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Alsubail, Rayan A.Aesthetics vs. Functionality in User Prompt Design: A Mobile Interface Usability Study on the iOS Touch ID Feature
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2015, Computer Science (Engineering and Technology)
The usability of smartphone software presents unique challenges as compared to desktop software. Both aesthetics and functionality play an important role in mobile interface design. In this paper, we examined the usability of the iOS Touch ID feature with different user prompts. We compared three different types of user prompt designs for the touch ID feature, including a user prompt with no guidance (NG), a user prompt with aesthetic-first guidance design (AF), and a user prompt with functionality-first guidance design (FF). An experiment with 30 participants showed an improvement for 90% of them when using the FF prompt for the fingerprint inputs, as compared to when using the AF prompt. Additionally, the fingerprint inputs were improved for all participants using the FF prompt as compared to the NG prompt. We concluded that user prompt designs do have a material impact on the usability of mobile software, and that functionality rather than aesthetics should be the primary consideration in user prompt design.

Committee:

Chang Liu (Advisor); Frank Drews (Committee Member); Jundong Liu (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering; Computer Science; Experiments

Keywords:

Usability; Touch ID Usability; Touch ID; iPhone Usability; Interface Design; User Prompt Design; Aesthetic; Aesthetic Design; Aesthetic and Usability

Chandler, Chelsea BethThe Art of Teaching: Understanding the Lived Experience of Artistic Teachers
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2015, Curriculum and Instruction
The concept of artistry in teaching is not new, however, the importance of reevaluating artistry in teaching may be of value in light of a societal focus on the anaesthetic features of positivism under the auspices of standardization and accountability. The purpose of this study was to discover the connections between teaching as artistic expression and learning as aesthetic experience from the perspective of current in-service teachers. Through interviews, observations, and artifacts such as teacher reflections and photographs, a preliminary understanding of artistic teachers’ lived experiences was gained and the essence of these artistic teachers encounters with phenomenon was drawn out to create models of the art of teaching to better understand teachers’ philosophical orientations. The guiding questions for this study included: In what ways did teachers conceive teaching as artistic expression? In what ways did teachers conceive learning as aesthetic experience? In what ways did teachers conceive the connections between teaching as artistic expression and learning as aesthetic experience?

Committee:

Leigh Chiarelott, Ph. D. (Committee Chair); Jenny Denyer, Ph. D. (Committee Member); Dale Snauwaert, Ph. D. (Committee Member); Mark Templin, Ph. D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Education Philosophy; Pedagogy; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Artistic Expression, Aesthetic Experience, Aesthetic Spiral

Piccorelli, Justin ThomasThe Aesthetic Experience and Artful Public Administration
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2014, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
As Maurice Merleau-Ponty pointed out, a work of art allows us to explore our sense for meaning in the world. It not only allows us to translate our perceptions, but it allows our perceptions to speak to us through what he called a “respiration in being” (Merleau-Ponty, 1964). In this process of respiration, artists and artful public administrators alike are inspired by what they see, and expire that which is seen (Merleau-Ponty, 1964). This research suggests that what Merleau-Ponty described is an element of the aesthetic experience that enables a person to explore the world and what it means to be in it. After Dwight Waldo argued that all ways of knowing are value laden in the field of public administration, he left the field without a prescribed way to know, and this is a problem, given that public administrators are often required to act while in a crisis. If public administrators lack a form of inquiry to understand the world, then how are they to act? This dissertation asks whether administrators, in fact, base their administrative discretion on aesthetic judgment and what they find pleasing or displeasing, their taste (Kant, 2001), to discern what to do and which type of understanding to employ (Arendt, 1992; Hummel, 2006; Stivers, 2011). Through a set of phenomenological interviews the dissertation attempts to access, or pull on the understanding(s) of artists, artful administrators, and hybrids, to better understand administrative discretion by examining the aesthetic experience more deeply and hopefully contribute to how we think about the role of the expert in public administration.

