undeniable contribution to the Turkish nationalist movement, she was able to problematize Atatürk’s account and to decentralize the “great man” history.

I emphasized Halide Edip played a critical role in shaping the cultural, ideological and political milieu of 20th century Turkey that was overwhelmingly male-dominant. I argued that her involvement in the ideological debates through her political deeds and literary writings played a critical role in determining the parameters of the perceptions, discussions, and applications of the major issues of nationalism, the “woman question,” and modernism. Rather than sharing the claim that her engagement with the “West” and the “woman question” failed to exceed the boundaries set by orientalist and patriarchal discourses, I tried to highlight Halide Edip’s ideological complexities that cannot be confined to the uncomplicated categories of secular, modernist, Islamist, feminist, or patriarchal. I observed that her writings insisted on the ideals of diversity, humanity, historical/cultural continuity and thus generated a discourse through which she negotiated within, against, and beyond the epistemological and ontological categories of the dominant discourses.

In this particular study on Halide Edip, my aims were two-fold. On the first level, I used her as a site of historical analysis through whose life and works I tried to reconsider a critical period of Turkish history. Secondly, I explored Edip as a critical political figure who supported and simultaneously questioned the existing discourses and dominant political trends. Rather than reading Edip’s different stances on certain subjects as Edip’s inconsistency, I interpreted this as her complexity and originality. I regard Halide Edip’s discourse as “innovative,” “revolutionary,” and “counter-hegemonic,” which emphasized interaction, exchange, and commonality rather than hostility, exclusion or “othering.” The unbiased interpretations of Halide Edip would inspire alternative views in today’s Turkey where Kemalist ideology has turned into dogmatism, where the aspiration to enter EU has almost become an obsession, and where the discussions of women’s rights is confined to the discussions on veil.

Committee:

Janet Klein (Advisor); Tracey Jean Boisseau (Advisor)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

ED¿¿¿¿P; HAL¿¿¿¿DE ED¿¿¿¿P; HAL¿¿¿¿DE; TURKISH; OTTOMAN; Atat¿¿¿¿rk; Kemal

Richards, ChristopherEd Mieczkowski's Contradictory Cues in Dimensionality in Painting and Sculpture
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of the Arts / School of Art
The aim of this thesis is to show how Edwin Mieczkowski’s exploration of visual perception created contradictory dimensional cues in painting and sculpture. By utilizing black, white, and grey as key components to constructing and solving visual problems, Mieczkowski explored the depiction of three-dimensional space on two-dimensional surfaces and created three-dimensional works that emphasized the two-dimensional picture plane. Tracking Mieczkowski’s work from his involvement in the Anonima Group in the 1960s to his sculptural works in the 1980s, I argue that the perception of depth of space depicted using hard-edged geometric shapes lies at the center of his artistic development. While Mieczkowski the influence of previous movements such as De Stijl and Consctructivism gave him a visual vocabulary, it was his interest in how we visually perceive the world around us that led him to create dimensional puzzles. This thesis draws heavily on primary resources; including letters, interviews, exhibition catalogs and reviews.

Committee:

John-Michael Warner (Advisor); Albert Reischuck (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Criticism; Art History

Keywords:

Ed Mieczkowski; Op Art; Geometric Abstraction; Dimensionality in Art; Anonima Group

Harper, ElaineBibliotherapy Intervention Exposure and Level of Emotional Awareness Among Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2010, College of Education and Human Services

Educators and mental health professionals search for interventions to help students with emotional and behavioral problems. Bibliotherapy, the therapeutic use of literature, has been a widely used yet sparsely researched intervention. Research regarding bibliotherapy and students‟ emotional awareness is absent. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among bibliotherapy intervention exposure, level of emotional awareness, and characteristics of students with emotional and behavioral disorders.

Archival data sets from 182 students ages 6 - 13 in day treatment were analyzed in this study. One archival data set was scores from the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale for Children (LEAS-C; Bajgar, 2004). The LEAS-C is a self-report instrument, designed to assess emotional awareness in children. Another archival data set detailed the amount of bibliotherapy intervention exposure that each student received. The final archival data set came from existing student demographic information such as gender, age, race, DSM-IV-TR diagnosis and length of stay in day treatment.

Quantitative and qualitative methods specific to each question were used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and regression modeling examined relationships among bibliotherapy intervention exposure, level of emotional awareness and student characteristics. Qualitative methods were used to analyze archived interviews of students‟ experience with bibliotherapy.

