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Krismer, Marianne ZwickAttibutes and Support Systems That Promote Resilience and Achievement for “At Promise” Community College Students
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Education : Educational Foundations
This qualitative study of five first generation community college students and four faculty who participated in high school to college bridge program(s) was undertaken in order to determine the attributes and personal and community support systems accessed by successful students. The students in the study all had significant academic and social barriers to their success. This study was grounded in resilience theory that is based upon 25 years of study, primarily on children, that suggests the nature of the human is to self-right, and with adequate support, the majority will be able to overcome adversity and achieve educational success. Interviews of students and faculty provided data that described the perceptions of attributes and support systems that promote resilience and achievement. Data was abstracted and coded for common themes for attributes, personal support systems and community support systems that foster resilience and achievement. There was significant agreement among the students and faculty in most categories, with individual stories illustrating how these successful students plan, overcome obstacles, and utilize resources to achieve success. Findings indicated that social competence, autonomy, goal setting, high expectations, teacher belief, identifying someone who cares and utilization of multiple individual and community support systems were key characteristics identified by these successful students and faculty who interact with “at-promise” students. The results of this study indicated that the personal attributes and support systems accessed by this young adult population are congruent with those accessed by successful children. Since this study is focused on achievement and resilience of a population that is typically identified as “at-risk”, it was determined to identify these students as “at-promise” promoting the positive concept that resilience is ordinary and achievable for the majority. Implications arising from this study include the need to provide intentional opportunities for students to develop their own attributes and identify and utilize support systems effectively. High school-to-college bridge programs were affirmed as being supportive of resilience and achievement. Bridge programs constructed to include caring, supportive teachers with high expectations; opportunities to develop social competence, autonomy, resources, and strategies to effectively re-right after failure will maximize success and provide connections for “at-promise” students.

Committee:

Dr. Mary Pitman (Advisor)

Keywords:

at-promise students; at-promise community college students; at-risk community college students,; resilience and community college students; achievement and community college students

Shepherd, Kathleen KayThe Influence of the College Environment on Community College Remedial Mathematics Instructors' Use of Best Practices in Remedial Mathematics
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2016, Higher Education
An estimated 41% of the more than 11 million students who attend a community college need remediation, with remedial mathematics the most common course students need. The literature pertaining to best practices for student success in remedial mathematics abounds, yet, there is little evidence of the factors that influence instructor use of these best practices in the classroom. This study evaluated results of a 29-item survey of American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges’ members on the influence of instructor demographics, faculty development, institutional policies and procedures, and student support services on instructor use of best practices in teaching remedial mathematics. Developmental Theory served as the study’s theoretical framework, while the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education and the Input-Environment-Output Model served as conceptual frameworks. Analysis revealed nine significant predictors of overall use of best practices, four of which were influenced by instructor demographics, three by institutional policies and procedures, and two by professional development. This study may inform policymakers and administrators alike as they scrutinize the delivery of remedial mathematics courses.

Committee:

Ronald Opp, PhD (Committee Chair); Debra Harmening, PhD (Committee Member); William Weber, EdD (Committee Member); Grace Yackee, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Mathematics Education

Keywords:

community college remedial mathematics; community college developmental mathematics; best practices community college teaching; developmental theory

Curtis-Chávez, MarkHispanic Male Success in the Community College as Measured by Cumulative GPA
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2017, Higher Education
The majority of Hispanics select community colleges as their higher institution of choice, but studies on what contributes to their success, especially Hispanic males, has been limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence, if any, of environmental variables on the cumulative GPA of Hispanic males attending community college. Employing Astin’s Theory of Student Involvement, data from the CCSSE’s 2012 – 2014 survey were used to conduct a multiple regression analysis. The study’s sample included 5,615 Hispanic males attending community college. The final model identified 15 variables that were significantly related to the cumulative GPA of Hispanic males attending community college, and explained 15.6% of the variance. Student effort and active and collaborative learning variables emerged as the strongest predictors of Hispanic male GPA. This study provides educators with additional resources to improve Hispanic male academic success in the community college, and informs future research, theory, policy, and practice.

