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Karunanidhi, KarthikeyanARROS: Distributed Adaptive Real-Time Network Intrusion Response
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2006, Computer Science (Engineering)

Research in Intrusion Response has shown that the success rate of an attack increases with time. With attacks becoming sophisticated and automated, the response to these attacks still remains a time-consuming manual process. An active response system is a mechanism that can be used in conjunction with an intrusion detection system (IDS) to provide a network administrator with the capability to respond to an attack automatically when it has been detected. Active Real-time RespOnse System (ARROS) is an active, distributed, adaptive, and real-time Intrusion Response System (IRS) that provides Intrusion Response capabilities to INBOUNDS (Integrated Network Based Ohio University Network Detective Service), a network-based, real-time, hierarchical intrusion detection and response system being developed at Ohio University. ARROS consists of distributed autonomous agents that run at various different points on the network it protects. Agents communicate with each other to share information about the network, intrusions, and co-ordinate the response. Each ARROS agent is a fully functional autonomous unit capable of responding to intrusions in a distributed fashion. Coupled with priority queuing for ARROS traffic, distributed response capabilities, and time-bound response the ARROS system is able to provide real-time active Intrusion Response while minimizing adverse effects to the host network.

Committee:

Shawn Ostermann (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

NETWORK INTRUSION RESPONSE; AUTOMATED, AUTOMATIC RESPONSE; COMPUTER SECURITY; NETWORK SECURITY; ACTIVE INTRUSION RESPONSE; ARROS, IRS, IR

Brasee, Kaleb DSecure Distributed Single Sign-On with Two-Factor Authentication
Master of Science in Engineering, University of Toledo, 2007, Computer Science
In this thesis we present the Secure Distributed Single Sign-On (SeDSSO) architecture. SeDSSO provides secure fault-tolerant authentication using threshold key encryption with a distributed authentication service. The authentication service consists of ntotal authentication servers utilizing a ( t, n) threshold encryption scheme, where tdistinct server-signed messages are required to generate a message signed by the service. Existing distributed SSO schemes such as CorSSO and ThresPassport are examined and the benefits of our system over these schemes are presented. SeDSSO establishes secure portable identities by defining a two-factor authentication scheme that uses both a username/password and a unique USB device. The combination of a distributed authentication service and two-factor identities allows SeDSSO to securely authenticate users in any environment.

Committee:

Kami Makki (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Single Sign-On; Two-Factor Authentication; Computer Security; Distributed Systems; SeDSSO

Burji, Supreeth JagadishReverse Engineering of a Malware : Eyeing the Future of Computer Security
Master of Science, University of Akron, 2009, Computer Science

Reverse engineering malware has been an integral part of the world of security. At best it has been employed for signature logging malware until now. Since the evolution of new age technologies, this is now being researched as a robust methodology which can lead to more reactive and proactive solutions to the modern security threats that are growing stronger and more sophisticated. This research in its entirety has been an attempt to understand the in and outs of reverse engineering pertaining to malware analysis, with an eye to the future trends in security.

Reverse engineering of malware was done with Nugache P2P malware as the target showing that signature based malware identification is ineffective. Developing a proactive approach to quickly identifying malware was the objective that guided this research work. Innovative malware analysis techniques with data mining and rough sets methodologies have been employed in this research work in the quest of a proactive and feasible security solution.

Committee:

Kathy J. Liszka, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science; Engineering; Experiments; Systems Design

Keywords:

malware; reverse engineering; data mining; rough sets; rogue malwares; lifecycle of a malware; P2P malware; computer security

Lydon, AndrewCompilation For Intrusion Detection Systems
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2004, Computer Science (Engineering)
Within computer security, intrusion detection systems (IDSs) are the subject of extensive and varying research. Distributed IDSs have additional research problems. This thesis contributes a way of using compilation of a multi-layered language to simultaneously solve multiple issues confronting distributed IDSs. The target of the compilation is the configuration of existing IDSs with run time support. The language for compilation has two layers: a lower layer for signature and other computationally limited matching including anomaly based matching and a higher layer for general computations. This compiler is implemented and shown to be sufficient to produce arbitrary IDSs using existing IDSs for input rather than custom system software. Graceful degradation and reasonable performance during denial of service attacks have been added on top of existing IDSs using this framework.