Results established a range of the levels of emotional awareness for students with emotional and behavioral disorders. The level of emotional awareness for Self and Other was found to be correlated. Differences in emotional awareness were found among students with differing DSM-IV-TR diagnoses. Bibliotherapy intervention exposure did not predict student level of emotional awareness. However, student exposure to bibliotherapy intervention combined with PATHS was correlated to students‟ level of emotional awareness. Select student interviews revealed that student experience with bibliotherapy included identification with characters and opportunities for emotional expression.

Recommendations based on findings included attention to a trauma informed approach to treatment, consideration of LEAS-C as a screener for diagnostic assessment, the integration of bibliotherapy intervention with other interventions, such as PATHS, completion of a bibliotherapy intervention manual and specialized training for bibliotherapy intervention implementation. Recommendations for further research include establishing LEAS-C validity and reliability through psychometric studies and conducting quasi-experimental and case studies to explore student bibliotherapy experience and its benefit.

Committee:

Judy Stahlman, EdD (Committee Chair); Joshua Bagaka's, PhD (Committee Member); Karl Wheatley, PhD (Committee Member); Kathryn MacCluskie, PhD (Committee Member); Kathleen McNamara, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Curricula; Education; Mental Health; Special Education; Therapy

Keywords:

bibliotherapy; emotional awareness; students with emotional or behavioral disorders; special education; intervention programs; Level of Emotional Awareness Scale for Children (LEAS-C); integrated academic and mental health programming; Re-ED

Miller, JasonDevitrification Effects on the Structure and Corrosion of an Fe-based Bulk Metallic Glass
Master of Sciences (Engineering), Case Western Reserve University, 2010, Materials Science and Engineering
Fe-based metallic glasses have high corrosion resistance. The effect of heat treatment on the corrosion and structure of SAM1651 was studied. The fully amorphous material was heat treated at 600°C, 700°C, and 800°C, i.e. temperatures above and below the reported recrystallization temperature (653°C). Structural changes were examined by X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and showed partial devitrification by the formation of (Cr,Fe)23C6 and (Cr,Fe)7C3 nanoparticles. The corrosion behavior of the devitrified SAM1651 in 1M and 6M HCl at room temperature was examined using weight loss, cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, and constant potential tests. These tests revealed some degradation of corrosion resistance after heat treatment manifested in the formation of a black corrosion affected layer. The structure of this layer was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the chemistry was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TEM images after immersion in 6M HCl also were taken.

Committee:

Joe Payer, PhD (Advisor); Gary Michal, PhD (Committee Member); John Lewandoski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Materials Science

Keywords:

Devitri; CORROSION; SAM1651; Devitri ed; Amorphous; fully amorphous; Corrosion Resistance

Houston, George GregorySpirituality and Leadership: Integrating Spirituality as a Developmental Approach of Improving Overall Leader Effectiveness
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
The role of leadership continues to be a consistent topic of discussion whether you are considering the seminal work of Stogdill (1974), Burns (1978), Kouzes and Posner (1995), or Van Hooser's (2013) Leaders Ought to Know, one of Amazon's 2013 Top Ten Leadership books. A consistent question in leader development circles is-how can leaders be more effective in their role given the current state of leadership? One dimension of leadership development that is often overshadowed, downplayed, minimized, or completely ignored is the concept of spirituality. If the spiritual development of individual leaders can be integrated with other accepted leadership skills, such as job specific technical skills, emotional intelligence, and physical fitness, then there is an exponentially greater possibility that both the ineffective and the good leader will improve their effectiveness. Without improving the effectiveness of individual leaders and the organizations they lead, not only we can expect a continued decline of leadership as we know it, but all aspects of society, organizations, groups, and individuals will be compromised on multiple levels. In this study, the relationship between spirituality and leadership effectiveness was explored in ways that identify spirituality as an additional factor that may contribute to the effectiveness of leaders. Based on study findings a definition of spirituality is proposed: Spirituality is accessing a universal understanding that life can be greatly enhanced in all relationships by developing our inner wholeness and other connectedness. Survey results indicated that six Campbell Leadership IndexTM items that were rated as at least quite descriptive of spirituality by 80% of the respondents. These items included: considerate, encouraging, enthusiastic, helpful, trusting, and trustworthy. Correlation analysis found that the spirituality items were correlated to the Executive Dimensions leader effectiveness competencies, particularly in the area of Leading Others and Leading by Personal Example. T-tests showed that the six spirituality items distinguished between high and low scores on most of the sixteen Executive Dimensions competencies, except in some of the Leading the Business competencies. Regression analysis showed that the spirituality items most influenced the competencies of forging synergy and interpersonal savvy. The results of this study are a part of the next step in affording spirituality its place in the development of leaders alongside more traditional leadership competencies or behaviors. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Chair); Alan Guskin, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Morgan Roberts, PhD (Committee Member); Karen Eriksen, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology

Keywords:

leadership; spirituality; definition; effectiveness; development; quantitative; competency; correlation; T-test; regression analysis; Campbell Leadership Index; CLI; Executive Dimensions; ED; leaders; senior level executives

Al-Mafrachi, Basheer Husham AliDetection of DDoS Attacks against the SDN Controller using Statistical Approaches
Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE), Wright State University, 2017, Computer Engineering
In traditional networks, switches and routers are very expensive, complex, and inflexible because forwarding and handling of packets are in the same device. However, Software Defined Networking (SDN) makes networks design more flexible, cheaper, and programmable because it separates the control plane from the data plane. SDN gives administrators of networks more flexibility to handle the whole network by using one device which is the controller. Unfortunately, SDN faces a lot of security problems that may severely affect the network operations if not properly addressed. Threat vectors may target main components of SDN such as the control plane, the data plane, and/or the application. Threats may also target the communication among these components. Among the threats that can cause significant damages include attacks on the control plane and communication between the controller and other networks components by exploiting the vulnerabilities in the controller or communication protocols. Controllers of SDN and their communications may be subjected to different types of attacks. DDoS attacks on the SDN controller can bring the network down. In this thesis, we have studied various form of DDoS attacks against the controller of SDN. We conducted a comparative study of a set of methods for detecting DDoS attacks on the SDN controller and identifying compromised switch interfaces. These methods are sequential probability ratio test (SPRT), count-based detection (CD), percentage-based detection (PD), and entropy-based detection (ED). We implemented the detection methods and evaluated the performance of the methods using publicly available DARPA datasets. Finally, we found that SPRT is the only one that has the highest accuracy and F score and detect almost all DDoS attacks without producing false positive and false negative.

Committee:

Bin Wang, Ph.D. (Advisor); Yong Pei, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mateen Rizki, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering

Keywords:

SDN; Controller; DDoS attacks; SPRT; CD; PD; CUSUM; ED

Berger, Laura ElizabethValidation of a 10-item Questionnaire Measuring Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in 9-11 year old Children Living in Low-Income Households
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2014, Human Ecology: Human Nutrition
Abstract Background: Many low-income children do not consume the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables (FV). For this reason, a primary objective of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) is to increase children’s consumption of FV. To accurately measure dietary changes related to FV intake, validated assessment tools that are quick and easy to administer are needed; however, few such tools exist. Objective: To test a 10-item fruit and vegetable questionnaire (10-item FVQ) for criterion and convergent validity, sensitivity, test-re-test reliability, and internal consistency. Participants: The study took place among 9-11 year old children attending a SNAP-Ed-eligible elementary school. Four 3rd grade and four 4th grade classrooms were invited to participate. The study included 3rd (n=46) and 4th grade (n=40) participants, with the majority being white (93%). Main Outcome Measures: Criterion validity was assessed by comparing the total score on the 10-item FVQ to total servings of FV as reported on a single 24-hour dietary recall (24-HDR). Convergent validity analyzed the “variety” and “snack” constructs from the 10-item FVQ compared to variety and snack reference scores generated from the matched 24-HDR. Sensitivity of the 10-item FVQ was assessed by comparing scores pre- and post- a 4 lesson FV intervention to FV servings reported on the 24-HDR. Reliability was evaluated by administering the 10-item FVQ at two time points one week apart, pre-intervention, and internal consistency by analyzing scores on a single 10-item FVQ. Pearson correlation was used to assess criterion and convergent validity, and sensitivity. Reliability was measured using a pairwise t-test, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Cronbach’s alpha. Results: Correlation between the total scores on the 10-item FVQ and 24-HDR was significant (r = 0.36, p < 0.005), in addition to the total variety (r = 0.306, p < 0.01) and total snack scores (r = 0.329, p < 0.01). Fruit as a snack (r = 0.322, p < 0.01) and variety of vegetables (r = 0.256, p < 0.05) demonstrated a moderately significant correlation to the 24-HDR reference scores. Sensitivity testing showed a moderately significant correlation of r = 0.287 (p < 0.05). Test-re-test reliability demonstrated agreement between repeated testing measures (r = 0.784, p < 0.0001) and internal consistency assessment yielded a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.806 and a significant intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.775 (p < 0.001). Conclusions and Implications: Results from this study suggest that the 10-item FVQ is a valid and reliable measure of FV intake behaviors among 9-11 year old children. Further testing of the 10-item FVQ in a pre/post intervention design is needed to further investigate the questionnaire’s sensitivity to detecting change, differences among gender, and use within various ethnic groups. Evidence from this study suggests the 10-item FVQ may be used as a short and easy to administer alternative to traditional methods of dietary collection in assessing FV intake among low-income 9-11 year old SNAP-Ed participants.