Committee:

Camilla Stivers, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Nicholas Zingale, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Robert Zinke, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Philosophy; Public Administration

Keywords:

Phenomenology; Aesthetic Experience; Administrative Discretion; Public Administration; Role of the Expert; Art of Administration; Art; Artful; Aesthetic Judgment; Hannah Arendt; Camilla Stivers; Merleau-Ponty; Ralph Hummel; Philosophy of Aesthetics

Basile, Jeffrey A.A Modern Aesthetic Reevaluation of Literacy
Master of Arts in English, Youngstown State University, 2014, Department of English
A social change is happening, and as this change progresses so does literacy. This change is an aesthetic reshaping of what it is we read, how we tell stories, how we learn, how we analyze information, and how we write. The days of words and physical pages are dwindling. Pictures, digital representations, integrated technology, reinterpretations; all of these things, and others, are evolving into a modern definition of literacy that now includes all of the above, which is transforming not only our definition of literacy, but also what we might legitimately call literature, making, by the same effect what anyone can coin "literacy" something wholly new. With the introduction of these new literatures a new term, New Media, takes their place for the remainder of this argument, encompassing all of the mediated literatures that are foregrounding the change in what it is we call "literate".

Committee:

Scott Leonard, Ph.D. (Advisor); Steven Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Corey Andrews, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Technology; Language Arts; Literacy; Literature

Keywords:

Literacy; New Media; Aesthetic Literacy; Visual Literature

El-Mereedi, Mary L.Transactional Literature Discussions in English Language Teaching: An Investigation of Reader Stance and Personal Understanding Among Female Arabic-Speaking Learners of English at Qatar University
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Curriculum and Instruction (Education)
The primary purpose of this investigation was to explore an instructional approach for reading, writing, and talking about literature in an EFL environment. The instructional approach investigated in this study is Transactional Literature Discussions (TLD), which has an aim of facilitating the aesthetic experience with literature. TLD is grounded in reader-response theory and recognizes that there is no single correct interpretation of literature. Instead, the understanding of the text is highly personal and unique to every reader in that the reader's previous experiences, thoughts, and feelings contribute to its meaning. Two research questions were explored (1) Does participation in TLD affect the stance readers adopt toward a text and (2) Is there a relationship between stance and level of personal understanding? An instrument for Rating a Reader's Stance and An Instrument for Measuring Level of Personal Understanding (Cox and Many, 1989) were used to score the pre-post test responses. The results of the statistical analysis revealed that participation in TLD encourages students to adopt the aesthetic stance and results in a higher level of personal understanding. The study also revealed a relationship between stance and level of understanding, particularly when students were specifically taught to take the aesthetic stance. A discussion of the findings as well as suggestions for future research is also presented.

Committee:

James Salzman, Director, Steven's Literacy Center (Advisor)

Subjects:

English As A Second Language; Higher Education; Language Arts; Literature; Reading Instruction

Keywords:

Reader-response; personal understanding; stance; transactional literature discussions; aesthetic reading; efferent reading; EFL

McCaughey, John PaulSmarter Than We Are Wise
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Art
In our travels, commonly overlooked objects end up becoming a part of the peripheral canvas, the colorful blur of unimportant information that becomes the backdrop of our urban experience. As a visual artist I feel we should pay more attention to these objects that reside at that periphery, as they can have far more social and political power. Recently, my work has focused on these objects that are often unseen, such as surveillance cameras, graffiti, and advertisements. QR and Datamatrix codes are visual and informational objects in our environments that have come into view for me. In this thesis I will discuss my usage of these visual and informational symbols as a platform to critique the larger issues that have plagued the urban condition for many years. This thesis will also discuss how this body of work was formed through prior experiences and discuss the possible directions for future bodies of work. In conclusion, I feel this body of work echoes one of the most important notions I have learned and advocated as of late and that is artists should make work that is more meaningful and relevant to our time.

Committee:

Sergio Soave (Committee Chair); Ken Rinaldo (Committee Member); Steve Thurston (Committee Member)

Keywords:

art; qr code art; qr codes; datamatrix codes; the new aesthetic; ohio state art; mfa ohio state; data correction; fine art; john mccaughey; microsoft tag art

