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Stallard, Matthew S.John Milton’’s Bible: Biblical Resonance in Paradise Lost
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2008, English (Arts and Sciences)
This dissertation mainly consists of a modernized edition of John Milton’s Paradise Lost that is abundantly annotated with Biblical references. The editorial preface outlines the methods used for arriving at these annotations, the rationale for editorial decisions, and a discussion of the Biblical translations consulted. Lastly, this work includes a critical essay that engages how Milton’s choices between various translations of the Bible and his depiction of the Holy Spirit in Paradise Lost reveal his disposition toward the Trinity doctrine.

Committee:

Andrew Escobedo, PhD (Committee Chair); Beth Quitslund, PhD (Committee Member); Jeremy Webster, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Ingram, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bible; Clergy; English literature; History; Judaic Studies; Language; Language Arts; Literature; Philosophy; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; Religious History; Theology

Keywords:

John Milton; Paradise Lost; Bible; Old Testament; New Testament; Jehovah's Witnesses; King James Version; Authorized Version; Great Bible; Bishop's Bible; Geneva Bible; Douay-Rheims Bible; Renaissance Literature

Innes, Kari A.Revelations of a Genealogy: Biblical Women in Performance during Twentieth-Century American Feminisms
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Theatre and Film
This dissertation treats dramatic representations of biblical women by women that have emerged in the last century within milieus informed by emerging and shifting feminisms. I begin my study with proto-feminist Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and then trace a genealogy of the dramatization of biblical women during twentieth-century American feminisms through the works of female artists. These performers and playwrights include Salome dancers, Florence Kiper Frank, Lorraine Hansberry, Marsha Norman, Madonna, and others. The goal of my project is to argue that theatre and performance provide what feminist theologian Elizabeth Schussler Fiorenza describes as a “hermeneutics of creative imagination and ritualization” that “retells biblical stories and celebrates our foresisters in a feminist key.” Feminist religious scholars like Fiorenza, as well as feminists such as Hélène Cixous and artists such as Sandra Cisneros, have urged similar re-visionings of biblical women towards feminists ends. These projects, however, tend to privilege critical and non-dramatic texts, particularly the creative writings of contemporary women that endeavor to rewrite biblical women through a feminist perspective. Marjorie Procter-Smith, a scholar of feminist liturgy, ritual studies, and performance theory, cites the need for historical reconstruction, but that which “involves not only remembering with the mind but also remembering with the body.” While Fiorenza and Procter-Smith do not extend their claims to include drama in the reconstruction of feminine memory, the goal of my research is to argue that theatre and performance fulfill this type of hermeneutic. My project asks “Does, or how does, theatre and performance provide an embodied ‘creative and imaginative hermeneutic’ to reclaim and reshape feminine religious and social identity?”

Committee:

Scott Magelssen, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jonathan Chambers, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Lesa Lockford, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Susana Peña, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Theater Studies

Keywords:

Biblical Women; Bible Plays; Bible in Performance; Feminist Theology

Berry, Autumn CThe Historical Evolution of Malone: A Challenge to Keep Christ First in the Journey from Bible College to Christian Liberal Arts University
Undergraduate Honors Program, Malone University, 2015, Honors Thesis
This paper focuses on the changes Malone went through between 1966-1971. At that time, Christian colleges throughout the nation were deeply wrestling with social upheaval, and many institutions decided to become secular. Then-president Everett Cattell worked with current and prospective students, faculty and staff, and alumni and parents to gather opinions to determine exactly what constituents were looking for in a Christian college. The five years of efforts culminated primarily in removing a single sentence in the student handbook that made reference to students abiding by all policies whether they were commuting or living on campus. Although the change was technically minor, it had major ramifications for the Malone community.

Committee:

Amy M. Yuncker (Advisor); Diane Chambers, PhD. (Committee Member); Malcolm Gold, PhD. (Committee Member); Jacalynn Welling, PhD. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Religious Education

Keywords:

Malone University; Everett Cattell; en loco parentis; Malone Experiment; Evangelical Friends; college; liberal arts; Malone College; Cleveland Bible College; Cleveland Bible Institute

Kim, Kyoung-Hee MichaelaMary's mission at the foot of the cross of Jesus in John 19:25-28a; in light of Isaac's role in the narrative of Abraham in Genesis 22:1-19
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2017, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

Isaac, Biblical patriarch, sacrifice ; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint typology ; Bible Genesis 22, 1-19 criticism and interpretation ; Bible John 19, 25-28 criticism and interpretation