Committee:

Carl Bruggeman (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Security; Intrusion Detection; Computer Security; Distributed; Real-Time; Complier

Hausrath, Nathaniel L.Methods for Hospital Network and Computer Security
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science
Hospital IT security presents many unique challenges that must be solved by the entire organization. Network and computer threats can cause thousands of dollars in lost time and resources, legal repercussions, and damaged repu- tation. Despite warnings from a wealth of public breach notifications, many hospitals are inadequately prepared to deal with today’s computer-based at- tacks. This thesis explores the root causes of hospital network and computer in- security, and addresses these problems with methods implemented in actual hospitals. A lack of comprehension of methods to assess and implement secu- rity measures by hospital IT security employees can hinder network visibility and prevent their ability to stop threats. In addition, these same people are unable to express security concerns in terms management can understand, harming their credibility within the business as a whole. Without this sup- port, organizational change is impossible. By addressing these concerns with a combination of people, process, and tools, we can solve complex problems, protect patient data, and ensure IT operations so hospitals can serve their community and save lives.

Committee:

John Franco, PhD (Committee Chair); Raj Bhatnagar, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Kumpf, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Information Technology

Keywords:

hospital it Security;information security;network security;computer security;hospital information security;security

Campbell, Joshua MichaelHow Information and Communication Security Technologies Affect State Power
Undergraduate Honors Program, Malone University, 2016, Honors Thesis
With the growth of the Internet to an omnipresent system, access has become easier than ever, and its use has grown drastically. With this growth, however, comes drawbacks. In this growth, criminals are trying to gain unauthorized access to systems and the information contained therein. While for an average citizen, this breach might have only a few smaller impacts, this could be devastating if a critical target is affected. To prevent this, security technologies have been developed to try and prevent these breaches from occurring. However, this security can end up causing problems for legitimate investigations as much as it does for illegal access. This paper looks at how the growth of information and communication technologies in the modern era and the security systems protecting them affect how the state operates.

Committee:

Scott Waalkes, PhD (Advisor); David Beer, PhD (Committee Member); James Glasgow, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science; Information Systems; Information Technology; International Relations; Political Science

Keywords:

Cybersecurity; ICT; Information and Communication Technologies; State Power; Computer Security; Computers and Politics

Naik, Vinayak ShashikantReliable and secure data transport in large scale wireless networks of embedded devices
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, Computer and Information Science
Recent advances in semiconductor technology have resulted in techniques that can build miniaturized radios and sensor-actuators, which can be deployed in the physical world in a large scale. These inexpensive devices can be used to provide coordinated dense sensing, processing, and communicating. Combining these capabilities with robust system software will empower physical sciences with real-time data of high fidelity. To realize this opportunity, computer scientists must address new challenges posed for development of robust system software for the large scale resource constrained wireless networks of embedded devices (sensors). These devices have limited resources in terms of processing, memory, radio bandwidth, and energy. Further, once deployed these devices will necessarily remain untouched and expect to work for an extended period of time. All though Internet is a large scale network, all of the above mentioned constrained do not apply to the nodes in the Internet. Therefore, network services must be designed specifically for the large scale wireless sensor networks. The network services for large scale sensor network must have low time complexity and memory complexity. We provide low complexity reliable and secure data transport for large scale wireless networks of embedded devices. We focus on bulk data transport for two of the most commonly used services, viz. data dissemination and data collection. Our services are better than the state-of-the-art. We address the problem of key maintenance for providing secured communication in the presence of key compromise and denial-of-service attacks. We also investigate the use of testbed to facilitate experimentations for large scale wireless networks.

Committee:

Anish Arora (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Network protocols; Real-time systems and embedded systems; Wireless; Wireless sensor networks; Computer security