Lee, Li-FengThe responses of Taiwanese adolescent girls to selected American short stories for young adults
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Educational Theory and Practice
This qualitative study sought to explore the experience of six Taiwanese 11th -grade English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students in reading six realistic American short stories as they participated in an after-school American Young Adult Literature (YAL) Study Club for a period of six weeks. Informed by reader response theories and research, second language reading and learning theories, and multicultural young adult literature, this study examined the students’ literary responses and their cultural awareness when reading across cultures. For literary responses, I tried to answer the questions: What were the students’ response patterns? and What did they draw on in order to make sense of the story? For cultural awareness, the two sub-questions guiding the study were: To what extent was the students’ cross-cultural awareness demonstrated in their literary responses? and What were their reading stances when reading across cultures? Data sources included questionnaires, response journals, group discussions, and individual interviews. The findings indicated three levels of literary response: interacting, interpreting, and evaluating, with the latter tending to be built upon the former levels. The students’ frames of reference encompassed linguistic, personal, intertextual, and sociocultural dimensions. At the level of interacting, the different frames of reference were drawn upon equally. The sociocultural frame was especially prominent at the level of interpreting while the personal and intertextual frames were more important at the level of evaluating. The primary mode of the students’ literary responses was characterized by didactic interpretation of characters, which was greatly influenced by their sociocultural frames of reference. The participants’ cultural awareness initially seemed to be limited and needed to be probed to become known. The participants adopted a predominantly aesthetic stance when reading the literature from another culture. Such a stance enabled them to enjoy the literary experience despite cultural differences but also held the promise of potentially broadening the students’ cultural perspectives.

Committee:

Barbara Kiefer (Advisor)

Keywords:

reader response; cultural awareness; EFL; young adult literature; aesthetic stance

Hensley, Jordan CLa Guerra Civil Española en la memoria histórica: Una conversación continua con el pasado
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Hispanic Studies
Este ensayo enfoca en una variedad de obras españoles de cine y literatura contemporanea, incluidos novelas, documentales, peliculas y una novela grafica, que narran las historias de españoles que experimentaron la epoca de la Guerra Civil Española, la represion nacionalista durante la dictadura de Francisco Franco y el proceso de transmitir los recuerdos de aquellas epocas a una generacion mas joven que no las vivio. Investiga los papeles que desempeñan estas obras en el proyecto de narrativizar eventos centrales de la memoria historica de una epoca que sigue siendo importante en el presente.

Committee:

Sebastiaan Faber (Advisor); Patrick O'Connor (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Film Studies; Foreign Language; Hispanic American Studies; Literature; Modern Literature

Keywords:

Franco;interlocutor;history;Spain;Spanish Civil War;Francisco Franco;literature;Hispanic Studies;documentary;film;historical memory;victims;recuperation;aesthetic history

Weaver, Joanna CorinneAn Exploratory Study of Teacher Education Students’ Experiences with an Innovative Literacy Assessment and Remediation Course
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2014, Curriculum and Instruction
Young adult illiteracy is an epidemic in our country, and the traditional model of literacy education will not serve the needs of struggling readers. The purpose of this study was to discover if utilizing my pedagogical provided an impactful experience on our teacher candidates. Can a literacy program provide a transactional learning experience and what is that experience? My study is a qualitative, exploratory study that looks at the experiences of teacher candidates and how they experienced the process of this literacy model. The participants had the opportunity to directly apply the instructional, literacy strategies learned and discussed in class to working with a young adult struggling reader. Through collaboration and dialogue, teacher candidates created connections and literacy materials that applied directly to their students’ lives, creating and experiencing an authentic, transactional literacy experience. Candidates documented their tutoring event through case studies, emails, reflections, and interviews and then discussed with me their understanding of the process and what they took away from the experience. This helped me evaluate if the pedagogical model implemented in the teacher preparation class was a success.

Committee:

Leigh Chiarelott (Committee Co-Chair); Jenny Denyer (Committee Co-Chair); Mark Templin (Committee Member); Dale Snauwaert (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Literacy; Reading Instruction; Secondary Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Experience; aesthetic response, transaction; literacy experience; struggling readers; high-interest, authentic materials; motivation; perception; engagement; self-efficacy; collaboration; pedagogical model; assessments; connections; reflection

Newman, Jay M.Dear Goth
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, Youngstown State University, 2015, Department of English
Dear Goth is a collection of poems that chronicles the tumultuous life of a modern-day "goth kid" in small-town USA, how his musical heroes have influenced him, his relationships, and his ultimate conclusion that perhaps life isn't all about doom and gloom all the time.