Ewing, Lisa MDangerous Feminine Sexuality: Biblical Metaphors and Sexual Violence Against Women
Master of Humanities (MHum), Wright State University, 2013, Humanities
This analysis responds to an ongoing debate between feminist and traditional readings of sexually violent (SV) metaphors in the prophetic texts of Hosea, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, and the New Testament book of Revelation. Whereas feminist scholars have often argued that such metaphors are built upon the exploitation of women’s sexuality, traditionalist scholars have insisted that the metaphors are merely literary devices that should only be read within their historical and literary contexts. Taking a moderate position, this analysis uses the cognitive metaphor theory to explain that the SV metaphors depend on cognitive associations of dangerous feminine sexuality to relate to historically-specific concerns of the original authors and audiences. This analysis then examines said historically-specific concerns to reveal the literary function of the metaphors in their original contexts. Finally, this analysis closes by considering current sociopsychological concerns that cause contemporary society to continue relying on the same cognitive associations of dangerous feminine sexuality as seen the SV metaphors.

Committee:

David Barr, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Mark Verman, Ph.D (Committee Member); Andrea Harris, M.A. (Committee Member); Ava Chamberlain, Ph.D (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Religion; Womens Studies

Keywords:

BIBLICAL METAPHOR; BIBLE, FEMINIST CRITICISM; SEXUAL VIOLENCE; HOSEA, BOOK OF; JEREMIAH; BOOK OF; EZEKIEL, BOOK OF; REVELATION, BOOK OF; WHORE OF BABYLON; BIBLE, WOMEN IN; COGNITIVE METAPHOR THEORY

Presta, JamesCornelius a Lapide's biblical methodology used in Marian texts and its comparison with a contemporary approach
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2005, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Biblical Teaching; Cornelius a Lapide; Bible, hermeneutics; Bible, criticism and interpretation

Wong, Chien-HuiAn Analysis of Style and Influence in Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco's Le Danze del Re David
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2011, Music
This document focuses on the Italian-Jewish composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and one of his most important compositions for the piano, Le Danze del Re David - Dances of King David (1925). The factors – musical and non-musical – that influenced the creation of this significant work will be examined as well as an analysis of the music. Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s life, including his persecution as a Jew during World War II and flight to the United States, his music education, and his career development are explored. Italian Sephardic liturgy and new Italian music society which developed in 1900–1930 influenced this work. The origin of King David’s dance, as referenced in 1 Chronicles 13:8 of the Bible, as well as specific instrumentation listed is represented in this work. Six facets of music conception from large scope to small unit including formal structure, melodic structure, the harmonic language of Le Danze del Re David, tempo, rhythmical characters, and musical texture are examined so as to enable a detailed musical analysis and provide a more complete view of Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s style. With a better understanding of this work, a performer’s perspective of this piece including suggestions on interpretation is provided in the final chapter.

Committee:

Steven Glaser (Advisor); Jan Radzynski (Committee Member); David Clampitt (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco; Rhapsody; Sephardic Jew; Bible; King David; Dances; ancinet instrument; analysis; shofar; piano; liturgy; Italian composer

Frankel, David HarryStudies in Saadiah Gaon's Arabic Translations
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
With these three chapters analyzing Saadiah’s bible translations, exegesis, and liturgical translations, it will be demonstrated that Saadiah’s use of Arabic terminology allowed him to create an innovative form of the expression of Jewish ideas. In the case of the Pentateuch translations, the Arabic terminology that was analyzed served to preserve not only a very literal meaning of the text in the vernacular of the Jewish masses but also the sacred nature of the text by utilizing terms which possess a sacred nature in the Qur’ān and Islamic texts. In his translations of the baqqashot, Saadiah includes names for God which occur in Islamic prayer and includes terminology that describes its actual choreography. In this way, Saadiah allowed for the prayer to not only serve as a form of Jewish piety, but also to resemble the Muslim piety for the sake of his readers. The interpretation of the first Psalm also displays an innovative form of the expression of Jewish ideas by supplying a multiplicity of meanings for some words, a feat which is not common in the Jewish literature that preceded him.