Committee:

Ron Opp (Committee Chair); Snejana Slantcheva-Durst (Committee Member); Sunday Griffith (Committee Member); J. Michael Thomson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Hispanic Americans; Minority and Ethnic Groups

Keywords:

Hispanic males; Hispanic male GPA; Latino males; Latino male GPA; community college; Hispanic male performance; Latino male performance; Hispanic male academic success; Latino male academic success; Community College Survey of Student Engagement

Watts, Rebecca L.An Exploration of Community College Transfer Alumni Perceptions of their Undergraduate Experiences and Subsequent Alumni Affinity
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Higher Education (Education)
The study explored transfer alumni perceptions of their community college and university experiences, their alumni affinity as measured by the frequency of alumni engagement with each institution, and what motivates that engagement. Study participants rated their university experiences more positively than those at their community college and reported engaging in more alumni activities with their university than their community college. Based on the findings, recommendations for practitioners include enhanced documentation and communication of the learning and development outcomes gained through the community college experience, increased university support services for transfer students, and increased community college outreach efforts with alumni.

Committee:

Henning John, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Young Robert, Ph.D. (Advisor); Horton David, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Brooks Gordon, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Descutner David, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Theory; Higher Education

Keywords:

transfer student; community college student; transfer alumni; alumni affinity; student satisfaction; student development; residential student; non-residential campus; at-risk college students; community college alumni outreach; university alumni outreach

Dean, Aaron MThe Professional Development Needs of Community College Business Faculty: A Qualitative Investigation
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Business Education
The purpose of this qualitative within-site case study was to better understand the perceived professional development needs of community college business faculty. The study was important, because few studies had described the professional development needs of community college business faculty, which annually serve more than 7.2 million students. Because the teachers provide timely and relevant instruction, they need professional development to stay abreast of changes within their professional disciplines (e.g., accounting, business communications, office administration technology). The findings in this study reveal that community college business faculty need professional development focused on meeting the needs of students from across the lifespan, from diverse family and socioeconomic backgrounds, technology, the selection and implementation of teaching methods, and understanding theory and its application to classroom settings. Further study is recommended to determine the extent to which findings in this study may be applicable to the larger population of community college teachers of business and recommendations for practice include designing and delivering professional development that coheres with the perceptions of target participants.

Committee:

Frederick Polkinghorne, Dr. (Advisor); Vera Lux (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Technology; Educational Theory

Keywords:

community college; professional development; framework;community college business faculty;effective teaching and learning;effective teaching;contextual knowledge;instructional strategy;knowledge;instructional context;

Cox, Andrew AllenA National Study on the Role of Community Colleges in the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998: Perceptions of State Association Chief Executives
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2014, College of Social Justice and Human Service
Community Colleges are regarded as important providers of workforce training in America, yet the role of community colleges in the public workforce system is not well understood. This exploratory study examined the perceptions of community college state association chief executives (SAEs) regarding the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. SAEs are a group of policy entrepreneurs who advocate for community colleges on the state and federal level. A Likert-type survey containing closed and open ended questions was administered to the universe of 23 community college state association executives who are members of the National Council of State Association Chief Executives. Responses were tabulated electronically using descriptive statistics appropriate for Likert-type scale research. The open ended questions were content analyzed for key points and emerging themes. A document analysis of state workforce plans found that every state referenced community colleges in WIA, yet the perceptions of the survey respondents indicated that community colleges should have a greater role. Agenda-setting theory provided insights and broader implications for research and practice as policy makers consider the evolving role of community colleges in the workforce system and on the American higher education landscape.

Committee:

David Meabon, Dr. (Committee Chair); Renay Scott, Dr. (Committee Member); Thomas Stuckey, Dr. (Committee Member); Mary Ellen Edwards, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

Workforce Investment Act; community colleges; workforce training; community college state associations

Maurer, Matthew JonnathanCase studies of community college non-science majors: effects of self-regulatory interventions on biology self-efficacy and biological literacy
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Educational Studies: Hums, Science, Tech and Voc
Science literacy has been at the heart of current reform efforts in science education. The focus on developing essential skills needed for individual ability to be literate in science has been at the forefront of most K-12 science curricula. Reform efforts have begun to stretch into the postsecondary arena as well, with an ever increasing dialogue regarding the need for attention to science literacy by college students, especially non-science majors. This study set out to investigate how the use of self-regulatory interventions (specifically, goal setting, concept mapping, and reflective writing) affected student biology self-efficacy and biological literacy. This study employed a qualitative research design, analyzing three case studies. Participants in the study received ten self-regulatory interventions as a set of portfolio assignments. Portfolio work was qualitatively analyzed and coded for self-efficacy, as well as evidence of biological literacy. A biology self-efficacy survey was administered pre- and post- to provide a means of self-efficacy data triangulation. Literacy data was supported via a biological literacy rubric, constructed specifically for this study. Results indicated that mastery experiences were the source of biology self-efficacy. Self-efficacy for specific tasks increased over time, and changes in self-efficacy were corroborated by the self-efficacy survey. Students were found to express biological literacy at nominal, functional, or conceptual levels depending on the specific task. This was supported by data from the biological literacy rubric scores. Final conclusions and implications for the study indicated the need for further research with more samples of students in similar and different contexts. Given the fact that the literature in this area is sparse, the results obtained here have only begun to delve into this area of research. Generalization to other biology courses or contexts outside of the one presented in this study was cautioned until future studies can be conducted.