Committee:

Mary Biddinger, PhD (Advisor); Catherine Wing, MFA (Committee Member); Steven Reese, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Language; Literature; Modern Literature; Music

Keywords:

poetry; goth aesthetic; goth subculture; goth philosophy; music; nihilism

Moody, Kathryn IreneLexicons in Lace: The Language of Dress in the New Woman Novel
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2011, English

Historically, dress has served as a kind of shorthand for expressing information about characters, particularly female characters, in British literature. I assert that there is a language of dress at work in the New Woman novel, and this dissertation is an endeavor to interpret four components of that language: Aesthetic dress, the tea gown, the tailor-made gown, and rational dress.

Through analysis of Vernon Lee’s Miss Brown, Sarah Grand’s The Heavenly Twins, and Mary Ward’s Marcella, I argue that to dress a woman Aesthetically was often to denote her desire for women’s liberation along with her own. As painters dressed female models Aesthetically, so Aesthetically dressed characters found themselves “painted” into particular roles. Through readings of Netta Syrett’s The Day’s Journey, John Strange Winter’s A Blameless Woman, and Violet Hunt’s The Human Interest and A Hard Woman, I show that to dress a character in a tea gown was to demonstrate her desire for intimacy. New Women heroines often wear tea gowns in situations not considered socially appropriate. Such fashion statements demonstrate a desire to expand societal notions of “respectable” intimacy; one example of this is the association of the tea gown with maternity. Through interpretations of Rita’s A Jilt’s Journal, George Moore’s Evelyn Innes and Sister Teresa, Ella Hepworth Dixon’s The Story of a Modern Woman, and Beatrice Whitby’s Mary Fenwick’s Daughter, I show how the tailor-made represents a desire for solidarity with other New Woman, and a tendency to seek maternal guidance from one’s peers rather than from one’s mother. Finally, some fictional New Woman heroines appear in trousers, or rational dress. These costumes appear only rarely in fiction as they appeared rarely in life, due to social stigma which associated women in pants with actresses and prostitutes. Such fiction represents an attempt to revise the language of dress by presenting rationally dressed New Women as particularly honest, while depicting other characters as mendacious. I support this assertion through readings of H. G. Wells’ The Wheels of Chance, Rhoda Broughton’s Scylla or Charybdis?, George Paston’s The Career of Candida, and Elizabeth Burgoyne Corbett’s New Amazonia.

Committee:

William Siebebschuh, PhD (Committee Chair); Kurt Koenigsberger, PhD (Committee Member); Kenny Fountain, PhD (Committee Member); Mary Davis, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

new woman; dress; aesthetic; Victorian; Sarah Grand; Mary Ward; Violet Hunt; Vernon Lee; George Moore; John Strange Winter; PreRaphaelite; Iota; Rita

Evans, Robert A.An Aesthetic Attitude: An East - West Comparison of Bullough and Nishida
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2010, Philosophy (Arts and Sciences)
This paper is an examination of the aesthetic attitude theories of Edward Bullough and Kitaro Nishida, establishing key characteristics of an aesthetic attitude theory. These characteristics comprise a complete definition of an aesthetic attitude, which accounts for all types and levels of aesthetic experience, aesthetic judgments, and aesthetic participants.

Committee:

John Bender, PhD (Committee Chair); Arthur Zucker, PhD (Committee Member); Vladimir Marchenkov, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Philosophy

Keywords:

Aesthetics; comparative philosophy; Edward Bullough; Kitaro Nishida; aesthetic attitude

Jones, Rita A.Developing High School Students' Ability to Write about their Art through the Use of Art Criticism Practices in Sketchbooks: A Case Study
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Ohio University, 2008, Art Education (Fine Arts)

This mixed methods inquiry took place in an advanced high school art class to determine if the application of art criticism practices in their sketchbooks would improve students writing and thinking about their art.

During the study, the targeted class was involved in a variety of classroom and sketchbook exercises designed to assess the impact that reflective journals have on the students' thinking about art and develop their skills in the use of art criticism.

Data for the study was gathered using a variety of data collection methods as a form of triangulation. These methods included: Pre- and Post-study questionnaires, detailed observations, direct participation, informal interviews, reflective journal writings, and the student sketchbook journals.

Combining the use of art criticism as a part of students daily sketchbook procedures successfully engaged students in critical thinking about their art, and impacted their ability to articulate their ideas in a more meaningful way, improved their journaling performance and developed their ability to think and write critically about their art.

Because art teachers are continually describing, analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating works of art during the process of instruction, implementation of the four actions of art criticism into my curriculum proved to be a natural step for not only my students, but for me as an art educator.