Committee:

Daniel Frank, PhD (Advisor); Michael Swartz, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Judaic Studies

Keywords:

Saadiah Gaon Arabic translation bible exegesis tafsir geonim medieval jewish liturgy siddur

Melick, Christina M.The Impact of Translation Theory on the Development of Contextual Theology
Bachelor of Arts, University of Toledo, 2007, Linguistics
I argue that as Bible translators worked in non-Western cultures and languages, they, along with the people in these cultures, realized that some words cannot be divorced from their cultural context and connotations. This idea inevitably led them to conclude that each culture also has their own unique viewpoint of God, faith, and reality, which was essentially the birth of contextual theology. This was a major shift from classical theological thought which saw theology as more of a scientific description of God and faith, which implies that it is universal, the same for every person in every culture. I begin by discussing the issue of meaning within the context of translation. What actually happens during translation? Can the meaning of a text actually be transferred to another language? To investigate this idea, I examine two key ideas within translation studies: untranslatability and equivalence, namely what aspects of a text may be untranslatable and what type of equivalence between the source and target language texts is possible and desirable. I conclude that the way in which a translator solves these problems leads to a unique new work of art. Next, I relate this conclusion to the key premise of contextual theology, that theology cannot be separated from cultural context, although each person can gain a deeper, fuller view of God by studying other cultures’ theologies. I will particularly focus on the synthesis model of contextual theology, as described by Stephen Bevans, which is particularly well suited to showing the influence of translation theory. Ultimately I conclude that the development of contextual theology would not have occurred without the changes in translation theory prompted by the act of Bible translation.

Committee:

Dorothy Siegel, PhD (Advisor); Richard Gaillardetz, PhD (Advisor); Melissa Gregory, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Linguistics; Theology

Keywords:

translation; translation theory; contextual theology; Bible translation; equivalence; untranslatability; Nyarafolo; Senufo

Rudavsky-Brody, MiriamSolomon ibn Gabirol and Samuel ibn Naghrela: An Examination of Life and Death
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
This thesis focuses upon the poetry of Samuel ibn Naghrela (993-1056) and Solomon ibn Gabirol (c. 1021-1057), two of the most notable poets of the Andalusian period of Hebrew poetry. These two contemporary poets personify different characteristics of medieval Andalusia: Ibn Gabirol's poetry incorporates the Neoplatonic philosophical ideas that infused medieval Andalusian society, while that of Ibn Naghrela, written several years earlier, is unaffected by Neoplatonism. The first chapter introduces the historical and cultural context which gave birth to these two poets. The second chapter introduces the two poets. Chapters three and four present the themes of death and life in the context of eight poems. Ibn Gabirol accepts death as inevitable and reflects on life's brevity. He regards death as a new beginning and celebration of the soul's release. Ibn Naghrela regards death with trepidation. But in the poetry that is examined, he neither advises his reader to prepare for death, nor indicates that he himself is altering his life to prepare for death. Examining the two poets' views towards death in these poems also indicates how they lived their lives. As will be shown, in the poems that are discussed Ibn Naghrela exhorts his readers to enjoy life, reminding them that life is fleeting, and that life's pleasures will not outlast death. He does not advise his reader to renounce the material world in preparation for death, for he views death as a grim finality, and broods on the gruesome aspects of physical decay. Ibn Gabirol, on the other hand, influenced by the Neoplatonic theme of spiritual purification and the soul's release, advocates more pietistic practices in the poems that are examined, urging his readers to improve themselves while they are alive for the edification of their trapped soul, so that she may escape the corporeal body upon its demise.

Committee:

Adena Tanenbaum, Dr. (Advisor); Daniel Frank, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Near Eastern Studies

Keywords:

Hebrew language; Hebrew Bible; Judaism; Andalusia; Judeo-Arabic; poetry

Jones, AleiahQuerying the Church: Christian Church Leaders' Perspectives on Homosexuality
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2013, Sociology
This thesis explores the perspectives of Christian church leaders on homosexuality. Sexual orientation, specifically homosexuality, is a highly controversial issue in Christianity. The denominations within Christianity maintain a variety of views which range from outright condemnation to complete acceptance. The purpose of this study was to identify the perspectives on homosexuality that exist among Christian church leaders in the Toledo area. A qualitative research methodology was utilized for this study. Two distinct bodies of literature - sexualities studies and Christian theology – were used as the theoretical frameworks to guide the research. Church leaders held a wide variety of views on the topic – but mainly they could be defined as the Religious Right, who consider homosexuality a sin, and the Welcoming and Affirming churches, which do not regard homosexuality as a sin and are explicitly inclusive towards homosexuality. Church leaders rely on combination of Scripture, reason, tradition, and experience to formulate their perspectives on homosexuality.