Committee:

Michael Beeth (Advisor)

Keywords:

self-efficacy; self-regulation; science literacy; biological literacy; community college; non-majors

Fennmore, Gabrielle MelissaElectronic media and university curricula: a case study of an associate degree program's development within a rural town community
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Art Education
This descriptive case study is an examination of the collaboration between a regional campus of a large university; representatives of the local community in which the regional campus is located; and an art education doctoral student as they planned and implemented an interdisciplinary, community-based curriculum for a new Associate Degree in Electronic Media. The overarching question of the study asks: Is it necessary to, and what would it take to create an interdisciplinary, collaborative, art and technology program in Electronic Media with the Ohio University Regional system; specific to the commnity needs of the Lancaster branch. Research methodology and methods consisting of case-study reviews, personal survey response, and multiple case method rsearch such as narrative and observation are used to investigate four areas contributing to the development of the Associate Degree. a descriptive analysis is used to present and analyse the data which is derived from the material collected and reviewed. Findings of the research indicate that incorporating community input directly into the program development process, both promotes and encourages commitment, support, confidence, and success when designing programs to meet the needs of area businesses and employment venues. This study also suggests that collaborative experiences in teaching and administration are most successful when all members are involved in initiating the program, share a commitment to the process, and are open to the concept of shared teaching and learning. This study suggest institutions should be more supportive and accountable in their roles in the communities in which they reside. Identification of community expectations, faculty and administrative commitment, budget confirmation and scale of the project should be primary considerations of new university program development.

Committee:

Patricia Stuhr (Advisor)

Keywords:

art education; visual art; art and technology; curriculum development; community college; associate degree

Muzyka, DiannAn Ethnography of Community College Presidents From Continuing Education
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2004, Counselor Education (Education)

The purpose of this study is to explore the characteristics of selected community college presidents who had previously held dean or director positions in continuing education areas of community colleges. Also, the study seeks to explain why and how this administrative track led to the presidency. The five primary areas of focus are career choice, preparation for the presidency, perceptions of the presidents about their college and role, perceptions of a dean and a board member of this cohort, and perceptions of the presidents for others in continuing education who aspire to become a community college president.

Snowball sampling identified the five community college presidents in this ethnographic study. Personal interviews were conducted with each president. An academic dean or coordinator and a board member were also interviewed during the college visit. In some cases, the dean of continuing education was interviewed. Data were also obtained from observations and relevant documents.

The findings indicate these presidents are individuals with out-going personalities, confidence, courage, good judgment, and an ability to lead. The presidents value diversity, integrity, fairness, trustworthiness, and respect for others. They involve faculty and staff in the decision-making process. The presidents are committed to serving their communities. Although the presidents do not believe it is necessary to ascend to the presidency via the traditional academic route, three of them did. The presidents believe continuing education people make good presidents because they have characteristics that are transferable to the role. Several suggestions were offered for those who aspire to become a community college president. The perceptions of the deans and board members about the presidents and the colleges parallel those of the president.

Search committees and boards of trustees may find the results helpful as they choose presidents for their institutions. This study may also interest those involved with succession planning and choosing individuals for leadership development programs. Finally, the results will interest people who aspire to become community college presidents.

Committee:

Robert Young (Advisor)

Keywords:

Community College Presidents; Continuing Education; Effectiveness

Brown, Pearley LeroyA Comparison of Burnout Rates between Part-Time and Full-Time Postsecondary Educators at a Community College
Masters in Education, Marietta College, 2009, Education
Almost absent from the literature concerning teacher burnout are studies comparing the rates between part-time and full-time postsecondary educators in a community college environment. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) in its various forms is considered the primary instrument used by researchers in their studies of burnout, whether in the workforce, in student-oriented academia, or in elementary, intermediate, and secondary education. Some studies have shown, however, that this instrument is—by its very design—inadequate for the measurement of burnout among postsecondary educators because it does not account for differences and numbers of variables. Because of this fact, an instrument was designed by the researcher to effectively compare these part-time and full-time postsecondary instructors and to offset any disparity in the types of variables being measured. In order to gather valuable numerical data, a quantitative survey design was implemented, utilizing a nonprobalistic, convenience sampling. The researcher created and used a combination nominal and Likert scale demographic survey for data collection in combination to the MBI, covering other measurable factors contributing to burnout among community college educators, such as gender, years of experience, years working at the community college, and working at other jobs in addition to being an educator.