Committee:

Carolyn Gunther (Advisor); Ana Claudia Zubieta (Advisor); Julie Kennel (Committee Member); Tonya Orchard (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Nutrition; Public Health; Public Health Education

Keywords:

validity; reliability; sensitivity; validation study; fruits; vegetables; children; SNAP-Ed; evaluation tool; questionnaire; intervention; low-income; 9-11 year olds

Dansby, Benjamin W.An Informed Emergency: Improving Patient Comfort And Comprehension In And After The Emergency Department
MFA, Kent State University, 2010, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design
The emergency department can be a stressful, confusing place. Using touchscreen applications, patients can be educated and reassured about their stay in the ED. Once patients are discharged, following instructions can be difficult. Online discharge instructions provide greater readability and usability to patients, helping patients care for themselves more effectively.

Committee:

Ken Visocky O'Grady (Advisor); Mary Anthony, PhD (Committee Member); David Middleton (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Health; Health Care; Health Education

Keywords:

tablet; ipad; iphone; web site. internet; discharge; emergency; ED; ER; web; insurance; health; healthcare; graphic design; visual communication; touchscreen; interactive

Xia, PingAdhesive functions in fibronectin's alternatively-spliced ED(a) segment
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 1996, Molecular Biology and Microbiology
EDa (EIIIA) is an alternatively-spliced type III homology repeat present in cellular fibronectins (cFNs) but not in plasma fibronectin (pFN). Potential adhesion-promoting activity was investigated for EDa and its two neighboring repeats III11 and III12. Recombinant protein corresponding to EDa alone promoted Balb/c 3T3 cell attachment, as did neighboring repeats III11 and III12 when tested as single repeats. Activities were even higher for recombinant proteins containing two or three repeats. While EDa alone exhibited 40-60% of the attachment activity of human pFN depending upon cell type, EDa with both neighboring repeats displayed 70-90% of pFN activity. Besides attachment, the recombinant substrata also supported limited cell spreading. 3T3 cells on the EDa substratum displayed round cell bodies with filopodia contacting the substratum. Cells on III11-EDa-III12 displayed spindle-shaped cell bodies and pseudopods in contact with the substratum. The two-repeat molecule of III11-III12 gave an intermediate response. Moreover, adhesion activities towards these recombinant proteins were oncogene-regulated: comple tely abrogated by two different ras oncogenes, unaffected by the sis oncogene, and elevated by the src oncogene aFunctional complementarity was noted between EDa recombinant molecule and pFN. Co-coating substrata with EDa and a suboptimal concentration of pFN led to increased attachment and extensive spreading of v-src-transformed 3T3 cells relative to that found on substrata of suboptimal pFN or EDa alone. This complementarity requires as little as 1 μg/ml EDa in the adsorbing mixture and displays sequence specificity for only EDa (i.e., III11 or III12 was without effect.). Furthermore, stress fibers and focal contacts were inducible on the EDa:PFN mixture, suggesting the full adhesion-promoting competence of the heterologous substrata aSynergy in promoting post-attachment adhesion responses among III11, EDa and III12 was also observed. This conclusion is supported by two lines of evidence: (a) spreading on two-repeat molecules was better than spreading on single-repeat molecules, and (b) only the three-repeat molecule was competent for inducing stress fibers and focal adhesions. Experimental evidence indicated that glycosaminoglycans did not participate in these adhesion processes; neither did β1-containing integrins. Affinity chromatography was employed to isolate the putative receptor(s) to no avail. These studies reveal a new adhesion promoting activity in fibronectin molecules whose function is more effectively presented by cFNs than pFN, which may indicate the advantage of cFNs in various physiological and pathological conditions where expression of EDa sequence is elevated.