Committee:

Mark Sherry (Committee Chair); Willie McKether (Committee Member); Barbara Chesney (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Clergy; Religion; Religious Congregations; Sociology; Theology

Keywords:

Homosexuality; Christianity; Christian Church leaders; Bible; Sodom and Gomorrah; Religious Right; Welcoming and Affirming

Acker, John ThomasSurrogate Scriptures: American Christian Bestsellers and the Bible, 1850-1900
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, English
This dissertation examines four bestselling Christian novels published in the United States between 1850 and 1900: Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) by Harriet Beecher Stowe, The Gates Ajar (1868) by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Ben-Hur (1880) by Lew Wallace, and In His Steps (1896) by Charles Sheldon. These four books reached millions of readers in a time when many Christians refused to read novels at all, helping to launch what is today a $4B Christian merchandise industry. More importantly, amid what Nathan Hatch has called the “democratization of American Christianity,” popular Christian novels offered a measure of cultural unity, despite splintering churches and increasing skepticism. To explain these novels’ literary popularity and religious impact, I approach them as what I call “surrogate Scriptures.” Just as surrogates are both representatives and substitutes, in a sense these novels can both replace the Bible and point readers back to it. All four novels confirm the Bible’s centrality and authority in Christian theology and practice, but they also showcase changing attitudes toward reading, understanding, interpreting, and applying Biblical content. The four novelists I study here stake out very different positions on these issues, but they all contribute to a vibrant and fascinating Christian literary culture. Each of my four chapters evaluates one or more of three related theological concepts: revelation, hermeneutics, and exegesis. Chapter 1, on Uncle Tom’s Cabin, examines the role of Bible reading in Augustine St. Clare’s conversion. I show how Stowe transforms the “take and read” scene from St. Augustine’s Confessions to link Bible reading to social action. In Chapter 2 I evaluate intertextuality in The Gates Ajar, in light of the novel’s diary-like structure. I track several of Phelps’ allusions and quotations, and show how she uses a range of artistic and theological resources to offer her readers both comfort and creativity. Next, in Chapter 3 I analyze the Magi’s origin stories in Ben-Hur, in light of doctrines of Christian supersessionism. These narratives, I argue, promote the idea that the Magi’s respective cultures and religions must inevitably give way to Christianity. Finally, Chapter 4 examines the role of writing and ethics in In His Steps. I contend that even though the characters ask “what would Jesus do?” to inform all their ethical decisions, they actively avoid studying or even reading any texts, especially the Bible. Overall, my study contributes to the existing scholarly literature by enriching and complicating our understanding of Christian bestsellers, and of 19th-century attitudes toward reading and applying the Bible. These four novels, though only representing a small portion of 19th-century Christian fiction, demonstrate diverse and sophisticated ideas about reading, faith, and imagination. Christian readers, writers, and publishers approached cultural engagement cautiously, especially with art forms that could distract or even mislead believers. Evaluating their strategies in terms of Biblical authority, not just doctrine or content, gives us a flexible and sophisticated framework for understanding a range of Christian fiction, both historical and contemporary.

Committee:

Jared Gardner (Advisor); Elizabeth Hewitt (Committee Member); Hannibal Hamlin (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Religion

Keywords:

American literature, Christianity, Bible, religion and literature, Stowe, Phelps, Wallace, Sheldon

Neel, Paul JosephThe Rhetoric of Propriety in Puritan Sermon Writing and Poetics
PHD, Kent State University, 2012, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English

Puritans cautiously appropriated and deployed classical rhetorical theory in their preaching and poetics, and both of these language practices register dialectical tensions between rhetorical propriety and the propriety of rhetoric, which suggests that Puritan preaching and poetics deals squarely with rhetorical propriety. Rhetoricians, however, have largely overlooked, diminished, or even dismissed the role rhetorical propriety plays in rhetorical situation generally and, more specifically, the role rhetorical propriety plays Puritan rhetoric. I argue that Puritan rhetoric offers a clear articulation of the sense of propriety that underwrites Christian ethics, epistemology, and aesthetics, from which we can draw conclusions about rhetorical propriety as a meaningful concept for studying rhetorical situation.

I therefore argue that rhetorical propriety can be treated as a usable methodology for studying rhetorical situation. Modern rhetorical theorists have primarily studied rhetorical propriety by taking classical rhetorical tradition as their starting point, and so they have reached the same conclusions as the classical rhetoricians themselves that rhetorical propriety cannot be properly theorized to create a usable (or teachable) methodology. Puritan language practices offer a starting point for examining rhetorical propriety: Puritan sermon rhetoric offers a starting point for examining rhetorical propriety in rhetorical situation and Puritan poetry a starting point for examining rhetorical propriety in literary analysis.