Committee:

William Bauer, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Community Colleges; Education; Higher Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Burnout; Community College; Maslach Burnout Inventory; Quantitative; Higher Education

DiGiandomenico, MaryJoAn Analysis of the Relationship Between Social Support, Selected Demographics, and Physical Activity Among Community College Students
PHD, Kent State University, 2010, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Health Sciences

The purpose of this study was to analyze the difference in physical activity participation, awareness of exercise facilities, institutional physical education requirements, number of physical education classes taken, perceptions of current exercise habits, perceived current physical fitness level, perceived body weight, and selected demographic variables between students at two types of community colleges. In addition, this study analyzed the extent to which the social support of family and friends exerted an influence on physical activity participation between subjects at the two subject institutions.

This study will make a valuable contribution to the body of literature because there is a lack of research published concerning the relationship of physical activity patterns among the community college population.

The Social Support Theory served as the foundation for this study (House, 1981; Israel, 1982; Sallis, 1986). For the purposes of this study a stratified random sample was generated to depict a proportional representation of students enrolled in each curriculum at each institution (Wiersma & Jurs, 2005). Subjects in this study were from two Midwestern community colleges that provided responses about their physical activity participation.

The time frame for the data collection process was conducted during the Spring semester 2009. The data collection protocol followed the Dillman Tailored Method (DTM; 2000). The instrument contained 46 items with 5 subscales. The response rates from community college (city) were 325 and community college (rural) was 311.

Out of the nine hypotheses three statistically significant findings were revealed. First, hypotheses 1 revealed a statistically significant difference in physical activity participation between community college students at a city and rural campus. Second, hypotheses 2 revealed that the interaction (combined effect) of awareness of exercise facilities and the type of community college exerted a statistically significant influence on the physical activity participation among subjects. Third, hypotheses 9 revealed a statistically significant difference in physical activity participation and selected demographic variables (sex, parenting status, and employment status) between community college students at a city and rural campus. Future research is needed to determine what intervention and evidence-based practices are best to encourage college students to engage in physical activity participation.

Committee:

Cynthia W. Symons, DEd (Committee Co-Chair); Amy Thompson, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Ellen Glickman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Community Colleges; Education; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Physical Education; Recreation; Sociology; Sports Medicine; Urban Planning; Womens Studies

Keywords:

physical activity; community college students; social support

Held , Mary Beth An Investigation of the Resilience of Community College Students with Chronic Physical Health Impairments
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
One population of students who are commonly overlooked in research but are a significant population attending community colleges is students living with chronic physical impairments (CPIs) such as irritable bowel syndrome, migraine headaches, and diabetes. To address the gap in scholarly research, I utilized an asset-based approach to understand the lived experiences of students who are persisting at one rural community college in Appalachia. My investigation utilized a phenomenological methodology to form descriptive themes. Through purposeful random sampling and snowball sampling, 14 participants living with CPIs who had a minimum GPA of a 2.0 and had completed two or more semesters of college were interviewed. Through in-depth face-to-face interviews lasting 60 to 90 minutes, participants provided rich data. My findings revealed six themes describing the experiences of students with CPIs who are persisting at a rural community college. The six themes included: recognizing the peaks, valleys, and plateaus, finding the bright side and accepting the dark side, keeping their “eyes on the prize,” engaging in a fellowship, coaching one’s self, and connecting with environments.

Committee:

Peter Mather (Committee Chair); Laura Harrison (Committee Member); Dianne Gut (Committee Member); Jenny Nelson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community Colleges; Counseling Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Health; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Psychology

Keywords:

resilience; community college students; chronic physical health impairments; disability; illness

Evans, Carolyn M.The part-time community college faculty member as an adult educator : a needs assessment based on their competencies for helping adults learn /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1980, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Community college teachers