Art making alone provides students with an unmatched opportunity to digest the abundance of media and information they come in contact with throughout the day. By combining art making with the journaling process (even without art criticism), educators can cultivate yet another avenue through which they can strengthen their student's educational experience.

Committee:

Connie L. Wolfe, MFA (Committee Chair); Bower David, PhD (Committee Member); Adleta Don, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education

Keywords:

Aesthetic valuing; art Criticism; art Critique; authentic instruction; critical thinking; higher order thinking; sketchbook journal; visual journal; writing about art; teaching art criticism

Griswold-Nickel, Jennifer AnnHugo Wolf’s Penthesilea: An Analysis Using Criteria from His Own Music Criticism
MM, University of Cincinnati, 2007, College-Conservatory of Music : Music History
Hugo Wolf’s music criticism in the Wiener Salonblatt (1884–1887) was published while he was actively composing his own symphonic poem Penthesilea, based on the play by Heinrich von Kleist. This criticism, along with comments in his letters (1887–1897) to friend Melanie Köchert, reveals that Wolf placed a high regard on works exhibiting originality, proper orchestration, form and compositional technique. After briefly tracing the history of music criticism in late nineteenth-century Vienna, this thesis establishes Wolf’s compositional aesthetic derived from his critical opinions about instrumental music. A structural analysis of Wolf’s Penthesilea, his only complete programmatic instrumental work, concentrates on thematic material, form, and texture and orchestration and establishes the methods by which he composed his own music. A comparison of Wolf’s aesthetic criteria to his music shows that he adhered to his own compositional aesthetic in concept, but not always in execution.

Committee:

Dr. Mary Sue Morrow (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Hugo Wolf; Penthesilea; symphonic poem; Heinrich von Kleist; music criticism; Vienna; Wiener Salonblatt; compositional aesthetic

Martínez, Ángel LuisYoung, Gifted, and Brown: Ricanstructing Through Autoethnopoetic Stories for Critical Diasporic Puerto Rican Pedagogy
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Young, Gifted and Brown is a journey of two directions converging. It is a study of Puerto Rican Diaspora in higher education, specifically, students making sense and meaning of their everyday. It is also a study of how I have related to them as a professor. Together, this is a story: research done creatively, toward the development of Critical Pedagogy for Puerto Rican Diaspora. The research question is: what has made the Puerto Rican Diaspora in the United States flourish and their lived experience meaningful? How can a diasporic people connect with and affirm their roots in an educational system far from home? The answer is rooted in creativity: how does poetry provoke students to teach each other about their experiences and to learn with each other through sharing their own poetry? This Dissertation was composed through poetic performance ethnography, from which I have developed my findings from students’ reflections on their lives through the AutoEthnoPoetic. The process is deeply informed by Eugenio María de Hostos’ moral social and José Martí’s poetic pedagogy as well as race critical educational theories, including Culturally Relevant Pedagogy. Through an AutoEthnoPoetic journey through puertorriqueñidad, “Puerto Rican-ness,” or sense of being Puerto Rican, there are lessons for students and educators on how poetic performance ethnography can facilitate success and alegría (happiness) and inspire, motivate, and celebrate in an education system where diaspora are present. This Dissertation contains three MP3 files and 13 MP4 files. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Philomena Essed, PhD (Committee Chair); Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Member); René Antrop-González, PhD (Committee Member); Ulrika Schmauch, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; American Studies; Community College Education; Curriculum Development; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Ethnic Studies; Higher Education; Hispanic American Studies; Latin American Studies; Pedagogy

Keywords:

performance ethnography; poetry; poetic inquiry; college; Associate degree students; Puerto Rican Studies; Diaspora Studies; Latina Latino Studies; educational leadership; aesthetic leadership; higher education; leadership

Parker, Michael GQueer Orientation in Twentieth-Century American Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, English
My dissertation looks to works of literary fiction in order to assess how the narratives approach and describe the orientations of queer characters. I argue that queer characters possess an orientation that is askew, slanted, and/or non-normative. A queer orientation, therefore, describes the directionality of a person and this directionality to objects, spaces, times, and ideas draws upon a person’s experiences, desires, feelings, and wants. An orientation describes both a direction and a framework that then shapes perceptions and this is important for literary studies because it revises how we approach queer identity by considering both sexual objects and objects which may not be sexual.