Finally, I argue that rhetorical propriety offers an analytical method that is dialectical in its movement. The concept comprises four different “moments” of analysis: stylistic propriety, rhetorical propriety, social propriety and economic propriety. Stylistic propriety concerns literary decorum—whether a language user’s style suits its subject, genre, and purpose. Rhetorical propriety concerns the materials that compose rhetorical situation—whether a language user suits style to audience, occasion, and exigency. Social propriety concerns the customs, manners, and mores of a culture or subculture—whether the language user’s style meets or challenges social expectations. Economic propriety concerns the materials that “underwrite” all the other forms of propriety; specifically, economic propriety concerns authorship and authority and how style becomes the material “language instrument” that shapes and is shaped by authority, as well as the social institutions that back it. Each of these analytical “moments” implies the others, even when a single moment is brought into focus.

Committee:

Raymond Craig, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Ronald Corthell, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Kevin Floyd, PhD (Committee Member); Sara Newman, PhD (Committee Member); David Odell-Scott, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; American Literature; Bible; British and Irish Literature; Ethics; Literature; Philosophy; Rhetoric

Keywords:

propriety; rhetoric; dialectic; puritan; preaching; sermon; poetics; Aristotle; Cicero; Augustine; King James Version; Geneva Bible; William Perkins; John Milton; Edward Taylor

Clement, Brett G.A Study of the Instrumental Music of Frank Zappa
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2009, College-Conservatory of Music : Theory

This dissertation offers the first large-scale analytical study of the instrumental music of Frank Zappa (1940-1993). Following initial commentary in Chapter 1 on the problems of categorization in the repertoire, Chapter 2 offers a preliminary discussion of style and form in Zappa's music. Regarding style, I detail the fallouts of Zappa's unique early musical education as well as the influence of his guitar playing in his compositional style. My investigation of form explores the formal implications of melodic repetition, examining non-repeating forms characteristic of the hybrid works and repeating forms utilizing variation procedures such as contour retention and isomelism. Chapter 3 is devoted to rhythm and meter in Zappa's music. The primary topics of this chapter are various types of rhythmic/metrical conflict, including polymeter, metrical dissonance, and rhythmic dissonance, which are explained in part as an attempted merging of advanced compositional techniques and rock/pop music norms. A theoretical discussion of rhythmic dissonance, which is Zappa's trademark rhythmic device, comprises the bulk of the chapter.

Chapter 4 offers a Lydian theory for Zappa's diatonic music, loosely adapted from George Russell's seminal jazz theory The Lydian Chromatic Concept (1953). This theory views the Lydian scale as representing a tonic state in Zappa's music due to its special static attributes. It introduces the concept of a Lydian system, containing a limited group of diatonic modes related to a common Lydian scale. Within, I demonstrate how the pitch structures of non-Lydian modes are related abstractly to those of the Lydian tonic, and follow by considering pedal substitutions and progressions within the Lydian system.

Chapter 5 is devoted to Zappa's non-diatonic music. The first section of this chapter explores Zappa's methods of chromatic pitch organization, including pitch-class diversity, chromatic saturation, and symmetry. The second section investigates a system of composition based on a Chord Bible of Zappa's own devising. This section includes a preliminary recreation of certain aspects of Chord Bible and a discussion of the compositional employment of Chord-Bible harmony in the series of orchestral works composed circa 1977-1982.

Committee:

David Carson Berry (Committee Chair); Steven Cahn, J. (Committee Member); Catherine Losada (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Zappa; Lydian scale; Chord Bible; rhythmic dissonance

Yoder, Tyler RFishing for Fish and Fishing for Men: Fishing Imagery in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
This dissertation examines the use of fishing imagery within the Hebrew Bible and ancient Near Eastern literature up through the end of the Iron Age. Outside of the concluding chapter, this study comprises six major units. The introduction grounds the ensuing literary discussion in chapters 2-6 with a survey of the ichthyological and piscatorial evidence from the ancient Near East, as well as a comprehensive lexical study of the fishing terminology employed in the Hebrew Bible. The following five chapters, each of which is a self-contained unit, analyze the gamut of fishing references within the Hebrew Bible. Chapter two investigates the conceptual phenomenon of divine fishers in the ancient Near East and its relationship to Jer. 16:16-18. The third (Amos 4:1-3; Hab. 1:14-17; Ezek. 12:13-14; 17:16-21; 19:1-9) and fourth (Job 40:25-32; Ezek. 29:1-6a; 32:1-10) chapters build directly on this unit by unpacking the chief connotation of this phenomenon, whether directed against humans or monstrous fauna: divinely appointed exile. Chapter five (Qoh. 9:11-12) takes the act of fishing to its logical end by examining its relationship to death. The sixth chapter explores the relationship between fishing and polarity in the final three fishing images within the Hebrew Bible (Is. 19:5-10; Ezek. 26:1-14; 47:1-12). The conclusion synthesizes the assemblage of data examined in the previous chapters, weaving all of the material and literary evidence together to evaluate the function and source of fishing imagery in the Hebrew Bible. In addition to focusing on the use of rhetoric and imagery, this comparative study sheds light on both the complex network of cultural and literary interchange in the ancient Near East.