Babu, ManojCharacteristics of Effective Leadership of Community College Presidents
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Management
The performance measures facing Community College Presidents (CCP) in the United States is reaching a level of scrutiny that is unprecedented. The social needs of the community, in an effort to create a true learning environment, become dependent on the effectiveness of CCP. Community Colleges play a vital role in the upward mobility and social access to higher education in the U.S. while the upcoming changes in the educational system reveal a new set of skills that is mandatory for a successful presidential tenure. The presidents of these educational post-secondary institutions are becoming more aware of their leadership roles and expectations from groups such as students, community, and their respective board of trustees. This study delves into the core leadership competencies that lay the foundation and groundwork for a successful CCP. The key findings of this research include essential areas of leadership effectiveness such as emotional and social intelligence, shared vision, and community engagement. Ultimately, this research attempts to answer the question: “What does it take to become an effective community college president?” This research also provides a compelling argument into the emotional and social leadership skills set needed to be successful as a CCP using comparative analysis, statistical evidence, and a multi-rater system of analysis. The major theme categories, as found by this research, needed to be an effective CCP are emotional intelligence, sense of purpose, social intelligence, involving external stakeholders, and cognitive intelligence. It is the intent of this research to identify competency markers as indicators for an effective CCP. In an attempt to identify core competencies relevant to the success of CCPs, this research focuses on three completed studies, each one building on the next in succession. The first study is a qualitative approach using critical incident behavior analysis during formal interviews with CCPs. The second is a quantitative approach to the insights and expectations of community college faculty. Finally, the third study is a quantitative focus on the competencies of effectiveness and engagement of CCPs. In addition, the third study is a multi-rater design analysis with a 360 feedback survey from direct reports of the presidents of community colleges. These three studies create a mixed-method network of evidence and logic formulated to lay a foundation for CCPs. Ideally, the information compiled from this research can be used by current and future community college administration. The competencies that once led to a successful CCP tenure have changed and have been replaced with new expectations from the community college board of directors, students, and communities. This research outlines what is required to have a successful tenure as a CCP in today's post-secondary education system.

Committee:

RICHARD BOYATZIS, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory

Keywords:

Leadership, Post Secondary, Community College President, competencies

Long, Coby E.Intrusion, Convenience, or Indifference: Investigating Attitudes of Community College Students Regarding the Use of Social Networking Software in College Coursework
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Instructional Technology (Education)
This study sought to understand the perception of community college students on utilizing social media as represented by Facebook as a tool in their community college courses. A demographic survey was administered to students in the researcher's courses and a group of six students were selected based on their survey responses to be interviewed. Transcripts of the interview dialogue were coded and responses were compared with each other as well as the demographic characteristics of the interviewees. The study found that the majority of community college students interviewed held positive preconceptions of using Facebook for purposes related to their college coursework. Five out of the six students interviewed reported that they would be open to the notion of using Facebook for educational purposes relating to their college coursework in the future. Their reasons for holding this positive preconception revolved around two notions: that Facebook is convenient because they are already using it compared to having to learn the Blackboard application for college use, contrasted with a mild disdain for Blackboard and utilization of the LMS being constrained to only when necessary. Further study recommendations include using larger sample sizes, studying across broader class rank and majors and analyzing student desires for different software.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Software; Educational Technology

Keywords:

Facebook; community college; Blackboard; learning management system; social networking

Miller, Karen CA National Study on Student Satisfaction with and Importance of College Environment Variables as Predictors of Spring-to-Spring Retention
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2014, Higher Education
As accountability for America’s community colleges is at the forefront of conversation nationwide, it is now more important than ever that leaders in higher education determine the right combination of interactions and practices that matter most in engaging, retaining, and graduating community college students. The purpose of this research was to utilize the results of the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory for Community and Technical Colleges from 22 community colleges across the country to determine if student satisfaction with and importance of college environment variables are predictors of spring-to-spring retention. As research indicates a connection between student satisfaction and retention, this study seeks to fill the gap in the literature also connecting importance with satisfaction. Using Vincent Tinto’s Theory of Student Departure as the framework, and Alexander Astin’s I-E-O model as a data analysis framework, this study seeks to determine the connection between levels of satisfaction and importance on the variables and spring-to-spring retention. The results of this study will fuel discussion around future interventions and policy implications to promote retention and success for community college students across the country.