Committee:

T. Kenny Fountain, Dr. (Committee Chair); Michael Clune, Dr. (Committee Member); Mary Grimm (Committee Member); Laura Hengehold, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Gender Studies; Glbt Studies; Literature

Keywords:

20th-Century American Literature, Queer, Queer Theory, Phenomenology, Desire, Orientation, Cather, McCullers, West, Butler, Delaney, Sexuality, Gender, Baldwin, Race, Aesthetic Sensibility

Wisniewski, Jaime LHOW ARE SELECTED CONTENT AND SKILLS ADDRESSED IN STATE LITERACY STANDARDS SPONTANEOULSY MANIFESTED WITHIN LITERATURE CIRCLES
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Reading
Literature circles are powerful in classrooms because they allow students to discuss literature with their peers. Readers can choose to read literature aesthetically or efferently (Rosenblatt, 2005). Aesthetic response refers to readers connecting the text to their own background or experiences to create meaning. Efferent response involves students reading to gain information (Rosenblatt). Rosenblatt suggests that aesthetic response is often ignored in the classroom because teachers feel pressured to teach certain requirements, and they believe that having students respond efferently will better help them achieve those requirements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if aesthetic response in literature circles help students discuss topics identified in state standards. In this study, two seventh grade classrooms were observed as students participated in literature circles. Data were collected using observational field notes and a researcher-developed coding sheet that was based on state comprehension and literary standards.

Committee:

Cynthia Bertelsen (Advisor)

Keywords:

LITERATURE CIRCLES; students; classrooms; state standards; Aesthetic response; Rosenblatt

Moon, Joshua D.Progress, Restoration, and the Life of Rock After Alternative
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, Interdisciplinary Arts (Fine Arts)
This dissertation engages the state of rock music in Western popular culture over the past twenty years. Taking inspiration from the philosophy of Theodor W. Adorno, the project utilizes the concepts of progress and restoration to describe how musicians, scholars, and journalists have confronted challenges facing the continued practice of rock music into the twenty-first century. I argue that the tension between this progressive impulse in rock and a restorative response provides an explanation for aspects of rock’s recent history and its creative challenges. Via interpretations of musical texts, references to artistic statements, and engagement with aesthetic theory, the chapters reveal how these concepts have been navigated in the evolving state of rock, including responding to anxieties such as the “death of rock.” Emphasis includes advocacy for a renewed focus in academic scholarship on rock as a musical phenomenon. This approach asserts that stylistic and formal development are integral to thinking about the music’s social history and cultural impact. As a critical study of the recent history of aesthetic ideas, I argue that progress and restoration influence rock culture, and that diagnosing their function within the genre is vital for understanding rock’s history and trajectory.

Committee:

Vladimir Marchenkov (Committee Chair); William Condee (Committee Member); Judith Grant (Committee Member); Garrett Field (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Music; Philosophy

Keywords:

aesthetic theory;rock music; theodor adorno;popular music studies; progress;smashing pumpkins; mars volta; white stripes; rock and roll; alternative rock; philosophy

Hoffman, Sarah G.Not Just Entertainment: Hollywood Animation and the Corporate Merchandising Aesthetics and Narratives for a Children’s Audience
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2017, Film Studies (Fine Arts)
This thesis explores different techniques in aesthetics and narrative the Walt Disney Company, Pixar, and DreamWorks use to sell corporate ideologies to child consumers and family audiences in the 1980’s and early 2000’s. Disney scholars recognize Disney Princess Movies as large merchandising agents for moral pedagogy for children. Film theory on aestheticism demonstrate how Disney’s social representations reside in a spectacle rather than an actual moral educators for children. Disney’s affiliate, Pixar Inc., designs their characters for the Disney market, but Pixar promotes itself as a more socially conscience company. DreamWorks’s early films propose alternative methods for making children’s films by eliminating formulaic narratives and incorporating non-merchandisable comedy. These animation production studios provide children and families with antidotes for reality’s drudgery through images ranging from idyllic fairy tale narratives to their parodies.