Committee:

Samuel Meier (Advisor); Daniel Frank (Committee Member); Carolina López-Ruiz (Committee Member); Brent Strawn (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Archaeology; Bible; Biblical Studies; Comparative Literature; Judaic Studies; Near Eastern Studies

Keywords:

fishing; fishing imagery; fishing metaphors; Hebrew Bible; ancient Near East; fishers of men; Akkadian literature; Assyrian royal inscriptions; prophetic literature; divine retribution; Babylonian exile; death; Leviathan; Tannin

Kim, Taeoh TimothyMary, the model of all Christians in the Gospel of Luke: the realized eschatological perspective on discipleship to Jesus as seen in Mary as the model-figure (Lk 1-2) and manifested by various characters in Luke's parables
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2002, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Christian life; discipleship; Bible, Luke 1-2, criticism and interpretation

Nolan, Mary CatherineThe Magnificat, canticle of a liberated people: a hermeneutical study of Luke 1:46-55 investigating the world behind the text by exegesis; the world in front of the text by interpretive inquiry
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 1995, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Magnificat; Luke 1, criticism and interpretation; Bible, hermeneutics; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint

Sacks, RachelFearless Foreign Women: Exploring Tamar and Ruth as Characters Within a Post-Exilic Debate on Intermarriage
BA, Oberlin College, 2017, Religion
This paper examines the influence of Genesis 38 on the Book of Ruth. Both texts feature women—Tamar in Genesis 38 and Ruth in the Book of Ruth—whose extraordinary actions result in the preservation of King David’s descendants. While the Book of Ruth draws on many received traditions, its use of Genesis 38 has been underappreciated and not fully understood. To explore this, I identify similarities in the stories, as well as the likely political purpose and historical context of each text. I analyze the ancient practice of retelling biblical stories, and argue that evidence points to the Book of Ruth as a rewritten adaptation of Genesis 38 that advocated for intermarriage in Judean communities. The story was written as part of a larger tradition of post-exilic texts that use Genesis 38 as a basis for the debate on the legitimacy of intermarriage, which erupted under Ezra and Nehemiah during the Persian period.

Committee:

Cynthia R. Chapman (Advisor)

Subjects:

Bible; Gender; Judaic Studies; Middle Eastern History; Middle Eastern Studies; Religion; Religious History

Keywords:

Book of Ruth, Genesis 38, Rewritten Bible, Post-exilic, Intermarriage

Golden, Tasha L.Push
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2012, English
Push seeks to expose – and simultaneously exploit – religious feeling and language as gateways to and from supposedly distinct fields of human experience. To this end, it explores the heightened language of religion, violence, and sexuality, revealing language's collusion among these realms and affirming the extent to which an experience in one area is deeply and irrevocably affected by language borrowed from another. The wielding of this language in Push serves to question the boundaries between desire, devotion, and oppression, and illuminates the ways in which the experience of having and losing faith parallels not only that of (jilted) romantic love, but also of more common and/or less blatantly spiritual occurrences such as rage, bereavement, sexual tension, and domestic violence. In these explorations, Push seeks to draw this laden language out of its common source(s), into a felt sense of its immanent resonance and volatility.