Committee:

Ronald Opp (Committee Chair); Debra Harmening (Committee Member); Sunday Griffith (Committee Member); Jennifer Spielvogel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Education; Higher Education

Keywords:

community college retention; student satisfaction; retention; student engagement

Brook, EllenINVESTIGATING THE ADULT LEARNERS’ EXPRERIENCE WHEN SOLVING MATHEMATICAL WORD PROBLEMS
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purpose of the study was to understand and describe the experiences adult learners have while solving mathematical word problems. The focus of the study was on how these adult students used prior mathematical knowledge and how their past experiences with mathematics influenced their solving of mathematics word problems typically found in an algebra course. The research methodology was multiple case studies. The research sample was comprised of the students taking a Beginning Algebra class at a Midwest community college. Individual interviews with open-ended questions and observations of students solving mathematical word problems were employed to gather information about the individual’s constructions and experiences. The within-case and cross-case data analyses followed the data collection. The study found that the attitudes, feelings and beliefs that adult students in the study hold toward mathematics and problem solving are an integral part of their mathematics learning experience. This study also reports on the particular pattern observed within the participants’ attitude toward mathematics education during their schooling years beginning from elementary school till college. In addition, the study also found that the majority of the participants were not ready to tackle the traditional word problems because of the lack of necessary cognitive resources/previous knowledge. The adult students participated in the study lacked the necessary knowledge of such concepts as motion and concentration. Finally, the study found that even after learning the topic during the college class, the participants had difficulties with applying algebraic approaches to word problem solving. The participants mostly relied on the memorization rather than conceptual understanding. In addition, the majority of the participants displayed no transfer of learning between the classroom and everyday activities.

Committee:

Michael Mikusa (Committee Chair); Joanne Caniglia (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Community College Education; Education; Mathematics Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Math Education, Mathematical Problem Solving, Adult Education, Algebraic Reasoning, Community College

Baranyk, Bethany L.S.A Model for Choosing a Four-Year University or a Two-Year Community College with the Presence of a Government Subsidy
Master of Science, University of Akron, 2012, Applied Mathematics
Students today face the decision of choosing either a four-year university or a two-year community college when pursuing higher education. This choice as well as the government's choice of subsidizing the four-year university or the two-year community college is analyzed using game theory. The two players of the game are the individual and the government. The individual, who intends on receiving a four-year degree, can choose to either directly attend a four-year university or first attend a two-year community college before enrolling in a four-year institution. The government can choose to subsidize the four-year university and the two-year community college either at the same level or different levels. The goal of both the individual and the government is to optimize their lifetime earnings. We find that looking at the immediate future, the individual should directly attend a four-year institution regardless of ability. However, looking at the distant future, we find the choice does depend on the individual's own merit, and based upon ability the individual should choose to attend community college first before enrolling in a university unless the subsidy for the four-year university is greater than the subsidy for the two-year community college. We also find that at retirement age, the lifetime earnings of the individual are not significantly affected by the presence or absence of a government subsidy.

Committee:

Stefan Forcey, Dr. (Advisor); Curtis Clemons, Dr. (Advisor); Kevin Kreider, Dr. (Committee Member); Gerald Young, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Applied Mathematics; Higher Education

Keywords:

game theory; higher education; community college; university; subsidy

Craider, Holly LA Narrative Study of First-Generation Community College Students' Success in an Unfamiliar Environment--College
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
Currently sitting in ninth place, the United States is lagging behind the rest of the world in the number of college graduates. Aware of this ranking, the federal government has put pressure on state officials to increase state completion rates. Tying state funding to performance metrics, state governors are requiring that higher education institutions determine a way to increase their graduation rates. With the increased attention on completion, community colleges, currently graduating an average of 20 percent of their students, are focusing on assisting students to get through academic programs successfully. The most intriguing population, first-generation college students, has been the target of much literature in relation to success. The majority of literature surrounding first-generation college students has focused on the inability of this type of student to succeed on our college campuses. Relying on the results of quantitative studies, researchers have often examined this population of students from a deficit approach. Grouping the students into one category, assumptions are made regarding their ability to succeed, purporting that these students are less likely to earn strong GPAs and persist at our colleges because they are the first in their families to attend college. While researchers continue to grapple with this question, the number of these students continues to grow on our campuses, specifically community college campuses. Due to increased numbers of first-generation students attending community colleges, researchers have directed more attention toward this population of students and more information is needed. The purpose of this research was to explore first-generation community college students’ ability to succeed in an unfamiliar environment—college. Acknowledging the fact that they are able to succeed, I questioned the deficit theory approach previously embraced by researchers regarding this population. Utilizing narrative inquiry methodology, data was collected through in-depth interviews with a diverse sample of six students at a large community college in the Midwest. Using a three-dimensional framework, participants were asked to explore their pasts, presents, and futures in regard to their ability to succeed. The content of the narratives was analyzed using Fraser’s (2004) line-by-line approach. A constructivist framework guided the interpretation of the results. The results of this study indicate that the tendency to understand first-generation community college students from a deficit approach should not be encouraged. Contrary to what the social constructions have indicated, these students are capable of the same academic endeavors as their continuing-generation peers. Regardless of early environments, they are able to succeed at our community colleges. Once we truly understand where they have been, who they have become, and where they wish to go, we can build on their strengths to ensure that they will succeed at our institutions.