Committee:

Lloyd Culp (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biology, Cell

Keywords:

Fibronectin's alternatively-spliced ED(a) segment

Graham, Emily NicoleOptimizing Care for Oncologic and Hematologic Patients with Febrile Neutropenia
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2017, Allied Medicine
Background: Febrile neutropenia is considered an oncologic medical emergency. This means that of the Oncology and Hematologic population, those who are at risk for febrile neutropenia are at a higher risk of negative outcomes associated with the care of their illness. Those who develop febrile neutropenia are typically receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment in response to their cancer diagnosis. Febrile neutropenia has been directly associated with long hospital length of stays and increased mortality rates. This study will evaluate the impact of time from ED arrival to first administered antibiotic based on process changes that were implemented and the impact of time to antibiotic on patient outcomes associated with length of stay. This study also identifies the opportunity for further improvements with this population by exploring risk stratification using the MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) and the CISNE (Clinical Index of Stable Febrile Neutropenia) risk index scores for predicting complications and course of treatment. Design and Methods: The target population for the study consisted of cancer patients who presented to the ED with febrile neutropenia. This is a comparative study of two cohorts: cancer patients who presented to The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Department between October 1st, 2014 and June 30th, 2015, and those who presented between October 1st, 2015 and June 30th, 2016. Descriptive, explanatory and correlational statistical procedures were completed on the data. These procedures included calculating volume, index scores, means, and p-values for statistical significance. Results: The study findings regarding the impact of process improvement interventions revealed t-test equal variance t statistic of 6.716 and 340 degrees of freedom with a p-value of .000 with 95% confidence intervals of 49 and 91; demonstrating reduction in time to antibiotic as well as a reduction in variation between pre and post intervention. The analysis to determine correlation between time from ED Arrival to the first administration of broad spectrum antibiotic for patients who present with febrile neutropenia and Length of Stay Index (Observed to Expected Length of Stay based on UHC’s risk model) proved to have statistical significance. Correlation does not mean causation so the study simply proves that a positive correlation exists between the two variables. In addition two risk models were tested for potential use in risk stratifying febrile neutropenia patients in high and low risk; the MASCC score and the CISNE score. MASCC score has no statistical significance in terms of admit risk of mortality; however the CISNE proved to be statistically significant with a chi square p-value of .011. When the two risk models were compared in another chi square analysis and shown to be significantly associated. Conclusion: It is encouraging that continuing efforts to improve the care associated with febrile neutropenia related to time to antibiotics are directly impacting the outcomes of this population. This study identified certain risk factors that could risk stratify patients with febrile neutropenia in the Emergency Department and the CISNE risk index score demonstrated more significance when used at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Department than the MASCC score on cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Working to reduce time to antibiotic and risk stratifying these patients use a risk index scoring system like CISNE will help Emergency departments and clinicians across the continuum to provide better patient care for cancer patients with febrile neutropenia.

Committee:

Susan White (Committee Member); Miranda Gill (Committee Member); Laurie Rinehart-Thompson (Advisor)

Subjects:

Health Care; Health Care Management; Health Sciences; Medicine; Nursing; Oncology

Keywords:

Oncology, Emergency Department, Sepsis, Febrile Neutropenia, MASCC, CISNE, Risk model, Cancer ED, Hematology, Sepsis alert, oncogolic medical emergency

Kincaid, Heather A. Examining Satisfaction with Employment and Instructional Activities of Full-time Faculty and Instructional Staff Holding a Ph.D. or Ed.D. Employed at Two-Year Institutions
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Higher Education (Education)
This study was designed to examine job satisfaction of faculty and instructional staff that are employed at two-year institutions in the United States who hold a Ph.D. or Ed.D. by investigating (a) differences in the level of job satisfaction among those who hold a Ph.D. or Ed.D. and those who do not, and (b) determining if individual and institutional variables relate to job satisfaction among this specific faculty group. The main purpose of this research is to reduce the gap in the literature concerning these faculty members and to help administrators understand the issues that faculty holding a Ph.D. or Ed.D. deem important. This study was based on secondary analysis of data compiled from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04). The first research question was answered through descriptive analyses conducted through the use of PowerStats. The second research question was answered through the use of t – tests. The third research question was answered through weighted least squares regression conducted using PowerStats. Findings of the study indicated significant differences in the levels of job satisfaction between Ph.D./Ed.D. faculty members and non-Ph.D./Ed.D. faculty members who were employed at two-year institutions in the fall of 2003. Additionally, the variables of union membership, degree of urbanization, total number of hours worked and core instructional expenses were significantly related to the satisfaction indexes utilized in the study.

Committee:

Valerie Conley (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

faculty satisfaction; Ph. D. or Ed. D.; community colleges