Committee:

Mr. David Schloss (Committee Chair); Dr. Catherine Wagner (Committee Member); Dr. Tuma Keith (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bible; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Gender; Language Arts; Literature; Philosophy; Psychology; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

religion; sexuality; grief; blasphemy; apostasy; Manley Hopkins; Henry Vaughan; homosexuality; faith; Bible; reproduction; womanhood; gender; doubt; blame; domestic violence; desire; rage; body; sex; oppression; spirituality

Taylor, Mark LymanThe implications of the Biblical references to music for music education in evangelical Christian schools
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 1995, Music Education
Leaders and writers of evangelical Christian schools insist that the Bible should be the basis for every aspect of the Christian school. They apply this principle to the curriculum of every course offering including those in the area of music. They further assert that the Bible should be studied for concepts and data that can be integrated with the subject matter of each course. The purpose, then, of this study was to investigate the references to music in the Bible to see what implications they have for the purpose, goals, objectives, and methods of music education in evangelical Christian schools. The study begins with an explanation of the evangelical Christian philosophy of education. The evangelical world view is first explained, and then the tenets of the philosophy of education that is derived from that world view. Foundational concepts, the purpose, goals, and objectives of evangelical Christian school education are presented.

Committee:

John Kratus (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music

Keywords:

Music in the Bible; Music in Christian Education

Warren, Timothy S.Rhetorical strategies for biblical hermeneutics /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1987, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Bible--Hermeneutics;Rhetoric

Eberle, Donald CConscription policy, citizenship and religious conscientous objectors in the United States and Canada during World War One
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2013, History
In democratic societies, governments often assume extraordinary powers during wartime, thus redefining, at least temporarily, the relationship between citizens and the State. During the First World War, the democratic governments of the United States and Canada conscripted their citizens to fight on the distant battlefields of Western Europe. Conscription created unique challenges for both governments as a number of eligible men, in both Canada and the United States, refused to recognize their government's authority to compel them to take up arms. Though the number of conscientious objectors was rather small, they were a remarkably diverse group that was highly visible. This created challenges for policy makers. The war would not wait and these almost unprecedented conscription policies was being made and revised even as they were being implemented. The war years were a difficult time to oppose government policy as both Canada and the United States employed impassioned rhetoric and expanded coercive powers to encourage all citizens, and resident aliens, to give the government their full cooperation. The young men who would later become religious conscientious objectors were peaceful, industrious and law abiding. They were generally considered to be highly valued members of society. The war, and specifically conscription, changed this positive perception. Complicating matter even further was the fact that many conscientious objectors were German immigrants, or the descendents of German immigrants. They frequently read and spoke German, often more fluently than they read or spoke English. These men, and their co-religionists, were now viewed as unpatriotic, untrustworthy, ignorant and dangerous. This dissertation examines the manner in which conscientious objectors challenged, either directly or indirectly, the basic authority of the state. It explores how conscientious objectors were identified as a threat, and how the governments of Canada and the United States tried to contain that threat. It also examines the ways in which citizenship was a contested and evolving concept in both Canada and the United States during the war, and particularly during the period of conscription, especially for recent immigrants and their descendants whose ethnic background and religious beliefs made them a highly visible minority and set them apart from the dominant culture. Examining conscription policy, and how it applied to conscientious objectors, during this particular moment in history not only sheds greater light upon the creation and implementation of conscription policies, but is crucial to answering larger questions about cultural attitudes in the United States and Canada toward vulnerable and marginalized populations. These issues remain highly relevant as both the United States and Canada become more diverse and continue to attract large numbers of immigrants.

Committee:

Gary Hess, Dr. (Advisor); Rebecca Mancuso, Dr. (Advisor); Beth Griech-Polelle, Dr. (Committee Member); Edgar Landgraf, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

World War I; United States; Canada; Conscientous Objectors; Mennonites; International Bible Students; Conscription

Sears, Joshua M.“His Hand Is Stretched Out—Who Will Turn it Back?”: Intercession within the Twelve Prophets
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

This paper explores the phenomenon of prophetic intercession as it appears within the Twelve Prophets of the Hebrew Bible, Hosea through Malachi. I begin by defining the term intercession as I will use it in this paper, essentially a prayer someone offers on behalf of another in an attempt to have God act positively toward the latter. I include in my discussion intercessory prayers offered by both prophetic and non-prophetic figures, but my discussion will concentrate on the prophets simply because they as a group intercede most frequently. Within each book of the Twelve I determine 1) if intercession occurs in some form, and 2) if intercession occurs, what are the forms, functions, and results of the intercession as portrayed in that book, and how do these relate to examples elsewhere in the Bible. I have limited my study to the Twelve because, with the exception of Amos, intercessory activity within the Twelve is often glossed over or ignored in studies on intercession; most of the attention goes to more famous examples such as Moses, Samuel, and Jeremiah. My hope is to fill this void by shining the spotlight directly on these smaller texts.