Committee:

Susan Iverson, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Martha Merrill, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Belinda Miles, Ed.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

First-generation; success; narrative; community college; qualitative; student

Neely, Janet HenchieA study of socialization and job satisfaction of faculty at an urban two-year community college /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Community college teachers;Socialization;Job satisfaction

Owens, John ThomasPOWER CHORDS, BLAST BEATS, AND ACCORDIONS: UNDERSTANDING INFORMAL MUSIC LEARNING IN THE LIVES OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE MUSICIANS
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College of the Arts / School of Music
The purpose of this multiple case study was to explore the experiences of informal music learners at a community college. In this study, the views and understandings of participants provided diverse perspectives into individual lifeworlds, which are informed by social, economic, and cultural conditions. Purposeful sampling was used to provide information rich cases. Specifically, maximum variation and criterion sampling guided the researcher in selecting eight distinct participants with divergent perspectives, attitudes, and positions. This investigation was directed by three research questions. First, how do informal music learners at a community college pursue musical studies and describe their experiences? Second, based on participant experiences, how do these beliefs and ideas influence their musical understanding? Third, what aspects of how music is learned do participants perceive as being beneficial to other musicians? To gather rich and descriptive information, data collection included formal interviews, group interviews, and observations. An interpretive approach to data analysis was utilized to explore, understand, and give meaning to responses. As a constructivist, the author aimed to analyze data with respect to the idiosyncratic understandings and beliefs of each participant. Further, in this multiple case study a cross-case analysis was implemented to emphasize findings and maintain the singularity of each case. Research revealed that members used similar and varied approaches to pursue musical studies, utilize resources, and convey learning processes, which included reliance on listening, observation, repetition, collaboration, seeking guidance, and trial-and-error. Findings uncovered how self-taught musicians illustrated prolonged musical engagement, varied learning approaches, emphasized aural skills, and perseverance in completing musical tasks, which are critical to music education.

Committee:

Craig Resta, Ph.D. (Advisor); Christopher Venesile, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Andrew Shahriari, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Alicia Crowe, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music Education

Keywords:

Informal learning, music, self-taught musicians, music education, case study, community college students, lifelong learning, aural skills, listening, watching, trial-and-error, YouTube, repetition, personal interest

Duncan, Robin AStudents' Perceived Value of the Community College Experience: A Mixed Methods Study
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this study was to explore students’ perceived value of their community college experience and its relationship to other factors often related to student persistence in college, namely satisfaction, academic quality, service quality, and engagement. The research was guided by three focused questions: How do students describe and define perceived value of community college; what components emerge from exploratory factor analysis of items designed to measure perceived value; and how, if at all, is a student’s perception of the value of a community college experience different from related measures such as satisfaction, engagement, or quality? Data were collected from students enrolled at, primarily, three Massachusetts community colleges, employing a three-phased, mixed methods exploratory sequential approach. Phase 1 consisted of focus group interviews with students from one of the participating colleges to identify the themes and language for developing the perceived value construct. Phase 2 consisted of an online survey targeting currently enrolled community college students. Factor analysis identified key components of the perceived value scale and multiple regression analysis determined the relationship between perceived value and other control variables. Phase 3 consisted of a virtual post survey focus group with voluntary survey participants from Massachusetts community colleges to discuss and clarify the quantitative results and narrative survey responses. The dominant theme emerging from the findings was that students described perceived value as “I am valued” by the college. Results also indicated that the perceived value construct was different from other measures and suggested promising ways for further exploring and measuring student persistence. As a result of the study’s findings, a conceptual framework in the form of a Perceived Value Wheel was proposed with recommendations to community college leaders and practical contribution to higher education leadership and change. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ruth Slotnick, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Business Administration; Business Education; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Continuing Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Management; Marketing; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Perceived Value; Service Quality; Academic Quality; Satisfaction; Student Engagement; Involvement; Student Experience; Higher Education; Two Year Colleges; Community College; Students; Mixed Methods; Regression; Factor Analysis; Persistence; Retention