Committee:

Ofer Eliaz (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Film Studies; Marketing

Keywords:

Animated Films; Aesthetic; Narrative; Children

Chang, Chinhong LimUnveil the Veiled: An Interdisciplinary Study of Aesthetic Ideas in the Works of Piet Mondrian and Samuel Beckett
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2003, Comparative Arts (Fine Arts)

The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate a relationship of aesthetic ideas in the works of Piet Mondrian and Samuel Beckett. This study takes a conceptual and aesthetic approach when examining the creative processes undertaken by both artists in presenting their aesthetic ideas through the use of different media. The works of art created by both artists serve in this study as physical evidences for the presentations of their aesthetic ideas. Their writings, which include letters, art criticism, literary criticism, and theoretical essays, are used to justify observations and investigations made in this study.

In order to investigate whether a shared notion of aesthetic ideas exists between the works of both artists, stages of stylistic change from each artist’s early to the late works are examined. Influences from historical, philosophical, religious, and aesthetic ideas are noted. The discussion focuses specifically on the ways in which ideas affect the artistic choices made by the artists. A case study between Piet Mondrian’s Composition with Red, Blue, Yellow, Black and Gray and Samuel Beckett’s Quad I is made to further explore four aesthetic concepts: dynamic balance, ultimate reduction for universalization, establishment of relationship through differentiation, and the expression of the presence of the absence.

The investigations of the works by both artists and the cross-examinations done through the study of their writings demonstrated that there is an intricate similarity in the aesthetic ideas pursued by both artists despite their differences in aesthetic goal. The similarities can be seen through the progressive reductive methodology adopted by both artists from their early to their late works. In the process of reduction, both artists’ works continuously reveal an emphasis on a notion of relationships. This dissertation concludes that the shared notion of aesthetic ideas between Mondrian and Beckett is reflected through the reductive methodology they used in portraying a notion of relationship. For Mondrian, this notion of relationship is a dynamic balance between the contraries. For Beckett, this notion of relationship cannot be defined in concrete terms because it is an unresolved paradox.

Committee:

William Condee (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

Interdisciplinary Arts; Creative Process; Piet Mondrian; Samuel Beckett; Aesthetic ideas; reductive process/reductive technique

Kaufman, Amanda ChristineA System of Aesthetics: Emily Dickinson's Civil War Poetry
Bachelor of Arts, University of Toledo, 2010, English
Decades of scholarly research have portrayed Emily Dickinson as living a strikingly reserved personal and social life, distributing her poetry not through publication but through handwritten correspondence. In this paper, however, I examine recent critical scholarship on Emily Dickinson’s letters to few close friends that reveal her to be a politically aware citizen. I pair this with a reading of the three poems: “Blazing in Gold, and quenching in purple” (02/29/1864), “Flowers – Well – if anybody” (03/02/1864), and “These are the days when Birds come back” (03/11/1864), published anonymously in a Union-driven newspaper entitled the Drum Beat alongside other contemporary poetry in February and March 1864. This Drum Beat publication shows that, at the crucial historical moment of the Civil War, the notoriously private and unpublished poet’s work did, in fact, appear in a public venue, and begs readers to examine the significance of the three specific poems within their original context. While scholars have published legitimate and commonly-accepted readings of these works that emphasize their poetic form and their themes of nature, religion and death, these readings have, for the most part, been consistently non war-related. This paper adds to the recent and exciting scholarship of Dickinson’s political awareness. Through close attention to the poems and their context, I argue that these poems serve as Emily Dickinson’s public response to the Civil War.

Committee:

Dr. Sara Lundquist, PhD (Advisor); Dr. Melissa Valiska Gregory, PhD (Advisor); Dr. Thomas E. Barden, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

American Literature

Keywords:

Emily Dickinson; Dickinson; Civil War; Poetry; Women Poet; Flowers - Well - if anybody; Blazing in Gold, and quenching in purple; These are the days when Birds come back; the Drum Beat; Sunset; October; Flowers; Aesthetic

Wanczyk, David M.Collation: Essays
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2010, English (Arts and Sciences)

This dissertation is a collection of creative essays preceded by a critical introduction that defines what the author calls "The Aesthetic of Friendship." That essay explores the work of Mary Karr, Edward Hoagland, Patricia Foster, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginia Woolf, and David Foster Wallace, with particular focus on writer-reader connection.

The ten creative essays that follow explore issues of family influence and empathy (and also love, and chili, and college theater, and nuclear power).