Over the course of this study we find that Amos contains the clearest examples of intercessory prayer; Habakkuk contains some petitions that, while vague, demonstrate an intercessory character; Joel contains examples of intercession by both prophet and priests; Zechariah contains an unusual intercessory plea by an angel; Hosea and Micah contain passages that are not clearly intercession although some have called them such; and the remaining books contain no discernible examples of intercession. In these latter cases I discuss why the absence is either expected or surprising.

Intercession can be a complicated topic because it incorporates—and sometimes challenges our assumptions about—topics ranging from prayer to prophets, deity to human agency. This paper seeks to understand what the Twelve have to offer to this ancient and fascinating discussion.

Committee:

Samuel Meier, PhD (Advisor); Daniel Frank, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ancient History; Bible; Biblical Studies; Religion; World History

Keywords:

intercession; prophets; prayer; Hebrew Bible; intercessor; intercessory; Minor Prophets; Twelve Prophets

Downey, H.R.Removing Homosexuality from Sodom: Contextualizing Genesis 19 with Other Biblical Rape Narratives
Master of Humanities (MHum), Wright State University, 2017, Humanities
This analysis disputes common interpretations that the Sodom narrative (Genesis 19) is an anti-homosexual story by presenting it as part of a four-story arc about rape in the Bible. The three other stories discussed in addition to Sodom are as follows: the gang rape of the Levite’s concubine (Judges 19), the rape of Dinah (Genesis 34), and the rape of Tamar (2 Samuel 13). Each of the four stories discussed in this analysis contain various types of sexual violence, such as male-to-male rape or attempted rape, female-to-male rape, and male-to-female rape; in each case, the rapes or attempted rapes lead to disastrous social consequences, which this analysis concludes is the overarching message to each of the four narratives. In addition, this analysis will consider how the Sodom narrative became incorrectly associated with homosexuality and the negative impact that this misinterpretation in American jurisprudence and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.

Committee:

Mark Verman, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Patricia Schmil, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sarah McGinley (Committee Member); Ava Chamberlain, Ph.D. (Other); Valerie Stoker, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Gender Studies; Glbt Studies; Political Science; Religion; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Bible; homosexuality; Sodom; sodomy laws; rape; American politics

Iacobellis, Lisa Daugherty“Grant peine et grant diligence:” Visualizing the Author in Late Medieval Manuscripts
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, History of Art
Author portraits, those initial introductions to the creator of a text that are usually located on the very first folio, are ubiquitous in medieval illuminated manuscripts, yet this subject has not been the focus of a systematic art historical survey. For this reason, few are aware of the evolution of this genre over the course of the Middle Ages, moving beyond the early static figures of authors posing with their works, or seated writing on scroll or codex. This dissertation expands our understanding of this tradition, focusing on a limited selection of examples drawn from a variety of popular formats for author portraits that were employed in the fourteenth century. In particular, this study addresses representations of contemporary scholars - authors shown dreaming of their subject matter, accompanied by personifications or objects representing the content of their text, diligently engaged in translating an important work from Latin into the vernacular, or meeting privately with the recipient to deliver and discuss their work. Each category is explored through close examination of one outstanding example, and includes an analysis of the entire manuscript, in order to place the image within its textual, socio-political, and art-historical context. Although each case study embodies a different role for the author, as a group they reflect changing perceptions of authorship in the Late Middle Ages, and the increasing understanding of and respect for both the physical and intellectual labor required. These depictions of scholastic authors provide visual evidence of the interest in the author as an individual that Alastair Minnis, in his seminal work, Medieval Theory of Authorship, ultimately associated with the implementation of the “Aristotelian prologue” type, an introductory tool employed in education and commentary which encouraged reflection on an author’s life, reputation and working methods. The images suggest a narrowing of the gap between ancient Roman auctors and late medieval scholars, as well as a sharing of influences and ideas with contemporary literary figures. At the same time, they provide clues about the complex collaborative relationships among authors, readers and members of the professional book trade, including project managers, scribes, rubricators and illuminators. A critical evaluation of these innovative new approaches to author portraits invites further careful scrutiny of the images as a genre, and not just as a seemingly minor part of the overall program of miniatures that accompany a text.

Committee:

Karl Whittington, PhD (Advisor); Barbara Haeger, PhD (Committee Member); Christian Kleinbub, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History; Medieval History; Middle Ages

Keywords:

manuscript illuminations; author portraits; medieval manuscripts; dream visions; presentation scenes; Master of the Bible of Jean de Sy; fourteenth-century manuscripts; Nicole Oresme; Jean de Vignay

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