Doty, Laura S.A Study of Enrollment Management Structures and Activities at Community Colleges in Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
During the 1960s, a community college movement spread across the United States providing for the expansion of education beyond high school to local communities. Ohio took part in this movement under the vision of Governor James A. Rhodes who wanted community colleges established to provide technical training and retraining to meet the needs of the changing workforce. The two-year college expansion and enrollment boom would not last forever. Consequently, community colleges must learn to manage enrollments with declining resources but increasing pressures and goals both internally and externally. Effectively recruiting, admitting, retaining, and graduating students are challenges for these typically low-cost, open access alternatives to four-year institutions. The purpose of this study is to assess how community colleges in Ohio are practicing enrollment management by obtaining academic and non-academic perceptions of the existence and effectiveness of the enrollment management function and related activities. An electronic survey was used to collect data for this quantitative study. The bulk of the survey was made up of 63 Likert-type questions that collected perceived existence and effectiveness data. There were 673 respondents in the final data set with 83 percent having an academic role and 17 percent having a non-academic role. Community colleges in Ohio are practicing enrollment management by having enrollment management plans in place and most often use an enrollment management division as an enrollment model. In addition, academics believe that they are not as knowledgeable, not as active, and should not have a more active role in enrollment management compared to non-academics. Most of the activities evaluated are perceived to exist and be at least moderately effective to neutral at the respondents’ community colleges. Five new constructs were developed from principal components analysis of the activities evaluated and then used for multivariate analysis of variance. It was determined that there are relationships between the enrollment management organizational model utilized and how enrollment management is practiced. There was a significant effect on respondents’ perceptions of the new construct activities at community colleges in Ohio from the interaction between the enrollment model used and the institutions’ location.

Committee:

A. Michael Williford, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Gordon Brooks, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Laura Harrison, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David Horton, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

community college; higher education; enrollment management; enrollment management models; Ohio; two-year college

Kline, Elizabeth A.How Single Mothers Experience Hope and Resilience on their Journey through the Community College
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
Respect and economics are the two reasons single mothers say they attend college. Single mothers have a strong motivation to earn a degree, but why are some of them able to finish and others not? This study explored the motivational systems single mothers use to persevere as they journey through the community college. Hope in the form of waypower (the ability to navigate obstacles) and willpower (the sense of purpose or agency) and resilience proved to be key factors. Utilizing Seidman's (2006) three-interview sequence with questions focused through the appreciative lens, I created the narrative profiles for five single mother students. I explored the profiles for common themes and emerging theory and identified four themes. The first theme discusses the shared early childhood and high school experiences as well as the experiences of becoming a mom, and the chance to begin again in college. The second theme explores the motivation of the women to attend college in terms of economic power, breaking the cycle, and achieving self-fulfillment. The third theme explores how the women navigate obstacles by employing effective strategies such as support systems, goal setting, time and money management techniques, and stress management techniques; and key attitudes including resilience, willingness to sacrifice, independence, and self-acceptance. Finally, the final theme delves into the way the women perceive their experiences as a mother and student integrating the roles. The study concludes with implications for current practice and future research including utilizing the Adult Hope Scale as part of intrusive advising with incoming students, providing workshops geared towards the findings from the Hope Scale college-wide, a mentorship network, professional development for faculty and advisors, and revisiting college policies and procedures.

Committee:

Peter Mather, Dr. (Committee Chair); Laura Harrison, Dr. (Committee Member); Lynn Harter, Dr. (Committee Member); Shah Hasan, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

single mothers; community college; hope; resilience

Schwartz, Carol A.An Analysis of Instructional Practices of Contingent Faculty in Community Colleges
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education

The academy has long acknowledged teaching, service, and research as the threefold work of its members. Those members in community colleges primarily engage in teaching, as opposed to research and service, but historical trends show an increase in the percent of courses taught by contingent instructors as opposed to full-time faculty members. This trend, when considered with the fact that almost half of the students now pursuing postsecondary educational opportunities do so in community colleges, provides a rich landscape for investigation.

This dissertation examines, through description correlation methods, the existence of relationships between characteristics of community college contingent faculty and the planning, preparation, class environment, instruction, and professional development activities used by contingent faculty in community colleges, specifically those instructors in the Arts and Sciences or general education divisions.

Those varied teaching activities are the components of Danielson’s Framework for Teaching, a model developed to address wide-ranging aspects of instruction. That model serves as the conceptual framework for this study, which included participants from across the nation who work in community colleges differentiated by size and the populations they serve.

The analysis of the results of this correlational study leads to recommendations for more effective instructional practices in contingent faculty and improved integration of this group into the academic life of community colleges.

Committee:

David Meabon, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mary Ellen Edwards, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Larry McDougle, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Bin Ning, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Renay Scott, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Education; Pedagogy; Teaching

Keywords:

community college; contingent faculty; adjuncts; adjunct faculty; teaching practices; Framework for Teaching; instructional practices; pedagogy; instruction

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