Committee:

Dinty Moore, MFA (Committee Chair); David Burton, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Halliday, PhD (Committee Member); Carey Snyder, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

English literature

Keywords:

The Aesthetic of Friendship; essays; memoir

Fein, Zachery E.The Aesthetic of Decay: Space, Time, and Perception
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture

There is a specific aesthetic that exists amongst architecture in the absence of routine human interaction; it is the aesthetic of decay. This aesthetic develops over time, as buildings cease to function in the way they were originally designed to do so. As this happens, such buildings become leftover, forgotten spaces that go unseen by the bulk of society; they are left to minor, often illicit alternate uses.

This makes the task of explaining the aesthetic rather difficult, and extra attention must be paid to the methodology that best accomplishes that task: photography. Photographs tell the tale of what these spaces are, in the clearest and most straightforward way. An exploration through photography coupled with a secondary level of exploration into how the space came to be, is capable of informing a reactionary exploration into what the space can become.

The goal of such an exploration is to not only understand this, but also to exploit the individual elements of it in order to inform an architectural approach. The aesthetic of decay has developed over time, and alternative uses should do the same; minor issues have drastically affected the decay of the building, and minor interventions will likewise affect the function of the space.

Committee:

Aarati Kanekar, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael McInturf, MARCH (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

urban decay;decay;ruin;industrial;photography;aesthetic

Ferone, JenniferWomen and China Painting at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: An Analysis of the Influence of The Art Amateur and The Art Interchange
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2006, Family and Consumer Sciences-Clothing, Textiles and Interiors
The Aesthetic Movement had a profound effect on America at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century. There was a renewed interest in the decorative arts and all things handmade to adorn the home. Some of the handmade objects that began to receive greater status in the art world were those that had traditionally been utilitarian and created by women, such as painted china. Painted china, and those that participated in this form of art, began receiving positive attention and greater status. Key publications of the time period, particularly The Art Amateur and The Art Interchange, sought to elevate and legitimize china painting as equal with fine art mediums. As the popularity of china painting grew, some towns had clubs or studios where students, who were mostly women, could learn to create beautiful painted designs on blank, white pieces of china. Akron, Ohio, a growing city at the turn-of-the-century, had a china painting studio. The studio was called Spicer Studio, named after its proprietor, Lizzie Spicer. Lizzie Spicer and her studio remained in business for over forty years, outliving the domestic art trends of the Aesthetic Movement. She was able to do this by adapting the art of china painting to the latest design styles and even modifying painting techniques to glass, which had become more popular than china in later years. There are many surviving examples of china and some glass pieces from this studio, with its distinctive mark on the back. They have become collectable items. The longevity of the Spicer Studio and the fact that a single woman, who never married, owned the studio and earned a living from it, was rare for the time period, but serves as a notable success story for women and their role in domestic art.

Committee:

Virginia Gunn (Advisor)

Keywords:

China painting; Spicer Studio; Lizzie Spicer; The Art Amateur; The Art Interchange; The Aesthetic Movement

Koenig, Wendy K.The art of interruption: a comparison of works by Daniel Libeskind, Gerhard Richter, Ilya Kabakov
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, History of Art
This dissertation examines the Jewish Museum Berlin by Polish-American architect Daniel Libeskind, the painting cycle October 18, 1977 by German painter Gerhard Richter and three installations–Incident at the Museum, or Water Music; Healing with Paintings; and the Communal Kitchen–by Russian artist Ilya Kabakov within the context of Rezeptionsästhetik (aesthetics of reception), associated with Hans Robert Jauss and Wolfgang Iser, and the aesthetic theories of Theodor W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Bertolt Brecht, Martin Heidegger and Victor Shklovsky in order to illustrate the commonalities between the works of art in terms of thematic content, the use of “interruptive” techniques and their capacity to create the conditions for the possibility of a valid aesthetic experience in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Each of the above works of art addresses issues of memory, loss, mourning or exile, and does so in a manner that, I argue, acknowledges and successfully contributes to the development of its respective medium (whether architecture, painting or installation). Such innovations are revealed to a greater degree, I believe, when the works are considered in conjunction with one another rather than separately. Similarly, corresponding aspects of the theoretical writings by the various authors are illuminated when they are brought into a dialogue around the notion of “interruption” and in tandem with actual experiences with the works of art. The “interruptive” techniques and particular innovations of these artists emerge as significant tendencies for post-World War II and post-Soviet era art in a European context.

Committee:

Stephen Melville (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Daniel Libeskind; Gerhard Richter; Ilya Kabakov; Aesthetic Theory; Reception Theory

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