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Mraovic, DejanGraphic Ambassadors of a Country (Redesign of Serbian Banknotes and Coins)
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Ohio University, 2012, Studio Arts (Fine Arts)

My thesis research is focused on money and redesign of the Serbian national currency - dinar. The current design of banknotes and coins is bellow the artistic level of the Serbian and Yugoslav dinars used in the 19th and 20th century. In my opinion, these are the problems: lack of the expressed national pride through symbols; inconsistent representation of historic figures; low artistic level of drawings of buildings and nature; poor understanding of Serbian rich history and its connection with the present time. I consider banknotes and coins ambassadors of every country because on them one can read about a country's culture, history, and nature; that is why I designed an attractive and modern currency. I am working in collaboration with the National Bank of Serbia in Belgrade, and my redesigns will be considered by the Governor and Treasury for possible implementation.

Since I wanted to better understand the previous designs of money in Serbia, I wrote a historic overview in collaboration with Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, National Museum, Belgrade and ten other state museums from Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, which not only provided the needed and rare material for my thesis but their curators are also special advisors on my project.

As a measure of protection for my currency, I designed a completely new, sans-serif font entitled Serbiana. Serbian is the only language in the world that uses both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabet: I included both alphabets for this project. I believe that this unique, brand new font, will contribute to the originality and beauty of my redesigned banknotes and coins.

Committee:

Don Adleta (Committee Chair); Rajorshi Ghosh (Other); Rajko Grlic (Other)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Graphic design; redesign; dinars; banknotes; coins; Serbiana; design history

Turner, Helen A.Designing the Domus: enhancing the history, theory and practice of contemporary interior design through analysis of ancient Roman domestic space(s)
MSARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture

This thesis attempts to enhance the connection between interior design and ancient Roman domestic space by establishing a continuous, reflective and reciprocal relationship, through which their similarities might be strengthened and incongruities mutually illuminating. Though the topics of contemporary interior design and ancient Roman domestic decoration may seem disparate, the information presented throughout this thesis indicates they are, in fact, contingent. What is more, exploring them simultaneously is imperative to enriching, not only the history and theory of interior design but also augmenting the knowledge concerning ancient Roman domestic space as a holistic environment. When experiencing an ancient Roman domestic interior, it becomes very apparent that all aspects of decoration, including walls, floors, ceilings and even furniture, coalesce to evoke the sense of a ‘coordinated interior’, or a space in which all design elements work in harmony and correspondence with one another.

Though an abundance of literature and research exists concerning ancient Rome and its domestic interiors, it is often segmented according to scholarly discipline, like architecture, art history or archaeology, as well as fragmented by decorative elements, such as wall paintings or floor mosaics. Such disparate research results in the divorce of decoration from context, which eliminates the possibility of understanding how it may have fit into an organized scheme or even how it functioned within the space. Thus, it is difficult to discuss or study a holistic ancient Roman interior environment when, conceptually, the scholarship does not acknowledge its existence. What is more, such elements have occasionally also been physically removed from their context and intended viewing position to be framed and displayed as components of museum exhibits where they are viewed or studied as such. Regrettably, in my opinion, this has led to numerous history of interior design courses that introduce the mere aesthetic qualities of ancient spaces rather than reasons why such spaces were decorated, who designed them, or how they were implemented.

In an effort to remedy these difficulties, my lens as an educated and practiced interior designer combined with related methodologies, ancient Roman domestic space and decoration is to be explored through literature and field research. Next, because decoration is influenced, and sometimes determined, by the space within which it is created, ancient Roman domestic decoration is considered relative to a broader organizing system progressively involving: the layout of a house, the situation of a house within a city block, the block as formed by planning of city streets and finally, the organization of streets according to the city’s site and orientation. Ideal prescriptions of ancient authors, like Vitruvius, compared to the real manifestations visible in the cities like Pompeii and Herculaneum, discovered through this systematic study, converge in a discussion of domestic decoration expressed by the House of the Ceii in Pompeii. Lastly, because interior design is a practice characterized by its process, rather than focus solely on completed decoration, the implementation of the ancient Roman domestic interiors will be considered alongside a design methodology utilized in contemporary interior deign practice and education.

Committee:

Edson Cabalfin, MSArch (Committee Chair); Patrick Snadon, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

interior design;history;decoration;Roman;domestic;coordinated interior

Murdock, Jason E.Fluid identity: History & Practice of Dynamic Visual Identity Design
MFA, Kent State University, 2016, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design
The main aim of this thesis is twofold. Firstly, this investigation seeks to broaden the scope of graphic design history as it pertains to visual identity design by documenting the existence of an alternative paradigm—dynamic visual identity design—which has developed alongside the prevailing visual identity design paradigm—static visual identity design—but which is not currently well documented or understood. To this end, case studies will be provided to demonstrate that these two schools of thought have existed contemporaneously since the inception of visual identity design in the first decade of the twentieth century. Secondly, this investigation seeks to assist graphic design educators and practitioners in finding practical application of dynamic visual identity design in the classroom and professional practice by examining the mechanics of visual identity design and delineating three generative techniques for creating dynamic visual identity systems. Prototypes have been developed as part of this inquiry, and are presented as a way of demonstrating how these techniques are used to design functioning dynamic visual identity systems. Promoting the hegemony of one visual identity paradigm over another is not a goal of this thesis, nor is it a goal of the author to suggest that one visual identity paradigm should supplant another. Rather, it is hoped that a pluralistic view of visual identity design has been advanced in order to allow designers the broadest possible landscape and greatest opportunity to modify and adapt their approach based on the specific needs of the stakeholders with whom they design.

Committee:

Jessica Barness, M.F.A. (Advisor); Kenneth Visocky O'Grady, M.F.A. (Committee Member); Brian Peters, M.Arch. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Design

Keywords:

Branding; Identity Design; Visual Identity; Dynamic Visual Identity; Design History